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					                                                                                                                                     Linguistics
                                                                                     (offered by the Department of Linguistics)
                                                                                             Telephone number 012 429 6316

 1                                                                                                                                       Introduction
Linguistics is the study of language in general and it focuses on a wide variety of topics, such as: what a grammar is; how our thinking processes shape
the grammar we use; what makes texts coherent; how language is learned; how language is used in different social circumstances; how language planning
can change the status of languages in a society; and so on. In our courses you will, on the one hand, learn more about what it is that human beings know
when they know a language, and how linguists go about discovering more about this linguistic knowledge. On the other hand, in more practical terms,
you will develop a clearer perspective on the sort of linguistic skills and understanding needed in the language professions (for example, language
teaching, language planning, terminology development, lexicography, translation and editing). These professions, which we deal with in more depth at
postgraduate level, are vitally important in a multilingual country like South Africa.


 2                                                                                                                    General Information
To study Linguistics, you do not need to know more than one language, but we do recommend that you include at least one language module in your
degree.


 3                                                                                                    Transitional Arrangements
 Study         Modules which may not be             Outstanding
 unit          taken                                modules
 passed
 LNG100        LIN101, 103                          –
 LNG202        LIN202, 204                          LIN203 and 205
 LNG204        LIN203, 204                          LIN202 and 205
 LNG301        Students will be credited with       Any other TWO
 LNG302        any TWO third-level modules          third-level modules
               per third-year paper                 for a major subject
 LNG303
 LIN102        LIN205
 LIN201        LIN309
 LIN304        –                                    Any other THREE
 LIN307                                             third-level modules
                                                    for the major subject

       Students who have passed any LIN module that has been discontinued will retain these credits at the appropriate level towards a major.
       Distinctions for students who took LIN201 (instead of LIN309) at third level will be calculated by using LIN302, 306, 308 and LIN201.


 4                                                                                             Linguistics as a Major Subject
                                                                Compulsory modules for a major subject combination:
First level:  LIN101, 103
Second level: LIN202, 203, 204, 205
Third level: LIN302, 306, 308, 309

       NB
       Linguistics is a ten-module major. This means that students may have a third-year slot open for an extra module. Students are advised to fill this slot with LIN304
       or LIN307.
       If students chose LIN201 at second level, and are therefore prohibited from doing LIN309 at third level, they can choose any outstanding second-level module to
       complete the ten modules for the major.



 5                                                                                                                                                 Syllabus
FIRST-LEVEL MODULES

LIN101W         Grammatical concepts (S1 and S2)*
Advice: Speakers of an African language can supplement their learning by registering for the relevant language module 102 on sound and word structure,
offered by the Department of African Languages.
Purpose: to enable students to define, identify and illustrate a set of basic grammatical (ie morphological and syntactic) concepts used in the description of
language in general. The module is very practical in that it will help students to describe the basic structure of any language they choose to study.

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LIN103Y         Multilingualism: the role of language in the South African context (S1 and S2)
Purpose: to introduce students to language use in multilingual societies, equipping them to deal with language issues they may come across in the
South African context, providing insight into the way in which language functions both to separate and unite communities, and covering topics such as
children’s acquisition of first and additional languages, bilingual schooling, language variation, language planning and cross-cultural interaction.

SECOND-LEVEL MODULES

Prerequisite: TWO first-level modules in this subject or any FOUR first-level modules

LIN2024         Linguistic categorisation (S1 and S2)
Advice: Knowledge of basic grammatical concepts (such as taught in LIN101) is assumed. LIN203 and the module in Psychology PYC303 would be an
interesting supplement to the syllabus.
Purpose: to enable students to analyse various aspects of language (eg word meaning, words and their respective word classes, grammatical constructions
and morphological types), using the prototype approach developed in cognitive linguistics.

LIN2035         Language acquisition in a natural environment (S1 and S2)
Advice: LIN103 and LIN202 are recommended. The module in Psychology PYC202 would be an interesting supplement to your learning about children
and their development.
Purpose: to provide insight into the human ability to acquire and use language, the complex relationship between language and the brain, the evolution of
language in the human species, children’s acquisition of language during their first six years (from the babbling stage to complex sentences), to introduce
students to various theories on how children acquire language, and to some unusual cases of language acquisition (eg in mentally retarded children).

LIN2046         Language in a changing world (S1 and S2)
Advice: LIN103 is recommended.
Purpose: to introduce students to factors in society that cause languages to change, to explore attitudes to language change and their implications for
language planning and language practitioners, and to gain an understanding of the reasons why certain languages are abandoned by their speakers
whereas others are maintained.

LIN2058         Sound and sound structure (S1 and S2)

      NB
Students need to have access to a CD player as audio material forms part of the study material in this module.

Advice: Speakers of an African language can supplement their learning by registering for the relevant language module 102 on sound and word structure,
offered by the Department of African Languages.
Purpose: to enable students to define, identify and illustrate a set of basic concepts used in the description of the sound structure of languages in general,
and to relate the meaningful properties of sound structure to sound production and perception. The module is very practical in that it will help students
to describe the basic sounds and sound structure of any language they choose to study.

THIRD-LEVEL MODULES

Prerequisite: TWO first-level modules in this subject or any FOUR first-level modules

LIN3028         Approaches in Linguistics (S1 and S2)
Advice: Knowledge of basic grammatical concepts (as taught in LIN101) is assumed.
Purpose: to enable students to compare and evaluate selected linguistic theories in the domains of syntax and phonology.

LIN304A           Translation and editing techniques (S1)
Advice:
        It is recommended that you register for a module from the list below after completing this module or together with it. These modules focus on
        translation practice with a language department. (Full professional qualifications in translation are offered at postgraduate level.)
        Students must be proficient in two languages.
African languages/English            Module 305 (Creative writing and translation) in the relevant language
Afrikaans/English                    TEX8228 (Persuasive texts)
French/English                       FRC3065 (Practical translation from and into French)
Purpose: to introduce students to the professions of translation and editing, to help them identify and solve translation problems at word, sentence and text
level, to gain insight into professional ethics, translating culture, and basic terminology theory, and to identify and analyse various text types for editing
and translation purposes.

LIN306C         Learning and teaching an additional language (S1 and S2)
Advice: Students are advised to consider registering for LIN203, either together with or before this module. LIN103 also provides appropriate background
to this module.
Purpose: to develop a better understanding of the issues involved in learning and teaching an additional language (a language other than a first language),
to study both the theories of language learning and important variables in the teaching of language, and to explore the practical applications and
implications of such knowledge for language learning and language teaching.

LIN307D          Text quality: theories, models and techniques (S2)*
Advice: Knowledge of basic concepts in text linguistics (as taught in LIN201/309) is assumed.
Purpose: to introduce students to the various theories, modules and techniques of assessing the communicative quality of non-literary texts.

LIN308E         Language planning and linguistic description (S1 and S2)
Advice: LIN101, LIN103 and LIN204 are useful background modules
Purpose: to enable students to identify and characterise problems related to language planning and development in a multilingual society, with special
reference to the development of standard languages in Africa, and the role of grammars and dictionaries.




                                                                                                                                                          13
LIN309F          Text structure and function (S1 and S2)
Advice: Knowledge of basic grammatical concepts (such as taught in LIN101) is assumed.
Purpose: to introduce students to text linguistic skills that will enable them to identify what makes texts coherent, to recognise differences between spoken
and written texts, to identify the sort of coherence and cohesion problems that may develop in the writing of texts, to explain why we understand some
texts more easily than others, and to compare various types of written texts (eg narrative versus academic writing).




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