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					                            The University of Adelaide
Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design




                                   Student Handbook 2011




            Welcome to the School of Architecture, Landscape
            Architecture and Urban Design

            This student handbook is essential reading for students
            undertaking courses in the School. Students are assumed to
            have read the handbook and to be aware of the Policies and
            Procedures it describes.

            Students are advised to read carefully the conditions for entry to
            the Master of Architecture, Master of Landscape Architecture,
            Master of Architecture/Master of Landscape Architecture, Master
            of Planning, Master of Planning (Urban Design) and Master of
            Planning (Urban Design)/Master of Landscape Architecture
            programs - this information is important.

            Any alterations or additions to the Handbook during the year will
            be updated on the School‘s website
            www.architecture.adelaide.edu.au
                            Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011
________________________________________________________________________________




Contents
               Section


        1      The environment, safety and facilities


        2      Where to find information


        3      How the School works


        4      The Design Students‘ Association


        5      The School‘s Degrees


        6      Attendance, submissions, supplementaries, grading...


        7      Leave of Absence Policy and Exclusion Procedures


        8      Occupational Health and Safety, accidents, injuries...


        9      Plagiarism and other people‘s work


       10      Student e-mail


       11      Studio and computing facilities, after-hours access...


       12      What students need


       13      Language Protocols for working with Aboriginal
               Peoples and Organisations


       14      Staff in the School of Architecture, Landscape
               Architecture and Urban Design
                                    Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011    page 1
________________________________________________________________________________

                               The School Office on Level 4 of the Architecture Building opens:

                                              Monday to Thursday: 9.00 am - 5.00 pm
                                              Friday:             9.00 am - 12.00pm

Acting Head of School                     Dr Sam Ridgway
                                          Available by appointment through Mrs Nicole Bailey

Personal Assistant                       Mrs Nicole Bailey (Room 474)

School Manager                            Mrs Velice Wennan (Room 475)

Student Adviser                           Mr Clement Low (Room 478)

M.Arch. Program Coordinator               Professor Ian McDougall (Room 471)
                                          Dr Sam Ridgway (Room 473)

M.L.Arch. Program Coordinator Ms Tanya Court (Room 465)

M.Plan Program Coordinator                Professor Antony Radford (sem I) (Room 471)
                                           (sem 2) (TBC)

MDM Program Coordinator                   Dr Dean Bruton (Level 3, Room 3015)

Design Studies Program Coordinator Ms Tanya Court (Room 465)

Design Studies Grad.Dip. Coordinator TBC

International Student Adviser             Mr Josh McCarthy (Room 463)

All Program Coordinators and Student Adviser are available for appointment through the School Office.

Enquiries:
Undergraduate and Postgraduate Coursework Students                    Mr Clement Low (Student Adviser, Room 478)

Postgraduate Research Students                    Mrs Nicole Bailey (Room 474)

Abbreviations:
BDesSt:                           Bachelor of Design Studies
MArch:                            Master of Architecture
MLArch:                           Master of Landscape Architecture
MArch/MLArch:                     Master of Architecture/Master of Landscape Architecture
GradDipDesSt:                     Graduate Diploma in Design Studies
GradDipDesSt (Land):              Graduate Diploma in Design Studies (Landscape)
MDDM                              Master of Design in Digital Media
MPlanning                         Master of Planning
MPlanning (UD)                    Master of Planning (Urban Design)
MPMLA                             Master of Planning (Urban Design)/Master of Landscape Architecture
____________________________________________________


The University of Adelaide
School of Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design
North Terrace
ADELAIDE SA 5005
AUSTRALIA
telephone             (08) 8303 5836
fax                   (08) 8303 4377
Internet              www.architecture.adelaide.edu.au
Email                 architecture.enquiries@adelaide.edu.au
                     Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 2
________________________________________________________________________________



1 The environment and ...
                           As people with a particular concern for design and quality in our
                           surroundings, and a high degree of awareness of the natural and built
                           environments, students and staff try to keep our building and our
                           equipment in good condition. Please help us to do so. If graffiti does
                           appear we have it removed as soon as possible (repainting is expensive
                           and uses the School‘s very limited funds that would otherwise be spent on
                           teaching and facilities). If you accidentally damage something, or if you
                           notice damage or graffiti by others, please tell Ms Alison Bosnakis or Ms
                           Melissa Wilson in the School Office off the Common Room on Level 4.

     mobile phones         Mobile phones must be turned off at all times during lectures,
                           tutorials, and studio sessions.

              laptops      Use of laptops to access on-line chatrooms, etc during lectures,
                           tutorials and studio sessions is prohibited.


                           safety
                           All staff and students have a duty of care to ensure a safe and healthy
                           environment.

                           The University of Adelaide is committed to safeguarding the health and
                           safety of its employees and students. Rules laid down by the Manager of
                           the University Health and Safety Unit must be obeyed. In particular the
                           rules prohibit decoration with flammable material, extension of electrical
                           circuits with double adaptors or non-approved power boards, and the
                           restriction of passageways to fire exits. If you are in an area when there
                           is a fire alarm or evacuation warning you must leave the building
                           immediately.

                           Health and safety requirements also apply during field excursions and
                           trips. Staff will outline all special requirements prior to such trips (see
                           Section 8).

  School safety officer    If an accident or near-miss occurs you should notify the School Office staff
                           or the Acting Head of School.

       electrical safety   The School has a strict policy regarding electrical safety that is reviewed
                           regularly by the Faculty Health and Safety Committee. Only authorised
                           persons shall undertake electrical installation. All electrical appliances
                           that are used have to comply with current Australian Standards and be
                           tested and tagged by the School‘s contract electricians. However, the use
                           of electric power tools in the School by students is banned. Only power
                           boards approved by the School's Safety Officer, and securely mounted
                           clear of the floor, may be used. Double adaptors CANNOT be used under
                           any circumstances.

                           The School has installed a hot water boiling unit in the Kitchen on Level 5
                           of the Architecture Building and has donated a microwave oven to the
                           Design Students‘ Association. Electric jugs, kettles, and water heaters,
                           toasters, griller-ovens, etc. are NOT to be used. Any such appliances will
                           be immediately confiscated. Any questions regarding electrical work and
                           appliances should be directed to the Acting Head of School through Mrs
                           Nicole Bailey, Room 474.
                       Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 3
 ________________________________________________________________________________


                            The office of the University‘s security staff is to be found along the
          Security Office   western side of the Wills Building. The office is open 24 hours a day for
                            emergencies. The general telephone number is (830) 35990. The number
                            for emergencies only (security, fire, medical, chemical) is (830) 35444.

     after-hours security   The University‘s Security Service provides both walking escorts and
                            safety shuttle escorts to nearby residences, public transportation or
                            parking facilities during the evening hours. Escort boundaries generally
                            fall within 2.5 km from the Campus, however escorts beyond these limits
                            may be provided in special circumstances at the discretion of either the
                            senior ―on duty‖ Security Officer or by prior arrangement with the
                            Manager, Security Services. Further information is available on website
                            http://www.adelaide.edu.au/security/students/escort.html or phone
                            8303 5990.

CAAD studio telephone –     A telephone for incoming and internal calls only (8303 5876) is located in
                            the CAAD Studio on Level 5, Architecture Building to enable family and
        after-hours only    friends to contact students who are working after-hours in the School.


                            Facilities
     the Common Room        The Common Room on Level 4 is a meeting/common room; staff have
                            precedence in its use, but it is available also to students. It is generally
                            not to be used for teaching purposes.

      the Meeting Room      The Meeting Room off the Common Room is available for staff and other
                            meetings. In general it should not be used for classes except in special
                            circumstances.

                 printing   The School has a printer and plotter in the Student Work Room near the
                            CAAD Studio on Level 5, Architecture Building. Students are not to use
                            the printer in the Photocopy Room of the School Office on Level 4.

                            The Plotter Printer

                            The school has a plotter which is essentially an A0 inkjet printer. The
                            school's plotter is selected in the printer list as "ArchPLOT-Plaza-508-HP-
                            DesignJet-T1120". It is used for large format printing ( ie NOT A4 or A3
                            paper sizes). Although several standard sizes are listed, any non
                            standard size from a postage stamp to an AO with its margins altered will
                            cost the same and is the maximum amount.

                            Please refer to http://www.adelaide.edu.au/cats/printing/charge-use/ for
                            printing costs.

                            The plotter cannot do rolls or banners. Large jobs can take several hours
                            and thus delay your peers from printing. Students can ring the Service
                            desk on extension 33000 to have such jobs deleted even if it is not their
                            own print out. In Photoshop only print flattened images (images with only
                            a background layer) as the difference in time to print is dramatic. It can go
                            down from a couple of hours to 20 minutes for large jobs.
                     Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 4
________________________________________________________________________________



2 Where to find information
                           people for advice
     the Acting Head of    To see the Acting Head of School, Dr Sam Ridgway, appointments must be
                           made through Mrs Nicole Bailey (Room 474)
                School
       Student Adviser     The Student Adviser, Mr Clement Low, is located in Room 478 linked to the
                           School Office.    Questions which might need ‗legal‘ answers (those
                           determined by General and Academic Program Rules) or which entail
                           enrolment or changes of enrolment, ‗status‘ (credit for studies completed
                           previously), program changes and pre-requisites are characteristic
                           questions to take to the Student Adviser. In certain cases involving
                           academic matters, students will be referred by the Student Adviser to an
                           academic staff member for additional advice.

       the International   In addition to the Student Adviser, the School appoints one member of the
                           academic staff to be International Student Adviser — while still having full
       Student Adviser     teaching and research duties. In 2011 the International Student Adviser is
                           Mr Josh McCarthy who will undertake this role to facilitate the smooth
                           transition and integration of international students into the School.

 the Graduate Diploma      The School also appoints a Program Coordinator for students undertaking
                           the one-year Design Studies Graduate Diploma bridging programs. In 2011
         Co-ordinator      the Program Coordinator is to be confirmed.

   Course Co-ordinator     Questions and suggestions about particular courses should always be
                           addressed to the Course Co-ordinator; this will avoid your being given
                           contradictory information by different Lecturers and Tutors. In courses
                           where several Lecturers are involved, queries should be directed first to the
                           Course Co-ordinator.

 the Equal Opportunity     The University has a commitment to equal opportunity and to maintaining a
                           teaching and working environment free of any form of discrimination (on the
             Officer &     basis of race, age, gender, disability etc.), or any form of sexual
   Sexual Harassment       harassment. The School Manager, Mrs Velice Wennan, will provide
                           information about who you can see regarding problems in this area. Any
       Contact Officer     discussions relating to discrimination or sexual harassment will be treated
                           as confidential.




