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					                            Student Ambassador Handbook

                                              Contents
1. Introduction to the Student Ambassador Scheme                                        3
1.1 What is Widening Participation?                                                     3
1.2 What is Aimhigher?                                                                  3

2. Contact information                                                                  4
    2.1 General contact information                                                     4
    2.2 Where is the Communications and External Relations corridor                     5
    2.3 Emergency contact information                                                   5
    2.4 Example emergency situations                                                    5

3. The Role of a Student Ambassador                                                     6
        3.1a Work related to Student Recruitment                                        6
        3.1b Work Related to Widening Participation                                     6
    3.2 How many hours do I work and how do I apply?                                    7
    3.3 What are the different types of work I can get involved in?                     7
        3.3aVisit/Interview Days                                                        7
        3.3b Open Days                                                                  7
        3.3c Campus Tours                                                               7
        3.3d School Talks                                                               7
        3.3e Higher Education Fairs                                                     8
        3.3f Office Tasks                                                               8
        3.3g Clearing                                                                   8
        3.3h Campus Visits                                                              8
        3.3i Student Panels (Widening Participation)                                    8
        3.3j Summer Schools (Widening Participation)                                    8
        3.3k Aimhigher Associates (Widening Participation)                              8
    3.4 Who do I contact/report to?                                                     9
    3.5 What do I have to wear?                                                         9

4. Key Dates for 2010/11                                                                9

5. Contract of Employment and Payments                                                  10
    5.1 Contract of Employment                                                          10
    5.2 Rates of Pay                                                                    10
    5.3 How do I get paid?                                                              10
    5.4 Tax issues                                                                      11
    5.5 Right to work in UK                                                             11
    5.6 I am an international student, how do I get a NIS number?                       11
    5.7 Expenses                                                                        11

6. Training                                                                             12
    6.1 Health and Safety
        6.1a Manual Handling Training                                                   12
    6.2 Child Protection and Safeguarding Procedures                                    12

7. CRB Checks for Student Ambassadors                                                   13
       7.1 Enhanced CRB Checks                                                          13
       7.2 What doe the application process involve?                                    13
       7.3 What if I have a Criminal Record?                                            13
       7.4 I am an international student, how do I complete the CRB form?               13
       7.5 CRB contact                                                                  13

8. Personal Development                                                                 14
    8.1 How does being a Student Ambassador develop my CV                               14
    8.2 What next? Further opportunities within Communications and External Relations   14
        8.2a Senior Student Ambassadors                                                 14
        8.2b Student Recruitment Assistant                                              15
    8.3 Providing a Reference                                                           15
   8.4 Learning from Work Module                                                      15

   9. Campus Tour Information                                                         16
   9.1 Important Information needed prior to giving a tour                            16
       9.1a No of Students/Visitors                                                   16
       9.1b Time                                                                      16
       9.1c Route                                                                     16
       9.1d Access and Step Free Routes                                               17
       9.1d Age Restrictions                                                          17
   9.2 General Campus Tour Information                                                17
       8.2a General university information                                            17
       8.2b Library                                                                   17
       8.2c Square 5                                                                  17
       8.2d Square 4                                                                  17
       8.2e Square 3                                                                  18
       8.2f Squares 2 and 1                                                           18
       8.2g Sports Centre                                                             18
       8.2h Colchester                                                                18
       8.2i Relations between students and the Garrison                               19
       8.2j Wivenhoe                                                                  19
   9.3 Accommodation Tour Information                                                 19
       8.3a What is in the bedrooms?                                                  19
       8.3b What is in the Kitchens?                                                  19
       8.3c Am I guaranteed a room?                                                   19
       8.3d Do I have to move out during vacation?                                    19
       8.3e Are there computer facilities in my room?                                 19
       8.3f Is there provision for car parking?                                       19
       8.3g Can I leave my room before my contract has finished?                      19
       8.3h Towers                                                                    20
       8.3i South Courts                                                              20
       8.3j Wolfson Court                                                             20
       8.3k Quays                                                                     20
       8.3l Houses                                                                    20
       8.3m Weekly rent charges                                                       20
       8.3n Resident Support Network                                                  20
   9.4 Campus tour tips                                                               21

   10. Working with Young People – Practical Tips                                     22
       10.1 Student Panels                                                            22
       10.2 The A-Z of Working with Young People                                      23

   11. Employment Policies, Values and General Procedures                             25
       11.1 Unable to Work/Sickness Procedure                                         25
       11.2 Punctuality                                                               25
       11.3 Appropriate Conduct                                                       25
       11.4 Smoking Policy                                                            25
       11.5 Disciplinary Procedures                                                   25

Appendix A
      Code of Conduct for Student Ambassadors
Appendix B
      University of Essex Guidelines for the Working with Under 18‟s and Vulnerable Adults
Appendix C
      Safeguarding Children Procedures for Widening Participation, Outreach and Student
      Recruitment Activity
Appendix D
      What is Aimhigher?
Appendix E
      Arts on 5
Appendix F
      Student Support – Removing the Barriers



                                                 2
                         1. Introduction to the Student Ambassador Scheme

Congratulations on becoming a Student Ambassador! You are now part of a successful group of
students who work together to promote the University and Higher Education to the outside world.

Student Ambassadors play an essential and important role in the recruitment process at the University of
Essex. A great deal of the work carried out by the Communications and External Relations Department
relies heavily on the involvement of Student Ambassadors.

Communications and External Relations is one of the seven main administrative sections in the
University, responsible for co-ordinating the way in which the University relates to the outside world.
Headed by the Director of Communications and External Relations, and a staff of around fifty, it has
specific responsibility for the recruitment of students from the UK, the EU and internationally, the
admission of all students, university publications and promotional literature, media relations, fund-raising,
alumni relations and arts on campus.

As a Student Ambassador, you are not expected to know everything about the University and how it
functions. The aim of this handbook is to provide you with some useful information to help you in your
role as an ambassador. A range of issues are covered in this handbook including what your role involves
and what is required of you, useful campus tour information and tips, and the terms and conditions of
your contract. It also covers a range of other issues. Hopefully it will answer some of your questions and
be a good point of reference in the future.

Although this handbook covers a range of different issues relating to the Student Ambassador scheme, if
you have any questions please contact Nicola Wood, Student Ambassador Coordinators.

1.1 What is Widening Participation?

Widening Participation aims to promote higher education to all those who can benefit from it,
especially in areas where traditionally participation in higher education has been low. These students
from under-represented groups such as; disabled students, mature students, students who are, or
have been in care, students with vocational qualifications, students from lower and disadvantages
socio-economic backgrounds, students with no family history or higher education, and students from
under-represented ethnic groups.

www.essex.ac.uk/wp

1.2 What is Aimhigher?

Aimhigher is a national campaign, funded by the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE)
and the Learning and Skills Council (LSC) which will address the Government‟s targets to widen and
increase participation of young people in higher education, (2010, 50%).

The objective of the Aimhigher scheme is to raise awareness and aspiration levels of young people and
their families; helping to remove the barriers that prevent some young people from progressing to HE. In
order to achieve this, relevant bodies including universities, colleges and Aimhigher partnerships are
working together, so that young people and their families have information and advice about Higher
Education such as progression pathways into HE, including vocational and work-based routes.

For further information please see websites below and Appendix D

 http://www.aimhigher.ac.uk/essex/home/
http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/EducationAndLearning/UniversityAndHigherEducation/index.htm




                                                     3
                                                  2. Contact Information

         For procedures on reporting illness or if you are unable to work see point 11.1

         2.1 General Contact Information

          Widening Participation and Aimhigher related work
          -including campus visits, career fairs, summer schools, sixth form visits
Key Areas of Work                     Name & Title               Email                Tel.          Room
                                                                 (@essex.ac.uk)
First contact for:                    Chris Snow                 casnow               01206         5N.7.5
WP/Aimhigher work & payment           Widening Participation                          873424
enquiries                             Assistant
Student Ambassador                    Nicola Wood                nicolaw              01702         5N.7.5 and
Coordinator                           Widening Participation                          328234/       Southend
Colchester & Southend Campus          Officer (WP Officer)                                          Campus
                                                                                      07786695653
Looked After Children Project
Campus Visits                        Claudia Carey                 ccarey             01206         5N.7.5
Aimhigher Associates                 WP Officer                                       873707
                                                                                      07787105792
Campus Visits                        Lucy Watson                   lwatson            01206         5N.7.5
Primary School Project               WP Officer                                       874398 /
(Colchester)                                                                          07786975543
Students with Spld Project
Sixth Form Visits                    John Orchard                  jorchard           01206         5N.7.5
Mature Students                      Education Outreach                               873752 /
                                     Officer                                          07787153724

        Recruitment related work
        -including open days, individual tours, visit days and mailings
Key Areas of Work                Name                            Email                Tel.          Room
                                                                 (@essex.ac.uk)
Payment enquiries for            Sarah Searle                    ssearle              01206         5N.7.2
Recruitment related work         Communications & External                            872991
                                 Relations Coordinator
Individual Campus Tours           Carol Gillman                    cgillman           01206         5N.7.17
                                  Student Recruitment                                 873987
                                  Clerical Assistant
Recruitment Events                Caroline Dimbleby                cdimble            01206         5N.7.17
HE Fairs                          UK and EU Recruitment                               873947 /
                                  Officer                                             07717450055
Open Days                         Liz Hilditch                     echild             01206         5N.7.17
Recruitment Events/HE Fairs       Student Recruitment Officer                         872002 /
                                                                                      07717450086
Open Days                         Loren Murphy                     lsmurp             01206         5N.7.17
                                  Student Recruitment                                 872800
                                  Assistant

       Admissions related work
Key Areas of Work              Name & Title                        Email                   Tel.     Room
                                                                   (@essex.ac.uk)
Visit Days                            Jen McElroy                  jamcel                  01206    5S.7.30
                                      Visit Day Co-ordinator                               873333
                                      (Maternity cover)
Visit Days                            Susan Coutts                 susanc                  01206    5S.7.30
                                      Visit Day Co-ordinator                               873333
                                      (from Feb 2011)
Visit Days                            Heather Tracey               hftracey                01206    5S.7.30
                                      Administrative Officer                               874436
                                      (UG Admissions)

                                                               4
2.2 Where is the Communications and External Relations corridor?

The Communications and External Relations corridor is located on floor 7 above Barclays Bank. You
can access it by taking the stairs to the left of Barclays Bank and going up two floors, then turn left at the
top, or take the first set of stairs in the Law department and go up to floor 7, turn left when you get to the
top. The main rooms that you will need in order to find members of staff are 5N.7.5 and 5N.7.17.


2.3 Emergency Contact Information

In the event that there is an accident to a visitor or visitors during a campus tour, please use the follow
the emergency procedure below. Please do not call 999.

If you require a first aider, call 01206 87 2125
If you require Ambulance call 01206 87 2222
If you require police call 01206 87 2222
If you require fire brigade call01206 87 2222

First aiders are based at the Information centre on square 3, the final 4 digits of the above numbers are
the direct campus extensions and can be dialled from any University phone or call box on campus.

2.4 Example Emergency situations

Visitor has a physical accident: Inform the rest of your group that you are telephoning for help and
telephone for first aid on the above number. Describe your location as clearly and calmly as possible. Do
not attempt to treat or move the visitor yourself. Contact the Recruitment/ Marketing/Widening
Participation Office to inform them of the accident.

Visitor requiring emergency medical attention: Inform the rest of your group that you are telephoning for
help and telephone the emergency number above. Describe your location as clearly and calmly as
possible. Do not attempt to treat or move the visitor yourself. Contact the Recruitment/ Marketing
/Widening Participation Office to inform them of the accident.

Fire: Ensure all visitors are escorted from the buildings and taken to the centre of Square 4 as a meeting
point. Call 01206 87 2222 to report the fire. For some events the designated meeting point may change
– please check this prior to an event.

Visitor has allergic reaction to food: Inform the rest of your group that you are telephoning for help and
phone the emergency number above describing your location as clearly and calmly as possible.




                                                      5
                                3. The Role of a Student Ambassador

Student Ambassadors are involved in a variety of different roles. They can generally be split into two
areas, work for the Recruitment team and work for the Widening Participation team.

3.1a Work related to Student Recruitment.

       A Student Ambassador is a current student who actively promotes the University to those both
        inside and outside of the University. Student Ambassadors must be willing to promote the
        University to all of its stakeholders.

       A Student Ambassador must be friendly, enthusiastic, approachable and outgoing. Visitors need
        to feel like they can talk to Student Ambassadors about all aspects of student life.

