56-Insightful-Interviewing-_-Hiring by lsy121925

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									Bohan &
Bradstreet, Inc            .                    Professional Search and Recruitment – Staff through Executive Level
   Accounting/Financial  Information Technology  Engineering/Manufacturing  Human Resources  Sales/Marketing



                           Insightful Interviewing & Hiring
The business world is moving at a faster pace than most companies realize. New companies, advanced
technology, global competition for local markets, and evolving organization structures have created a
fierce battle for talent. Attracting, retaining and harnessing human capital is the cornerstone for
every company’s success. As we progress through the first decade of the 21st century, there will become
an increasing need to train and retool employees as the aging population begins to retire. At the same time,
global competition, new technology and customer demands will intensify the hiring process. React to the
recent 5% to 6% unemployment but plan that in the near future there will be more positions than
available employees. The outsourcing of employment to international locations and the automation of
business processes will offset some employment growth. But starting shortly, the woes of the economic
slump will be behind us and an extreme shortage of talent will exist.

Hiring is a buy-sell agreement for both the company and the candidate. The psychology and objective
of the interview is very straightforward. The company has needs that have to be met and must hire an
individual to fulfill those needs. The company seeks to understand the appropriateness of the technical
abilities, business experience and soft skills of the candidate. Most applicants do not want to change
employers, therefore seek a company with a vision, business plan, leadership, and a communicative
management style where the candidate can contribute, rewarded and respected for their accomplishments.
There are three types of employees: those that make things happen, those who watch things happen,
and those who don’t know anything happened. Loyalty is a wonderful thing as long as it doesn’t
masquerade inadequacy. Never before has Bohan & Bradstreet partnered with as many business leaders,
C-level executives and board members on confidential replacements and strategic hires to enhance the
company’s future success.

Turnover will intensify at all levels in the near term for two major reasons: pruning of ineffective
and/or unproductive personnel and expansion of business due to improving global economy. Time is
money, therefore, when hiring the prudent company creates an interviewing and selection strategy that is
quick and efficient. Interviewing is a two way process. The company is attempting to hire the best
candidate for their specific opportunity. The candidate wants the best position for their career. Candidates
compete against each other for the offer and companies compete against each other for the ideal
candidate. From 2000 to the end of 2003, it has been a job driven market, however, what goes around
comes around and that means the demand for talent will be changing to a candidate light market by end of
2004.

There are three stages in the hiring process and each one is as important as the other. The first stage is the
planning. There are numerous occasions when the company or hiring authority reacts too quickly. A
perfect example is when someone gives notice or an employee is forced to leave for whatever reasons.
“Reactive” hiring is like filling the void rather than strategically improving the team. Planning is critical
because too often the right candidate gets hired in the wrong position or the wrong person ends up
in the right company. Planning must include:


                                   34 Park Drive East  Branford CT 06405
                       (203) 488-0068  Fax (203) 483-8338  www.bohan-bradstreet.com
Bohan &
Bradstreet, Inc            .                    Professional Search and Recruitment – Staff through Executive Level
   Accounting/Financial  Information Technology  Engineering/Manufacturing  Human Resources  Sales/Marketing


Insightful Interviewing & Hiring                                                           Page Two
      Redefine the role, responsibilities and reporting structure. Maybe this is an opportunity to
       reengineer a department or establish an organization structure that is more proactive and
       productive.
      Create a new job description. Most descriptions are very generic, old and practically useless. A
       proper description should define goals, core responsibilities and deliverables broken out by
       percentage of time, examples of projects (either past, present or future), reporting structure,
       communications responsibilities outside the department, special skills, and anything else important
       to the success of the position.
      Establish short (3 to12 months) term goals and objectives. These should be the deliverables that
       the hired employee will be measured against during first year of employment.
      Include long (1-2 year) term goals and objectives. A more succinct view beyond the first year
       horizon of opportunities to contribute and be measured.
      Create a scorecard with list of requirements, personality traits and skills sets that are
       important to the success of the position (i.e. written communications; problem solving; self-
       directed) and develop questions or what-if scenarios that will measure a candidate’s abilities for
       the scorecard.
      Establish an interviewing strategy. Decide who will be involved in the interviewing process and
       define their role.

The second stage is the buy-in or evaluation of the candidate(s). The objective is to identify the best fit
for the opportunity and company, today and tomorrow. No one knows for certain who is the best candidate
for any specific job; however, it is safe to say that more than 50% of the time the best available
candidate doesn’t get hired for a variety of reasons (i.e. timing, competition, counteroffers). However,
the number one reason for failure to extend and/or accept an offer is a breakdown in the
interviewing sequence. First impressions are made in the initial minutes of most interviews. There are
equal responsibilities between the candidate and the company to properly prepare for the first meeting.
Weak handshakes, sloppy or too informal dress, and lack of direct eye contact are immediate turn offs for
both the company and the candidate. Lack of interview planning and poor execution of interviewing
techniques on both parts leads to most failures.