                           places for information
       world wide web      Information about the School, courses, etc., including this Handbook may
                           be found on the School's web-site www.architecture.adelaide.edu.au

     e-mail and internet   All students will be given an e-mail address (see also Section 10: e-mail and
                           internet access). It is your responsibility to check your e-mail regularly to
                 access    receive important notices from the School such as changes to teaching
                           arrangements, timetables, student information sessions, availability of
                           computing facilities, enrolments, exhibitions, etc.
                      Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 5
________________________________________________________________________________

     the student notice     Notice boards on Levels 4 and 5 of the Architecture Building are used for
                            general notices.
               boards

     course ‘handouts’      In each course, ‗handouts‘ supplement the University Undergraduate and
                            Postgraduate Calendars which provide course descriptions, giving more
                            detailed information about assessment, lecture, tutorial and seminar
                            content, practical classes (laboratory, workshop, studio, fieldwork),
                            reference lists and so on. In most cases this information will be on the
                            MyUni course site (see below). You are responsible for ensuring you read
                            all relevant handouts; if you miss information handed out in a lecture or
                            tutorial, borrow a copy from a fellow student and make your own copy.
                            For each student handout that is distributed during class, only the
                            appropriate number of copies will be made.

        on-line learning    MyUni is the entry point to online learning at the University of Adelaide and
                            provides students and staff with access to course materials, discussion
        through MyUni       forums, announcements, online assessment and many other features to
                            help manage your study or learning. All detailed information and
                            documentation regarding this service are at
                            https://myuni.adelaide.edu.au/webapps/login/

      Access Adelaide       www.access.adelaide.edu.au
                            Access Adelaide is the name of the web-based on-line service that allows
                            you to access, and in some cases, amend your records. You can log on to
                            Access Adelaide from the University computer pools or from your home
                            computer and:
                                 search the course catalogue
                                 find out information about specific classes
                                 complete or amend your enrolment
                                 view your unofficial academic transcript, including your examination
                                    results
                                 view your exam schedule
                                 view information about fees and charges on your student account
                                 update your address and telephone details
                                 apply to graduate
                                 change your password

 University Calendar of     The University Calendar for Undergraduate and Postgraduate Programs
                            contains the General Program Rules, Academic Program Rules, and
programs and courses        Syllabuses of all courses. The University Calendar is available on the
                            University‘s website www.adelaide.edu.au/calendar/


transition to University:   Apart from the University Calendar and School Handbook it is
                            recommended that students who are enrolling for the first time look at the
   – support programs       website: www.adelaide.edu.au/smoothstart/ which provides information
                            about the University‘s ―SmoothStart‖ Program designed to help First Year
                            students have an easier and more enjoyable transition to University life.
       student services     The Student Centre, located at Level 4 of the Wills Building, has a website
                            at www.adelaide.edu.au/student/current/ which provides helpful information
                            relating to student services such as the University‘s on-campus Health
                            Provider and the University Counselling Centre, and other general
                            information including the procedures for appeals and complaints. The
                            University also has a Disability Services office, located on the ground floor
                            of the Horace Lamb Building and provides a range of services to students
                            with temporary or ongoing disabilities or medical conditions. Disability
                            Services can be contacted on 8303 5962.

      Design Students       The School is fortunate to have an active Design Students' Association (see
                            Section 4).
          Association
                    Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 6
________________________________________________________________________________

      the School Office   When the sources described above fail to answer your questions, ask the
                          School staff, Ms Alison Bosnakis or Ms Melissa Wilson in the School Office
                          on Level 4. They will either answer your question or refer you to someone
                          else who can.
                    Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 7
________________________________________________________________________________



3 How the School works
             the School   The School of Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design is
                          part of an Administrative Division known as the Faculty of the Professions
                          comprising the Law School, School of Architecture, Landscape
                          Architecture and Urban Design, Business School, School of Economics,
                          and School of Education. The Executive Dean of the Faculty is Professor
                          Pascale Quester.

                          The Acting Head of School represent‘s the School within the Faculty of the
                          Professions and on the higher policy-making committees of the University,
                          and is responsible for the disbursement of the funds allocated to the
                          School. The Acting Head of School of Architecture, Landscape
                          Architecture and Urban Design is Dr Sam Ridgway.

             the School   The School Board acts as an advisory committee to the Acting Head of
                          School on matters related to the day to day operations of the School. It
                  Board   meets about four times per year and comprises all teaching staff in the
                          School, some administrative staff, one student representative from each of
                          the undergraduate degree, the Masters by coursework programs and the
                          Postgraduate by Research programs.

           the School’s   The School‘s Professional Advisory Board acts as an advisory committee
                          to the Acting Head of School and/or the School Board on matters of policy
  Professional Advisory   and strategic planning and comprises the Executive Dean of the Faculty of
                 Board    the Professions, Acting Head of School, School Manager, Academic staff
                          of the School, student representatives and outside members representing
                          related professions, industries or institutions. (If in doubt about who are the
                          student representatives on the School Board and Professional Advisory
                          Board, enquire at the School Office.)

 the Academic Program     There is an Academic Program Committee for UG and PG Coursework
                          programs. This Committee is responsible to the Faculty Curriculum
           Committee      Committee and has delegated responsibility for the development of
                          policies in respect of individual programs for the approval of Faculty, and
                          the implementation of University and Faculty policies.

                          It meets regularly to deal with student matters. Students should refer
                          specific and general issues relating to their studies to the Program
                          Committee through the Acting Head of School or their student
                          representative.

         the Program      The Program Coordinators for 2011 are:
                          Design Studies :         Ms Tanya Court
        Coordinators      Architecture:            Professor Ian McDougall
                                                   Dr Sam Ridgway
                          Planning:                Professor Tony Radford
                          Landscape Architecture : Ms Tanya Court
                          Digital Media :          Dr Dean Bruton

      equal opportunity   The University‘s policy on equal opportunity applies to all members of the
                          student body, and the academic and administrative staff (including casual
                          or visiting Lecturers and Tutors). The policy covers such matters as
                          discrimination on the grounds of race, gender, disability, ethnic
                          background, language, age, sexual harassment, and sexist language
                          (such as the ‗generic‘ use of the words man, Man or he/his taken to ‗also
                          imply the female‘).
                    Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 8
________________________________________________________________________________

                         The University‘s policy on non-sexist and generally non-discriminatory
                         language is set out in its pamphlets Sexism in Education and Guidelines
                         for Non-Discriminatory Language Use. In the case of unacceptable sexist
                         language or behaviour, whether or not inadvertent, for instance in lectures
                         or ‗crit.‘ sessions, if students are hesitant to challenge the person
                         concerned, they should bring the matter to the attention of the Acting Head
                         of School.

       student conduct   The University‘s ―Policy and Rules for Student Conduct‖ is on the website
                         http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/33.Students studying on-campus and
                         participating in site visits and field trips are expected to conduct
                         themselves in an acceptable manner that provides a safe and supportive
                         environment.

       mentor schemes    The School promotes the Australian Institute of Architects Mentor Scheme
                         'project ARCH' as well as the Australian Institute of Landscape Architects
                         Mentor Scheme where students are linked up with practicing architects
                         and landscape architects. More information about these schemes will be
                         available early in Semester 1. All students are encouraged to participate in
                         these worthwhile schemes.
                    Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 9
________________________________________________________________________________



4 The Design Students’ Association (DSA)
             the DSA     The School is fortunate to have an active Design Students‘ Association
                         (DSA). The DSA actively pursues the interests of the students of the
                         School and forms the basis of the student social organisation.


            what it is   The Design Students Association of the University of Adelaide
                         Incorporated (DSA) is a student-operated and managed organisation that
                         assists the interests of students within the School, through the provision of
                         many critical student-centred amenities and services that supplement
                         those offered by the School. Open to all students of the School,
                         membership is at a cost of less than $10 per year. The focus of the DSA is
                         to be flexible to the aspirations of students, to respond to concerns or
                         hopes of the student body and to foster active student participation
                         throughout the School, from both a study perspective and to further form a
                         complete and broad university experience. The DSA remains in close
                         contact with students who act as representatives on the School Board, and
                         remains independent to representation to the School and the University.


             who it is   Under its Constitution the DSA is managed by an executive committee
                         comprised of a number of officers that manage the associations financial
                         system, architecture library, product library and ITS and promotional work,
                         assisted by year-level representatives, elected in Semester 1.

           where it is   The DSA office is located on Level 5 of the Architecture Building.

         what it does    The DSA manages an Architectural library, product library and associated
                         magazines and fosters greater social involvement within the School
                         through organised events throughout the year.

         DSA library     Open Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays between 10am -
                         1pm, the DSA manages its own architectural source and reference library
                         (with items available for loan). Architecturally relevant Australian standards
                         can also be found in hard-copy version to supplement the electronic
                         resource provided by the Barr Smith Library.

              lockers    The DSA manages the distribution and allocation of lockers each year,
                         ensuring the fairest possible results for all students. The cost of locker hire
                         is $30 per year, and these are distributed in Semester 1.

       DSA activities
       social events     Numerous and varying social nights occur throughout the year, with the
                         DSA‘s endeavour to provide at least two per Semester. These vary
                         according to input of current students, but in previous years have included:
                         barbeques, pub nights, soccer afternoons, film events and quiz nights.
                         These social activities are a means towards ‗community building‘ across all
                         year levels in the School.

          exhibitions    The DSA provides sponsorship to, and helps mount student exhibitions
                         within the School, culminating in assistance that helps run the final year
                         student exhibition which is generally held off-campus.

        professional     The DSA is in continual liaison with several professional organisations
                         throughout the country, such as the Australian Institute of Architects (AIA),
        connections      Australian Institute of Landscape Architects (AILA) and the Architecture
                         Foundation (SA).
                   Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 10
________________________________________________________________________________

     other students’    The DSA acts as a point of contact for SONA, the national architecture
                        students association, and maintains strong links with similar student
       associations     organisations both within Adelaide and Australia generally.

           the Future   The DSA operates upon the footing of a founding constitution that fosters
                        the continual reinterpretation of the business and development plans that
                        the elected student members derive from year to year, with the continual
                        aim of maximising student experience and enjoyment throughout their
                        period within the School. The aim of these plans is to provide continual
                        development to relevant and useful facilities, functions and services without
                        compromising the integrity of the Association through means of efficiency
                        or finance.

             joining?   Membership of the DSA costs less than $10 a year. Why should we sell
                        ourselves more than once? One shouldn‘t need to read this more than
                        once for motivation to join!
                    Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 11
________________________________________________________________________________



5 The School’s Degrees
            the School:   The School of Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design at
                          the University of Adelaide is the combination of the people who work under
        its philosophy    its title, both staff and students (undergraduate, postgraduate coursework
          and teaching    and research). When you enrol in one of the School‘s degrees or Graduate
                          Diplomas you become a part of the School and can participate in its
                          activities and decision-making.

                          The aims and content of the School‘s activities reflect our broad definition of
                          Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design as disciplines
                          encompassing the natural and built environment and their relationship to
                          people (individuals and groups), material and non-material culture, systems
                          and processes, and the bio-physical (‗natural‘) environment.

                          The University of Adelaide has a published statement of its mission. Within
                          the University's mission, the aim of the School of Architecture, Landscape
                          Architecture and Urban Design is to critically and creatively engage the
                          theory and practice of architecture, landscape architecture and urban design
                          as modes of intellectual activity in their own right, as vehicles for the
                          interpretation and evaluation of the meanings and effects of the natural and
                          built environment, and as both education in and preparation for their ethical
                          design, realisation and management.