       A Student Ambassador has to work with visitors of all ages, especially students aged between
        11 and 18, and must therefore be responsible, and possess the ability to show authority without
        being patronising.

       A Student Ambassador needs to be confident and willing to speak openly to large groups of
        parents and prospective students. A large part of the Student Ambassador role is talking about
        life at university. Student Ambassadors need to be open with visitors; they have come to the
        University to know what real students think, so tell them but ensure your answers are
        appropriate.

       Communications and External Relations full-time staff use Student Ambassadors on a number
        of different projects, therefore Student Ambassadors must be reliable and on time.

       Student Ambassadors often give tours alone, therefore they must be able to work on their own
        initiative as well as part of a team.

       Student Ambassadors are, in many ways, the face of the University. On many occasions the
        actions taken by an ambassador can influence a prospective students‟ decision to study at the
        University. It is therefore essential that Student Ambassadors are helpful and enthusiastic at all
        times. Ambassadors should always be willing to offer advice to visitors to the University, they
        should believe in Higher Education and have a passion for the University of Essex.

3.1b Work Related to Widening Participation.

       Most work with the widening participation department is very similar to the work for the
        recruitment department and therefore all the personal qualities outlined above apply.

       Work with the Widening Participation department has a focus on the promotion of Higher
        Education in general rather than just the University of Essex. Ambassadors will often draw on
        their own experiences of life at the University of Essex however they must be prepared to
        promote all routes into higher education and recognise that not all universities are the same.

       Work will be predominately with students aged 11 to 16 years old; however some work will
        involve younger or older students. Ambassadors must therefore behave responsibly and
        appropriately around these young people.

       Ambassadors must have an awareness and understanding of the aims and objectives of the
        Aimhigher project, and be able to answer questions which are of particular concern to Aimhigher
        students and their parents/carers.




                                                     6
3.2 How many hours do I work and how do I apply?

Student Ambassadors are able to be flexible in terms of the hours they work. We understand that you
are students and your University work has to come first. This is why we allow ambassadors to decide
when and if they want to work.

When the Department need ambassadors to work, an e-mail will be sent out. Ambassadors are selected
generally on a first-come first served basis. On some occasions staff may select ambassadors that are
the most appropriate for the job, for example, if help is needed at an event in Southend, an ambassador
who originally comes from the Southend area may be selected over another ambassador.

3.3 What are the different types of work I can get involved in?

Student Ambassadors are offered work in a range of different settings, both on campus and off campus.
Although work is given out on a first come first served basis the more effort and time you put into the
scheme, the more you will get out of it. Below are descriptions of the different types of work that
ambassadors are involved in.

3.3a Visit/Interview Days
These days are organised and co-ordinated by Jen McElroy (maternity cover for Susan Coutts, returning
Feb 2011). The main role of the Student Ambassador is to provide campus tours for university
applicants and their parents. You may be required to take your group to a seminar/lecture room after
their tour and pick them up. You are required to be on hand and helpful at all times, if you see lost
parents/students, please offer to help. At the end of the day you may be required to take part in a
„question and answer‟ session about student life. All instructions will be given to you via e-mail and when
you arrive at work on the day. Generally Visit/Interview days require ambassadors to work on a
Wednesday afternoon from 12pm-2pm, some ambassadors will be asked to stay until 4pm.

3.3b Open Days
These days are organised and co-ordinated by the Student Recruitment Assistant. The main role of the
Student Ambassador is to provide campus and accommodation tours for prospective students and their
parents. You may be required to take groups to and from seminar/lecture rooms and you are required to
be on hand and helpful at all times, if you see lost parents/students, please offer to help. All instructions
will be given to you when you arrive at work on the day. The University holds three open days each year
in June, September and October. Students will be required to work from around 9am-4.30pm.

3.3c Campus Tours
These are organised by the Marketing and Recruitment Office . They involve a Student Ambassador
collecting a couple of visitor from Visitors Reception on Square five and giving them a guided tour of the
campus. In most cases this will include accommodation. You may be required to collect and drop-off
accommodation keys from the main Accommodation Office. These tours occur as and when visitors
arrive, and are expected to last one hour.

3.3d School Talks (Aimhigher Related)
In some circumstances, Student Ambassadors are required to go into local schools and deliver
presentations on student life. A full-time member of Communications and External Relations staff or
Senior Student Ambassador would usually accompany you, but occasionally you may be required to go
alone. Transport will be provided or where the use of public transport is required, advance tickets will be
provided. Any expenses incurred as a result of this work will be reimbursed. If you are asked to give a
presentation, please ask a member of the Recruitment or Widening Participation teams for advice on
presentations. School talks can last from 20 minutes to an hour; you will be paid for all of your travel and
work time. You may also be asked to accompany a member of staff to a primary school to deliver a
workshop.




                                                      7
3.3e Higher Education Fairs
Occasionally Student Ambassadors are required to accompany a member of staff to Higher Education
Fairs. Ambassadors are required to assist in setting up the University of Essex stand, talk to and provide
advice to prospective students about the courses on offer at the University and answer any questions
students may have. This can involve staying away from the University for one or two nights. Full
transport will be provided and Communications and External Relations will pay any expenses incurred
as a result of the work. A full briefing will be given to the Student Ambassador prior to the fair. The hours
involved can be anything from a couple of hours to a couple of days. You will be paid for work and travel
time only.

3.3f Office Tasks
Communications and External Relations often have mail shots and data inputting that needs completing
in the office. Student Ambassadors will be required to pack envelopes and send out information to
prospective applicants, input data onto a computer and may be required to telephone prospective
students regarding university events.

3.3g Clearing
Each year Student Ambassadors are required to man the phones on the clearing hotline during the
UCAS clearing period. Ambassadors will be required to answer the phones, take down and give out
information regarding applications, and a number of different office jobs including filing. An additional
application process and interview, in the summer term, is required for the position of Clearing Temp.

3.3h Campus Visits (Widening Participation)
These are generally organised by the Widening Participation Team and involve ambassadors giving
campus tours to younger students (predominately aged 14-17). Ambassadors will need to tailor their
tours to suit the ages of the visitors (see Campus Tour notes for further information). You may be
required to accompany students to lunch. Due to the age of these students, it is essential that you are
aware of the number of students in your group and do not leave anyone. If someone in your group goes
missing, please report this to the organiser as soon as possible. The hours and timings can differ for
each visit.

3.3i Student Panels (Widening Participation)
A Student Panel is an activity which involves a small number of ambassadors (3 or 4) answering a range
of questions from a group of school students and/or parents/carers. Questions can be about anything to
do with university life including finance, social life and study. Student panels take part at the end of a
campus visit, as well as during other activities such as visits to schools.

3.3j Summer Schools
During July and August the Widening Participation Team coordinates a series of residential and non-
residential summer schools. These involve 2-3 days worth of work, plus staying overnight at the
University for residential summer schools. There is a separate application and training process for the
summer schools and all the ambassadors will be notified when the time for application arrives. If you
would like to know more about summer schools then please speak to one of the widening participation
team.

3.3k Aimhigher Associates
 Aimhigher Associates offer support and encouragement to school and further education students as
they encounter various transition milestones between year 9 and 13. Aimhigher Associates are first and
second year undergraduate students who are from a state school background and are positive roles
models in higher education. Each Associate is allocated a school or college and a group of 5 or 6
students that they work with throughout the academic year, the sessions last an hour and take place
approximately once a fortnight either face to face or via e-mentoring. For further information contact
Claudia Carey, ccarey@essex.ac.uk




                                                      8
3.4 Who do I contact/report to?

This generally depends on the type of work that you are doing. Chris Snow will contact Student
Ambassadors on behalf of any work for the Widening Participation Team. Similarly Carol Gillman will
contact Student Ambassadors for work relating to Student Recruitment. They will send out details of any
work available and unless stated on the e-mail sent out, you should reply to them if you are available to
work.

Depending on the work that you are doing, you will report to different members of the Communications
and External Relations team. You will be told who this member of staff is when you sign up to work.
Their contact details will be given to you should you need to contact them.

If you have any queries or concerns about your role as an ambassador, or you need any support, then
speak to the Student Ambassador Scheme Coordinator, Nicola Wood, nicolaw@essex.ac.uk

For procedures on reporting illness or if you are unable to work see point 11.1

3.5 What do I have to wear?

Student Ambassadors are required to wear casual but smart clothing. Jeans and hoodies are acceptable.
It is strongly advised that you wear comfortable shoes as you may be required to do several campus
tours on one day. Trainers or other flat shoes are advised and sandals/flip-flops are acceptable.

On some occasions you may be required to wear smarter clothing, in these circumstances you will be
informed prior to the occasion.

     - Recruitment & Admissions Events
You may be given a red Student Ambassador t-shirt or red Ambassador jacket to wear. If you are given
this, you must wear it as this makes you identifiable to any visitors on campus. The red t-shirts and
jackets must be returned at the end of the event.

    - WP & Aimhigher Events
You will be required to wear a purple Aimhigher Ambassador polo shirt or purple Student Ambassador
polo shirt (whichever one that you are issued with at the start of the year.) This can be collected from the
Widening Participation office, 5N.7.5. The purple t-shirt is yours to keep and your responsibility to
launder ready to be presentable each time you work on an Aimhigher event.


                                          4. Key Dates for 2011

Colchester Campus University Wide Open Days
Saturday 18 June 2011
Saturday 17 September 2011
Saturday 22 October 2011

Departmental Visit and Interview Days
Every Wednesday afternoon from 12pm November 2010-April 2011 (in term time)

Clearing
August 2011

Summer Schools
July-August 2011

Please note there may be other key events which require Student Ambassadors. You will be informed of
                                       these dates via e-mail.




                                                     9
                               5. Contract of Employment and Payments

5.1 Contract of Employment

All Student Ambassadors will be employed on a temporary contract. You will be given a contract to sign
at the training session and members of staff will be there to help you fill out the form. You will be
employed as a member of casual and temporary support staff by the Communications and External
Relations Department. Your contract will be subject to you successfully completing a Criminal Records
Background check and providing any necessary right to work documents (see 5.5).

Student Ambassador Contracts will expire on 31 July 2011. You will be contacted before the end of the
summer term via your Essex email account and asked to confirm if you would like to continue in the role
of Student Ambassador in the next academic year. You must be intending to return as a registered
student for 2010/11 in order to be eligible.

Please note, only returning Student Ambassadors who have responded to this email by the deadline set,
                                                    st
will be invited to renew their contract commencing 1 September 2011.

5.2 Rates of Pay

Student Ambassadors will be paid at the rate of £7.19 per hour

The majority of activities will be paid at the hourly rate, however on some occasions, such as residential
summer schools, you will be paid one fixed amount for the whole event. This will be indicated to you by
e-mail prior to the event.

5.3 How do I get paid?

All Student Ambassadors will be paid through the BACS automatic payment system on a monthly basis.
                                      th                                                       th
If your work takes place before the 10 day of the month, you will usually receive payment on 28 of that
month; otherwise your payment will be the following month.

At your training session you will be given an envelope which contains the payroll information. You will
need to fill out the necessary forms and hand them into the Finance office in order to get paid.
The envelope contains the following:
     Brown pre-addressed envelope to return your information to finance
     Staff Questionnaire
     P46 (tax form)
     P38(s) (tax form)
     Waiver/Opt-out (University Superannuation Scheme) (Pension)
     A letter from the finance section

The letter will tell you which forms you need to fill out and how to fill them out. Please read the letter
carefully before filling out any of the forms. If you make a mistake or require spare copies of the form
please go directly to the Finance Department. If you require any help filling out the forms please ask a
member of staff in the Finance Department.

Fill out and return the appropriate forms Chris Snow in 5N.7.5 as soon as possible, who will then forward
these to Finance on your behalf. If you delay handing these back or fail completely to hand them back
you WILL NOT get paid! You also need to have filled out your code of conduct.

If you already work for the University in a different department and are already on the University payroll,
you will NOT need to fill out any more finance forms. Your wages from Communications and External
Relations will automatically go into your existing paycheque.
If you currently work for the Students‟ Union, you are not on the University payroll and therefore need to
fill out the forms that apply to you from the payroll information pack.

Any queries about pay should be initially addressed to Sarah Searle for student recruitment activities
and Chris Snow for widening participation related work.




                                                     10
5.4 Tax Issues

If you have any queries regarding tax, please contact a member of staff from the Finance Section.
Finance is located off Square 4, entrance 4SW, level 6. The opening hours are Monday - Friday 10am-
4pm).

