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Classroom Response Systems poliomyelitis

VIEWS: 8 PAGES: 39

  • pg 1
									Supporting Faculty Use of
  Classroom Response
        Systems
             Derek Bruff
   Vanderbilt University Center for
              Teaching
         March 11, 2007
                  Agenda
 Demonstration
 Types  of Questions
 Types of Activities
 FAQs
 Why Use Clickers?
 Faculty Development
 Conjectures
              Question 1
What is your primary interest in learning
   about classroom response systems?
A. For my own teaching
B. For development work with instructors
C. Both equally
             Question 2
How many times have you taught a course
   using a classroom response system?
A. Never
B. Once or twice
C. More than once or twice
              Question 3
How many instructors are using clickers on
   your campus?
A. None
B. Just a few early adopters
C. Use among instructors is growing rapidly
D. Many instructors are already using
   clickers
                 Factual Question
Traxoline is a new form of zionter. It is montillated in Ceristanna. The
     Ceristannians gristerlate large amounts of fevon and then bracter
     it to quasel traxoline. Traxoline may well be one of our most
     lukized snezlaus in the future because of our zionter lescelidge.

Based on this information, how is traxoline quaselled?

A.   Via gristerlation
B.   Via bracteration
C.   Via lukization
D.   Via montillation

(Duncan, 2005)
         Conceptual Question
Stacy Klein,
  Biomedical
  Engineering
    Partially Correct Multiple Choice
                Questions
A 32-year-old man has a 4-day history of progressive weakness in his
   extremities. He has been healthy except for an upper respiratory tract
   infection 10 days ago. His temperature is 37.8 C (100 F), blood pressure is
   130/80 mm Hg, pulse is 94/min, and respirations are 42/min and shallow.
   He has symmetric weakness of both sides of the face and the proximal and
   distal muscles of the extremities. Sensation is intact. No deep tendon
   reflexes can be elicited; the plantar responses are flexor.
Which of the following is the most likely diagnosis?

A. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis
B. Guillain-Barré syndrome
C. Myasthenia gravis
D. Poliomyelitis
E. Polymyositis

(Case and Swanson, 2002)
  Partially Correct Multiple Choice
              Questions
 Francisco   Estrada-Belli, Anthropology
          Opinion Question
Have you ever personally followed someone
   around or conspired to run into them?
A. Males – Yes
B. Males – No
C. Females – Yes
D. Females – No


Bob Innes, Human & Organizational Development
            Opinion Question
If you did follow someone or conspire to meet
     them, did you do that alone or with a close
     friend?
A. Males – Alone
B. Males – With Friend
C. Females – Alone
D. Females – With Friend


Bob Innes, Human & Organizational Development
Question Asking for a Prediction
A 0.5 kg mass is hung from a string that
   goes over a pulley and then attaches to a
   scale. The scale reads 5 N.
Question Asking for a Prediction
A second 0.5 kg mass is then attached to the other
   side of the scale and hung over the pulley.
   What does the scale read now?
A. 0 N
B. 2.5 N
C. 5 N
D. 10 N


Shane Hutson, Physics
                    Game
Suppose each of you has $10. I will ask each of
  you to contribute any amount of money from $0
  to $10 in $1 increments. I will increase the
  amount collected by 20% and the resulting total
  will be divided equally among all class members.
  You may discuss your contribution with your
  neighbors, but your actual contribution will
  remain secret. How much do you contribute?

(Sulock, 1990)
       Feedback on Teaching
Evaluate the lecture thus far.

A. Very clear so far, no questions.
B. I have a question or two.
C. I have a lot of questions.
D. I am so confused, I don’t have any questions.


(Burnstein and Lederman, 2006)
      Types of Clicker Questions
   Factual Questions
   Conceptual Questions
   Partially Correct Multiple Choice Questions
    (Burnstein and Lederman, 2005)
   Opinion Questions
   Questions Asking for Predictions
   Games
   Feedback on Teaching
    Types of Clicker Activities
 Attendance
 Summative  Assessment (e.g. quizzes)
 Formative Assessment (e.g. CATs)
 Discussion Warm-Up
        Types of Clicker Activities
   Contingent Teaching (Draper & Brown, 2004)
       Bob Innes, Human & Organizational Development
 Peer Instruction (Mazur, 1997)
 Question-Driven Instruction (Beatty et al., 2006)
 “Choose Your Own Adventure” Lectures (ex:
  Hinde and Hunt, 2006)
 Others?
                   An Example
      Let Z be a standard normal random variable.
     Which of the following probabilities is smallest?
                                                                                             44%
1.    P(0 < Z < 2.07)
2.    P(-0.65 < Z < -0.11)
                                                              26%
3.    P(Z > -1.06)                                                            22%
4.    P(Z < -0.88)
                                                7%




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                   An Example
      Let Z be a standard normal random variable.
     Which of the following probabilities is smallest?
                                                                                            100%
1.    P(0 < Z < 2.07)
2.    P(-0.65 < Z < -0.11)
3.    P(Z > -1.06)
4.    P(Z < -0.88)