                          Our purpose is to address the craft, technologies, theory, profession and
                          ethics of architecture, landscape architecture and urban design as defined
                          in the wide sense implied above. In doing this we aim to improve the
                          knowledge and understanding of those who experience architecture,
                          landscape architecture and urban design, as well as those who create and
                          manage it.

                          By informing present and future designers, critics, clients, users,
                          developers, regulators, politicians and others, we aim to improve the quality
                          of architecture, landscape architecture and urban design. But the way we
                          approach the task — by combining critical and creative skills — is as
                          important as our field of work. Our second purpose is to develop a mode of
                          intellectual activity that has value not only in architecture, landscape
                          architecture and urban design, but also in many other fields.

                          The education offered here is distinctive and challenging. Its central
                          characteristics are that it:
                          • strongly couples critical thought and creative action;
                          • addresses a wide student body; and
                          • founds professional training on a student‘s pre-existing capabilities and
                             maturity in the coupling of critical thought with creative action.

                          The first characteristic is the most important. The most notable quality of
                          graduates from our degrees should be their capacity to link critical analysis,
                          interpretation and understanding with the making of creative decisions and
                          proposals for action, a combination of skills that distinguishes those who
                          take leading positions not only in architecture, landscape architecture and
                          urban design but also in other professions and the business world. Much of
                          the School‘s teaching involves project-oriented assignments requiring a
                          significant level of student initiative, and integrating the content and
                          approach of a number of disciplines or fields in a holistic fashion simulating
                          the ‗real world‘ of design.
                   Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 12
________________________________________________________________________________

                        The second characteristic reflects several concerns:
                        • the need for a specialist yet broad education for those who will work in
                          the field of the natural and built environment;
                        • the need for issues in the natural and built environment to be better
                          understood by society;
                        • the complementary need for many of those who will work in the field of
                          the natural and built environment to have additional skills in a second
                          area, such as anthropology, historiography, computing, languages, law
                          or economics;
                        • the recognition that the intellectual skills and knowledge involved in
                          combining critical thinking with creative activity, cultural sensitivity with
                          problem-solving, are of interest and value in many different fields.

                        The courses of the BDesSt program bring together students from many
                        Schools and Faculties, with benefits to both our own and other students.
                        The opportunities it offers for joint programs of study are unique in Australia.

                        The third characteristic reflects a belief that the professional training of
                        architects and landscape architects can be most intense, exciting and
                        effective with a relatively small group of skilled graduates who have already
                        demonstrated that they can couple critical thought and creative action.

  coursework degrees    Our aim is reflected in our teaching, research and professional consulting,
                        and particularly in the design and structure of the School‘s Bachelor‘s
                        degree: the Bachelor of Design Studies [BDesSt], a first degree, and the
                        Master of Architecture [MArch], Master of Landscape Architecture [MLArch.]
                        and Master of Architecture/Master of Landscape Architecture
                        [MArch/MLArch] double-degree, along with the Master of Planning, Master
                        of Planning (Urban Design) and the double degree of Master of Planning
                        (Urban Design)/Master of Landscape Architecture which are second
                        degrees.

                        The School also offers students enrolled in the Master of Architecture and
                        the Master of Landscape Architecture programs the opportunity to
                        undertake a research-rich pathway in the second year of these programs.
                        Students invited into this research pathway might then have the choice of
                        progressing into a Postgraduate by Research program on successful
                        completion of the Masters coursework program.

     research degrees   The School offers postgraduate research degrees in design studies,
                        architecture, landscape architecture, urban design and building science at
                        Masters and Doctoral levels.

                        A wide range of scholarships is available to suitably qualified applicants
                        wishing to undertake higher degrees. Interested students should see the
                        Personal Assistant to the Acting Head of School, Mrs Nicole Bailey for full
                        details.
                    Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 13
________________________________________________________________________________

  admission to MArch,     Many students in the School complete the Bachelor of Design Studies
                          degree with either a major in Architectural Studies or Landscape Studies or
         MLArch and       Architectural and Landscape Studies, then proceed to the professional
MArch/MLArch double-      architecture program and become architects, or to the professional
                          Landscape Architecture program and become landscape architects or to the
               degree     Architecture/Landscape Architecture double-degree.

                          The professional programs are at the Master‘s level and students who
                          successfully complete the BDesSt (with an Architectural Studies major) or
                          the BDesSt (with a Landscape Studies major) program with an average
                          overall result of 60% or higher standard, are eligible for entry to either the
                          MArch or MLArch program respectively.           Students who successfully
                          complete the BDesSt (with an Architectural and Landscape Studies major)
                          program with an average overall result of 70% or higher standard can apply
                          for entry to the Master of Architecture (Coursework)/Master of Landscape
                          Architecture double-degree program. Selection for the double-degree is on
                          academic merit and quota restrictions will apply.

                          A small number of places in the MArch or MLArch degrees may be available
                          to selected graduates of degrees other than BDesSt. They may be
                          admitted to MArch or MLArch, subject to quota restrictions, after
                          successfully completing a bridging program comprising the Graduate
                          Diploma in Design Studies or Graduate Diploma in Design Studies
                          (Landscape) respectively.

Master of Planning and    The School also offers a Master of Planning and Master of Planning (Urban
                          Design). These are two-year programs that are designed to provide
              Master of   advanced coursework leading to professionally recognised qualifications.
       Planning(Urban     The programs will have a strong foundation in ecological, social and
                          economic sustainability as a basis for planning. They will also emphasise
               Design)    skills in communication and collaboration with local communities and
                          professional groups. Graduates should find employment in government and
                          private practice.

                          Backgrounds in environmental studies, geography, design, law, architecture
                          and landscape architecture are obviously appropriate, but this is a
                          profession that welcomes the contributions of people with a wide variety of
                          knowledge and backgrounds.


    Master of Planning    The School also offers a 3-year double degree Master of Planning (Urban
                          Design)/Master of Landscape Architecture which is available to suitably
(Urban Design)/Master     qualified graduates of the Bachelor of Design Studies (with a Landscape
        of Landscape      major) or equivalent. It is designed to provide professionally recognised
                          qualifications in both planning and landscape architecture.
         Architecture
           alternatives   Many students (including some of the most successful graduates) choose
                          after graduating in BDesSt to pursue career options, other than architecture
                          and landscape architecture, which better complement their individual
                          interests and expertise.


                          The two-degree Masters structure allows students the flexibility to graduate
                          after five years with a respected academic qualification. It also enables
                          those students who find that they lack the necessary aptitude or motivation
                          for practising architecture or landscape architecture to graduate
                          successfully. The structure works well for all students. Because of its
                          breadth of choice, the first degree permits students to find courses for the
                          development of their specific talents and interests, or to discover new
                          opportunities.
                     Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 14
________________________________________________________________________________

     cross-institutional   Due to matters of load management and the project-based nature of
                           teaching in the professional architecture and landscape architecture
           enrolments      degrees, it is not generally possible for students in programs offered by the
                           School of Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design to
                           undertake alternative courses offered by another university, except in the
                           case of an approved overseas exchange or joint teaching program.

   overseas exchange       The School actively promotes and supports students in undertaking part of
                           their program through an approved overseas exchange program.
         programmes        Opportunities for exchange are in Semester 2 of Level II and Semester 1 of
                           Level III of the Bachelor of Design Studies program; and in Semester 2 of
                           Level I of the professional architecture and landscape architecture
                           programs.

                           Details about suitable programs are available from the Exchange/Study
                           Abroad Office and the University website
                           www.adelaide.edu.au/student/study_abroad/

                           All students considering such programs must see the School‘s Student
                           Adviser (Room 478) to discuss their application.

    prizes and awards      The School administers several undergraduate and postgraduates prizes
                           that are awarded annually on academic merit. Details are available on the
                           University website www.architecture.adelaide.edu.au

                           In addition, students in the School may be eligible, from time to time, for the
                           following awards and prizes:
                           AILA National Student Award (bi-annual)
                           Rodney Beames Memorial Award (annual)
                           Hassell Travelling Fellowship in Landscape Architecture (annual)
                           AIA Bates Smart Architecture Award (annual)
                           John Walter Prize (annual)

              honours      For 2011, enquiries about admission to Honours Design Studies should be
                           directed to the Student Advisor, Clement Low.

                           With the introduction in 2008 of the professional Master of Architecture
                           (Coursework) and Master of Landscape Architecture programs, there will no
                           longer be an opportunity for students in those programs to undertake
                           Honours. Eligible students who are interested in proceeding to a research
                           degree after completion of the Master of Architecture or Master of
                           Landscape Architecture can enrol in a research thesis during the final year
                           of these programs.

   ‘bridging’ programs     The School currently offers two postgraduate coursework ‗bridging‘ awards
                           for graduates from other disciplines wishing to undertake either the
                           postgraduate MArch or MLArch degree. The bridging programs are the
                           Graduate Diploma in Design Studies [for entry to MArch] and the Graduate
                           Diploma in Design Studies (Landscape) [for entry to MLArch].
                    Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 15
________________________________________________________________________________



6 Attendance, submissions, assessment,
       supplementaries, etc. ...

            attendance     Attendance at lectures and tutorials, and any Field Trip is compulsory. A
                           Roll is taken at tutorials. A roll may be taken in Lectures and spot quizzes
                           for grades may be performed. Students‘ attendance may be considered in
                           making decisions about eligibility for Academic Supplementary assessment.

                           There are well publicised School policies for registering non-attendance for
                           legitimate reasons, and you are strongly encouraged to formally
                           acknowledge non-attendance reasons as soon as is practicable prior to
                           planned absences/after your non-planned absence. The Medical and
                           Counselling services, as well as the Education and Welfare Office of the
                           University are available to assist you free of charge in this regard for
                           medical or counselling matters.

                           Students are required to attend all scheduled teaching; and lectures,
                           tutorials and other classes will proceed on the assumption that students
                           have done so. Attendance at tutorials, seminars, practical work and studio
                           sessions is taken into account in decisions about offering supplementary
                           assessments and/or examinations. Students who regularly do not attend
                           sessions and do not carry out the associated work may be precluded from
                           and regarded as having failed the course.

                           Individual staff members may amplify these expectations in their written
                           course handouts at the start of each year/semester, and may keep an
                           attendance roll. Some marks for a course may depend on contributions to
                           tutorials/seminars and group work.

                           Students who are repeating a course may seek formal exemption in writing
                           (through the Acting Head of School) from course components already
                           successfully completed, and from teaching the Lecturer or Course
                           Coordinator concerned believes they need not attend.

                           Students should take advantage of the educational opportunities offered by
                           all classes, including the opportunity for interaction, and learning from each
                           other. Compulsory attendance is necessary at all practical work sessions
                           for a number of reasons: to achieve this interaction, in particular in group
                           work; because of the sequential nature of work in some courses; because
                           of the need for students to provide an audience and feedback for other
                           students presenting work; and to ensure the authorship of project work on
                           which assessment is based.

            disabilities   Students who have a disability that may affect their learning outcomes (e.g.
                           mobility impairment, visual impairment, deaf or hearing disability, dyslexia)
                           should contact the School Student Adviser to discuss any special
                           arrangements which may need to be put in place, and to make
                           arrangements to negotiate a learning plan with the Course Coordinator(s)
                           concerned.

          submissions      Courses offered in the School are predominantly assessed by
                           ‗assignments‘ which are carried out in non-contact time and which are ‗due‘
                           at or before a specified time on a specified day. The requirements
                           regarding submission formats, timing, re-submissions, lateness, etc. now
                           follow.

