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Course Calendar 2008-2009 for Revisions by dfsdf224s

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									                               2010-2011 Course Calendar

                                       Attention all registered students
On-line access is provided for all aspects of students records. Students can access their
schedules, grades, locker numbers, mid-term assessments, tax forms, cote R,
registration information, student timetable, etc. on the Login Centre of the Champlain
College Saint-Lambert Web Site www.champlainonline.com. Students will need their
Champlain student number to create their account. Users will be asked to create a
password and provide a secret question to reset a forgotten password. If you have
forgotten your password, the system will prompt you to answer your secret question.
Choose a question for which the answer will be easy to remember.

Printed copies of the ‘College Studies Transcript’ can be obtained by students at the
Registrar’s Office (F-103). For Official copies of student transcripts, please refer to the
“Transcript Requests” section of the calendar for proper procedures.

    A revised version of this Calendar is available on the Champlain College Web site.

                                     900 Riverside Drive, Saint-Lambert, Quebec J4P 3P2

                                                             Tel.: (450) 672-7360
                                                             Fax: (450) 672-9299

                                                Toll free in Canada: 1 (877) 929-9197

                                                admissions@champlaincollege.qc.ca

                  Champlain College Saint-Lambert is a campus of Champlain Regional College
The College reserves the right to make changes without prior notice to the information contained in this publication, including the alteration of various
fees, revision or cancellation of particular courses and modification of dates in the Academic Calendar. Admissions requirements are subject to change
by the Ministry.

                                            Dépôt légal 2e trimestre 2010 Bibliothèque nationale du Québec
             MISSION STATEMENT FOR CHAMPLAIN REGIONAL COLLEGE
Mission
Champlain Regional College is a public, English-language post-secondary institution that provides pre-university and
technical college-level education and training, primarily in English, to learners in both Regular Day and Continuing Education
programs. The College, through its unique multiregional structure, responds to the needs of diverse linguistic and cultural
communities and contributes to the educational and socio-economic development of the regions of Quebec served by
Champlain-Lennoxville, Champlain-St-Lambert and Champlain-St. Lawrence.

The College is dedicated to fostering the individual success of its students and their development as well-rounded,
responsible and informed citizens of the world.


Values
The College values:
 lifelong learning for students, faculty and staff through personal growth and professional development;
 excellence through striving for continuous improvement;
 respect for all individuals, manifested through open communications and a commitment to fairness, justice and honesty;
 caring through compassion, courtesy and friendliness and a commitment to the wellness of students, faculty and staff;
 collaboration in the achievement of shared goals and objectives;
 stewardship through the responsible and effective use of human, physical, environmental and financial resources; and
 a sense of community and tradition within and among all locations of the College.


Vision
Passionate in our commitment to students, and inspired by our mission and values, Champlain Regional College aspires to:
   offer unique and innovative high-quality programs and services;
   graduate students who are recognized for the excellence of the knowledge and skills they have acquired;
   attract and retain outstanding faculty and staff; and
   be a learning-centered college.




                                                           Page 2
Canada Day                                       JULY 2010                                    AUGUST 2010                                 New Student
Thursday, July 1st                S    M     T      W      T    F    S         S        M     T   W     T     F    S               Course Confirmation
                                                                                                                                Monday, August 16th to
                                                            1    2    3             1    2      3    4    5    6    7
                                                                                                                         Thursday August 19th (inclusive)
                                   4    5      6       7    8    9   10             8    9     10   11   12   13   14
                                  11   12     13      14   15   16   17            15   16     17   18   19   20   21               First Day of Classes
                                  18   19     20      21   22   23   24            22   23     24   25   26   27   28              Monday, August 23rd
                                  25   26     27      28   29   30   31            29   30     31




Labour Day – Holiday                        SEPTEMBER 2010                                   OCTOBER 2010                        Thanksgiving – Holiday
Monday, September 6th             S    M      T   W    T        F    S         S        M     T   W    T      F    S              Monday, October 11th
                                                       1    2    3    4                                        1    2    Midterm Assessment Deadline
Monday Schedule
Tuesday, September 7th             5    6      7       8    9   10   11             3    4      5    6    7    8    9             Friday, October 15th
                                  12   13     14      15   16   17   18            10   11     12   13   14   15   16
Course Drop Deadline                                                                                                                  Friday Schedule
                                  19   20     21      22   23   24   25            17   18     19   20   21   22   23
Friday, September 17th                                                                                                         Wednesday, October 27th
                                  26   27     28      29   30                      24   25     26   27   28   29   30
                                                                                   31                                                  Pedagogical Day
                                                                                                                                    Friday, October 29th

Open House                                  NOVEMBER 2010                                    DECEMBER 2010                         Last Day of Classes
Sunday, November 7th              S    M     T   W    T         F    S         S        M     T   W     T     F    S          Wednesday, December 8th
                                        1      2       3    4    5    6                              1    2    3    4               English Exit Exam
                                   7    8      9      10   11   12   13             5    6      7    8    9   10   11        Wednesday, December 15th
                                  14   15     16      17   18   19   20            12   13     14   15   16   17   18                Final Exam Period
                                  21   22     23      24   25   26   27            19   20     21   22   23   24   25         Thursday, December 9th to
                                  28   29     30                                   26   27     28   29   30   31        Friday, December 17th (inclusive)
                                                                                                                                            Grades Due
                                                                                                                                  Friday, December 24th

First Day of Classes                        JANUARY 2011                                     FEBRUARY 2011                                  Info Session
Monday, January 24th              S    M     T   W    T         F    S         S        M     T   W     T     F    S              Thursday, February 3rd
Mark Review Request Deadline                                          1                         1    2    3    4    5
                                                                                                                                  Course Drop Deadline
Monday, January 10th               2    3      4       5    6    7    8             6    7      8    9   10   11   12             Monday, February 14th
Mark Review Reply Deadline         9   10     11      12   13   14   15            13   14     15   16   17   18   19
Monday, January 17th              16   17     18      19   20   21   22            20   21     22   23   24   25   26                        Study Day
                                  23   24     25      26   27   28   29            27   28                                        Monday, February 28th
Winter 2011 Course Confirmation
Monday, January 10th to           30   31
Thursday, January 20th

Study Days                                   MARCH 2011                                        APRIL 2011                               Friday Schedule
Tuesday, March 1st to             S    M     T  W     T         F    S         S        M     T    W     T    F    S                  Tuesday, April 19th
Friday, March 4th (inclusive)
                                               1       2    3    4    5                                        1    2
                                                                                                                                  Good Friday – Holiday
Midterm Assessment Deadline        6    7      8       9   10   11   12             3    4      5    6    7    8    9                 Friday, April 22nd
Wednesday, March 23rd             13   14     15      16   17   18   19            10   11     12   13   14   15   16
                                  20   21     22      23   24   25   26            17   18     19   20   21   22   23          Easter Monday – Holiday
                                  27   28     29      30   31                      24   25     26   27   28   29   30                 Monday, April 25th