                                                0%              0%             0%




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              Another Example
Adam List,
  Chemistry
              Another Example
Adam List,
  Chemistry
                    Question 4
Which of the following best describes the attitudes of most
    faculty members on your campus when they hear
    about clickers?
A.  Enthusiastic – They can’t wait to incorporate clickers in
    their teaching.
B.  Cautiously Positive – They are interested in
    experimenting with clickers.
C. Neutral – They want to hear about their colleagues’
    experiences before trying clickers themselves.
D. Negative – They are not interested in teaching with
    clickers.
E.  Strongly Negative – They are resistant to the
    possibility of changing their teaching practice.
         FAQs about Clickers
 What questions or concerns do you think
 your faculty members do or would have
 about using clickers in their teaching?
              FAQs about Clickers
   Given that you spend more time in class interacting with
    students, do you find it difficult to cover as much
    material?
       Adam List, Chemistry
       Stacy Klein, Biomedical Engineering
       Francisco Estrada-Belli, Anthropology
   Where do you get your questions?
   How do your students respond to using clickers in your
    course?
   Should I count clicker questions as part of the course
    grade?
              FAQs about Clickers
   How well do these activities work in small classes?
   How many clicker questions can you ask in a class
    period?
       Shane Hutson, Physics
   How do you know that peer instruction time is fruitful?
   How do I lead a class-wide discussion after a clicker
    question?
       Stacy Klein, Biomedical Engineering
   Which brand of clickers should I adopt?
          FAQs about Clickers
 Contingent     Teaching
     At what point do you decide it’s time to move
      on to the next topic?
     What do you do about the students who
      answer incorrectly when it’s time to move on?
     What do you do if only, say, 10% of your
      students answer correctly?
     What do you do if you give your best
      explanation, and the students still don’t get it?
         FAQs about Clickers
 What   do you do if the technology doesn’t
  work or the students don’t bring their
  clickers?
 How much time and effort is needed to
  start using clickers?
 What advantage is there to using clickers
  over low-tech options (flashcards, etc.)?
 Has this completely changed your
  teaching?
                Question 5
Which of the following concerns would be most
   troubling to instructors on your campus?
A. Time needed to change one’s teaching
   practices
B. Difficulty of covering the material when adding
   interactive elements to one’s teaching
C. Writing effective multiple-choice questions
D. Potential for technical difficulties
E. Cost of clickers to students
F. Some other concern would be most troubling
Why Use Clickers?
                Why Use Clickers?
   Learner-Centered
       To promote active student engagement during class
         • Bob Innes, HOD
         • Bob again
       To surface student misconceptions and prior knowledge
       To teach in a way that adapts to the immediate learning needs of
        one’s students
       To promote student satisfaction with the learning experience
   Knowledge-Centered
       To develop conceptual understanding
       To develop critical thinking and evaluation skills
              Why Use Clickers?
   Assessment-Centered
       To check for student understanding during class
       To help students assess their own understanding
   Community-Centered
       To promote discussion and collaboration among
        students
       To encourage participation from each and every
        student in a class
       To develop mutual awareness among students
           Why Use Clickers?
 Research    on student perceptions of
 learning
     Cue 1998, Draper and Brown 2004, Greer
      Heaney 2004
 Research    on student learning
     Crouch and Mazur 2001, Nicol and Boyle
      2003, Draper and Brown 2004, Judson and
      Sawada 2006
               Question 6
Which of the following reasons to use clickers
   would probably appeal most to instructors at
   your campus?
A. To promote active student learning in class
B. To promote discussion and collaboration
   among students
C. To encourage participation from all students
D. To assess student understanding during class
E. To practice contingent teaching
F. Some other reason would be most compelling
            Faculty Development
   Activities
       Workshops with panels of users
       Electronic mailing list
       One-on-one consultations
       Demo system available for lending
       “Teaching Visits”
       Campus discussions on standardization
       Modeling clickers during workshops and other events.
       Interviewing faculty for conference workshops!
          Faculty Development
 Ideas
     Memo to faculty during book order season.
     Convene a working group of instructors
      actively using clickers.
     Identify and support experienced clicker users
      as mentors for other instructors.
     Others?
              Conjectures
 Hands-on   use
 Discipline-specific examples and
  experience
 Small steps with continuing inspiration
 Student activity ≠ student learning
 Novice teachers
 Stealth faculty development
 SoTL
               Question 7
Which of the following venues for instructor
   development around clickers would seem most
   promising on your campus?
A. Workshops
B. One-on-one consultations
C. Demo set for lending
D. “Teaching Visits”
E. Modeling clickers during other events
F. Some other venue seems most promising
         Further Resources
Vanderbilt Center for Teaching Guide on
 Classroom Response Systems:
 www.vanderbilt.edu/cft/ > Resources >
 Teaching Resources > Classroom
 Response Systems

                Derek Bruff
        derek.bruff@vanderbilt.edu

								
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