Please note that Communications and External Relations staff may not be able to help with concerns
relating to tax. However, if you believe you have not been paid correctly due to a reason other than tax,
please contact Sarah Searle or Chris Snow who can check the payment details for you.

5.5 Right to work in UK

If you are an International or EEA/Swiss student you must check the rules on working in the UK in
relation to your immigration status before applying for work. For instance, you may not be able to work if
you do not have the correct visa, if you can work you may have to join the Workers Registration Scheme
or you may be limited to the amount of hours you are able to work during term time.

Information on eligibility to work in the UK for International students and those from EEA/EU countries
can be found of the University‟s Student Support pages.
http://www2.essex.ac.uk/stdsup/welfare/working.shtm
Further information can be found at UK Council for International Affairs
http://www.ukcosa.org.uk/student/working_during.php

5.6 I am an international student, how do I get a National Insurance number?

You can apply for a National Insurance Number if you have been offered a job or if you can prove that
you are looking for a job. The proof would be several documents (rejection letters, invitations to
interviews, confirmations of received applications etc.).

International students (non EU/EEA students) who have entered the UK on a visa no longer need to
have a face-to-face appointment in order to receive a National Insurance Number. You need to call 0845
6000 643 in order to obtain a Fastpath Application Form. Once you have received this form, complete it
and return it to the address stated on the form and you will then receive a National Insurance Number in
the post.

If you are from the EU you need to have an appointment in order to obtain a National Insurance
Number. As a University of Essex student, you should first telephone the JobCentre Plus appointment
line to make an appointment for an NIS number. Please note that your appointment will be with the
JobCentre Plus in Ipswich.

The appointment line number is 0845 600 06 43 and is open 8am - 6pm, Monday – Friday.

You will need to take your passport, your student registration card, proof of employment and the name
and address of your employer to your appointment. The Student Ambassador Co-ordinator can provide
you with a letter of employment. Once the forms have been completed and the interview was held you
will be issued with a National Insurance Number, but it may take up to 6 weeks to come through.

For further information on how to apply for a National Insurance Number visit
www.direct.gov.uk or the University Careers Centre pages
http://www.essex.ac.uk/careers/information_general/international_students_info.shtm

5.7 Expenses

Some activities may require you to spend a period of time away from the University. All your transport
will be arranged and paid for prior to the event. In the event of an over-night stay, your hotel will be
booked and paid for in advance.

In some circumstances Student Ambassadors may have other expenses. These must be agreed
beforehand by a full-time member of Communications and External Relations. In this situation you will
be required to keep VAT receipts for all purchases which can be reimbursed by coming to see a member
of full-time Communications and External Relations staff.



                                                    11
                                                 6 Training


All Student Ambassadors are required to attend an initial training session prior to taking part in any
events and will be paid for their time. The training is designed to ensure that all Student Ambassadors
have the knowledge to carry out any tasks that are asked of them in the role. If you feel you need further
training at any stage, please feel free to contact the Student Ambassador Scheme Coordinator, Nicola
Wood, nicolaw@essex.ac.uk. We will be happy to provide you with the training you need.

If any further training needs are identified, you will be required to attend additional compulsory training.

6.1 Health and Safety

A Risk Assessment will be carried out by a full time member of staff prior to each event. Before each
event you will be briefed about any specific health and safety issues that apply. You must ensure that
you know what to do and where to meet in the case of a fire.

Please note: Visitors aged 16 or under are not allowed in the SU Bar or the Library.
No visitors are allowed on the paternoster lifts in the Library.

6.1a Manual Handling Awareness

Following attendance at the initial training session you name will be registered to complete and online
Manual Handling Awareness course. This is provided by the University‟s Occupational Health and
Safety Advisory Service (OHSAS), who will contact you directly via your Essex email account with
details.

The course is intended for employees who carry lightweight loads, for example nothing heavier than a
box of photocopying paper in an office environment, so will prepare you for events such at HE Fairs
when you may be required to lift a box of prospectuses.

The course will be provide information on how to carry out straightforward lifting and carrying tasks in a
safe way and should only take about 45 minutes, including course assessment.

6.2 Child Protection and Safeguarding Procedures

You will receive training on Child Protection and Safeguarding Procedures, to enable you to confidently
work with Under 18‟s and Vulnerable Adults and to respond appropriately to a situation. Please
familiarise yourself with the document
„Safeguarding Children Procedures for Widening Participation, outreach and Student Recruitment
Activities‟ ( Appendix C ).

As the majority of visitors that you will be working with will be under the age of 18, all of our Student
Ambassadors are required to successfully complete a criminal background check by completing the only
CRB form. You will not be able to work until you have completed the online CRB application process
and you may be restricted from working on certain events until we have been notified by the CRB that
your check has been successful.




                                                     12
                               7. CRB Checks for Student Ambassadors

7.1 Enhanced CRB Checks

The University of Essex is a Registered Body with the Criminal Records Bureau, enabling it to carry out
CRB applications for students and staff requiring CRB checks. As a Student Ambassador, you will be
working in areas where you are likely to have contact with and responsibility for Under-18s, and
therefore are required to apply for an Enhanced CRB Disclosure. This will inform the University of any
warning, reprimand, caution or conviction you may have, even if it is spent or occurred whilst you were a
juvenile. In some cases, an Enhanced Disclosure may also contain details that are deemed to be
relevant to the position by a Chief Police Officer.

7.2 What does the application process involve?

The University uses an electronic application system, managed by @lantic Data. You will receive an
email containing your login details and a URL to access the site. The application asks for personal
information such as your title and full name, date and place of birth, and five year continuous address
history. You will be asked to specify certain ID documents that you wish to use, and when you have
completed the application you will be asked to bring these documents to room 6.101 to be checked.

7.3 What if I have a criminal record?

In the event of a CRB disclosure certificate containing information about a criminal conviction or caution,
the information will be passed to the Student CRB Review Panel for a decision about whether you can
continue as a Student Ambassador. The University of Essex complies fully with the CRB Code of
Practice and undertakes not to discriminate unfairly against any subject of a Disclosure on the basis of a
conviction or other information revealed. A copy of the University‟s Student CRB Checks Policy is
available on request – please email crb@essex.ac.uk for details.

7.4 I am an international student. Do I complete the CRB form?

As an international student you will still be required to complete the normal online CRB application and
include details of your addresses for the last five years. The CRB will only check your criminal
background for your time spent in the UK. If you have not lived in the UK for the last five years, you may
also be required to obtain a certificate of good conduct from your resident country.

7.5 CRB Contact Details

Should you have any enquiries regarding your CRB application or encounter any difficulties in the
electronic application system please email crb@essex.ac.uk

If you would like more information on CRB checks, please visit www.crb.org.uk.




                                                    13
                                        8. Personal Development

8.1How does being a Student Ambassador develop my CV?

As a Student Ambassador you have the opportunity to get involved with many different types of work.
The more effort you put into the scheme the more you will get out of it. Being an ambassador will allow
you to develop skills you already have and also gain new ones
.
Giving tours allows you to develop your communications skills. You will be talking to people of different
ages and backgrounds as well as groups of varying sizes. This means you have experience of
communicating and conveying your opinions and experiences to a wide range of audiences, tailoring
your conversations where necessary.

Presentations also allow you to gain experience in public speaking to a range of different audiences, as
well as the ability to research a topic and collate all the information in one place.

Office work will give you experience working in an office environment; handling telephone calls, filing
and using varies computer programmes. This will also develop your ability to work on your own initiative.

Working at visit and open days will give you experience working as part of a team. You will be required
to listen to instructions, and follow them correctly. You will also work alone, whilst giving a tour, and
therefore be required to use you own initiative and deal with any issues as they come about.

HE Fairs and off-campus events will provide you with experience in networking and sharing good
practice with students and colleagues from other universities.

You will also gain general skills such as the ability to balance your studies, socialising and a part-time
job thus developing essential time-management skills.

Not only will you lean and develop transferable skills but you will also have lots of fun doing it. As a
Student Ambassador you will work closely with other ambassadors and most probably form friendship
groups. You can share stories and experiences, and the rest is up to you – you could always start a
Student Ambassador Society, for those involved in the scheme.

8.2 What next? Further opportunities within Communications and External Relations.

8.2a Senior Student Ambassadors
Once you have at least one years‟ experience as a Student Ambassador you will be eligible to apply for
the role of Senior Student Ambassador. We have a small team of Senior Student Ambassadors, whose
fundamental role is to lead and facilitate School Campus Visits and to attend School/College External
Visits without the supervision of a full time member of University staff. Senior Student Ambassadors are
also required to deliver presentations.

The role of Senior Student Ambassador provides the opportunity for personal development and to gain a
range of skills through undertaking additional responsibilities to those of a Student Ambassador. The
role would be particularly suited to any student wishing to work in the fields of widening participation,
schools liaison or student recruitment after graduation.




                                                     14
8.2b Student Recruitment Assistant
The Communications and External Relations Department annually appoints an Essex graduate to work
as the Student Recruitment Assistant on a two year, non-renewable graduate training programme.

The Student Recruitment Assistant assists both the Marketing and Recruitment teams throughout the
year. Duties include assisting to edit and produce promotional material such as the undergraduate
prospectus and departmental leaflets, organise the three university open days, take part in recruitment
events across the country and give presentations at schools and colleges.

Many Student Ambassadors apply for this position as they possess lots of relevant experience and skills.
They often have an insight into the type of work that the SRA does and therefore is better prepared if
they are invited for interview. In the past, many of the SRAs have come from the Student Ambassador
scheme as they possess a range of skills necessary for the role.

We encourage Student Ambassadors who are considering the scheme, advise members of staff so we
can provide as much help and training as possible. The next opportunity to apply to the post will be in
summer 2012.

8.3 Providing a Reference

Communications and External Relations will be happy to provide a reference for you, if you have worked
for us more than five times. If you require a named referee for job applications upon graduation, please
contact Chris Snow casnow@essex.ac.uk , who will be able to provide you with details for the
appropriate member of staff.

8.4 Learning from Work Module

This module is an opportunity to turn your Student Ambassador ‘work experience‟ into „work-related
learning‟, providing formal recognition of your achievements as academic credit that can be recorded on
your degree transcript.

Contact: Liz Warr, emwarr@essex.ac.uk, Employability Consultant in the Careers Centre, for information
about enrolment on the module, offered in partnership with the International Academy.




                                                   15
                                      9. Campus Tour Information

9.1 Important Information needed prior to giving a tour

9.1a Number of Students/ Visitors
On general visit and open days, please try to keep track of your group as best you can. In some
circumstances you may have extremely large tour groups, and it may be inevitable that someone
wanders off from the group whilst you are giving your tour. In this situation do not panic, continue with
your tour and when you arrive at your destination (be it the LTB, sports hall or lecture room, inform a
member of staff that one (or a few people) have dropped out of your group. This way staff can keep an
eye out for lost-looking visitors.

In some circumstances you will need to keep track of the number of students in your group and keep an
eye on them at all times. This is usually when the visitors are much younger.

If you see someone looking lost, please go and offer them help, even if it is just taking them back to the
event base. Your help and positivity may be the reason a student chooses Essex over another university;
so please be helpful at all times.

9.1b Time
When you give a tour at a visit or open day you will be told how much time you have for your tour. It is
essential that you keep to the time restrictions, if you don‟t, visitors may miss important interviews and
presentations.

A normal campus tour including accommodation should take around one hour. In some circumstances
you may be required to give a campus tour in a shorter amount of time, for example, 30 minutes. In this
situation you may need to be choosy about what you show visitors. If your group is quite small it may be
best to ask visitors what they would prefer to see. For example, you might have time to show only one
type of accommodation, or you might decide to show the accommodation and miss out the sports centre
and the Library.

Please make sure that if you do miss out bits on your tour, you explain what facilities we have on
campus. For example, on some tours you may not need to go on to the north side of campus; however
you should still tell visitors about The Teaching Centre, the Health Centre, Nursery and Nightline
facilities.

If you have to miss out sections of the tour, please inform your group that an ambassador will be happy
to show them the missed out section at a later stage in the day when the visitor is free.

9.1c Route
There is no „best route‟ to give a campus tour, however there are some commonly followed routes.
Depending on where you start your tour and what accommodation you have to show, there is a range of
ways to go about your campus tour.

Starting from Visitors Reception
Library – Square 4 (if you have north accommodation show now), Square 3 – SU Bar – Tower, South
Courts and Sports Centre then back down to the reception.