Last Day of Classes                              MAY 2011                                      JUNE 2011                                     Grades Due
Tuesday, May 17th                 S    M     T     W      T     F    S         S        M     T   W     T     F    S                     Friday, June 3rd
English Exit Exam                  1    2      3       4    5    6    7                              1    2    3    4 Mark Review Request Deadline
Wednesday, May 18th                8    9     10      11   12   13   14             5    6      7    8    9   10   11               Friday, June 10th
Exam Period                       15   16     17      18   19   20   21            12   13     14   15   16   17   18 Fall 2011 Course Confirmation
Thursday, May 19th to             22   23     24      25   26   27   28            19   20     21   22   23   24   25           Monday, June 13th to
Friday, May 27th (inclusive)      29   30     31                                   26   27     28   29   30            Monday, June 20th (inclusive)
Journée des Patriotes – Holiday                                                                                            Mark Review Reply Deadline
Monday, May 23rd                                                                                                                      Friday, June 17th
                                                                                                                                        St-Jean Baptiste
                                                                                                                                        Friday, June 24th


                                                                          Page 3
                         OFFICIAL ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2010-2011
Fall Semester 2010
                  rd
Monday, August 23                                            First day of classes
                         th
Monday, September 6                                          Labour Day (no classes)
                         th
Tuesday, September 7                                         Monday class schedule
                       th
Friday, September 17                                         Course withdrawal deadline
                      th
Monday, October 11                                           Thanksgiving (no classes)
                   th
Friday, October 15                                           Midterm assessment deadline
                            th
Wednesday, October 27                                        Friday class schedule
                   th
Friday, October 29                                           Pedagogical day (no classes)
                      th
Sunday, November 7                                           Open House
                             th
Wednesday, December 8                                        Last day of classes
                         th                th
Thursday, December 9 to Friday, December 17 (inclusive)      Final exam period
                               th
Wednesday, December 15                                       English Exit Exam
                      th
Friday, December 24                                          Grades due


Other Important Dates
                  th                     th
Monday, August 16 to Thursday, August 19                     Fall 2010 registration for new students
                  th
Monday, January 10 , 2011 at 4:00 p.m.                       Mark review request deadline
                  th
Monday, January 17 , 2011                                    Mark review replies due


Winter Semester 2011
                   th
Monday, January 24                                           First Day of Classes
                          rd
Thursday, February 3                                         Info Session
                           th
Monday, February 14                                          Course withdrawal deadline
                           th         th
Monday, February 28 to Friday, March 4 (inclusive)           Reading Week (no classes)
                             rd
Wednesday, March 23                                          Midterm assessment deadline
                     th
Tuesday, April 19                                            Friday class schedule
                 nd
Friday, April 22                                             Good Friday (no classes)
                     th
Monday, April 25                                             Easter Monday (no classes)
                    th
Tuesday, May 17                                              Last day of classes
                         th
Wednesday, May 18                                            English Exit Exam
                      th          th
Thursday, May 19 to Friday, May 27 (inclusive)               Final exam period
                    rd
Monday, May 23                                               Journée des Patriotes (no classes)
               rd
Friday, June 3                                               Grades due
                  th
Monday, June 6                                               Pedagogical day
                  th
Tuesday, June 7                                              Pedagogical day


Other Important Dates
                   th                         th
Monday, January 10 to Thursday, January 20 (inclusive)       Winter 2011 registration for all students
                      th
Wednesday, June 8                                            Summer School 2011 - First day of classes
                th
Friday, June 10 at 4:00 p.m.                                 Mark review request deadline
                   th              th
Monday, June 13 to Monday, June 20 (inclusive)               Fall 2011 registration for returning students
                    th
Thursday, June 16                                            Graduation ceremony
                th
Friday, June 17                                              Mark review reply deadline
                   th
Friday, August 12 at 4:00 p.m.                               Late mark review request deadline
                        th
Thursday, August 18                                          Late mark review reply deadline




                                                         Page 4
                                   THE COLLEGE SYSTEM IN QUEBEC
The Cegep Structure
In the English language sector of Québec's educational system, students formerly went directly from high school (after
completion of Grade XI) to university. In 1967, the Québec government passed the General and Vocational Colleges Act,
providing for a new level of education following high school, the collegial level. Each college is an independent public
corporation, separate from both high schools and universities. These Community Colleges of General and Vocational
Education, commonly called CEGEP after the initials of the French name, “Collège d'enseignement général et
professionnel”, are distinctive institutions in Québec. They offer two-year general programs, leading to university studies,
and three-year technological programs, serving a wide variety of interests. Tuition-free for Québec residents, the junior
colleges are open to all students who have completed high school.


Champlain College Saint-Lambert Foundation




Each semester during registration, students pay an optional $10 fee to the Champlain College Saint-Lambert Foundation.
The Foundation has also received generous donations from various sponsors such as the Fédération des Caisses Desjardins,
rive-sud.

These fees help fund various student-related projects, such as student awards and scholarships, emergency student loans
for books and food, learning resources, extracurricular activities, the revitalization of the college library and providing
technology for use in the classroom.

For more information, or to make a donation, please contact Mr. Donald Shewan, at 450-672-7360, ext. 244.




                                                           Page 5
                     BOARD OF GOVERNORS & OFFICERS OF THE COLLEGE
Board of Governors
BEST, Randall ……………………………………………….........……........... Faculty Representative, Saint-Lambert
CORNO, Christian……………...…………………………….……............... Director of Studies
DI IOIA, Pino ……………………………………….………………...……......... Pre-University Graduate, Saint-Lambert
GABOURY, Jean ………………………………….……………...………......... Government Appointee
GALLANT Frédérick.……………...…………………………….…….......... Student, St-Lambert
GARNEAU, Richard………………...…………………………….……........... Support Staff, St. Lawrence
HANRAHAN, Louis ………………………...…………………….……........... Government Appointee, Socio-Economic
KERWIN, Terence .................................................................... Parent Representative, St-Lawrence
LE PROHON, Lise ………………………………...………………….…...........Government Appointee, Socio-Economic
MANOLI, Soheil ……………………………………...…………….……..........Faculty Representative, St-Lawrence
McLEOD, Valerie ..................................................................... Parent Representative, St-Lambert
MURRAY, Michael ………………………………………......…………......... Government Appointee
PARADIS, François ………………...…………………………….……........... Technology Graduate, Lennoxville
ROBERTSON, Ken ……………………...…………………….…………..........Director General
SANGSTER, David………………...…………………………….……............. Faculty Representative, Lennoxville
SHEERAN, Ruth ………………...…………………………….……............... Government Appointee
ST-HILAIRE, EMILIE……………………………………………………….……… Pre-University Student, St. Lawrence
TURNER, Christopher…………………………………………………….…….. Professional, Lennoxville
Vacant ……………………………...…………….……................................ Government Appointee, Enterprise