      School Standard      Late submissions of any student work are not allowed and will not be
                           accepted by the School.
     Submission Policy
                    Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 16
________________________________________________________________________________


                                 The following procedures apply to courses offered by the School of
                                 Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design. The procedure for
                                 courses offered by other Faculties, Schools and Departments at the
                                 University of Adelaide will differ and must be followed for those courses.

     assignment cover      (1) Work on A1 or smaller paper.
              sheets            The assessment schedule for the course will specify when (date
                                  and time) and where assignments are due to be submitted.
                                Work must have an attached Assignment Cover Sheet (obtained
                                  from the School Office) and stapled, clipped or bound together,
                                  unless otherwise instructed in writing by the Course Co-ordinator.
                                  The course and student‘s names should also be written on each
                                  sheet of the submission.
                                All work for an assignment must be submitted at the same time.

     submission times All assignments are to be submitted by the students
                           themselves to the designated display space or submitted in the
                           studio/tutorial sessions as outlined in the course handouts.


                           EARLY SUBMISSIONS IN THE
                           ‘SUBMISSIONS BOX’

                           Foyer, Level 4, Architecture Building
                           Submission box cleared daily at 10.00 am


                           Work on A1 or smaller paper may be submitted at any time prior to the due
                           time by placing it in the ‗submissions box‘ in the foyer outside the School
                           Office on Level 4 of the Architecture Building. The submission box is
                           cleared every morning at 10.00 am. The work submitted will be recorded,
                           stamped and given to the Course Co-ordinator.

                           On the date when an assignment is due, the work will need to be submitted
                           at a location specified in the course handout and will not be accepted at the
                           School‘s Front Office. Submissions may be at any time scheduled by the
                           Course Coordinator.

   School policy on late   The School‘s standard policies in relation to LATE submissions, electronic
                           submissions and re-submissions will apply, as will all other policies related
      submissions and      to applications for Supplementary considerations based on Medical,
       re-submissions      Compassionate or Extenuating circumstances. These Applications are
                           made through the School Office.

                           There is the opportunity to RESUBMIT any piece of assignment
                           assessment work for which you received a Fail for consideration for a grade
                           of up to 50% of the original assignment total.

                           You must resubmit the assignment assessment piece along with the
                           original submission within 7 days of receiving the grade from the Course
                           coordinator.
                    Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 17
________________________________________________________________________________

        re-submissions       EXCEPT FOR FINAL ASSIGNMENTS, an assignment that is submitted
                              on time and receives a mark of less than 50%P may be resubmitted,
                              and reassessed. The maximum mark a resubmitted assignment can
                              achieve is 50%P.
                            Work must have an attached Re-Submission Cover Sheet (obtained
                              from the School Office) and stapled, clipped or bound together, unless
                              otherwise instructed in writing by the Course Co-ordinator. The course
                              and student‘s names should also be written on each sheet of the
                              submission.
                            Due to deadlines for final marking, and publication of end-of-semester
                              results, the re-submission policy will not apply to FINAL assignments.
                            For assignments receiving a FAIL grade, which are the final piece of
                              assignment work prior to graduation, special provisions for academic
                              supplementary considerations apply to re-submission.
                            Work re-submitted may not receive written or verbal feedback and may
                              not be returned promptly.
      late submissions      There is no ‗graduated penalty‘; work is either ‗on-time‘ or ‗late‘. Late
                             work will receive a mark of zero. Students can protect themselves
                             against the risk of a late submission caused through heavy traffic or late
                             trains by submitting early or (if the work will not fit in the submissions
                             box) arriving early on the due day.
                           Work submitted late may not be resubmitted.


      models, mounted      Models, work on large sheets of paper and mounted work.
                           No work will be collected/submitted through the School Office and models,
              work, etc    work on large sheets of paper or mounted work cannot be submitted in
                           advance unless special arrangements have been made with the Lecturer or
                           Course Coordinator concerned (see below).           The ‗course handout‘ will
                           specify where work is to be taken at the ‗due time‘. Students should allow
                           plenty of time to allow for unexpected delays in travel.

        early hand-in of   Students who have reasons for needing to hand-in a model earlier than the
                           submission time should discuss, with the Lecturer or Course Coordinator
                models     concerned, the possibility of making other alternative arrangements for the
                           safe storage of their model prior to the submission time/date. Models
                           lodged early through such alternative arrangements will not be stored in the
                           School Office.

electronic submissions     Some courses may require or invite ‗electronic‘ submission of assignments.
                           These are treated the same as work submitted physically, the date and time
                           electronically recorded with the submission being regarded as the time of
                           submission. When work is submitted late electronically, it will suffer the
                           same penalty as any other LATE work, in that it will receive zero.
     ‘in-class’ assessed   Where a student is absent from a class at which a mark is given for work
                           carried out in class, the mark will be zero unless there are medical
                    work   problems or extenuating circumstances which justify the absence. Students
                           experiencing medical problems should make an Application for
                           Supplementary Assessment on Medical Grounds or those with extenuating
                           circumstances should make an Application for Consideration of Extenuating
                           Circumstances (see below). The date of the relevant class is regarded as
                           the ‗due date‘ for the work.
                   Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 18
________________________________________________________________________________

           group work     With Group Work (two or more students collaborating on an assignment)
                          the following guidelines apply:
                           The work should be submitted on time, unless both/all the members of
                               the group experience medical or personal problems as set out below or
                               arrangements have been made in advance with the Course Co-
                               ordinator for a later submission due to the inability of all members of the
                               group to fully contribute to the work.
                           The circumstances that have affected the work of the group should be
                               described on the back of the Assignment Cover Sheet and in
                               accompanying        official   documentation    relating      to  Medical,
                               Compassionate or Extenuating Circumstances.
                           Either the work will be marked, taking the circumstances into account,
                               or the work will be returned to the group for completion and a new ‗due
                               date‘ fixed.
                          The School Submission Policy may be varied for a course by
                          agreement between the Course Co-ordinator and students in that course.
                          Variations must be set out in writing by the Course Co-ordinator and agreed
                          by a majority vote of students present at the first scheduled lecture in week
                          2 (or first other occasion when all students are expected to be present in
                          week 2) of the semester. Students may propose a variation to the School
                          Standard Policy to a Course Coordinator before the course begins or at the
                          first scheduled lecture (or first other occasion when all students are
                          expected to be present in week 1) of the semester.

          special cases
      computer system     In the event of computer system breakdown in the School, or breakdown in
                          other University systems, hand-ins will be rescheduled by the Course Co-
          breakdown       ordinator and a notice placed in the foyer of the Architecture Building and/or
                          on the MyUni site for that course. Students are responsible for their own
                          computer systems or other systems outside the School, and computer
                          system breakdowns will not normally cause rescheduling of hand-ins where
                          only word processing is affected, since appropriate computers are also
                          available in the University Library. However, individual students badly
                          affected may make an Application for Consideration of Extenuating
                          Circumstances (described in a following section).

     medical problems     If there are medical problems affecting attendance or ability to complete
                          work, a form for Application for Supplementary Assessment on Medical
                          Grounds should be obtained from the School Office or from the School‘s
                          website at www.architecture.adelaide.edu.au/current_students/resources/.
                          Part A of the form must be completed and returned to the School Office
                          mailbox in the Common Room within 7 days of the due date of the
                          assignment. Part B of the form must be signed by a student‘s private
                          medical/dental practitioner or practitioner from the University‘s on-campus
                          Health Provider stating the period during which work has been affected.
                          Students must arrange for the practitioner to send Part B direct to the
                          School Office so as to arrive no later than 7 days after the assignment is
                          due. Students encountering continuing medical problems should also
                          consult the School‘s Student Adviser so that the School can help maintain
                          academic progress where possible.
                   Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 19
________________________________________________________________________________

                         Then a student affected either:

                         Completes an Assignment Cover Sheet, attaches it to the work, and
                         submits the work to the School Office. The number of days by which the
                         submission is late must not be greater than the number of days that the
                         student was affected as stated by the practitioner or counsellor. The
                         Course Co-ordinator will then treat the work as submitted on-time, with
                         ‗normal‘ marking and feedback, although it may not be marked until the end
                         of the Semester. If the submission date is beyond the number of days that
                         the student was affected as stated by the practitioner or counsellor, it will be
                         considered as a ‗late submission‘ and receive zero. The submission of the
                         work will constitute withdrawal of the application for supplementary
                         assessment for the assignment concerned.

                         or:

       supplementary     Does not submit the work, in which case the Application for Supplementary
                         Assessment on Medical Grounds will be considered by the Course Co-
         assessment/     ordinator at the end of the Semester. Supplementary examinations or
        examinations     assignments replace the work originally due and take place after Week 13
                         of the semester.      Work for supplementary assessment will not
   on medical grounds    normally be the same as for the original projects they replace. The
                         Course Co-ordinator will notify the student after Week 13 if the application
                         has been accepted, stating which original assignments (or other assessed
                         work) will be replaced by the supplementary work, when it is due, and what
                         is required. Students should note that presentation of medical certificates
                         does not entitle students to supplementary assessment, but only to be
                         considered for supplementary assessment. Results in other parts of the
                         course, and attendance at lectures, tutorials and other scheduled events,
                         may be taken into account in decisions about the offer of supplementary
                         assessment.

                         Students who plan to be away from Adelaide after Week 13 must make
                         appropriate arrangements to receive information about the granting of
                         supplementary examinations/assignments and ensure that they can submit
                         their work by the new due date.

           extenuating   If there are other extenuating circumstances for a late submission an
                         Application for Consideration of Extenuating Circumstances form should be
        circumstances    obtained from the School Office. The details should be completed and
                         returned to the School Office within seven days of the assignment due date.
                         The application will be recorded by the School Office and a copy forwarded
                         to the Course Co-ordinator who will decide whether waiving of the normal
                         late submission penalty of zero marks is warranted. This decision may be
                         appealed in the first instance to the Acting Head of School. The nature of
                         the circumstances, the actual date of submission, and previous applications
                         may all be taken into account. In addition, results in other parts of the
                         course, and attendance at lectures, tutorials and other scheduled events,
                         may be taken into account also in deciding about whether waiving of the
                         normal late submission penalty of zero marks is warranted.
                   Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 20
________________________________________________________________________________

    personal problems    Advice from the University Counselling Service or an Education and
                         Welfare Officer in the Student Care Office may be beneficial for students
                         experiencing personal difficulties affecting their studies.      In these
                         circumstances a form for Application for Supplementary Assessment on
                         Compassionate Grounds should be obtained from the School Office. Part A
                         of the form must be completed and returned to the School Office within 7
                         days of the due date of the assignment. Part B of the form must be signed
                         by a counsellor from the University Counselling Service or an Education
                         and Welfare Officer from the Student Care Office stating the period during
                         which work has been affected. Students must arrange for the counsellor or
                         Education and Welfare Officer to send Part B direct to the School Office so
                         as to arrive no later than 7 days after the assignment is due. Students
                         encountering continuing personal problems should also consult the
                         School‘s Student Adviser so that the School can help maintain academic
                         progress where possible.
                         Then a student affected either:

                         Completes an Assignment Cover Sheet, attaches it to the work, and
                         submits the work to the School Office. The number of days by which the
                         submission is late must not be greater than the number of days stated by
                         the counsellor that the student was affected. The Course Co-ordinator will
                         then treat the work as submitted on-time, with ‗normal‘ marking and
                         feedback, although it may not be marked until the end of the Semester. If
                         the submission date is beyond the number of days stated by the counsellor
                         that the student was affected, it will be considered as a ‗late submission‘
                         and receive zero marks.