Every applicant must anticipate strong internal and/or external competition on each interview. There are a
lot of ways that a candidate is measured, however, the most important is the quality of the questions
that are asked and the ability to translate the appropriateness of the candidate’s experiences and
abilities to the critical requirements, functionality and needs of the company. A candidate must:
     Research the company. Visit the company’s website and gain knowledge of recent events (i.e.
        press releases, written articles), products/services, past history (especially over last three years),
        vision/mission statement, key management, financial results, annual strategy, customers or market
        channels, strategic facilities, and any other information important for the interview.
     Review the job description and anticipate questions and discussion points that will be brought
        out during the interview.

                                   34 Park Drive East  Branford CT 06405
                       (203) 488-0068  Fax (203) 483-8338  www.bohan-bradstreet.com
Bohan &
Bradstreet, Inc            .                    Professional Search and Recruitment – Staff through Executive Level
   Accounting/Financial  Information Technology  Engineering/Manufacturing  Human Resources  Sales/Marketing


Insightful Interviewing & Hiring                                                  Page Three

      Identify specific accomplishments, personality traits and knowledge areas that are important
       and relevant to this specific opportunity and company. Practice by writing down you statements
       and answers to questions to ensure best articulation and completeness. There are lots of ways a
       candidate can disqualify themselves through poor answers, incomplete comments and bad
       interviewing habits.
      Develop a list of intelligent questions to measure the quality of the company, management
       and the initial position. If a candidate leaves the interview and feels that the company is unaware
       of their true abilities (i.e. specific skills, meaningful contributions, appropriate personality traits),
       then it is the candidate’s fault for either lack of planning or execution. Don’t blame the company.
       If it was important enough that a point should have been discussed (i.e. product line P/L), then the
       candidate should have been premeditated enough to have posed a statement question during the
       interview (i.e. “I know this position will measure the profitability of the product line. I have made
       significant contributions in that area. Would you like to know how I enhanced the communications
       and identified ways to strategically improve product line P/L?”).

Many companies are unaware of their bad habits that abound in the interviewing process. If you are not
attracting the interest of the best candidates after the interview or receiving turndowns to offers, then you
must review the interviewing process. Many companies do not have a clue on the content or quality of
what is being discussed or asked during the interview by their employees. Even if the company is not
interested in pursuing the candidate as a future employee, the candidate should leave the interview will
a positive impression. As part of our search practices, we ask candidates from senior staff to C-level roles
to provide feedback on their interviews. We want to understand their impressions, what was discussed, the
pluses, the concerns, and more.

Major turnoffs for candidates are inappropriate behavior (i.e. extensive waiting to be interviewed, taking
phone calls), negative commentary (i.e. knocking decisions or leadership), and lack of enthusiasm (i.e. too
casual, didn’t create interest in the company).

The third stage of the interview is “real” selling. On the company side, selling can occur at any time
from first comments and introduction to answering to a question with a very appealing and palatable
response. However, if the company has properly planned and executed the interview process in a very
positive, informative, and proactive way, then a decision needs to be made whether to either encourage the
candidate or end the interview. Many companies don’t know how to sell and close on a candidate and
have been lulled to asleep with fallacies of limited competition for top candidates, the availability of
a lot of high quality candidates, and a that any candidate will accept their offer because it is a fair
offer for the company. WRONG for candidates that make things happen; RIGHT for candidates that
watch or don’t know that things are happening.




                                   34 Park Drive East  Branford CT 06405
                       (203) 488-0068  Fax (203) 483-8338  www.bohan-bradstreet.com
Bohan &
Bradstreet, Inc            .                    Professional Search and Recruitment – Staff through Executive Level
   Accounting/Financial  Information Technology  Engineering/Manufacturing  Human Resources  Sales/Marketing


Insightful Interviewing & Hiring                                                  Page Four

From the company perspective, candidates must be sold that accepting the offered role, at this time,
working for or with the current management/executive team, for this compensation and benefits, within
this type of business, and with this specific company is better than their current employment and any other
opportunity existing now or in near future. “Real” selling is discussing how a future employee has the
opportunity to make a difference, expand knowledge, develop and/or improve skills, contribute to
short/long term goals, and build a career. The key drivers why “make things happen” candidates seek
out new employment are lack of challenge, growth and appreciation. Compensation, geographics,
size/type of company, and title are all secondary considerations. “Real” selling is enticing the ego and
captivating the id of the candidate.

On the candidate side, selling with confidence and sincerity should be at all times. “Real” selling is first
identifying the key goals of the position and then sharing parallel experiences and successes that
demonstrate skills, knowledge and desired traits aligned to as many of those goals as possible.
Understanding how the candidate can make a difference and then translating past situation-action-result
narratives that provide insight into the candidate’s abilities to perform are the secrets to gaining the
confidence of the future employer. Interviewing is like courting. Both the candidate and the company want
to fall in love with each other. “Real” selling is feeding the company’s ego by telling the hiring
authority why you can make a difference and why this specific opportunity is ideal for you.




                                   34 Park Drive East  Branford CT 06405
                       (203) 488-0068  Fax (203) 483-8338  www.bohan-bradstreet.com

								
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