Officers of the College
CORNO, Christian .............…………………..…….....………....…........ Director of Studies
FILION, Maxine ….....………………………..………......….................... Director of Human Resources/Secretary General
HAFFENDEN, John ……………………………..…..…....….…...……........ Director, Financial Services
KAESER, Paul ………………………………………..…..…….…...…….......... Director, Lennoxville
ROBERT, Jean ………………………………….......………….….....…......... Director, St-Lawrence
ROBERTSON, Ken …………………………………....……..…..….….......... Director General
SHEWAN, Donald T. ………………………………....…..…………............ Director, Saint-Lambert




                                                                     Page 6
                                                       ADMINISTRATION & STAFF
Director’s Office
DIRECTOR ........................................................................... SHEWAN, Donald T.
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT ................................................. POLIFRONI, Patrizia (Interim)


Academic Services
DEAN (Academic Resources) ................................................... Vacant
DEAN (Curriculum and Faculty Development) ........................ SINGELIS, Anthony
ASSISTANT DEAN/REGISTRAR ................................................. COULOMBE, Suzanne
PEDAGOGICAL COUNSELLOR .................................................. SPARKS, James
TECHNICIAN ............................................................................ HINDLE, Sue


Registrar’s Office & Academic Advising
STAFF…………………………………………………...........……………………. BRUNETTE, Jocelyne
………………………………….........................…….........………………….. LECOMTE, Paulette
………………………………………..................................………………….. SCULLY, Irene
TECHNICIANS .......................................................................... GRÉGOIRE, Pauline
………………………..........................……………….........……...………….. ST-JACQUES, Danièle
ADMISSIONS OFFICER ............................................................. WAGNER, Patricia
RECRUITMENT OFFICER .......................................................... THORNHILL, Kevin
ACADEMIC ADVISORS ............................................................. McKINNON, Ann
………………………………..................................…………………………… LESPERANCE, Dayle
………………………………..................................…………………………… ROCK, Geneviève
……………………………….........................…….........……………………… THORNHILL, Kevin
……………………………….........................…………….........……………… WAGNER, Patricia


Financial Services
DIRECTOR, FINANCIAL SERVICES & FACILITIES
MANAGEMENT ....................................................................... CONWAY, Paul
STAFF ......................................................................................BRUNELLE, Francine
……………………………….........................…………….........……………… JONES, David
…………………………….........................……………….……….........…..… COOPER, Suzy
……………………………..................................…………………………..… POIRIER, Linda (Interim)
TECHNICIAN ............................................................................ CÔTÉ, Suzie (On Leave)
……….........……………………………………...................…………………... LAWRENCE, Margaret (Interim)
FACULTY SECRETARY ............................................................... WARREN, Pamela


Library
COORDINATOR ........................................................................ HACHÉ, Nicole
REFERENCE LIBRARIAN ............................................................HUSTON, Dale
INFORMATION LITERACY LIBRARIAN ...................................... PENNER, Cornelia
STAFF.........................................................…………………………... BORAU, Angela
................................................................................................. GREENIDGE, Molly
................................................................................................. BURKE, Sabrina
TECHNICIANS .......................................................................... SYMONDS, Carol Ann




                                                                                 Page 7
Learning Centre
TECHNICIAN ............................................................................ KELLY, Doreen


HR Services
DIRECTOR …………....................................….............…….......... BÉLANGER, André François
MANAGER .............................................................................. IACONO, Patricia
STAFF ……............................................................………............ POIRIER, Linda


IT Services
MANAGER, IT SERVICES .......................................................... D’AMICO, Sam
STAFF ...................................................................................... KOUAME, Joséphine
………………………..............................................……………............ MÉNARD, Denise
TECHNICIANS .......................................................................... BLOCK, Max
………………………..............................................….........…………... ELLIS, Patrick
………………………..............................................………….........…... GÉDÉON, Pierre
SPECIALIST, TEACHING METHODS & TECHNIQUES.................. SAUVÉ, Gilbert


Continuing Education
DIRECTOR ................................................................................ WALLACE, Mark
MANAGER, COURSES & PROGRAMS ....................................... LECOMTE, Josée
MANAGER, CORPORATE and Government Training .............. SHIELDS, Terry
EDUCATION ADVISOR (RAC).................................................... ROCK, Geneviève
STAFF .......................................................................................BOURGEOIS, Céline
………………………………….................................……….........………... DUMONT, Henriette
…………………………………….................................……………............ GASS, Monica
……………………………………..........................................……………... GATIEN, Thérèse


Student Services
DIRECTOR ................................................................................ Vacant
COORDINATOR, STUDENT SERVICES ....................................... AMATO, Vince (Interim)
COORDINATOR, INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS .......................HOWIE, DEAN
…………………………….....................................……………..…............PERSONS, Dave (Interim)
SECRETARY .............................................................................. DALL-JONES, Wendy
COUNSELLING ......................................................................... BERISH, Mel (Interim)
………………………..............................................……………............ DOCKERY, Sue
………………………..............................................……………............ POLOMENO, Debra
………………………..............................................…..........…………... WYNNE, Veronica
LEARNING & SPECIAL NEEDS ...................................................PUPO, Marie
FINANCIAL AID OFFICER .......................................................... CORBEIL, Raymond
NURSE ..................................................................................... LEPINAY, Marie
RECREATION TECHNICIAN ....................................................... O’BRIEN, Scott (Interim)




                                                                               Page 8
Buildings and Equipment
FOREMAN ............................................................................... PELLETIER, Gaston
STAFF ...................................................................................... BERNI, Urbano
……………………….................................................…..................... COOPER, Suzy (Interim)
………………………........................................................……………... GRIFFITHS, Susan
………………………........................................................……………... GRISHIN, Aleksandr
………………………........................................................……………... MORIN, Joseph
………………………........................................................……………... PLOURDE, Eric
Academic Support Personnel
BIOLOGY .................................................................................. BÉLANGER, Elisabeth
PHYSICS ................................................................................... BOURASSA, Geneviève
CHEMISTRY ............................................................................. JIMENEZ, Horacio
CREATIVE ARTS ........................................................................HISCOCK, Ronald
PHYSICAL EDUCATION .............................................................EVELEIGH, Joe