Starting from LTB
(Route 1) Sq 3 – Sq 4 – Teaching Centre – North Accommodation – Library – Sports Centre
(Route 2) Sq 3 – Sq 4 – Teaching Centre – Library – Sports Centre – South Accommodation
(Route 3) South Accommodation – Sports Centre – Sq 3 – Sq 4 – Teaching Centre – Library
(Route 4) Sports Centre – South Accommodation – Sq 3 – Sq 4 – Teaching Centre – Library

Starting from Sports Centre
(Accommodation Tour) South Court – Tower or vice-versa
(Campus Tour) – Square 3 – Square 4 – Teaching Centre – Library


The idea when giving campus tours is to show visitors as much of the campus as possible. You will need
to use your common sense when picking a route. If several campus tours leave the LTB at the same
time, it may be wise to do a different route to the group ahead of you, otherwise you will be queuing to
see accommodation, especially if you need to use the lifts (in the towers).

                                                     16
9.1d Access
Ensure that you are familiar with „step free‟ and wheelchair accessible routes for visitors with a physical
or mobility impairment.

See the link below for a „step free‟ Colchester Campus Access Map
http://www.essex.ac.uk/access/colchester_access_map.pdf


9.1e Age Restrictions
Make sure that you keep in mind the age of visitors in your group, as there are some restrictions on
where younger visitors can go. Visitors under the age of 16 are not allowed in the Library or SU Bar.

If your entire group is under 16, explain the facilities from outside of the building. If you have a tour group,
where only one or two visitors are under 16, please take them to one side and explain that due to
insurance and health and safety, they are not allowed in the building. If you do not get an opportunity to
speak to them directly please tell the whole group that visitors under 16 are not allowed inside and kindly
required to wait outside. Make sure you let those who cannot go in know about the facilities.

9.2 Campus Tour Information

General University Information
    Explain that Essex is a 1960s campus University, built at the same time and similar to UEA,
       Warwick, York, and Sussex etc.
    Built in the grounds of Wivenhoe House, with 200 acres of parkland and three lakes, so is very
       pleasant in the summer.
    Designed like an Italian town, with the squares representing piazzas, it is very practical for a
       university and they serve as good meeting points for students.

Library
         You are allowed to go into the Library but keep noise to a minimum and show visitors the ground
          floor and reading room.
         Do not let visitors on paternoster lifts and be careful that any under 16s are not taken past the
          checking out desk!
         1000 study spaces so will always find somewhere to sit and work.
         Open 8am-10pm weekdays 9am-6pm Saturdays and 2pm-7pm Sundays (some of the longest
          opening hours for a library in England).
         System to look up books and computers in the reading room. Explain that there are other
          computer labs on campus and most are open to all students 24 hours a day. Explain you don‟t
          need to necessarily bring your own computer as there are lots of computer facilities on campus.
         Explain that students have their own e-mail account, and that this is the preferred way to initially
          contact services, departments and staff.
         3 day, 7 day, 14 day and 3 hour loan on books. Explain purpose of 3-hour loan!
         Point out Lakeside Theatre and Art Exchange. Explain that Waterstones get the right number of
          books in each year as lecturers tell them how many students are on each course.

Square 5
    Is the home of the Library and the Ivor Crewe Lecture Hall, opened in 2007, a state of the art
       1,000 seat lecture theatre which can be divided into two theatres seating 500 each. Graduation
       ceremonies take place here.
    Also home to the newly refurbished Lakeside Theatre which seats 200. Student and touring
       productions are held here, as well as concerts, recitals and comedy shows.
    Please see Appendix E for Key Facts on Arts on 5, including the Lakeside Theatre.

Square 4
    Campus Shop and how it is 24 hours a day! (Although Tesco only 15 minutes away), Post Office
       and SU Shop (stationery and Essex merchandise), Copy Centre, Santander and Barclays banks.
    Point out Top Bar, Sizzlers Restaurant, Blues Bar (and how it has been newly refurbished),
       Salad Bar and Happy Days.
    Point out North side of campus, where we have the new Teaching Centre, a Health Centre,
       Counselling service, Nightline, Launderette, Nursery and The Teaching Centre.




                                                      17
Square 3
    One of the busiest squares with a good meeting point in the middle.
    Information Centre (open 24hours a day, male and female fully trained first-aiders, CCTVs on
       campus covering main parts of campus, residences and car parks).
    Point out facilities on Square 3: The SU Bar and SU mini mall, Bakery, SU Advice centre, Lloyds
       TSB, SU Ticket Shop, Go-Go Global, Food on 3, Zest and Take 3.
    Point out SU corridor. Explain that SU is very accessible as we are a campus-based university
       and that they represent and help students. The SU also organise societies (academic, cultural
       and sporting), media (radio station and student newspaper, and TV station) and the
       entertainment (Bar, Sub Zero, Top Bar, Mondo, and Level 2).
    Cheap SU Minibus Service in the evenings for those living off-campus or at the Quays, they will
       drop you at your door!
    Students‟ Union Bar. Show them the inside of the Bar, the24hour Games Room and the mini
       mall.
    Students‟ Union corridor- point out and mention what they do. Also remember to inform them
       prescriptions can be picked up from here.
    Show them Mondo from outside and describe Level 2, Sub Zero and the events that are held
       there (club nights, cheesy nights e.g. Flirt, as well as visits from big names such as Calvin Harris,
       Chris Moyles and Trevor Nelson).

Squares 2 and 1
    Square 2 is the location of the Careers Centre which can be used for three years after
       graduating). The Careers Centre also helps students with job applications and with finding part
       time work on campus and in the local area.
    Square 1 is the location of the Department of Psychology and the School of Computer Science
       and Electronic Engineering.

Sports Centre
    Pay about £10 to join the Sports Federation.
    The new Passport to Sport scheme offers various inclusive memberships ranging from £75 to
        £150.
    Show them the brand new gym „Evolve‟ and point out the wall on the way to the gym that shows
        all the different sports clubs and societies.
    Tell them about the climbing wall, main hall, activity studios (including double height activity
        studio) squash courts, outside tennis courts, all weather pitches etc.
    Tell them about the Watersports Centre at Brightlingsea, primarily for sailing, windsurfing and
        canoeing.
    Swimming pool at Colchester Leisure World offers a student discount.

Colchester
     Colchester, as a town centre, has grown rapidly in the last five years. It has a young population
       due to the University, Colchester Institute (a large further and higher education college) and the
       Garrison.
     Lively town with most high street stores, lots of smaller independent, novelty and alternative
       shops, pubs (such as Slug and Lettuce, Yates, Wetherspoons, O‟Neills, Lakota and lots of
       independent pubs and bars),
     Nightclubs (Liquid and Envy/Route/Twisters) in Colchester vary in music style and size, the
       largest holds 2000, the smallest 350. Remember there are alternative venues such as V Bar,
       Dirty Penguin, the Twist etc, for live music/bands.
     Historic Town with the castle, museums etc.
     Regular buses from the University and Quays into town every 10 minutes.
     Leisure Centre with swimming pool, bowling and Colchester Zoo
     Tell them about the Odeon cinema in the centre of town.
     Less than an hour from Stansted with hourly buses from the University.
     45 minutes on the train to London.
     Rollerworld is Europe‟s largest roller skating venue! Also has Quasar and offers student discount
       for a retro night out!




                                                    18
Relations between Students and the Garrison
     Is never a problem between the two different groups of people
                                             th
     Colchester Garrison is home to the 16 Air Assualt Brigade and the 2nd Battalion Parachute
        Regiment, among others. The Colchester soldiers undertake reqular tours of duty in
        Afghanistan. They stage colourful homecoming parades in Colchester town centre on their
        return.

Wivenhoe
    Small fishing village near to the University campus.
    Home to many students in the second and final years.
    It has a lively quayside and a variety of pubs and restaurants.



9.3 Accommodation Tour Information

What is in the bedrooms?
    All the single rooms are heated and fully furnished containing standard bedroom furniture
        together with a desk and bookshelves.
    You are required to supply your own bedding and towels.

What is in the kitchens?
    Each kitchen contains a cooker, refrigerator, freezer, microwave oven, saucepans, kettle, iron,
        ironing board and storage units. In Towers kitchens there are usually two of everything.
    Communal areas are cleaned on a regular basis Monday – Friday. Each day in Towers and 2 -3
        times a week in en-suite accommodation.

Am I guaranteed a room?
    As a first-year student studying at Colchester you are entitled to apply for a single study-
       bedroom in University accommodation.
    Applicants who firmly accept a conditional or unconditional offer and are not usually resident in
       the borough of Colchester with their family are guaranteed University accommodation as long as
       the application is received by the published deadline.
    New full time fully registered overseas postgraduate students are guaranteed a room providing
       the form and deposit is received by the published deadline.
    New EU and UK postgraduate students are not guaranteed a room but will receive allocations
       whilst there is room availability. Allocations will be made when forms and deposit are received.
    All applications are made on-line.

Do I have to move out of my room during vacations?
     Undergraduates:
        The room is allocated to you for the full period of your study year so you do not have to move
        out during the Christmas and Easter vacations. If you require accommodation after the end of
        the third term you can make a booking in the accommodation office in the second term.
     Postgraduates:
        The room is allocated to you for the full period of your study year so you do not have to move
        out during the Christmas, Easter or summer vacations.

Are there computer network facilities?
     Unlike many other Universities there is no additional charge for connection to the university
        network and internet from your room. All rooms are set up with network connection facilities.

Is there provision for car parking?
      Regrettably it is not possible to permit students (other than disabled students) to register a
         vehicle for parking on campus.

Can I leave my room before my contract has finished?
    Please note that there is no Notice to quit facility. Students cannot therefore give written notice
        that they intend to leave their accommodation. This means that once students have signed for
        their accommodation keys they will be responsible for the rent until the end of their
        accommodation agreement.




                                                    19
The Towers
    The rooms in the towers have commanding views over the surrounding countryside and are
       among the cheapest University accommodation in the South-east of England.
    You can get out of bed at 5 to 9 and still be on time for a 9 o'clock lecture complete with cheese
       sandwich and cup of coffee!
    Towers are the best place to meet people and you can have a lot of fun in your first year, you
       have thirteen instant mates to go out with.
South Courts
    All flats are self-contained with the larger flats having two or three kitchens, other flats being for
       four or six students
    All rooms have en suite shower and toilet facilities
    Spacious rooms, well equipped kitchens, nice bathroom, cosy atmosphere
    Highly recommended for students who want on-campus convenience with a quieter living
       environment
Wolfson Court
    There are eight flats in this two-storey building, each housing seven students.
    The self-contained flats have a shared kitchen with dining area, shower and separate toilet
       facilities. Each room has a washbasin
The Quays
    This is the newest development situated close to the Colne Estuary yet within easy walking
       distance of the campus amenities (approx. 15 minutes from centre of campus).
    There is a launderette on site and the Quayside Café.
    There is a convenience store adjacent to the Quays complex and other facilities such as a hair
       salon nearby. The Tesco supermarket is also within easy walking distance.
    All rooms are en suite and most flats are shared between eight students.

The Houses
    The Houses are located on the north side of campus in pleasant parkland. The walking distance
       to the centre of campus is approximately 5 minutes.
    The accommodation is arranged in self-contained flats of four, five or six students sharing a
       kitchen. Each room has its own en suite shower and toilet facilities

The weekly rent charges for 2010/11 full academic year students are as follows:

                                                                                       Rent per
Location                                                                               week
South Courts                                                                           £104.93
The Houses                                                                             £97.65
University Quays                                                                       £96.11
Wolfson Court                                                                          £72.38
North Towers A (Keynes & Rayleigh)                                                     £68.11
North Towers B (William Morris & Tawney)                                               £67.55
South Towers (Bertrand Russell, Eddington)                                             £64.75


Resident Support Network (RSN)
    The aim of the RSN is to provide an environment within which students can have a positive
       experience of living and learning.
    Residents‟ Assistants (RAs) are trained undergraduate or postgraduate students who;
           -work with the residents to encourage communication and organise a range of social
           activities to promote integration.
           - respond to concerns and complaints that residents may have by operating an on-call rota
           which operates from 5pm to 9am.
    Teams of RAs are supervised by RSN Co-ordinators, these are predominantly postgraduate
       students who have involvement in complex cases and operate the on-call service during
       University vacations.



                                                    20
9.4 Campus Tour Tips

      Take your group outside and clear away from the building before you start your introductions
       and tour.