                         or:

        supplementary    Does not submit the work, in which case the Application for Supplementary
                         Assessment on Compassionate Grounds will be considered by the Course
           assessment/   Co-ordinator at the end of the Semester. Supplementary examinations or
          examinations   assignments replace the work originally due and take place after Week 13
                         of the semester.      Work for supplementary assessment will not
     on compassionate    normally be the same as for the original projects they replace. The
               grounds   Course Co-ordinator will notify the student after Week 13 if the application
                         has been accepted, stating which original assignments (or other assessed
                         work) will be replaced by the supplementary work, when it is due, and what
                         is required. Students should note that presentation of certificates from the
                         University Counselling Service or an Education and Welfare Officer does
                         not entitle students to supplementary assessment, but only to be
                         considered for supplementary assessment. Results in other parts of the
                         course, and attendance at lectures, tutorials and other scheduled events,
                         may be taken into account in deciding about the offer of supplementary
                         assessment.

                         Students who plan to be away from Adelaide after Week 13 must make
                         appropriate arrangements to receive information about the granting of
                         supplementary examinations/assignments and ensure that they can submit
                         their work by the new due date. Results (including an indication if a
                         supplementary assessment has been granted) are available through
                         Access Adelaide.

            academic     When a student receives a primary result of 45F-49F, University policy
                         provides that they be offered a supplementary examination or opportunity to
        supplementary    submit supplementary assignments on academic grounds.             However
        assessment or    students will need to have met the attendance requirements as outlined at
                         the beginning of this section; or as detailed in student handouts etc. The
         examinations    process of notification of academic supplementaries is the same as for
                         supplementary assessment on medical or compassionate grounds, as set
                         out above. In accordance with University policy, the maximum result
                         possible for a supplementary examination on Academic grounds is
                         50%P.
                   Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 21
________________________________________________________________________________

                          As above, students who plan to be away from Adelaide after Week 13 must
                          make appropriate arrangements to receive information about the granting of
                          supplementary examinations/assignments and ensure that they can submit
                          their work by the new due date. Results (including an indication if a
                          supplementary assessment has been granted) are available through
                          Access Adelaide.

        acceptance of     All students who are advised that they have been granted supplementary
                          assessment or examination must advise the School that they accept the
   supplementary offer    offer to complete supplementary work and submit by the due date.
                          Otherwise it will be assumed that they intend not to submit supplementary
                          work.

          exam scripts    Students are given the opportunity to read their examination scripts (and
                          any comments) after the results have been published.

  assessment of group     In the case of group work, it must be agreed with students in advance as to
                          whether all members of a group will receive the same grade, or to establish
                 work     means to determine who did (and deserves) what. (See also Section 9 on
                          Plagiarism.)

        computer work     Students are entirely responsible for ensuring that personal electronic
                          equipment is in working order. Late work, or loss of work, where this is due
                          to electronic failure outside the School‘s control, will not be accepted as a
                          valid reason for the non-production of work, at either undergraduate or
                          postgraduate level.

                          Documents should be ‗saved‘ often, and independent backup copies of
                          work executed on electronic media should therefore be made at
                          regular and appropriate intervals during production.

       grading of work    Results of work carried out during the year will be issued as grades. The
                          following rules apply to all courses except DESST 4001A/4001B Honours
                          Design Studies:
                          HD   =   High Distinction 85% or higher
                          D+   =   Distinction 80-84
                          D    =   Distinction 75-79      P     =     Pass 55-59
                          C+   =   Credit       70-74     P-    =     Pass 50-54
                          C    =   Credit       65-69
                          P+   =   Pass         60-64     F     =     Fail   under 50



      grade descriptors   Details of the University Grade Descriptors can be viewed via the Grade
                          Descriptors link in the Assessment for Coursework Programs Policy.

       assessment for     Details of the University‘s ‗Assessment for Coursework Programs Policy‘ is
                          available        on          the       following       website       link:
 coursework programs      www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/700/
               policy

        complaints and    There are well established University-wide procedures for handling
                          complaints about marks or other matters [refer to the Student Grievance
              appeals     Resolution Process at http://www.adelaide.edu.au/student/grievance/].

         progress and     Student progress will be closely monitored by Academic staff (Tutors) and
                          the Course Coordinators.          Progressive results will be posted for
 progressive posting of   assignments and tutorial tasks, and available through the student‘s
    assessment results    personal logon to My Uni, and through postings by the Course Coordinator.
                          It is the student‘s responsibility if they believe that there is a mistake or
                          omission to urgently contact their Tutor and the Course Coordinator by
                          email and to speak to the Tutor during scheduled tutorials.
                    Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 22
________________________________________________________________________________

   digital help sessions   The School runs ―digital help sessions‖ in the CAAD Studio on Level 5,
                           Architecture Building during Weeks 2-12 each semester. Watch for notices
                           that will show days and times for these sessions.

    course evaluations     Near the end of each Semester a brief student evaluation of courses is
                           administered by the School. The evaluation comprises an overall rating
                           question and two qualitative questions that seek brief comments on good
                           and bad aspects of the course. These are important in the future
                           development of teaching. You may also be asked to complete a longer
                           survey form prepared by the University‘s Centre for Learning and
                           Professional Development.

         return of work    If assignments have been submitted ‗on time‘, students can expect their
                           work to be returned to them fairly promptly (normally within a month) and to
                           receive feedback comment as well as a grade. Students who are
                           dissatisfied with their mark should first discuss it with the staff
                           member concerned. The University has instituted procedures for matters
                           you cannot resolve in this way (see appeals and complaints below).

                           The School retains a certain proportion of representative student work for
                           record and exhibition purposes as well as for reference for accreditation
                           purposes to the Architects Accreditation Council of Australia, the Australian
                           Institute of Architects, the Australian Institute of Landscape Architects and
                           the Planning Institute of Australia. Staff members will notify students if their
                           work is being retained.

      collection of work   Semester 1 work
                           Work which is available for collection after the end of the Semester 1
                           teaching period will be held on Level 5 of the Architecture Building. This
                           work will not be kept beyond the end of the first week of the mid-year
                           break. However, work which is not made available until after the
                           examination period will be kept until the end of week 1 of Semester 2.

                           Semester 2 work
                           Work which is available for collection after the end of the Semester 2
                           teaching period will be held on Level 5 of the Architecture Building. This
                           work will not be kept beyond the end of the year. However, work that is
                           not made available until after 16 December 2011 will be held until mid-
                           January in the following year.
                           .
                     Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 23
________________________________________________________________________________



7 Leave of Absence and
  Exclusion Procedures
      leave of absence      Students cannot take Leave of Absence (or extend a period of absence)
                            unless they have been granted official permission in writing from the
                            School. Leave will usually be granted for a minimum of one semester and
                            usually no longer than one academic year (ie, 2 consecutive semesters).
                            Leave will need to commence prior to the census date of the appropriate
                            semester. To apply for Leave of Absence students will need to fill in the
                            relevant form which is available from the School‘s Front Office.

                            Students awarded leave of absence are responsible for formally dropping
                            their courses on Access Adelaide for the time they will be absent from the
                            University, and before the relevant HECS Census date.

                            Failure to withdraw will result in students being liable for student
                            contributions/fees for all the courses in which they are enrolled.

   notification of return   Students returning from leave of absence must formally notify the School
                            when they recommence study.
             from Leave
leave without approval      Domestic students who leave their program without approval or who
                            extend a leave of absence beyond the time period approved shall be
and extension of leave      deemed to have discontinued their program. Re-admission may require re-
      without approval      application to SATAC. There is no guarantee that re-admission will be
                            granted.

 exclusion procedures       The School‘s exclusion procedures operate in accordance with those
                            determined by the Faculty of the Professions and also the University‘s
                            policy and procedures for preclusion of students.

                            The Faculty may prescribe rules for review of academic progress. Any
                            student who meets the requirements for review will be asked to show
                            cause as to why they should be permitted to continue their studies.
                            Students who cannot adequately explain poor academic performance may
                            have their enrolment cancelled or restricted, and/or be precluded from
                            undertaking further studies toward their program.
                        Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 24
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8 Occupational Health and Safety, site visit/field
        trip policy, use of approved cutting instruments,
        procedures for dealing with injuries, etc .....
     site visit / field trip   The University of Adelaide has an obligation under State Occupational
                               Health & Safety legislation (see also Section 1 Occupational Health and
policy and procedures          Safety) to ensure so far as is reasonably predictable that all students and
                               staff while at work (including study) are safe from injury and risks to health.
                               School staff cannot ‗sign away‘ the obligations of their duty of care.
                               In response to this obligation the University has adopted a policy that
                               applies to the conduct of all field trips. The University Field Activity Policy
                               and Guidelines are available for perusal from the School Administrative
                               Officer, Ms Alison Bosnakis.

                               This policy relates to teaching and research activity involving University
                               staff and students, which incorporates travel to and from a destination off
                               campus. Field activities vary in their nature and duration, and are difficult
                               to categorise. Some of the most commonly used names for University field
                               activity are:
                               (i)    excursions                  (vi)    field work
                               (ii)   field excursions            (vii) practical work
                               (iii) field trips                  (viii) tours
                               (iv) day trips                     (ix)    work experience*
                               (v)    field camps

                               * The policy does not apply to work experience programs carried out on facilities
                                 that are not owned or managed by the University.