                                                                              Page 9
                                                           FACULTY
Anthropology & Sociology                                                Creative Arts
Department Coordinator ......... Ford-Rosenthal, Angela                 Department Coordinator ......... Babineau, Dan
Anthropology .............................Mantha, Alexis                ………………………………….....……......Amberg, Nicolas
………………………………………...........Nouvel, Andrea                                ………………………………….....……......Benner, Zacy
………………………………………...........Olofsson, Ebba                                ………………………………….....……......Bernatchez, Elise
Sociology ................................... Lemay, Robert             …………………………………….....…......Estabrook, Kathryn
………………………………………...........Maurel, Mary-Lee                              …………………………………….....…......Finch, David
………………………………………...........Millar, David K.                              …………………………………….....…......Gutsche, Clara
………………………………………...........Resendes, Sandy                               …………………………………….....…......Miller, Ashley
                                                                        …………………………………….....…......Penserini, Francesca
                                                                        …………………………………….....…......Tatebe, Nancy
Biology                                                                 ………………………………………...........Watt, Barclay
Department Coordinator ......... Castillo-Ruiz, Priscila
…………………………………….....…......Bell, Justine                                 English
…………………………………….....…......Kearvell, Joan
…………………………………….....…......Woodruff, Peter                               Department Coordinator ......... Kerr, Christine
                                                                        ………………………………….....……......Bateman, Dianne
                                                                        ……………………….....………………......Bondre Ardelean, Crina
Business Administration                                                 …………………………….....…………......Buczko-Hackett, Daria
Department Coordinator ......... Bierbrier, Edward                      ………………………………….....……......Crane, Brian
………………………………………...........Ajzenkopf, Louis                              ………………………………………...........Dougherty, Tim
……………………………….....………......Dragunas, Saul                                ………………………………………...........Feder, Peter
………………………………….....……......Gibeau, Nelson                                ………….....……………………………......Harrison, Lisa
…………………………………….....…......Hertzman, Rubin                               ……………….....………………………......Hebert, Gordon
…………………………………….....…......Keras, Lydia                                  …………………….....…………………......Koper, Elizabeth
…………………………………….....…......Ladd, Laurel-Ruth                             ………………………….....……………......Kellock, Stephen
…………………………………….....…......Mirshak, Paul                                 ……………………………….....………......Leblond, Paul
…………………………………….....…......Nizami, Tariq                                 ……………………………………....…...... Mitchell-Peters, Brian
…………………………………….....…......Pietzsch, Wolfram                             ………………………………………...........Morrissey, Stephen
…………………………………….....…......Royce, Charles                                ………………………………………...........Murphy, Caitlin
                                                                        …………………………………….....…......Newman, Maureen
                                                                        ………………………………………...........Panzuto, Josie
Chemistry                                                               ………………………………………...........Paquet, Stéphane
                                                                        ….....……………………………………......Philpott, Nicola
Department Coordinator ......... Janik, Elizabeth                       ……….....………………………………......Preston, Pasley
……………………………….....………......Ghobadi, Elham                                …………….....…………………………......Scotten, Neil
…………………………………….....…......Goulet, Nathalie                              ………………….....……………………......Sinclair, Craig
………………………………………...........Ishayek, Rouben                               ……………………….....………………......Siourbas, Helen
………….....……………………………......Mancuso, Carmela                              …………………………….....…………......Tett, Alison
…….....…………………………………......McClory, Michael                              …………………………….....…………......Webb, Norcene
…………………………………………….Bell, Christa                                         …………………………….....…………......Woodruff, Susan
…………………………………………….Alessi, Manlio
Computer Science                                                        Graphic Communications
Department Coordinators ........ McGirr, Linda                          Department Coordinator ......... Sliz, Theresa
……………………………………........... Cabrejos, Pedro                               …….....…………………………………......Gaudet, Paule
………….....……………………………......Bierman, Robert                               ………….....……………………………......Pike, Suzanne
……………….....………………………......Liutec, Jennifer                              ……………….....………………………......Redman, Dawn
…………………….....…………………......Popiel, Alison                                …………………….....…………………......Lapointe, Louis
………………………….....……………......Ramadan, Samia




                                                              Page 10
Humanities                                                                            Mathematics
Department Coordinator ......... Warr, Monica                                         Department Coordinator ......... Chvatalova, Jarmila
……………….....…….....……………...... Albert, Denise                                          ………………………....………………...... Baba, Srinath
…………………….....……..…………...... Beauchamp, Philippe                                       …………………………....……………...... Bedrossian, Karnig
………………………………....………...... Conway, Stephanie                                           ……………………………....…………...... Best, Randall
…………………………………....……...... Dohle, Gordon                                               ………………………………....………...... Butler, William
……………………………………............. Fournier-Sylvestre, Nicole                                …………………………………....……...... Chambers, Mao
……………………………………….......... Gagné, Michel                                               ……………………………………....…...... Cordy, Brendan
……………………………………….......... Hershorn, Kim                                               ……………………………………….......... Fortin, Charles
……………………………………….......... Hreha, Steve                                                ……………………………………….......... Golovina, Galina
……………………………………….......... Jervis, James                                               …....……………………………………...... Harper, Malcolm
……………………………....…………...... Lachapelle, Jean                                            ……....…………………………………...... Indurskis, Gabriel
………………………………....………...... Lemay, Robert                                               ………....………………………………...... Larose, Benoit
…………………………………....……...... Millar, David                                               …………....……………………………...... Mei, Ming
……………………………………....…...... Morris, James                                               ……………....…………………………...... Nesbitt, Elizabeth
……………………………………….......... Morrissey, Stephen                                          ………………..………………………......… Petros, C.I.
……………………………………….......... Quinsey, Heidi                                              ………………….......…………………...... Titcombe, Michèle
………....………………………………...... Tett, Alison                                                ………………….......…………………...... Willis, Vern
…………....……………………………...... Toombs, Bruce
                                                                                      Methodology
International Baccalaureate
                                                                                      Coordinator ............................ White, Stephen
Program Coordinators ............. Hreha, Steve
................................................. Lachapelle, Jean
                                                                                      Physical Education
Languages                                                                             Department Coordinators ........ Rittmaster, Dana
                                                                                      …………………………………….....….... Sandman, Art
Department Coordinator ......... Noël, Colette                                        …………………………………....……...... Bourque, Ginette
Program Coordinator .............. Assimakopoulos, Vasiliki                           ……………………………………....…...... Cruise, Kerry
FRENCH ..................................... Bouchard, Marie-Pierre                   ……………………………………….......... Dagenais, Marc
……….....………………………..……...... Burman, Marie-Héléne                                      …………....……………………………...... Doyle, Amey
……………....…………………………...... Campeau, Johanne                                            ………....………………………………...... McConnell, Kevin
………………....………………………...... Charette, Nicolas                                           ……………....…………………………...... Rothsching, Norman
…………………....……………………...... Fournier, Pierre
……………………....…………………...... Kozminski, Catherine
………………………....………………...... Lachapelle, Diane
…………………………....……………...... Lajoie, Mélanie
                                                                                      Physics
……………………………....…………...... Mathieu, Hélène                                             Department Coordinator ......... O’Leary, William
………………………………....………...... Murchison, Ian                                              …………………………………....……...... Ajami, Fouad
................................................ Tchernigoos Kaia, Marina             ……………………………………….......... Barzilay, David
ITALIAN ..................................... Fonsato, Vanna                          …………………………………....……...... Dixon, Philip
SPANISH .................................... Assimakopoulos, Vasiliki                 ……………………………………....…...... Kenton, Paul
                                                                                      ……………………………………....…...... Poirier, Rémi
                                                                                      ……………………………………....…...... Kettner, Joanne
                                                                                      ……………………………………....…...... Varfalvy, Peter