      Don‟t walk and talk. When addressing the whole group stand still….they will hear you and it will
       be easier for you to get their attention.

      When walking do chat to visitors individually in turn…get to know them.

      Sell the University but don‟t over do it….be realistic and you will sound honest and believable.

      If you don‟t know the answer to a question be honest and tell them you will try to find out for
       them. If the visitors have time, refer the question to a member of Communications and External
       Relations Staff before leaving the visitors.

      Use your own personal experiences – anecdotes and stories from your time at Essex will help
       visitors to paint a picture of what life is like at the university. Remember, visitors will come from
       different backgrounds so ensure you are sensitive to this.

      Tell visitors about the brilliant social life at University but ensure that your stories are appropriate
       and cover the full variation of activities on offer (including non-alcohol related events).

      Use appropriate language at all times and never use swear words or those that may be
       considered offensive.

      Be positive and enthusiastic about the University, and your experiences. You may not like
       certain aspects of the University, but everyone has different opinions of what is good and bad. It
       is your responsibility to show the positive side to any negative comments. For example, “Yes
       Tower accommodation does look a little dull from the outside, but it offers student a brilliant
       social life”.

      Finally….be chirpy and enjoy yourself!




                                                     21
                            10. Working with Young People – Practical Tips

10.1 Student Panels

This is a chance for visiting students to ask a panel of Student Ambassadors about their experiences
and life at university. The audience size can vary from 10 to 100+ people and can the type of question
they ask can depend on the age of the students and how confident they are.

A member of staff or a Senior Student Ambassador will facilitate the panel. Firstly we will ask you to
introduce yourself, including where you are from, which course you are studying and your year of study.
If the students are a little shy to start with, the facilitator may ask one or two questions to get them going.


Examples of questions that are often asked include:

       Why did you decide to go to university?
       What qualifications did you do before?
       What research did you do before choosing your course and university?
       Why did you choose Essex?
       How many hours of lectures/seminars do you have?
                                                      th
       How is university life different from school/6 form?
       What do you want to do when you finish university?
       Is the work difficult?
       Is it hard do study independently?
       What are the teachers like?
       How do you motivate yourself to do independent study?
       How do you support yourself financially?
       Do you ever get home sick?
       Was it easy to make friends when you first started?
       Can you choose who you live with?
       What happens if you don‟t do the work or go to lectures?
       Are you in any clubs or societies?
       What‟s it like living in halls?
       What are the parties like?
       What‟s the best thing about uni?
       What‟s the worst thing about uni?

Be warned you may sometimes get asked questions like these…

       How much do you drink?
       Do you have a boyfriend/girlfriend?

Think carefully about how you answer them e.g. what is appropriate and how much personal information
you‟re willing to give away!




                                                      22
10.2 The A-Z of Working with Young People



A - Be Alert as to the whereabouts of your students. Sometimes the temptation of a day off school and
a chance to go shopping is sometimes too much for our little rays of sunshine! It is important to
remember that the University is a big place and it‟s all too easy for participants to wander off and get lost.

B - Bare faced cheek! - These events are designed to be fun and we want students to enjoy
themselves, but they are here to learn and you have the right to expect good manners and be respected.

C - Child Protection – Make yourself aware of the risks involved when working with young people and
how you can minimise these. Make sure you are clear about what to do in the case of a disclosure. You
will be asked to complete a CRB (Criminal Records Bureau) check.

D - Don’t be afraid to ask for help if there is anything you don‟t understand or if you are having any
difficulties with your students.

E - Encourage everybody to participate in group discussions/activities. There is always at least one
who likes to take a back seat, be enthusiastic, and you never know, they might even enjoy themselves.

F - Flexibility - Be prepared to adapt to different circumstances or last minute changes.

G - Group work – Try to involve all group members. Sometimes the dynamics within a group can
cause problems. If friction or tension arises, try to make efforts to resolve these if you can. If not, inform
a member of staff.

H - Hush! - Other people are trying to work! Ok, so we don‟t expect silence, but bear in mind that most
of the time there will be lectures/exams taking place around the University. Make sure your group is
aware of this and try to minimise disturbance and noise, especially in corridors.

I - Impressionable young minds! Young people are easily influenced by what you do or say, be aware
of this and display the appropriate behaviour and attitude.

J - Jargon – Some young people will not understand all of the terms that are used within HE institutions
(for example – what does HE stand for?). Don‟t use lots of jargon that they won‟t understand, or if you
do use terms they may not be familiar with, please try to explain what they actually mean.

K - Keeping in touch – Giving out your contact details such as phone number and email to a yound
person is a definite NO! The same goes for adding them as friends on Facebook etc. If you or they wish
to communicate after the event (e.g. to answer a particular question) you can do this via the WP team
who will communicate using their work emails.

L - Lunchtime – Lunchtime can be hectic and it‟s prime opportunity for students to go walkabouts! You
get paid during your lunchtime because you don‟t stop working, so whilst eating your lunch you must
keep your eyes peeled as to where the students are. Also try not to sit on a table of just ambassadors,
instead mix with the young people and chat to them during lunch, especially if anyone is sitting on their
own.

M - Mentor - As a university student you have first hand experience and knowledge of Higher
Education. You can offer the best advice and answer any questions; you are central to making these
events a success.

N - NEVER be alone with a young person at any time. This is to protect you as much as the young
person. Always have another adult present, or be with a group of young people.

O - Opportunities for you. Young people get a huge amount out of the work we do, but it‟s also an
opportunity for you to enhance your communication skills, increase your confidence, employment
prospects and leadership skills.

P - Professionalism - Working as a Student Ambassador means that you are acting as a
representative of the University of Essex, so stay professional at all times.


                                                     23
Q - Question time – Young people will ask lots of questions, either in student panels or on tours, so try
to be as informative as possible. Sometimes they can be a bit shy in coming forward with questions so
take the initiative and tell them about HE and your experiences.

R - Responsibility - You are responsible for a number of young people and must act accordingly. As
a role model you can find this job very rewarding, and you will get back what you put in.

S - Sneaky Smokers – smoking in the toilets is still a fascination with young people, watch out for
groups of kids disappearing for a quick fix! It will be highlighted this is now illegal in public buildings.

T - Time Keeping - You MUST be on time for your work. The beginning of the day is often the most
important. If you are late you could throw the whole day out of sync. It‟s also crucial to make sure your
group gets to their sessions on time, and returns promptly after lunch.

U - Utilise your experiences and knowledge. - If you feel that an event was not successful and you can
offer constructive suggestions that would improve things, then please let us know.

V - Varied groups. - Some groups will be great to work with, however some will be much harder to
work with and will need lots of encouragement. Also bear in mind that groups can range from 13 year
olds to 18 yr olds. Therefore consider what information will be most relevant to them. If you are unhappy
with a group please inform a member of the WP team.

W - Work Hard – If you put the work in and are willing to make an effort you will enjoy it!

X - X-Factor! - Make a lasting impression (for the right reasons!). Wow them with your personality and
skills.

Y - You play a very important role and can make a life changing difference. You could be the
difference between someone getting a degree and their dream job, or spending the rest of their lives
regretting they never took the chance. Ambassadors really do affect life choices about HE.

Z - Zzzz - Get some sleep the night before! You will be amazed how tiring you will find this work. You
need to be fresh faced and bright eyed to face the battles and delights of the day ahead. Please do not
turn up with a hangover and smelling of alcohol.




Acknowledgement:
Thanks to the University of Huddersfield (SCLS) for great A-Z inspiration!




                                                       24
                      11. Employment Policies, Values and General Procedures

11.1 Unable to Work/Sickness Procedure
Student Ambassadors are vital to the success of an event, as such we expect you to consider your
workload before agreeing to work on an activity. If you become unable to work an event that you have
signed up for please let the member of staff running the event know as soon as possible, via phone or
email, with at least 48 hours notice.

If you are ill and unable to work, please always phone as email is not sufficient at this late stage. The
member of staff running the event is unlikely to be accessing their email on the day of the event. You
may have been given a mobile number to contact on the day, alternatively:
For Widening Participation/Aimhigher events contact: 01206 873424
For Recruitment events contact: 01206 873987

If you do not give sufficient notice or a reasonable excuse for being unable to work, this will be taken
seriously and you will be given a formal warning and a „strike‟ issued

11.2 Punctuality
It is crucial that all Student Ambassadors report on time for any work they agree to undertake. If in the
unforeseen circumstance that you are delayed, you must phone the office to let them know the reason
why you are late and the time you expect to arrive. The member of staff running the event will not be
accessing their email on the day of the event.
The main office number is 01206 873424.

Due to the nature of the work carried out, it is extremely important to be on time as the event will be
delayed and this reflects badly on the University and damages relationships built with the public/visiting
schools.

11.3 Appropriate Conduct
Please note that you will be working with young people and therefore it is very important to behave
appropriately. Swearing, reference to drugs and/or bullying will not be condoned. It may also be
inappropriate to discuss drinking alcohol with particular groups and should generally not take over a
conversation about student life.

A positive attitude towards the University and Higher Education in general must be maintained at all
times. If your attitude becomes negative towards the University and Higher Education in general we
would ask you to discuss this with Nicola Wood. We understand realism and honesty is important but
the Aimhigher days have the aim of inspiring others into HE.

You will have been required to sign and adhere to the „Code of Conduct‟ (please see Appendix A)

11.4 Smoking Policy
While working as a Student Ambassador, Communications and External Relations enforces a strict no
smoking policy. If working on a full day event or for a longer period, you will be informed of designated
breaks and appropriate areas where you will be allowed to smoke. Please ensure you are out of sight
from any visitors, especially school groups, including at the end of the event when the group may be
leaving Campus.

11.5 Disciplinary Procedures
The Student Ambassador Scheme operates a Three Strike System. Where a Student Ambassador fails
to adhere to the Code of Conduct, you may be issued with a written formal warning. Upon the third
occasion, you will be withdrawn from the Student Ambassador list.
Student Ambassadors have the right to challenge any disciplinary actions.
All employees having a grievance regarding their employment have a right to express it. All cases
submitted by Ambassadors will be fully investigated and dealt with appropriately. Complaints of
discrimination / and or harassment made against Communications and External Relations staff will be
fully investigated.




                                                    25
Appendix A

                       Code of conduct for Student Ambassadors
As a Student Ambassador for University of Essex I agree that:

- I will:

       Adhere to the University of Essex child protection policy, and equal
        opportunities policy
      Be punctual for all events and activities with which I am involved
     Wear any identification provided for the activity
     Dress in a manner that is suitable for the activity
     Be respectful and courteous to all young people and other members of staff
     Do my utmost to ensure that all young people are included and valued, regardless
      of their race, creed, age and sexual orientation.
     Inform the member of staff running the activity, if I am unable to attend prior to the
      event for any reason
     Report any concerns regarding the welfare of a young person to the designated
      person for the activity.

- I will not:

        Work whilst under the influence of alcohol or illegal substances
        Smoke in the presence of young people
        Exchange personal contact details with young people
        Initiate, or respond to, inappropriate physical contact with young people or other
         members of staff
        Use inappropriate language when communicating with young people and other
         members of staff



Signed:……………………………………….


Print name:……………………………………


Date:……....




                                               26
Appendix B

UNIVERSITY OF ESSEX

GUIDELINES FOR WORKING WITH UNDER 18’S AND VULNERABLE ADULTS

The University has a responsibility to safeguard and promote the welfare of under-18s and vulnerable
adults who participate in its organised activities or services. These include registered students who are
under 18 or vulnerable, children who come onto University premises as part of organised activities such
as visits or summer schools and University staff working off campus (e.g. widening participation
activities in local schools). The University must ensure that reasonable steps to promote and safeguard
the welfare of children, young people and vulnerable adults are taken.
                              University of Essex, Policy for the Protection of Under-18’s and Vulnerable Adults

The following guidelines support the University’s Under 18’s and Vulnerable Adults Policy and have
been written to support University departments and staff. Please note that the Day Nursery is covered
separately by comprehensive child protection policies in accordance with Ofsted requirements.

Policies and Procedures
The University has an Under 18’s and Vulnerable Adults Policy. Staff who may work or come into
contact with any under 18’s or vulnerable adults are required to familiarise themselves with the Policy
document.

If a department has considerable dealings with under 18’s or vulnerable adults it may be necessary to
produce specific safeguarding procedures. Current safeguarding procedures and guidelines available are:

     Student Support Guidance for Staff
     Safeguarding Children Procedures for Widening Participation Outreach and Student Recruitment
      Activity

Staff may already be required to follow either of these procedures as part of their role and if so should be
familiar with and sign any required code of conduct.