                               In the School of Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design
                               this would include all site visits, meetings off-campus, study trips, and field
                               activities e.g. surveying. Briefly the document states:

                               • the Acting Head of School is responsible for the management of health
                                 and safety in all School matters, and must ensure that for any field
                                 activity organised by the School, consideration is given to provisions for
                                 health and safety.
                               • at least one week‘s notice must be given to the Acting Head of School of
                                 any field trip. The responsibility for safe conduct of field activities is
                                 delegated to the organiser of the field trip.
                               • students shall be briefed by the supervising staff member prior to all field
                                 trips regarding procedures to ensure safety.             This may include
                                 requirements for wearing appropriate clothing, footwear, safety helmets
                                 etc. Safety helmets are available from the School Office.
                               • students will be issued with a Field Activity Information Notice.
                               • students must submit a signed Field Activity Acknowledgment Form
                                 acknowledging their responsibilities prior to beginning the trip. Standard
                                 forms are to be used and will be provided by the supervising staff
                                 member.
                               • students must submit a signed Field Activity Medical Information
                                 Disclosure Form; these forms may contain confidential information.
                               • arranging the transport to and from a field activity site will in most
                                 circumstances be the responsibility of the supervising staff member.
                                 Where possible buses should be arranged.               It is generally not
                                 acceptable to allow students to make their own arrangements to get to a
                                 site.
                               • a suitable ratio of staff to students must be observed. Generally this
                                 should be a ratio of 1:10 and should not exceed a ratio of 1:20 (tour
                                 leaders provided at sites (e.g. on Timber Development Association field-
                                 days) may be included in this ratio).
                    Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 25
________________________________________________________________________________

                          • on small field trips a minimum first-aid kit (available from the School
                            Office) must be carried. On larger trips, and when normal medical
                            assistance may not be available, a staff member with first-aid training
                            must accompany the trip.
                          • staff members should seek the advice of the Acting Head of School
                             when organising large trips e.g. interstate trips etc. For all field trips,
                             expenses must be approved in advance by the Acting Head of School.

safety requirements for   As part of its responsibility for the safety and health of its students, the
                          School of Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design has
model-making and use      banned the use of scalpels in model making. Scalpels are more
 of cutting instruments   dangerous than alternative cutters because they have extremely sharp,
                          flexible blades that are not retractable. They are not designed for use as
                          modelling tools. Excellent results can be obtained using less dangerous
                          cutting tools which are readily available. These include cutters specifically
                          for modelling, and in particular general purpose fine cutters with stiff,
                          retractable, snap-off blades. In line with the School‘s ban on the use of
                          scalpels, the Design Students‘ Association does not sell scalpel holders or
                          blades. However, it sells a range of other safer cutters and replacement
                          blades for them, including cutters specifically for modelling.

    disposal of cutting   Used sharps (ie. snap-off blades and/or unwanted cutting instruments)
                          must be disposed of safely. Bright yellow CONTAMINATED SHARPS
                blades    containers are strategically placed in all work areas for the safe disposal of
                          such items. No snap-off blades or used cutting instruments are to be
                          placed in rubbish bins or left lying around work areas.

    disposal of broken    Any breakages involving glass must be cleaned up IMMEDIATELY.
                          Broken glass should be swept up, wrapped in several layers of paper or
             glass, etc   placed into an empty box, sealed and appropriately labelled. The broken
                          glass should then be placed in one of the green sulo bins (‗wheelie‘ bins)
                          for disposal by the cleaning staff. Please report such breakages to staff in
                          the School Office who will arrange for the area to be vacuumed by the
                          cleaners.

procedures for dealing    Any student who is injured while in the School of Architecture, Landscape
                          Architecture and Urban Design must report the incident as soon as
       with accidents,    possible at the School Office on Level 4 and complete the required
     including cutting    Accident/Incident Form.
               injuries   In particular, a student who sustains a cutting injury must have the wound
                          attended to immediately by one of the School‘s First Aid Officers at the
                          School Office or, in the case of a serious injury, at the University‘s on-
                          campus Health Provider, on the ground floor of the Horace Lamb Building.

                          All blood and blood products must be treated as potentially infected
                          material.
                          Any blood spilt due to an injury must be cleaned up immediately using the
                          following procedures and the accident officially reported.
                          1. Wear disposable gloves.
                          2. Clean up spilt blood using hot water and detergent and a disposable
                              cleaning cloth.
                          3. The hot water and detergent then must be flushed down the toilet (not
                              poured down a sink).
                          4. After the clean-up is completed, remove and dispose of gloves and
                              wash cloth in the yellow CONTAMINATED SHARPS container
                              provided.
                          5. Notify the supervising staff member or the School Office as soon as
                              possible that the accident has occurred.
                          6. The injured student must complete an Accident/Incident Form that is
                              available from the School Office.
                   Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 26
________________________________________________________________________________

            insurance    Students requiring medical treatment should check the claims and
                         reporting requirements of the University of Adelaide Sports Association
        arrangements     insurance scheme by contacting the Sports Association Office on
                         extension 35403. Claims should be submitted as soon as possible after
                         the injury has occurred. (Note: This is not a 24 hour policy i.e. cover is
                         only provided for University related activities.)

         safety videos   From time to time, students may be required to view appropriate safety
                         videos that relate to occupational health and safety issues relevant to the
                         course content (e.g. correct behaviour on a construction site, safety
                         clothing and footwear on a construction site, correct use of model-making
                         equipment, etc.)

    moving equipment     Students should note that moving large items of equipment (e.g. TVs,
                         videos, display boards, etc.) between floor levels IS NOT PERMITTED.
                         Arrangements to have such equipment moved must be made well in
                         advance through staff in the School Office.
                   Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 27
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9 Plagiarism and .....
                        Academic standards in relation to correct referencing and
                        acknowledgement of sources are highly valued in this University and are
                        specifically taught and developed in this School. Students have an ongoing
                        obligation to be aware of the University Policy Statement on Plagiarism,
                        Collusion and Related Forms of Cheating
                        http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/230 and to:
                         warrant that every piece of assessable work they submit is entirely their
                          own and is not the product of collusion (another person assisting in the
                          production of an assessment submission without the express
                          requirement, or consent or knowledge of the assessor) except where
                          group work is specifically sought
                         acknowledge the source of any textual and graphic content in that
                          assessable academic work which you have not created entirely yourself
                          through standard referencing procedures;
                         acknowledge that there is a University–wide policy in relation to
                          plagiarism (using another person‘s ideas, designs, words or works
                          without appropriate acknowledgement) which is enacted within this
                          School and each course, and that there are substantial penalties for
                          plagiarism which may include the requirement for revising and
                          resubmitting assessment work, receiving a result of zero for the
                          assessment work, failing the course, expulsion and/or receiving a
                          financial penalty.

                        A register of suspected plagiarism incidents is maintained within the School
                        and at the Faculty level.

                        A plagiarist is one who takes the ideas, designs or writings of others, with or
                        without permission, and passes them off as his or her own. Plagiarism
                        includes among other things any copying of all or part of another student‘s
                        essay, examination answer or design, or of text or an illustration from a
                        published or unpublished book, website, article or paper, (etc.) without
                        acknowledging the source. It also includes copying architectural, landscape
                        and other design drawings, however they were obtained. In effect
                        plagiarism is theft of intellectual property, and students should be aware of
                        the consequences of using unacknowledged the work of others (including
                        the work of other students), whether that work is text or graphics, or copied
                        from hard copy or from electronic sources such as web sites.

                        The School and the University regard plagiarism as a very serious
                        offence. If there are found to be no extenuating circumstances it may lead
                        to a student receiving zero marks for a course, without the option of a
                        resubmission.

                        When quoting text from a book or article, ensure that you quote it accurately
                        (verbatim); use quotation marks around the text quoted, or in the case of a
                        large extract, indent it to distinguish it from your own text, and reference
                        fully. Clear identification and acknowledgment is also necessary when
                        using a copy of a drawing or a photograph, a photograph of a model, or
                        electronic data or images. Where students are required to produce a
                        drawing of existing conditions of a building or site, any use of design or
                        other drawings must be clearly acknowledged.
                     Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 28
________________________________________________________________________________

                           In the case of both text and illustrations from books, provide a full reference
                           to all quoted or copied material, including author(s)/artist(s) and/or editor,
                           title, city of publication, publisher, date and page number(s). There are
                           protocols for referencing, footnotes and bibliographies which students must
                           become familiar with: see for example the Chicago Manual of Style. In the
                           case of graphics and electronic material, provide as full a reference as
                           possible to the presumed owner of the copyright, i.e. the design firm,
                           designer‘s/architect‘s office or company, and/or the artist/draftsperson,
                           programmer, or author (where known), or software provider.

                           Understanding, borrowing and adapting other people‘s ideas is a necessary
                           part not only of University study but of academic practice in general, but the
                           source of the ideas must always be acknowledged.


                           other people’s work
                           Unless specifically indicated otherwise (in writing) by the Lecturer or
                           coordinator in charge of a course (for instance in group work), all work
                           submitted must be entirely the student‘s own work without any assistance in
                           drawing, writing, etc. The only exception is the typing of written material.
                           Submitting a report written or partly written by someone else, or a
                           perspective drawn or partly drawn by someone else, as if it were your own
                           work, is regarded as cheating.

                           You may certainly ask others to read and comment on your written material,
                           and to show you how to do work, but not to do the work for you. If English
                           is not your first language, you should talk to the Lecturer or coordinator in
                           charge of the course about assistance with language and expression.

                           Collaborative work towards a final product, and ‗brainstorming‘ with
                           colleagues is welcomed as part of the project-oriented mode of learning in
                           the School, in particular in the design studio. In fact current theories of
                           architecture emphasise the contextual and derivative/adaptive nature of all
                           design ideas and significant forms. Students must learn to appreciate the
                           difference between copying other people‘s intellectual/creative property and
                           the evolution of their own designs with reference to types and precedents.

                           It is each student‘s responsibility to understand this University policy.
                           Students will be advised by staff when they have ‗overstepped the border‘;
                           allowance may be made for inexperience the first time, and students will be
                           referred where appropriate to the writing and speaking at Uni course
                           available for all students via Myuni.

                           Suspected cases of plagiarism are dealt with in accordance with the
                           University‘s policy. Students should refer to the relevant Statutes (Chapter
                           17.- Of Examinations and Other Forms of Assessment, Lower Tribunals
                           Clauses 15 and 16 Procedures for the Board of Conduct and Lower
                           Tribunals Clauses 17-19, and Chapter 12.- Of the Conduct of Students in
                           the University, Plagiarism Clauses 11 and 12 ), and are advised to read
                           them carefully. Mrs Nicole Bailey can provide you with a copy for your
                           reference.

 requests for electronic   As well as providing your hard copies of submissions a Course Coordinator
                           may request an identical electronic copy of work such as essays, tutorial
                   copy    papers, etc. This electronic copy will be used in conjunction with the
                           School‘s Plagiarism Checking Software which searches the World Wide
                           Web and other e-resources to identify instances of substantive similarities
                           between the submitted work and work found in such e-searching.
                   Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 29
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10 Student e-mail
          student e-mail   As soon as your enrolment is confirmed, an email account is set up
                           automatically, free of charge. Detailed information and documentation
                           regarding this service, including Help pages, is located at
                           http://webmail.adelaide.edu.au/.

                           Enquiries can be directed to either the Student Centre, telephone 8303 5208,
                           or via their online enquiry format
                           www.adelaide.edu.au/student/current/enquiries/; or the ITS Helpdesk on
                           8303 3000, or email helpdesk@adelaide.edu.au.

                           It is STRONGLY recommended that you read all of the information on the
                           web site before you use your account.