Liberal Arts
Program Coordinator ............... Lemay, Robert
PHILOSOPHY ............................. Hreha, Steve
………………....………………………...... Lachapelle, Jean
……………....…………………………...... Toombs, Bruce
RELIGIOUS STUDIES .................. Tett, Alison
…………………………………….....…..... Toombs, Bruce




                                                                            Page 11
Psychology                                                                 Tourism
Department Coordinator ......... White, Stephen                            Department Coordinator ......... Malard, Brigitte
………………………………….....…...... Labelle, Louise                                  ………………………………....………...... Bouchard, Lorelie
………………………………....………...... Arruda, Cindy                                    ……………………………....…………...... Danielse, Luc
………………………………....………...... Boucher, Joseph                                  …………………………....……………...... Jenkins-Marsan, Brenda
………………………………....………...... Glick, Mordechai                                 …………………………....……………...... Niederhoffer, Melvyn
…………………………………....……...... Gottheil, Marlene                                …………………………....……………...... Saba, John
……………………………………....…...... Haynes, Vadney                                   ……………………………....…………...... Wassef, Nadia
……………………………………….......... Videtic, Andrea
…………....……………………………...... Kerwin-Boudreau, Susan
……………....…………………………...... Sepinwall, Sharyn
………………....………………………...... Sissons, Elizabeth
…………………....……………………...... Tosco, Anna-Maria


Social Sciences
Department Coordinators                      Katrapani, Atanas
..................                           Said, Aminu
……………………………………........... Hnatchuk, Jim
ECONOMICS .............................. Lardizibal, Edward
…………………………....……………...... Saba, John
……………………………....…………...... Said, Aminu
………………………………....………...... Bouchard, Lorelie
GEOGRAPHY .............................. Katrapani, Atanas
………………………………....………...... Beauchamp, Philippe
HISTORY .............. ..................... Charpentier, Marc
……………………………....…………...... Dohle, Gordon
………………………………....………...... Katrapani, Atanas
…………………………………....……...... Jones, John
……………………………………....…...... Katrapani, Atanas
……………………………………….......... Korte, Nadine
……………………………………….......... Nasra, Michael
………………………....………………...... Dohle, Gordon
POLITICAL SCIENCE ................... Christopher Forest
……………………………………….......... Saba, John
…………………………....…………….....




                                                                 Page 12
                                                    ADMISSIONS
Quebec Residents                                                 Canadian Students Outside Québec
In order to be admitted to a program leading to a Diploma        Students who have received their high school diploma from
of College Studies (DEC), candidates must meet the               a province other than Québec must have the following
following three requirements:                                    minimum admissions requirements:

1.   The candidate must possess a Secondary School                    Alberta Grade XI (67-100 credits)
     Diploma and must be in at least one of the following             British Columbia Grade XI
     three situations:                                                Manitoba Grade XI (minimum 13 credits )
                                                                      New Brunswick Grade XI (minimum 12 credits)
     a) The candidate holds a Québec Diploma of                       Newfoundland Grade XI (minimum 24 credits)
        Secondary Studies (DES).                                      Nova Scotia Grade XI (minimum 12 credits)
        N.B. A candidate holding a DES, but who has not               Ontario Secondary School Diploma Grade XI (minimum
        succeeded in one or more of the following courses,            22 credits)
        will be required to complete remedial courses :               Prince Edward Island Grade XI (minimum 12 credits)
            Secondary V Language of Instruction                       Saskatchewan Grade XI (minimum 16 credits)
            Secondary V Second Language
            Secondary IV Mathematics
                                                                 Québec law requires students who are not deemed
            Secondary IV Physical Science
                                                                 residents of Québec to pay additional fees of $1055.00 per
            Secondary IV History of Québec and Canada
                                                                 semester ($5.15 per course hour for part time students).
                                                                 Please note that fees are subject to change without notice.
     b) The candidate holds a Diploma of Vocational
        Studies (DEP) and has successfully completed the         Students who were not born in Québec, and who are not
        following subjects:                                      deemed residents of Québec, will be required to submit
            Secondary V Language of Instruction                  proof of residency to the Admissions Office. The Admissions
            Secondary V Second Language                          Officer will verify the status of all applicants who applied
            Secondary IV Mathematics                             without a Québec birth certificate. In cases where proper
                                                                 documentation is missing, the candidates may be asked to
                                                                 provide additional documentation.
     c)   The candidate has completed a level of education
          that is deemed equivalent by the College.
                                                                 Students from the U.S.A.
2.   The candidate must satisfy, if applicable, the specific
     program prerequisites established by the Minister.          Grade 12 graduation is strongly recommended. Applicants
3.   The candidate must satisfy, if applicable, any special      with Grade 11 may apply and will be considered on a case
     conditions for admission established by the College for     by case basis depending on the nature of the high school
     each of its programs.                                       program followed in the U.S.A.

Details about specific program prerequisites and other           Applicants to Science programs which have additional
special conditions for admission are found within each           prerequisite requirements in Mathematics, Physics and
program description further in this document.                    Chemistry must submit detailed course descriptions for
                                                                 courses followed in Grade 11 or 12.
Please refer to the 2011-2012 Admissions Handbook and
Program Brochures for the 2011-2012 admissions
requirements.