A copy of all policies and procedures can be found at;

http://www2.essex.ac.uk/stdsup/policies/u18andvadults_index.shtm

Why we have responsibility to safeguarding under 18’s and vulnerable adults
   Under 18’s and vulnerable adults have a right to protection
   Everyone working in contact with under 18’s and vulnerable adults has a responsibility for their
    protection
   Responsibility relating to concern for an under 18 or vulnerable adult safety must be shared
   Under 18’s and vulnerable adults protection depends on all staff and all agencies working together
   Under 18’s and vulnerable adults protection overrides confidentiality, relationships with the
    family and agency hierarchy and objectives
   Protection issues are to be regarded as top priority and staff are reminded that it is the welfare of
    the under 18 or vulnerable adult which is of a primary concern and it is their duty to follow the
    safeguarding procedure
   If staff, in the course of their work at the University, have a protection issue bought to their notice,
    observe an incident of abuse themselves, or have cause for concern, they must treat this as a
    priority over other work and address the issue immediately
   If staff wish to seek guidance with regard to a specific incident or area of concern, advice can be
    sought directly from the Lead Designated Officer or a Designated Officer who may refer the
    matter to the University Lead Designated Officer
   Staff should be aware that if a referral to Social Care is the appropriate course of action then this
    needs to be done without delay


                                                     27
     Staff should not collude with a parent, under 18 or vulnerable adult to keep concerns secret in the
      area of protection
     All staff must be aware and adhere to required procedure for safeguarding those at risk

If abuse is suspected the ‘Guidance to staff’ principals in the University Under 18’s and
Vulnerable Adults Policy must be followed

Appendix A provides the definitions of abuse

Identified Staff
The University has a Lead Designated Officer and a number of Designated Officers who can be
contacted on any issues relating to the safety and protection of under 18s and vulnerable adults.

The University Lead Designated Officer is:

Wayne Campbell
Academic Registrar
01206 872977
waynec@essex.ac.uk

The Lead Designated Officer is responsible for the University Under 18’s and Vulnerable Adults Policy.
In all instances of concern related to protection, the Lead Designated Officer must be consulted and
involved.

The University has named Designated Officers in Student Support, External Relations and Personnel
these Officers are likely to be the first point of contact for staff wishing to discuss concerns or seeking
clarification:

Student Support
Rachel Fletcher
Director of Student Support
01206 872366
rachelf@essex.ac.uk

Paula Rothero
Assistant Director of Student Support (Advice)
01206 872366
prothero@essex.ac.uk

Angela Jones
Assistant Director of Student Support (Disability)
01206 872365
angela@essex.ac.uk

Communications and External Relations
Rachel Earle
Head of Widening Participation and Community Engagement
01206 873979
rearle@essex.ac.uk

Nicola Wood
Widening Participation Officer
01702 328238
nicolaw@essex.ac.uk



                                                     28
Claudia Carey
Widening Participation Officer
01026 873707
ccarey@essex.ac.uk

Lucy Watson
Widening Participation Officer
01206 874398
lwatson@essex.ac.uk

Personnel and Equality and Diversity Unit
Syd Kent
Equality and Diversity Officer
01206 872390
syd@essex.ac.uk

These Designated Officers have considerable responsibility for or contact with under 18’s and/or
vulnerable adults and will receive the relevant training to reflect this.

Recommendation
It is recommended that departments have a named contact for children and vulnerable adult safeguarding
issues who can also liaise with the Designated Officers, Student Support and/or External Relations
accordingly and if required.

Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) Checks
University staff CRB checks are administered through the Personnel Section. If you are unsure whether
a member of staff requires a CRB check contact Alan Charnock, Deputy Director of Personnel on
ext2461, alanc@essex.ac.uk.

University student CRB checks are initially administered by the department and then from October 2006
dealt with centrally by External Relations. If you have any queries or require more information
regarding a student CRB Check please contact Mo Lee on ext 2698, mo@essex.ac.uk.

Health and Safety
In the instance of a specific project or event involving under 18’s or vulnerable adults it may be
necessary to carry out a risk assessment. For additional guidance on risk assessments please contact the
University Safety Office.

Recruitment of Staff
The recruitment of staff must follow the procedures of the University Personnel Section. Any role
containing considerable work and contact with under 18’s or vulnerable adults should consider the
University Under 18’s and Vulnerable Adults Policy and make appropriate references in the job
description. Individual guidance should be sought from the Personnel Section.

Admissions
Applicants to any University scheme who will be under the age of 18 at the time of registration must
complete an emergency contact details form and sign a declaration before a place is confirmed. Details
and the relevant form are available from the Undergraduate Admissions Office.
Training
It is the responsibility of the Lead Designated Officer, the Designated Officers and department named
contacts to understand and implement the procedures and recommendations set out in the Under 18’s
and Vulnerable Adults policy. All staff that may come into contact with a person under 18 and/or
vulnerable adult is expected to have read the guidance and be aware of the University’s Policy.

Details on training and information sessions are available from the Staff Development Office on ext
2458 or email staffdev@essex.ac.uk .

                                                   29
Training available includes:
Educare
An online training opportunity run by the NSPCC is available. The programme requires up to two hours
in time and provides a basic level awareness and understanding in child protection. Information on
Educare is available from the Staff Development Office.

Recommendation
Educare is recommended to be the minimum level of training for all Designated Officers and department
named representatives.

Useful Websites
Guidance
NSPCC
www.nspcc.org.uk/inform

Working Together to Safeguard Children
www.the-stationary-office.co.uk/doh/worktog.htm

Caring for Young People and the Vulnerable
www.homeoffice.giv.uk/cpd/sou/young.htm

Our Duty to Care
www.volunteering-ni.org

Have Fun and Be Safe
www.nspcc.org.uk

Legislation
Criminal Justice and Court Services Act 2000
www.hmso.gov.uk

The Protection of Children Act 1999
www.doh.gov.uk/scg/childprotect

Further Information
If you have any queries regarding any issues related to the protection and safeguarding of under 18’s
and/or vulnerable adults please contact:

Rachel Fletcher                  Rachel Earle
Director of Student Support      Head of Widening Participation and Community Engagement
01206 872366                     01206 873979
rachelf@essex.ac.uk              rearle@essex.ac.uk


GUIDELINES FOR WORKING WITH UNDER 18’S AND VULNERABLE ADULTS
(Appendix A)

Definitions of Abuse
The term ‘abuse’ can take many forms; physical, emotional, sexual or neglect, and could be racist,
homophobic or related to gender.

Abuse of Trust
Under the Sexual Offences Act 2003 it is an offence for a person over 18 (teacher, student mentor,
academic staff etc.) to have a sexual relationship with a child under 18 where that person is in a position
of trust in respect of that child, even if the relationship is consensual.

                                                    30
Barriers to Disclosure
Disclosure is a term that is used when a child/young person tells about an abusive situation. In the event
of a disclosure the Safeguarding Children Procedure must be followed.
Barriers a child may face to disclosure can include:
      Fear of not being believed
      Fear of being taken away from home
      Fear of the consequences
      Loss of control of the situation
      Not knowing that rights have been infringed
Children at most risk of not disclosing:
      English is not first language
      Member of a group that experiences discrimination
      Deaf and Disabled Children
      Children living in abusive situation

 Indicators of Abuse
 The following is a summary of some of the indicators that may suggest that a child is being, or is at risk
 of harm. It is important to recognise that indicators alone cannot confirm whether a child is being
 abused. Every child needs to be seem in the context of their family and wider community and a proper
 assessment carried out by the proper persons.

 The important message is you feel unsure or worried, that the Safeguarding Children Procedures are
 followed.
 Indicators of Physical Abuse
 Physical Observations
 Bruising, especially:
 Bruising on trunk
 Bruises on upper arm,, shoulders, neck consistent with gripping
 Finger tip bruising/finger marks
 Burns and Scolds, especially:
 Cigarette burns
 Burns caused by lengthy exposure to heat
 Human bite marks
 Fractures, particularly spiral fractures
 Swelling and lack or normal use of limbs
 Any serious injury with no explanation or conflicting explanations/inconsistent accounts
 Untreated injuries
 Behavioral observations
 Unusually fearful with adults
 Unnaturally compliant to parents
 Refusal to discuss injuries/fears of medical help


 Withdrawal from physical; contact
 Aggression towards others
 Wears cover up clothing

 Indicators of neglect
 Behavioral observations
 Constant hunger
 Constant tiredness
 Frequent lateness or non attendance at school
 Destructive tendencies
 Low self-esteem
 Neurotic behavior
                                                    31
No social relationships
Running away
Compulsive stealing or scavenging
Multiple accidents and accidental injuries
Physical observations
Poor personal hygiene
Poor state of clothing
Emaciation, pot belly, short stature
Poor skin tone and hair tone
Untreated medical problems

Indicators of sexual abuse
Physical observations
Damage to genitalia, anus or mouth
Sexually transmitted disease
Unexpected pregnancy, especially in very young girls
Soreness in genital area, anus or mouth
Unexplained recurrent urinary infections ands discharges or abdominal pain
Behavioral observations
Sexual knowledge inappropriate for age
Sexual behavior in young children
Sexually proactive behavior/promiscuity
Hinting at Sexual activity
Inexplicable fall off in school performance
Sudden apparent changes in personality
Lack of concentration, restlessness, aimlessness
Socially withdrawn
Overly compliant behavior
Acting out, aggressive behavior
Poor trust in significant adults
Regressive behavior e.g. onset of wetting by day or bedwetting
Onset of insecure, clinging behavior
Arriving early at school, leaving late, running away from home
Suicide attempts, self mutilation, self disgust
Easting disorders

Indicators of emotional abuse
Physical, mental and emotional development lags
Acceptance of punishment which appears excessive
Over-reaction to mistakes
Continual self-depreciation
Sudden speech disorders
Fear of new situations
Inappropriate emotional responses to painful situations
Neurotic behavior (such as rocking, hair twisting, thumb sucking)
Self-mutilation
Fear of parents being contacted
Extremes of passivity or aggression
Drug/solvent abuse
Running away
Compulsive stealing, scavenging




                                                 32
Appendix C

   Safeguarding Children Procedures for Widening Participation Outreach and
                         Student Recruitment Activity

Definition of young person to mean any person under the age of 18 years

1. Background
The following procedures support the University Policy for the Protection of Under 18‟s and Vulnerable
Adults. All staff (including student staff, mentors and Aimhigher Ambassadors) working with young
people on University organised Widening Participation Outreach and Student Recruitment activity are
required to have read and adhere to the University Policy for Protection of Under 18‟s and Vulnerable
Adults and the Safeguarding Children Procedures for Widening Participation Outreach and Student
Recruitment Activity.

The procedure for safeguarding children provides guidance to anyone who is working with pupils under
the age of 18 years who suspects an incident of abuse has occurred. The procedure must be applied to
all events on campus involving young people under the age of 18 years.

For definitions of abuse, signs and symptoms of abuse and information on barriers to disclosing abuse,
please see Appendix A.

Widening Participation Outreach and Student Recruitment activities include:
    Mentoring Schemes in local Schools
    Residential and non residential Summer Schools
    All types of Campus Visits

2. Responsibility of Staff (including Student Staff, Mentors and Aimhigher Ambassadors)
Staff are required to report any incident and abuse or cause for concern which arises in the course of
their work with young people. Staff are required to sign up to the Code of Conduct to acknowledge the
University Policy for Protection of Under 18‟s and Vulnerable Adults and the Safeguarding Children
Procedures for Widening Participation Outreach and Student Recruitment Activity. In all instances the
Safeguarding Children Procedures must be followed and the following general principals should be
acknowledged and adhered to by all staff:
      Children have a right to protection;
      Everyone working in contact with children has a responsibility for their protection;
      Responsibility relating to concern for a child‟s safety must be shared;
      Child protection depends on all staff and all agencies working together;
      Child protection overrides confidentiality, relationships with the family and agency hierarchy and
       objectives;
      Child Protection issues are to be regarded as top priority and staff are reminded that it is the
       welfare of the child which is of a primary concern and it is there duty to follow the safeguarding
       children procedure;
      If staff, in the course of their work at the University, have a child protection issue bought to their
       notice, observe an incident of abuse themselves, or have cause for concern, they must treat this
       as a priority over other work and address the issue immediately;
      If staff wish to seek guidance with regard to a specific incident or area of concern, advice can be
       sought from the Designated Officer who may refer the matter to the University Lead Designated
       Officer or Child Social Care Services;
      Staff should be aware that if a referral to Child Social Care is the appropriate course of action then
       this needs to be done without delay;
      Staff should not collude with a parent or child to keep concerns secret in the area of child
       protection.