                                For general notifications, and through MyUni, the School will send
                                mail only to your University e-mail address.
      email address and    Your email address has a standard format as designed by the University.
                           Your student password is provided when you first receive your offer to study
              password     at the University. You can use it to access a range of IT services, including
                           student email, MyUni, on-campus printing services and Access Adelaide.
                           Staff in the Student Centre can generate a new password for you (on
                           production of photographic identification) if you forget your password or you
                           can change it directly using Access Adelaide http://access.adelaide.edu.au

   access to a computer    The School provides computers in two computer suites for students enrolled
                           in courses within the School. There is also a small computer lab of 6
       connected to the    computers which is for the use of Masters students only.
     University network
                           The general purpose suite, located on Level 3 of the Barr Smith Library can
                           also be used to access the e-mail service. There are also computers
                           available in the Student Centre, L 4 Wills building. Alternatively, if you have a
                           computer and modem where you live, you can connect to the University
                           Network via the University Remote Access Service.

                           Any Internet connected computer will allow you access to your e-mail
                           account. Therefore, public computers in Internet Cafes or Libraries, both
                           locally and internationally will allow you to check your e-mail when you are
                           away from the University.

                           Rules for the use of this service are provided on the ―Student IT Services‖
                           web site at www.adelaide.edu.au/its/it_policies/do/ and include:
                   rules
                              Do not let anyone else use any of your accounts or tell anyone your
                               password. You will be held responsible for e-mail from your account.
                              Do not type in your password if someone is standing behind you.
                              If you suspect someone has discovered your password you should
                               change it at once.
                   Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 30
________________________________________________________________________________

                     Please remember that this service has been provided for academic purposes
                     to improve communication between staff and students at this University. It is
                     not to be used to abuse or harass anyone. Any user suspected of abusing
                     this privilege will find their email account disabled immediately and the Acting
                     Head of School will be notified.

                     It is the students‘ responsibility to regularly check the MyUni sites for the
                     courses they are enrolled in as all important course-related announcements
                     will be communicated via this means. It is assumed that students will always
                     read their e-mail and course announcements. Individual e-mail from students
                     on course issues will not be responded to by teaching staff. The exception to
                     this is if a student has a personal matter which may affect their studies and
                     they need to discuss this with the teaching staff. Students with any questions
                     regarding the course must post these on the Course Discussion Board. The
                     teaching staff will attempt to respond to any course queries within two
                     working days.
                   Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 31
________________________________________________________________________________



11 Studio and computing facilities, and after-hours
        access
           studio space    Students are responsible for the cleanliness of their work places. Clearing
                           up after model-making must be carried out.
                           In some cases lockable plan files are provided by the School to students in
                           the professional courses.
                           The School accepts no responsibility for a student's personal effects,
                           equipment, materials, etc. left in the studio areas.
                           Students must clear all personal belongings from the School no later than 15
                           December each year. All lockers must be left empty and unlocked. Any
                           student who for some special reason cannot comply with this rule should
                           make arrangements with the appropriate School staff. Anything left is
                           assumed to be unwanted, and studios are completely cleared at the end of
                           each year.

              computer     Students have access to two computer suites on Level 5 of the Architecture
                           Building and level 5 of the University Staff Club Building, which can be
                 suites    accessed through a bridge from the foyer of Level 5. The labs have PCs with
                           word processing, various computer graphics and CAD programs, and
                           printing/plotting facilities.
                           Students can also bring their own laptops and connect to the University
                           system through the wireless network.

  managing network file    Many students run into problems in managing their network file space in the
                           computer suites. Each student is given a quota of space on their student
               space       account. If you are close to your quota you should remove or compress
                           some of your existing files. The following are some types of files that you
                           might consider for deletion:
                               any image files
                               old versions of files (particularly if you have followed the good
                                   practice of saving versions)
                               download zip files (.zip extension)
                               printer files (.prn extension)
                           You should consider your deletion choices carefully as you are responsible
                           for your data.

   after-hours access to   Access to the studio areas and computers in the Computer Suites on Level 5
                           of the Architecture Building and level 5 of the University Staff Club Building
   Architecture Building   will be via Student Card access only. Details about obtaining Student Cards
                           are available from Card Services located in the Student Centre on level 4 of
                           the Wills Building.
                           All access and use of the computers in the School's CAAD Studio‘s is
                           constantly monitored.
                           Access is not transferable and available only for students taking courses in
                           the School. Only course related activities are permitted. Any form of
                           tampering with computer hardware and software configurations is prohibited.
                           Breaches of these and other applicable regulations can result in punitive
                           action by the Acting Head of School (for infringements relating to the
                           computer suites within the School).
                           Use of the University Network for the carriage, storage or display of sexually
                           explicit or racially offensive material is prohibited and will be subject to strict
                           disciplinary action.
                           Please note that the University Security Officers are responsible for the
                           security of buildings and that the building including studios and computer
                           suites are under continuous television security surveillance.
                     Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 32
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12 What students need
  books and manuals       Course Coordinators and Lecturers will suggest texts; some Lecturers
                          will put together sets of readings for you, to be available for sale at the
                          University‘s Image and Copy Centre (Level 1, Hughes Building). The
                          Image and Copy Centre will charge only the cost of production for such
                          readings (plus GST if applicable). The School will make a number of
                          copies available for reference in the Barr Smith Library (BSL).

        student notes     University policy provides that the following basic information materials
                          are provided free and/or will be available on MyUni (see ‗course
        and handouts      handouts‘):
                          • program and course arrangements where necessary
                          • statements of learning objectives
                          • program and course lecture outlines
                          • reading lists
                          • tutorial topics and problems
                          • assignment questions and requirements, including assessment
                            criteria
                          • guidelines on the style and format of essays and reports.

      reading material    Whenever a change is made for any supplementary reading materials,
                          a number of copies will be available in the Barr Smith Library.

       equipment and      ‗Consumables‘, to the extent that they are needed by students to
                          complete the requirements of their programs and courses, are provided
        consumables       free by the School. This does not include items such as personal
                          stationery or model building materials.

                          ‗Training equipment‘ is also provided free. This refers to equipment
                          which students must use in order to fulfil and satisfy the requirements of
                          their programs, but which does not fall into the category of ‗personal
                          professional‘ equipment. ‗Personal professional‘ equipment comprises
                          items which working professionals normally own personally, and which
                          students will continue to use in their professional life after graduation; in
                          effect ‗tools of trade‘.

          and expenses An equipment list is given below for Level I BDesSt students enrolled in
                          and Human Environments: Design and Representation.

                          The costs involved in the various courses that involve both 2D and 3D
                          presentation work can vary widely, depending on the choices of
                          materials and techniques.

                          The School is required to provide free the basic necessities for
                          presenting required graphic/written work with the provisos above; more
                          elaborate and expensive materials and techniques are the responsibility
                          of students. It should be remembered that the quality of the work, and
                          the resulting grade, are not proportional to the expenditure on materials;
                          ideas and inventiveness in technique can produce excellent results
                          from low-cost and recycled materials.

                          Students are advised to join the Design Students‘ Association and take
                          advantage of its cooperative buying power.
                     Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 33
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         drawings and    Architects and landscape architects do not issue originals; the original
                         drawings are kept safely for future amendment or re-issue; students
          reproduction   should not submit unique originals either.

                         NOTE: All submissions become the property of the School, but the
                         copyright in them is vested in their author.

                        Refer
   details of equipmenttent:     to the equipment list which is distributed to students during the
                         first Orientations Week lecture.
                    Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 34
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13 Language Protocols for working with Aboriginal
         Peoples and Organisations

          Introduction     This guide is prepared by Wilto Yerlo, Centre for Australian Indigenous
                           Research and Studies for use by the students of the School of Architecture,
                           Landscape Architecture & Urban Design at the University of Adelaide.

                           Language usage changes regionally and over time. It is hoped this guide
                           will be useful in writing and talking about Aboriginal and Torres Strait
                           Islander Peoples. Should you be in doubt regarding further intricacies or the
                           regional usage of language it may be useful to consult Aboriginal and/or
                           Torres Strait Islander Peoples or organisations in your area. Wilto Yerlo,
                           the Centre for Australian Indigenous Research & Studies is located at the
                           University of Adelaide and may provide a good initial contact for students.

    outdated language      Some terms are no longer acceptable for use in referring to Aboriginal and
                           Torres Strait Islander people and may be offensive. The terms that are
                           generally outdated and their possible alternatives include:

                                    Outdated Term                      Common Usage term/s
                                    Aborigines/Aboriginals             Aboriginal peoples
                                    Tribe                              Language group
                                    Half-caste, quarter- caste, etc    Aboriginal person

     the use of capitals   In all instances the use of capitals for Indigenous, Aboriginal and Torres
                           Strait Islander should be considered. Huggins writes:

                            ‗‘a‘ for apple, agile, anger, another, address, alphabet, but not Aboriginal. It
                           is insulting and destructive to use a small ‗a‘. This spelling is extremely
                           racist, as are the biologically racist definitions of part, quarter, half caste and
                           full blood Aboriginals‘, (Huggins 1994: 3).

                           This is inclusive for use as an adjective (e.g. Aboriginal art). The use of
                           capitalisation to refer to people in respected positions is also recommended
                           (e.g. Aboriginal Elder).

        using the term     In recent years the term 'Indigenous' has become popular as a generic term
                           in Australia to describe Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Many
          'Indigenous'     Aboriginal people see particular problems with using the term. 'Indigenous'
                           in its correct definition is applied to a person 'born to the land‘. This could
                           be equally applied to a non-Aboriginal or non-Torres Strait Islander person.

                           The use of the term 'Indigenous' is generally accepted when dealing with
                           subject matter on the international level. At the national and state level, it is
                           used interchangeably with the terms ‗Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait
                           Islander‘ by some authors, while others avoid the term.

                           Due to the native title debate, it has become important for many Aboriginal
                           and Torres Strait Islander peoples to become more specific about their
                           relationship with land and they may choose to use terms that are more
                           precise about their relationship with the land (e.g. Kaurna Man/Woman).

    using the acronym      The acronym ‗ATSI‘ to refer indiscriminately to Aboriginal and Torres Strait
                           Islander people is not acceptable as it implies a common cultural identity.
                 ‘ATSI’    Torres Strait Islanders are a separate and unique linguistic and cultural
                           group and should be acknowledged as such.
                    Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 35
________________________________________________________________________________

  terms for referring to   Aboriginal terms appropriate to certain areas are generally suitable for use
                           when referring to the people from the concerned areas.
    Aboriginal Peoples
                                 ‗Our people did not use the word Aborigine to refer to ourselves
                                 before the coming of non-Aborigines. Everyone was simply a
                                 person, and each language had its own word for person Different
                                 groups distinguished one another in different contexts by different
                                 names (by their language, their country, etc). After 1770, words
                                 for 'person' such as Yolgnu, Yapa, Koori, Murri etc, were used to
                                 refer to Aboriginal people only, excluding the newcomers. Many
                                 of these words are used today by English speakers‘, (Jonas et al.
                                 1994:3).

                           Nunga is the term for South Australian Aboriginal people from certain areas.
                           Western Desert people to refer to themselves as Anangu. These terms and
                           other similar terms are not appropriate when referring to Aboriginal peoples
                           outside the concerned regional areas.

       people’s names      Often Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have names that do not
                           fit the ‗first name - second name - surname pattern‘. Moorcroft and
                           Garwood (1997) illustrate this with following example:

                                 ‗All Yolngu have several personal names, which are derived from
                                 ancestral songs and tie individuals into land and kin. Normally
                                 one name is considered to be the 'book name'- the name used in
                                 schools, hospitals and other Balanda (non-Yolngu) institutions -
                                 because of the inability of Western bureaucracies to cope with
                                 Yolngu ways‘, (Moorcroft and Garwood 1997: xi).