                                                            Page 13
International Students                                           Language Requirement
Applicants from outside Canada and the United States are         International Students and Permanent Residents whose
normally required to possess a high school diploma from          mother tongue is not English and/or who have not studied
their country in a pre-university secondary school program.      in English during the last two years are required to submit
Applicants without a high school diploma but with at least       official TOEFL results (Test of English as a Foreign
11 years of education in a pre-university secondary school       Language). Applicants may present the results of other
program may apply and will be considered on a case by            tests or examinations providing evidence of college-level
case basis. Applicants may wish to obtain an “Opinion of         abilities in English. Upon examination of this evidence by
Equivalence” (Avis d’équivalence) from the Québec Ministry       the College, applicants may be exempted from the TOEFL
of Immigration and Cultural Communities, which will be           requirement.
given serious consideration by the College for admissions
purposes. The ministry’s web address is                          All diploma programs offered by English colleges in Québec
www.micc.gouv.qc.ca.                                             require students to successfully pass two college-level
                                                                 courses in “French as a Second Language”. In order to
Québec law requires International Students to pay                ensure that admitted students will be able to pass these
additional fees of $8,180 per academic year ($4,090 per          courses, Champlain Saint-Lambert requires applicants who
semester). The fee for part-time students is $1,989 per          have studied outside Québec to demonstrate completion of
course hour. Please note that these fees are subject to          approximately 180 hours of French instruction.
change without notice.

International students must also provide the following
                                                                 Advanced Standing Applicants
documentation before arriving in Canada:                         Students applying from other Québec CEGEPs, private
                                                                 colleges, and other government approved college level
   A "Certificat d’acceptation du Québec" (C.A.Q.), which        institutions must submit a student copy of their bulletin
   must be obtained from the «Ministère des                      when applying. Upon admission, their official marks will be
   communautés culturelles et de l’immigration» of the           obtained directly from the Ministry of Education and will be
   Province of Québec;                                           integrated into their Champlain College Saint-Lambert
   A "Student Authorization" from the Federal                    bulletin.
   Government of Canada;

                                                                 Equivalences
International students should begin the process of
obtaining these documents once they have received their          Equivalences for courses taken at post-secondary
acceptance letter from Champlain College Saint-Lambert.          institutions other than Quebec CEGEPs, private colleges or
                                                                 other government approved college level institutions are
International students must provide proof of enrolment in a      considered on a course-by-course basis by the Academic
comprehensive health and accident insurance plan that is         Advisors in consultation with the appropriate Department
approved by the college. Students may obtain such an             Coordinator. Credit will not automatically be given for years
insurance plan at a cost of approximately $575.00 per year       or full semesters of study. Champlain College Saint-Lambert
through the auspices of the College.                             does not normally grant equivalent credit for courses
                                                                 followed at the university level.

                                                                 No request for equivalent credit will be considered until the
                                                                 following documentation has been submitted:
                                                                 a) A detailed description of the course content.
                                                                 b) An official transcript.




                                                            Page 14
Application Procedure                                            Registration
Applications are available online through the college            Champlain College Saint Lambert is in the process of
website at the following at www.champlaincollege.qc.ca or        implementing a new online registration process.
at http://commonapplication.qc.ca. The deadlines for             Information regarding Online Registration will be available
                                                      st
applying for full-time studies are as follows: March 1 for       online and on individual student web accounts.
                                    st
the fall semester and November 1 for the winter semester.
The application fee is $30.                                      Registration for your courses will be made easier if you
                                                                 follow these guidelines:
Student Fee                                                      Students should not select courses that conflict with
Once accepted by the College, all applicants pay a Student       personal commitments (this includes job related conflicts).
Fee of $150.00 per semester (includes an optional $10 fee        They must organize themselves and their schedules
for the Champlain College Foundation). Students who have         accordingly. Students are required to be present in class
registered and decide not to attend the College may receive      at all times.
a refund if it is requested in writing before the first day of
classes. The registration fee component of $20.00 is non-        FAILURE TO ATTEND A COURSE REGULARLY MAY RESULT
refundable once the applicant has registered for courses.        IN A RETROACTIVE CHANGE FROM FULL-TIME STATUS TO
See "Fee" section of this Calendar.                              PART-TIME STATUS.

NOTE: The Student Fee is subject to change without notice.       In order to be considered a full-time student, the
                                                                 minimum number of courses that a student must register
                                                                 for and attend is four (or 12 hours of classes per week).
                                                                 Part-time students are required to pay fees at the rate of
                                                                 $2.00 per course hour. Permission to register as a part-
                                                                 time student must be obtained from the Registrar.

                                                                 For special circumstances, please go to the Registrar's
                                                                 Office (Room F-103) or telephone 450-672-7360 ext. 320
                                                                 a.s.a.p.

                                                                 At any time before, during and after registration, the
                                                                 college reserves the right to change the time or the
                                                                 teacher assigned to a course as well as the courses
                                                                 assigned to students, for reasons such as over or under
                                                                 enrolled courses or for other serious reasons.

                                                                 For your individual program, please review the appropriate
                                                                 section of this Calendar to familiarize yourself with your
                                                                 program courses




                                                            Page 15
                             INSTITUTIONAL POLICY ON THE
                      EVALUATION OF STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT (IPESA)
Champlain Saint-Lambert has been in existence since 1971.         academic objectives. Evaluation of work produced is critical
During this period it has established a reputation for the        to the student since it leads to self-knowledge and mastery
quality of its teaching and for the maintenance of high           of the subject matter. It also serves as the basis for the
academic standards. Good teaching and high standards are          granting of academic credit for the courses followed. For the
not possible without the competent and professional               instructor, the evaluation of student learning provides
evaluation of student learning. Over the years the College        important feedback which helps in the choice of teaching
has demonstrated its ability to accomplish this task.             methods and strategies.

This policy seeks to make clear to the students, the Board        Because of the pivotal importance of this matter, the
of Governors, the Ministry of Education and the                   Minister of Education has required the Board of Governors
community, the principles and practices of Champlain St.          of the College to sanction a policy concerning evaluation.
Lambert in the matter of evaluation of student learning.          The aim of the Board in instituting this policy is to promote
                                                                  the quality of education and to contribute to the learning
This policy is a public profession of the commitment to the       process at Champlain Saint-Lambert. It is intended to
fundamental values of equity and justice and to the pursuit       support the faculty and administration in the exercise of
of academic excellence. However, learning is a complex            their professional judgement. This policy will provide
activity which is difficult to evaluate, and any general policy   students with information which will make them more
concerning evaluation should be interpreted with this in          aware of the expectations and standards of the College and
mind.                                                             what their duties and rights are with regard to the
                                                                  evaluation of their academic achievement. It will help them
The evaluation of student learning is of paramount                to derive the maximum benefit from the teaching and
importance to the College since it establishes the standards      learning environment.
of the institution and measures the attainment of its




                                                             Page 16
                               INSTITUTIONAL POLICY ON THE
                        EVALUATION OF STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT (IPESA)
                                                                  1.3       Conventions
Section 1.
                                                                  Several conventions are used throughout this Policy to
Foundations for the Policy                                        enhance readability.