                                                     33
In order that behavior is not misinterpreted, staff should always work to the following guidelines:
      Conduct all conversations in a public place (it is recognized that this will not be possible for
       agreed mentoring roles);
      Avoid one to one situations (it is recognized that this will not be possible for agreed mentoring
       roles);
      Avoid all contact with pupils;
      No visits should be made to a young person‟s accommodation by individual members of staff. If a
       visit is necessary the staff member should be accompanied by another member of staff. If the
       situation is urgent another young person should be present and the door to the pupil‟s room
       should be left open.

Abuse of Trust
Under the Sexual Offences Act 2003 it is an offence for a person over 18 (teacher, student mentor,
academic staff etc.) to have a sexual relationship with a child under 18 where that person is in a position
of trust in respect of that child, even if the relationship is consensual.

3. Policy Related Issues
3.1 Named contact for Safeguarding Children Issues
A named contact must be identified to take responsibility for dealing with any child protection issues that
arise during a particular event. It is the responsibility of the named contact to understand and implement
the procedures and recommendations set out in this document. The named contact will be a
Designated Officer or have a Designated Officer available if required during an event.

For details of all recognised „safe‟ people please see Appendix B.

3.2 Health and Safety and Risk Assessment
The event organiser is responsible for ensuring all items on the health and safety checklist have been
considered and acted upon. As part of the health and safety checklist a risk assessment document must
be completed prior to each event on campus. This should set out potential hazards and measures taken
to ensure the safety of all participants.

3.3 CRB checking of staff (including Student Staff, Mentors and Aimhigher Ambassadors)
Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) checks are designed primarily for people entering a new position of
employment that will involve “substantial unsupervised access” to the Under 18‟s or “vulnerable adults”.
Therefore the following staff are all required to be CRB checked to the enhanced level:
Widening Participation Officers/Assistants
Students Recruitment Officers/Assistants
Head of Undergraduate Admissions
Deputy Head of Undergraduate Admissions
All Summer School Staff/Mentors
Student Mentors
Aimhigher Ambassadors working with young people if they are to have “substantial unsupervised
access”
Academic colleagues do not need to be CRB checked unless they will be in one to one contact with any
young person. Academic staff can undergo a CRB check which should be administered thorough the
Personnel Section if it is deemed necessary. If there is any doubt on a requirement for a CRB Check
the Personnel Section must be contacted.




                                                    34
3.4 Recruitment and Selection of Staff and Students
3.4.1 Staff
Recruitment of staff to the University must follow the procedures set out by the Personnel Section and
acknowledge the University Policy for Protection of Under 18‟s and Vulnerable Adults and meet any
requirements of CRB checks.
3.4.2 Student Staff, Mentors and Aimhigher Ambassadors
The following must be carried out in the recruitment and appointment of Student Staff, Mentors
and Aimhigher Ambassadors:
      Define the role at the point of recruitment including a written job description and a person
        specification and identify if a CRB check is required;
      Written applications must be submitted, to include previous work and referees;
      On appointment a written Code of Conduct must be signed, agreeing to the University Policy for
       Protection of Under 18‟s and Vulnerable Adults and the Safeguarding Children Procedures for
       Widening Participation Outreach and Student Recruitment Activity and any other requirements
       necessary for the project;
      All applicants must be interviewed and references followed up prior to appointment.

 3.5 Staff Training and Information
      All Widening Participation Officers are to attend the Aimhigher Aimsafer Child Protection two day
       training course;
      All Summer School staff, Mentors and Aimhigher Ambassadors are to attend the in-house Child
       Protection Training and complete the Educare Programme;
      In addition to this:
              - All Summer School student staff must attend a full day child protection training session
                   tailored specifically for residential Summer Schools. This will be supported by the
                   Summer School Training and Information Pack;
              - All Student Mentors must attend a full day child protection training session tailored
                   specifically for Student Mentoring Schemes. This will be supported by the Mentor
                   Training and Information pack;
              - All Aimhigher Ambassadors taking tours on campus visits are to receive an
                   information/briefing sheet outlining their responsibility, guidance on working with under
                   18‟s and emergency procedures.
       All academic staff involved in the Widening Participation and Student Recruitment organised
         activities will be given a copy of the University Policy for Protection of Under 18‟s and
         Vulnerable Adults and the Safeguarding Children Procedures for Widening Participation
         Outreach and Student Recruitment Activity, prior to the start of the event.

 3.6 Information for Parents and Carers
 The University Policy for Protection of Under 18‟s and Vulnerable Adults and the Safeguarding Children
 Procedures for Widening Participation Outreach and Student Recruitment Activity, Risk Assessments,
 health and safety checklists and health and safety control measures must be accessible for parents/
 carers and school staff, prior to the event.

 3.7 Bullying
 Prior to a residential event, pupils must be asked to sign a code of conduct. The code states that
 bullying and/or discrimination of any sort will not be tolerated. This message must be repeated in the
 induction session of the event and pupils should be given the name of an individual they can go to if
 they have any concerns relating to bullying.

 3.8 Guidance on new technology safety
 Where an event involves pupils‟ use of new technology (such as the internet), guidance should be
 given to pupils by event leaders or staff overseeing the session. Any risks associated with the use of
 new technology must be clearly identified in the risk assessment document for the event, which must
 also detail measures taken to ensure the safety of pupils. Event organisers wishing to take
 photographs or video footage of an event which involves young people must first seek the consent of
 the parent or carer.

                                                    35
    3.9 Disciplinary Procedure
    Any staff disciplinary is to follow the University disciplinary procedures.

    3.10 Confidentiality
    In the event of any disclosure or incident raising concern of Child Abuse, the Child Safeguarding
    Procedures must be followed to ensure appropriate action is taken and that the level of confidentiality
    required, is considered.

4. Action information for all staff including student staff, mentors and Aimhigher Ambassadors
If you:
    Suspect a Child is suffering Abuse
    Receive a Disclose of abuse
    Have concerns about another member of staffs conduct

      You must:
      Stay calm and don't take hasty or inappropriate action;
     Listen to what the child/young person is telling you, and show him/her that you take him/her
      seriously;
     Explain that you cannot promise to keep what the young person tells you a secret; you will have to
      contact other people who can help to stop what's happening;
     Only one set of questions can be asked of the child or young person who is making claims of abuse,
      so leave it to the appropriate agencies. Do not ask any questions; otherwise social services and/or
      the police may not be able to investigate the case;
     Let the young person know that you understand how difficult it must have been for him/her to confide
      in you and reassure him/her, stressing that they are not to blame, but do not offer any opinions or
      solutions to the young person;
     Don't make promises you may not be able to keep;
     After any disclosure, you may feel the need to talk; you may also feel shocked, angry, upset or
      guilty. Remember that the Designated Officers are there to support you;
     You need to be prepared to document the disclosure as accurately as possible.

    Who do I inform?
    You must immediately inform the Designated Officer. They will identify themselves to you at the
    beginning of the project and they are likely to be one of the Widening Participation Officers/Assistants
    or Student Recruitment staff.
    Student Mentors should also inform the School Child Protection Officer (It may be more appropriate for
    them to be first person to inform). Mentors must refer to their Mentor Handbook for this procedure and
    contact details.

    When and how do I inform?
    Immediately, in person

    Who makes the decision regarding further action, including referral to Child Social Care
    Services?
    The Designated Officer who will then consult with the University Lead Designated Officer

    What other responsibilities do I have?
    Any follow up action requested by the Designated Officer, Lead Designated Officer, Social Care, the
    Police or other agencies.




                                                        36
What records must I keep?
At the earliest opportunity you must write an account of the allegation, disclosure, behaviors,
observations or the reasons for suspecting the child abuse on the report form-Appendix C. Include all
details given by the young person. It may be necessary to include a description of injuries, particularly
if sustained during the event. The information must be submitted to the Designated Officer who will
retain the document and liaise with Child Social Care Services, parents/carers and other agencies as
appropriate. Any information recorded will then be retained in secure/confidential files. These records
must be submitted to Child Social Care Services within 48 hours.

What additional guidance should I be aware of?
All staff must have read and familiarised themselves with the University Policy for Protection of Under
18‟s and Vulnerable Adults.

If I suspect any adult working on Widening Participation or Student Recruitment events of
abuse, what should I do?
You must immediately inform the Designated Officer who will refer to the University Lead Designated
Officer or Essex Child Social Care as appropriate.

If I suspect the named Designated Officer of abuse, what should I do?
You must immediately inform the University Personnel Section.

5. Action of the Designated Officers
If concerns on suspicion of abuse are referred to the Designated Officer they must;
      Inform Child Social Care. If the incident has occurred in the University campus this should be
       Essex Child Social Care (Helpline - 01245 434090 or out of hours 01245 434083). If the incident
       has occurred else where the Child Social Care of that area should be informed;
      Inform the University Lead Designated Officer;
      Produce a written report within 48 hours stating information received, advice obtained and action
       taken;
      Enable the member of staff making the report to continue to give attention to the young person;
      Where a young person needs medical attention/treatment this should be obtained;
      In the case of a school supervised event, the school Child Protection Officer must be informed.
       In the event that the school is to deal with the issue a record must still be kept;
  .
The Child Social Care Service area team will be responsible for initiating the investigation and the
future management of the case. The Lead Designated Officer must however ensure the referral has
been received and Child Social Care Services have all the information required.




                                                  37
                                Flowchart Summary of Procedure


                                    INITIAL DISCUSSION
                                        Collect key facts
                               Inform that you have to tell others
                                       Make no promises
                                     Discuss likely process
                                                ↓
                            INFORM DESIGNATED OFFICER
                                             and/or
         Personnel Section (if concern relates to Designated Officer) and school Child
              Protection Officer if on school premises or school arranged activity
                                                ↓
                     CONSULTATION BY DESINGATED OFFICER
                                        Speak to student
            Relevant professional bodies (e.g. Child Social Care Services, NSPCC,
                                             ACPS)
                              University Lead Designated Officer
                                             School
                                   Other Designated Officers
                                          Parent/carer
______________↓___________↓__________↓_____________
        Referral to Child Social       School takes forward         Personnel disciplinary
        Care and, if appropriate,
        the police
              ↑              ↓            ___↑_-- _______↓__________ _↑_______ ↓
 Check Progress               Check Progress                  Check Progress




Throughout process:
    Keep student informed
      Keep those involved informed as appropriate
    Make detailed notes
    Produce a written record from initial discussion within 24 hours
    Respect confidentiality




                                                 38
6. Additional Procedures for all staff including Student Staff, Mentors and Aimhigher
Ambassadors
What to do in an Emergency
     In the event of an emergency, all university emergency procedures must be followed;
     Emergency procedures must be provided to all staff with designated responsibility for
      participants in Widening Participation and Student Recruitment activities;
     All staff must follow the emergency procedures outlined in Summer School information/briefing
      packs and Aimhigher Ambassador briefing sheets.

Accidents
    Any accidents must be reported to the Designated Officer and if required emergency procedures
     must be followed;
    An Accident Report Form must be completed by the Designated Officer and the member of staff
     who has reported/witnessed the accident;
    A copy of the Accident Report Form must be forwarded to the University Safety Office as inline
     with the University‟s procedure. A copy should also be filed with Widening Participation/Student
     Recruitment.

7. More Information
If you have any questions or concerns about the information contained in the Safeguarding Children
Procedures for Widening Participation Outreach and Student Recruitment Activity please contact:

Rachel Earle
Head of Widening Participation and Community Engagement
01206 873979
rearle@essex.ac.uk

Nicola Wood
Widening Participation Officer
01702 328238
nicolaw@essex.ac.uk




                                                39
8. Report Form
This form should include all information on any concern of child abuse

Name of Child


Age


Ethnicity


Facts




Date and Time


Opinion




Additional Information (Please attach additional sheets if required)




Singed ......................................................................................................................................................

Print Name ................................................................................................................................................

Role ...........................................................................................................................................................

Date ...........................................................................................................................................................




                                                                                       40
Appendix D
                                         What is Aimhigher?

Aimhigher is a national programme which aims to widen participation in higher education (HE) by raising
HE awareness, aspirations and attainment along young people from under-represented groups.