                           Students need to follow the direction of the Aboriginal person/community
                           concerned when quoting names in academic work.

         pronunciation     There is a rich diversity in languages across Aboriginal Australia. Students
                           of the school are not expected to become proficient in Aboriginal languages.
                           It is expected that students conducting projects in particular areas will have
                           gained pronunciations of the concerned place name and language grouping
                           for critiques and other presentations. The reconciliation section of the
                           Adelaide City Council Website at
                           http://www.adelaidecitycouncil.com/community/reconciliation.html?s=47523
                           9013 provides Kaurna pronunciations of places around the Adelaide CBD.
                           The South Australian Museum is a rich source of information on languages
                           and resources to assist with pronunciations.

  informal terminology     There are informal terms used by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Strait
                           peoples and other non-Aboriginal peoples to refer to themselves and others
                           affectionately in daily life. Students must be aware that usage of these
                           terms is regional and may be affectionate in some areas, while regarded
                           highly offensive in other places. One example would be the use of the term
                           ‗blackfellas‘. This term may be used by Aboriginal peoples to refer to each
                           other and other groups of Aboriginal peoples affectionately, but may be
                           considered highly offensive by others.

                           Often language with racial overtones has developed over time and may be
                           commonly used by non-Aboriginal peoples, often with a tone of apparent
                           humour. Students need to be very aware to avoid such terminology. One
                           example would be the term ‗Port-a-gutta‘ to refer to the South Australian
                           town of Port Augusta. This term mimics Aboriginal English and has
                           developed from a history of racism. Students should not use this and
                           similar terms in speech or writing. Regional slang is not acceptable for
                           academic writing unless contained within direct quotations.
                   Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 36
________________________________________________________________________________

    Aboriginal English   Aboriginal English is a dialectal form of English that reflects Aboriginal
                         languages and cultures. The form and structure of this language exhibit
                         some speech patterns of standard English, as well as speech
                         characteristics and words originating from Aboriginal languages.

                         Aboriginal English is a respected part of culture for many Aboriginal
                         peoples. Caution needs to be employed when recording the spoken word of
                         speakers of Aboriginal English. Discussions regarding the way the material
                         is to be represented should be held. Speakers may wish for their word for
                         word accounts be represented without changes to standard English.

          place names    It is preferred that the current name of a place is used. In situations where
                         an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander name has been given to a place and
                         your audience is likely to know it by its former name then the former name
                         could be included in brackets after the Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander
                         name. For example:         Raukkan (Port McLeay). In some Aboriginal
                         communities there is a name for the community as well as the place causing
                         confusion for many non-Aboriginal people. For example:
                                          Iwantja Community, lndulkana.
                         A choice can be made to use either:
                                        Indulkana or lwantja Community, lndulkana.

          dual naming    In many urban areas the dual naming of landmarks is practised as one way
                         of indicating the Aboriginal heritage of landmarks. For example in Adelaide
                         dual naming of areas in the city has occurred. One example is Victoria
                         Square which also has the Kaurna name of Tarndanyannga.

                         The process of dual naming public spaces is ongoing in South Australia. It
                         is generally an initiative of the local council in consultation with the
                         concerned Aboriginal community. Students are encouraged to consult with
                         local councils for the most recent examples and include both names in their
                         work where possible.

        subject matter   Many Aboriginal academics and authors are involved in debates on which
                         subject matter is not appropriate for non-Aboriginal people to write about (or
                         use in a design project!). It is generally agreed that it is inappropriate for
                         non-Aboriginal peoples to write or record material, which would normally be
                         transmitted by oral tradition. This includes stories related to spirituality or
                         material conveyed through ceremony or song.

                         This issue is of particular importance to design students given many new
                         design projects are seeking to use oral traditions and spirituality as the basis
                         of design projects. All material transmitted by oral tradition will have
                         custodial owners or people who are authorised to speak on behalf of that
                         knowledge. It is critically important that these people are located and are
                         involved ethically in the design process. This amounts to fair and ethical
                         behaviour in terms of intellectual property issues and is likely to enhance
                         both the consultation process and the end-result of your design project
                         considerably.
                    Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 37
________________________________________________________________________________

      sensitive matters    For many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural knowledge and
                           information may belong to either women or men. It may be offensive for
                           many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples to have women's or
                           men's business discussed or written about. This is especially true of
                           material that is prepared by a person of the other sex (e.g. a man referring
                           to a woman). This may be general from the manner in which people are
                           dressed to more cultural matters such as rituals and ceremonies. The ethics
                           and benefits of discussing women's or men's business before a general
                           audience should be critically evaluated by the writer, and consultation taken
                           from an appropriate Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person if in doubt.

                           In many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures, it is offensive to refer
                           to a deceased person by name or view depictions of the person until such a
                           time as Elders and/or community representatives and relatives within the
                           community deem otherwise. Students are advised to ask community
                           members about their preferences in this eventuality.

      cultural warnings    Generally it is culturally offensive to display photographs and other ways
                           that depict deceased peoples. When using consulting processes that
                           involve depictions, consider the implications and seek advice. Consider
                           using cultural warnings. These should be included on the front page of the
                           publication or at the beginning of the presentation. An example of a cultural
                           warning may be:
                                 This report/presentation contains material and
                                 images referring to deceased persons that may be
                                 disturbing or offensive to Aboriginal peoples.

           bibliography/   Australia Council (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Board) Indigenous
                              Culture and Copyright Protocols
      further resources
                           http://www.australiacouncil.gov.au/research/literature/reports_and_publicati
                                ons/writing_protocols_for_producing_indigenous_australian_writing


                           Huggins, J. (1994). Respect Vs Political Correctness Australian Author
                           (26) 3: 223
                           Jonas, B., Langton, M. and others (1994). The Little Red Yellow and Black
                              (and green and blue and white) Book: A Short Guide to Indigenous
                              Australia, AIATSIS, Canberra
                           Message Stick: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Online (Australian
                              Broadcasting Commission) Cultural Protocol
                              www.abc.net.au/message/proper/
                           Moorcroft, H. & A. Garwood (1997), Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
                              Thesaurus National Library of Australia, Canberra.
                           Queensland Government. (1998) Protocols for Consultation and Negotiation
                              with Aboriginal People Queensland Department of Families, Youth &
                              Community Care.
                    Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 38
________________________________________________________________________________



14 Staff in the School of Architecture, Landscape
         Architecture and Urban Design in 2010
                Samer Akkach BArch (Dam) MArchDes(NSW) PhD(Syd),
                Associate Professor
                Teaching: Design; Islamic architecture; graphics
                Research: Islamic architecture, architectural design theories and methods

                Katharine Bartsch BArchSt., BArch(Hons) PhD(Adel)
                Dr.
                Teaching: Histories and Theories of Architecture and Landscape Architecture
                Research: Histories and Theories of design with emphasis on cross-cultural issues

                Dean Bruton Dip T (Art), Adv Dip T (Art) (UniSA) ,MA (Visual Arts)(Flinders), PhD
                Arch (Adel)
                Senior Lecturer/Course Coordinator
                Teaching: Digital media
                Research: Computational design

                Tanya Court BA (Fine Arts)(Jewellery)(Curtin), BLArch(RMIT)
                Senior Lecturer
                Teaching: Landscape architecture
                Research: Landscape architecture

                Joshua McCarthy BDesSt(Hons)(Adel), MDesSt(DigMedia)(Adel)
                Lecturer
                Teaching: Digital media

                Ian McDougall BArch (RMIT), March (RMIT)
                Professor
                Teaching: Architecture and urban design

                Antony Radford BA (Hons)(Newcastle-upon-Tyne), BArch(Hons)(Newcastle-upon-
                Tyne), DipTP(EdinCollArt), PhD(Syd) ARAIA RIBA,
                Professor
                Teaching: Architectural design and computer-aided design
                Research: Design and computer-aided design

                Samuel Ridgway BArch (Hon)(Adel), MArch(Adel), PhD(Sydney)
                Acting Head of School
                Senior Lecturer
                Teaching: Architectural design
                Research: The how and the why of architectural making. A philosophy of technology
                approach to building construction

                Peter Scriver BSc (Arch)(McGill), BArch(McGill), PhD(Delft)
                Senior Lecturer
                Teaching: History and theories of architecture
                Research: History and theory of design thinking with special reference to colonial
                architecture(s)

                Amit Srivastava BArch (GGSIPU), PhD (Adelaide)
                Lecturer
                Teaching: History and Theory of Architecture / Construction Theory
                Research: Post-colonial Architecture of South-Asia / Intellectual histories and theories
                concerning perception of architectural materials.

                Susan Shannon BArch (Hons)(Adel), PhD(Adel)
                Senior Lecturer
                Teaching: Architectural design
                Research: Architectural education
                                Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Student Handbook 2011 page 39
      ________________________________________________________________________________


                     Veronica Soebarto BArchEng(Indonesia), MArch(Texas), PhD(Texas)
                     Associate Professor
                     Teaching: Architectural science; architectural design
                     Research: Energy-conscious building design, energy simulation for building design, thermal
                     performance of buildings, thermal comfort

                     Terry Williamson BE (Monash), BArch(Melb), PhD(Adel) ARAIA
                     Associate Professor
                     Teaching: Architectural construction and science; building economics
                     Research: Thermal performance of buildings and thermal preferences

                     Joshua Zeunert BDesSt, BArch, BLArch(Hons) (Adelaide)
                     Lecturer
                     Teaching: Environmental design and sustainability, landscape architecture
                     Research: Landscape Architecture, Responsive systems design and environments



      Visiting Professor          Mr Hijjas bin Kasturi
                                  Dr Judith Brine BArch(Melb), DipTRP(Melb),Ph.H.(Adel)

      Adjunct Professor           Rob Cheesman BArch(Adel), MLitt(Camb) FRAIA
                                  Ron Danvers BArch(Adel) ARAIA

      Adjunct Senior Lecturer     Deborah White

      Visiting Fellows            Steve Grieve BSc(Arch)(UNSW), BArch(UNSW)
                                  Phil Harris BArch(Adel)
                                  Ian McDougall BArch (RMIT), MArch (RMIT)
                                  Barry Rowney AMusA (Adel), BArch(Hons)(Adel), MURP(Adel), PhD(Adel)


      Visiting Research Fellows     Derrick Kendrick BScTech(Manc), FIES(Aust), MCIBSE(UK), CEng(UK),
                                    MSLL Hon RAIA
                                    Newell Platten BE(Arch)(Adel)
                                    Michael Queale BArchSt(Adel), BArch(Hons)(Adel)



Professional Staff         Nicole Bailey
                           Personal Assistant to Acting Head of School

                           Alison Bosnakis
                           Administrative Assistant

                           Ian Florance
                           Local IT Officer

                           Clement Low
                           Student Adviser

                           Velice Wennan
                           School Manager

                           Melissa Wilson
                           Finance Officer (Wednesday-Friday)

				
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