1.1        Objectives                                             1.3.1     Use of the Term “Ministry”
                                                                            The term “Ministry” is used throughout the
The objectives of this Policy are                                           Policy to refer to the Ministère de l’éducation,
1.         to ensure that the evaluation of student learning                des loisirs et des sports (MELS).
           is fair and equitable;                                 1.3.2     Use of the Term “Dean/Director”
2.         to ensure that students receive clear, timely and                The term “Dean/Director is used throughout the
           complete information about how courses will                      Policy to refer to the College administrator(s)
           unfold and how learning will be evaluated;                       designated by the Campus Director as being
3.         to empower students, faculty, professionals,                     responsible for faculty and instruction in either
           support staff and administrators by providing                    the Regular Day sector or the Continuing
           them with clear rules, procedures and guidelines                 Education sector.
           to be applied in the evaluation of student
                                                                  1.3.3     Use of the Term “Academic Session”
           learning;
                                                                            The term “academic session” is used to cover
4.         to ensure that the awarding of diplomas is based
                                                                            both the standard semester in the Regular Day
           on evaluation of student learning that validly
                                                                            sector and the more variable program durations
           attests to the achievement of a program’s stated
                                                                            in the Continuing Education sector.
           competencies; and
5.         to specify procedures for the dissemination,           1.3.4     Use of French-based Annotations in the
           application, evaluation and revision of this Policy.             Remarks Section of the Transcript
                                                                            The codes used to place annotations in the
1.2        Application and Scope                                            remarks section of a student’s transcript are
                                                                            based on the French terms used in Ministerial
This Policy applies to the evaluation of learning for students
                                                                            regulations. For example, a course exemption is
in all pre-university and technical programs offered by the
                                                                            indicated on the transcript by the annotation
College that lead to a Diploma of College Studies (DEC) and
                                                                            “DI” from the French “dispense”.
in all programs leading to an Attestation of College Studies
(AEC) of credit courses offered by a Continuing Education
                                                                  1.4       Guiding Principles
service of the College.
                                                                  This Policy is based on the following set of guiding
This Policy supersedes and replaces the                           principles:
1.         Policy for the Evaluation of Student Learning:         Principle 1: Evaluation must be fair
           Champlain Lennoxville (Board of Governors              At the course level, students will be evaluated based on the
           Resolution 1594, June 21, 1995);                       stated learning objectives of the course, the program
2.         Policy on Evaluation of Student Learning:              competencies which the course is designed to address, the
           Champlain St-Lambert (Board of Governors               material covered, the relative importance of that material
           Resolution 1672, November 1, 1996);                    in the course, and the type of course work with which it is
3.         Policy for the Evaluation of Student Learning:         associated (pondération).
           Champlain St-Lawrence (Board of Governors
           Resolution 1596, June 21, 1995).                       Program-level evaluation, especially the Comprehensive
                                                                  Assessment in DEC programs, must be based on both the
The application of this Policy is under the joint                 stated program competencies and the material covered in
responsibility of the Director of Studies of the College and,     the courses of the program. The relative emphasis on
at each campus of the College, the Campus Director, the           particular competencies in the comprehensive assessment
Dean(s) in charge of faculty and instruction and the Director     must be consistent with the relative importance of these
of Continuing Education.                                          competencies in the program. Moreover, the
                                                                  comprehensive assessment must be designed in such a way
                                                                  as to afford students the opportunity to demonstrate their



                                                             Page 17
effective integration of learning acquired in different           intensive courses in Continuing Education which are, by
courses.                                                          their very nature, of short duration.
Finally, fairness requires that students have the right of
                                                                  Principle 7: Evaluation must be progressive
appeal when they perceive that either an evaluation task
                                                                  In order to provide a more accurate assessment of a
itself was unfair or that the grade awarded on that
                                                                  student’s learning over the duration of the session, course-
evaluation task was unfair.
                                                                  level evaluation should be undertaken at multiple points in
Principle 2: Evaluation must be equitable                         time. The final course grade cannot be based on a single
The principle of equity applies both to students in different     evaluation exercise.
sections of the same course and to different students in the
                                                                  Principle 8: Evaluation must attest to the achievement of a
same section of a course in a given session. In the context
                                                                  program’s competencies
of the comprehensive assessment, it applies to students in
                                                                  A passing final course grade signifies that a student has
the same program in a given academic year. Equitable
                                                                  acquired, to a satisfactory level, the program competencies
treatment requires that they be placed in similar conditions
                                                                  attached to that course. The evaluation tools and methods
for developing the course-associated competencies of the
                                                                  used in the course must therefore be designed in such a
program, that their learning be evaluated in a similar
                                                                  way that they will indeed assess the student’s acquisition of
fashion, that the requirements be similar from one student
                                                                  those competencies.
to the next, and that all students receive the same kinds of
information concerning the different aspects of evaluation.
                                                                  In DEC programs, a passing grade on the Comprehensive
Principle 3: Evaluation practices must be comparable              Assessment signifies not only that students have acquired
between courses and programs                                      the stated competencies for a given program, but that they
The measures and mechanisms implemented in different              have successfully demonstrated their ability to integrate
courses and programs on the same campus will produce              them. The Comprehensive Assessment must therefore be
comparable evaluation practices. This does not, however,          designed in such a way that it can indeed assess a student’s
mean that there must be uniformity in evaluation practices        integration of the program’s major competencies.
across programs. Rather, it requires that a common set of
                                                                  Principle 9: Evaluation is the joint responsibility of faculty
regulations applies to all courses and programs, from one
                                                                  and the College
teacher to another and from one session to another.
                                                                  At the course level, individual faculty members exercise
Principle 4: Evaluation must be transparent                       their professional responsibility and expertise in evaluating
Transparency requires that students be given, in advance,         student achievement of course competencies (selecting and
clear and understandable information concerning the               preparing evaluation tools and methods, timing of
content of their courses and their programs, the kinds of         evaluations, setting evaluation criteria, etc.).
learning activities they will encounter, and the different
methods for evaluating their learning.                            Departments and programs provide guidance and support
                                                                  to the evaluation efforts of individual faculty members and
Principle 5: Evaluation must be both formative and
                                                                  play a critical role in dealing with student appeals.
summative
Course-level evaluation facilitates student learning as well
                                                                  The College has the right and obligation to ensure that
as attests to the achievement of stated competencies and
                                                                  evaluation methods and practices conform to Ministerial
objectives. Consequently, both formative and summative
                                                                  regulations and this Policy. Institutional responsibility for
evaluation (see section 2.1) must be used in an appropriate
                                                                  the quality of evaluation also obligates the College to assist
balance.
                                                                  and support faculty in fulfilling their duties as evaluators.
Principle 6: Evaluation results and feedback must be
                                                                  Principle 10: The products of evaluation exercises are the
timely
                                                                  property of the student
In order to maximize the usefulness of evaluation in helping
                                                                  Consistent with the idea that one of the key functions of
students to become more effective learners and increase
                                                                  evaluation is to facilitate student learning, all the material
their likelihood of success on subsequent evaluations,
                                                                  produced by students in the completion of evaluation
evaluation results and related feedback must be given back
                                                                  activities during the session (e.g., papers, tests) is the
to students in sufficient time that the student can make the
                                                                  property of the individual student completing them. This
appropriate correction or improvement either to master
                                                                  carries with it an obligation for students to safeguard these
the competency or pass the course. Courses normally taken
                                                                  materials and be ready to present them in the event of an
by students who are in their first session of studies must
                                                                  appeal.
provide at least one summative evaluation activity during
the first five weeks of the session in order to help them
adjust to the methods and standards for the evaluation of
learning at the college level. The only exception would be