The role of Aimhigher is to:

       Raise aspirations and motivation to enter HE among young people from under-represented
        groups
       Raise attainment of potential students from under-represented groups so that they gain the
        academic or vocational qualifications that will enable them to enter HE
       Strengthen progression routes into HE via vocational courses
       Offer information, advice and guidance to potential students and their teachers and families

Jointly funded by the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) and the Department for
Innovation, Universities and Skills (DIUS), the Aimhigher programme operates across 44 area
partnerships throughout England, of which Essex is one.

Aimhigher encompasses a wide range of activities to engage and motivate learners who have the
potential to enter HE but may be under-achieving, undecided or lacking in confidence. The programme
particularly focuses on young people from lower socio-economic groups (NS-SEC groups 4-8) and those
from disadvantaged backgrounds who live in areas of relative deprivation where participation in HE is
low. Visit the Targeting section for further information.

Most Aimhigher activities are developed and delivered at an area level, which allows them to be tailored
to the needs of specific communities. The following activities represent the core programme offering and
take place in all areas of the country:

       Campus visits
       Mentoring
       Master classes, including subject enrichment or revision sessions
       Student Ambassadors
       Information, advice and guidance (IAG)
       Summer schools and HE-related residential experiences
       School or college based interventions

Activities delivered at an area level are supported by national Aimhigher activity:

       The Aimhigher Roadshow, the largest of its kind in Europe, tours schools and colleges across
        the country and encourages young people to consider the benefits of higher education and the
        different options available. Visit Roadshow for further information.
       IAG available online at www.direct.gov.uk/uni
       A range of HE information booklets, available from Communications.

From September 2009, the Aimhigher programme will be expanded to include a new national strand.
Aimhigher Associates is a £21 million mentoring scheme which will see around 5,500 university students
recruited to provide long-term individual and face-to-face support to more than 21,000 pupils in schools
and colleges across the country. An initial pathfinder phase began in September 2008 and involves 21
area partnerships. For further information, visit Aimhigher Associates.

The national Aimhigher programme began on 1 August 2004 as a result of the integration of two
previously existing programmes - Excellence Challenge and Aimhigher: Partnerships for Progression.
Funding is currently allocated to Aimhigher until 2011.




                                                    41
Appendix E
                                               Arts on 5
Office located in Room 5.000
Entrance 4NW next to the Campus Shop.

Arts on 5
Arts on 5 is the brand name for the two arts venues on Square 5. These are the Lakeside Theatre and
Art Exchange.

Arts on 5 also maintain UECLAA (pronounced weck-lah) which is the University of Essex Latin American
Art Collection- the largest public collection of Latin American art in Europe. UECLAA is expected to
expand over the next two years and today some pieces from the collection can be viewed in the Albert
Sloman library.

Lakeside Theatre – 5 key points

       The Lakeside Theatre was built in the 1970s and had a major refurbishment in 2009.

       The University raised funds of more than £800‟000 for the project which built the
        box office-café; improved disabled access with a lift to all floors, and refurbished the whole
        venue.

       The theatre programmes a huge range of performances .You can see anything here from classic
        theatre to stand-up comedy, from dance to live jazz and world music gigs, and weekly film
        screenings on the huge cinema screen.

       The best news is the average price of a Lakeside Theatre ticket for students is just £4.

       The theatre is also committed to producing new theatre made by students and works with the
        Theatre Arts Society - if you have a burning desire to make theatre, you can get involved by
        joining TAS at the SU.

University Gallery – 5 key points
       Art Exchange was launched in Freshers Week 2010 and is the new name for the University
        Gallery, which was built in the early 1980s.

       The new name was chosen because it promotes the gallery‟s main aim – to show that
        contemporary Art is a vibrant and dynamic exchange between artists and audiences.

       Art Exchange curates two major exhibitions per term.

       Despite being quite a small space, in the past two years it has exhibited work from some of the
        biggest names in British contemporary art.

       Student work also features in its programmes. In the summer term, students from the MA Galley
        Studies course curate their own exhibition.

       Admission is always free to the exhibitions

The website for all Arts on 5 events is www.essex.ac.uk/artson5


Steve Goatman
Arts Marketing and Communications Coordinator
Arts on 5
University of Essex




                                                      42
Appendix F

                          Student Support - Removing the Barriers
The University recognises that the environment, services and facilities may themselves be “enabling” or
“disabling” and therefore aims to continue to develop a more “enabling” environment and a non-
discriminatory culture in the University community.

Defining Disability
A disabled person is defined in the Equality Act 2010 (The Act) as someone with a physical or mental
impairment which has a substantial and long-term adverse impact on their ability to carry out normal
day-to-day activities.

The Guidance from the Equality and Human Rights Commission confirms this includes:

       „Conditions that affect the body such as arthritis, hearing or sight impairment (unless this is
        correctable by glasses or contact lenses), diabetes, asthma, epilepsy, conditions such as HIV
        infection, cancer and multiple sclerosis, as well as loss of limbs or the use of limbs are covered.

       HIV infection, cancer and multiple sclerosis are covered from the point of diagnosis.

       Severe disfigurement (such as scarring) is covered even if it has no physical impact on the
        person with the disfigurement, provided the long-term requirement is met ....

       People who are registered as blind or partially sighted, or who are certified as being blind or
        partially sighted by a consultant ophthalmologist, are automatically treated as disabled under the
        Act.

       Mental impairment includes conditions such as dyslexia and autism as well as learning
        disabilities such as Down‟s syndrome and mental health conditions such as depression and
        schizophrenia. „

The Social Model of Disability
The Social Model of Disability has been used by disabled people when campaigning for civil rights and
antidiscrimination legislation for 30 years. The Equality and Human Rights Commission confirms „A
Social Model approach states that people with impairments are disabled by physical and social barriers.
The ‘problem’ of disability results from social structures and attitudes, rather than from a person’s
impairment or medical condition. This approach has influenced a rights-based view of equality for
disabled people and represents the key to understanding and implementing the Disability Equality Duty,
the aim of which is to understand and dismantle the barriers which exclude and limit the life chances of
disabled people.‟
Removing the Barriers
The disabled person is usually the best person to start with when you are trying to establish what their
needs are and what possible solutions exist. The important starting point is not really what the
individual's impairment is (nor its cause), but what that person needs.

       people with similar impairments do not necessarily have similar needs.
       Do not make assumptions about the presence or absence of impairment; some people have
        hidden disabilities such as epilepsy or asthma.
       Mind your language
       Respect the person as an individual, find out about them and their requirements. Please do
        not ask “what is your disability?” or “what‟s wrong with you?” but do ask “what would you like
        me to do?” “can I assist you?




                                                    43
Blind/partially sighted
    •   Different eye conditions create different problems.
    •   Very few blind people see nothing at all.
    •   A minority can distinguish light but nothing else.
    •   Some have no central vision; others no side vision.
    •   Some see everything as a vague blur;
    •   others see a patchwork of blanks and defined areas.
    •   Some people with impaired vision can see enough to read this but they may have difficulty
        crossing the road.

Removing the barriers
   • Say the person’s name and introduce yourself A person with a sight impairment may not be
      aware you are talking to them. It is always a good idea to say their name when you are talking
      or saying something to them.
   • If a person requires guidance, ask their preferred method. It is usual to offer your elbow and
      they should take up a position slightly behind you. Take care through doors, it is a good idea to
      describe where you are, what obstacles are coming up and give an idea of distances.
   • Ask if they use stairs or a lift
   • Offer a seat by placing your arm on the chair and letting them run their hand down to the chair.
   • If they have a guide dog you should not distract the dog from its work by patting or stroking it.
      Remember to talk to the owner first and check they are happy for to make friends with the dog if
      you want to.

Hearing impairment
       People may use lip-reading, sign language, a hearing aid or a mixture of all these to aid
        communication.
       Most deaf and hard of hearing people use lip-reading to some extent
       The best lip readers understand 60% of a conversation
    •   For many people profoundly deaf from birth sign language will be their first language.
    •   Hearing aids do not fully compensate for hearing loss. All sounds are equally amplified,
        including background noise.
    •   People who wear a hearing aid may also use a radio aid this acts like a mini loop system. You
        may be asked to wear an additional microphone which transmits directly to their receiver.

Removing the barriers
   • You may need to gain the person’s attention when you wish to speak to them, usually
      however they will be watching carefully. If you can‟t get their attention by gesturing or looking at
      them you may need to touch them gently and briefly.
   • Don’t shout but speak clearly and a bit slower.
   • Don’t cover your mouth whilst speaking or turn away.
   • Look directly at the person; make sure your face isn‟t in the shadow or direct sunlight.
   • In group situations you can assist by repeating questions when answering and facing the
      person with the hearing impairment. You can assist in seating arrangements which make it
      easier for the hearing impaired person to see all the people who may be speaking.
   • If the person uses a sign language interpreter still face the person and talk to them. Allow
      time for the interpreter to translate and for responses to be given and translated too.
   • Writing things down is always useful.




                                                    44
Physical impairment
    •   Some people will have a physical impairment which will make it difficult for them to access stairs
        or to sit for long periods.
    •   Some people may use a wheelchair some of the time, all of the time or never.
    •   or they may use sticks or walking aids, some may prefer to stand than sit.
    •   Some people may use wheelchairs independently, others may need assistance with daily living,
        taking notes or accessing the library.
    •   Other people may also have difficulty with manual dexterity including using a pen

Removing the barriers
   • Make sure you know the wheelchair accessible routes if you are conducting a tour.
   http://www2.essex.ac.uk/stdsup/disab/access.shtm

    See the link below for a „step free‟ Colchester Campus Access Map.
    http://www.essex.ac.uk/access/colchester_access_map.pdf

    •   It‟s ok to offer to carry bags, open doors etc
    •   Go at the pace of the person with mobility difficulties
        - ask if they would like to take a rest if walking some distance,
        - give an indication about how far away something is.
        - If necessary ask them to wait while you check out a route and come back to them.
    •   Never grab, lean on, or push a wheelchair without the user‟s permission. It is ok to ask if the
        person would like assistance, sometimes they will, sometimes they won‟t.
    •   Try to place yourself at the same eye level as them. E.g. draw up a chair – come to the front of
        high counters

Mental health difficulties
    •   At some point in life 1 in 4 people will experience a mental health difficulty.
    •   There is still a stigma attached to mental health difficulties and many people choose not to
        declare them. A lot of people experience periods of stress and depression. Some people have
        behavioural difficulties, extreme phobias, delusions etc.
    •   Medication can make people drowsy and cause them difficulty in concentrating.

Long term medical conditions
    •   Many conditions will not be visible.
    •   Long term medical condition which has an effect on their lives. This could include CFS/ME, HIV,
        cancer and cystic fibrosis amongst other conditions. Fatigue and stamina difficulties
    •   Epilepsy
    •   Diabetes
    •   Asthma

Specific Learning Difficulities (SpLD)
Dyslexia is not related to intelligence. Dyslexia can be displayed in the following ways:
   • spelling errors
   • grammar and syntax errors
   • difficulties with essay structure
   • slow reading speed
   • difficulty remembering the sense of what has been read
   • difficulty understanding and remembering sequences
   • problems with time management and poor organisational skills
   • poor short term memory
   • spatial orientation (eg with maps/plans)
   • possibly poor handwriting

Dyscalculia - a condition that affects the ability to acquire arithmetical skills:
   • may have difficulty understanding simple number concepts
   • lack an intuitive grasp of numbers
   • problems learning number facts and procedures.




                                                      45
Dyspraxia - Developmental Dyspraxia is an impairment of the organisation of movement.
    • usually accompanied by problems with perception, thought and memory
    • Gross motor problems including difficulties with sport (especially team games) dancing and
       balance.
    • Fine motor problems including difficulties with handwriting, key-board skills, driving, craft and
       practical work.
    • Perception problems including sensitivity to noise and touch, and difficulties with judging time,
       space, shapes and distance.
    • Maths/number problems including number difficulties especially with geometry.
    • Memory and attention problems.
    • Organisation problems. They will mislay things and find it difficult to keep all their materials in
       order.
    • They may find listening hard, especially in large groups.
    • They tend to take things literally and find it hard to pick up non verbal messages.
    • They will often interrupt.
    • Oral problems people with specific learning difficulties often find it difficult to pronounce words,
       especially new long words.
Further information available from

The Disability Team
Student Support
Email: disab@essex.ac.uk
Telephone: (01206) 872365
Webpage: http://www2.essex.ac.uk/stdsup/disab/home.shtm




                                                    46

				
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