                                                             Page 18
Final examinations constitute a special case1 and are
therefore an exception to the rule. Nonetheless, students
                                                                               Section 2.
have the right to consult their final exams.                                   Course Level Evaluation of Student
Principle 11: Evaluation results are confidential                              Learning
Consistent with the College’s espoused value of respect for
individuals, student grades, progress reports and other
academic records are confidential information. The                             2.1       Types of Evaluation
confidentiality of evaluation results is also a legal obligation
                                                                               Formative evaluation is done to assist and further student
under the Act Respecting Access to Documents Held by
                                                                               learning by providing feedback to both students and
Public Bodies and the Protection of Personal Information.
                                                                               faculty. Formative evaluation exercises and assignments
As such, they will be given only to (a) students themselves,
                                                                               may be graded or not; their effectiveness depends primarily
(b) the parents of students under 18 years of age, upon a
                                                                               on the quality of the verbal or written feedback given to
request addressed to the Dean or Director of Continuing
                                                                               students.
Education, and (c) College employees or College-recognised
individuals with a legitimate need for that information in
                                                                               Summative evaluations assess formally and quantitatively
the performance of their duties2. In order to maintain
                                                                               student achievement in acquiring competency in the
confidentiality, marks will not be posted publicly in any
                                                                               learning activities required for a diploma. Summative
fashion such that someone other than the students
                                                                               evaluation exercises are graded and marks are cumulated
themselves can ascertain their grade, nor will completed
                                                                               for the student’s final grades.
evaluation materials (e.g. papers, test) be returned in such
a way that unauthorised persons have access to them.
                                                                               Summative evaluation methods may incorporate a
                                                                               formative component to provide additional feedback on
1.5         College’s Mission, Values and Vision Statement
                                                                               the strengths and weaknesses of a student’s performance
The particular elements of the College’s Mission, Values                       and/or suggestions for correcting errors or misconceptions.
and Vision Statement on which this Policy is based are
                                                                               2.2       Methods of Evaluation
Mission
The College is dedicated to fostering the individual success                   Both formative and summative evaluations of student
of its students and their development as well-rounded,                         learning are used in all courses. The former is more
responsible and informed citizens of the world.                                appropriate at the beginning of the course, while the latter
                                                                               should be spread throughout the semester. Early feedback
Values
                                                                               will help a student adjust soon after the beginning of the
The College values
                                                                               course. Mid-semester feedback will help students learn
   lifelong learning for students, faculty and staff through
                                                                               from their errors before completion of the course.
   personal growth and professional development;
   excellence through striving for continuous
                                                                               Evaluation methods are left to the discretion of the teacher
   improvement;
                                                                               in conformity with departmental procedures and may
   respect for all individuals, manifested through open
                                                                               include such things as examinations, essays, problem-
   communication and a commitment to fairness, justice
                                                                               solving exercises, oral exams, artistic productions,
   and honesty; and
                                                                               laboratory work, case studies and simulations. The choice
   collaboration in the achievement of shared goals and
                                                                               of evaluation methods should be consistent with the
   objectives.
                                                                               competencies and content of the course and the program
Vision                                                                         of which it is an element in accordance with Principle 1 of
Passionate in its commitment to students, and inspired by                      the previous section.
its mission and values, Champlain Regional College aspires
to                                                                             Consistent with the principles of fairness and progressive
    offer unique and innovative high-quality programs and                      evaluations, evaluation is a process that evolves as the
    services;                                                                  course unfolds over the session and as the program unfolds
    graduate students who are recognized for the                               from one session to another. Hence, students at the
    excellence of the knowledge and skills they have                           beginning of a course will not be evaluated in the same
    acquired; and                                                              fashion as they will be towards the end of a course, and,
    be a learning-centred college.                                             similarly, they will not be evaluated in the same fashion at
                                                                               the beginning of a program as they will be towards the end
                                                                               of their program. This evolution also applies to the
1
                                                                               evaluation tools or activities used.
  Final examinations are among the documents specified in the College’s
calendrier de conservation.
2
  This would include people such as auditors.

                                                                          Page 19
2.3       Evaluation Criteria                                    At the program level, students must be provided with clear
                                                                 and understandable information concerning the
Consistent with the principle of equitable evaluation,           composition of the program in terms of its courses, the
students in different sections of the same course, whether       kinds of learning activities, and the different means by
with the same teacher of with different teachers, must be        which student learning will be evaluated.
evaluated in a consistent and coherent manner with one
another in terms of the interpretation of objectives,            Unless student participation is explicitly and clearly linked
student workload, evaluation tasks, marking criteria and         to the achievement of course competencies and objectives,
weighting of evaluation tasks in the calculation of the final    it cannot be used as a distinct component of the course
course grade. While this requires collaboration between          grade.
the teachers involved, it does not require uniformity in
evaluation practices.                                            Class attendance is mandatory. However, students cannot
                                                                 be given grades based on attendance in class.
In addition, for different students in the same group,
whether in the same course section for purposes of course-       2.4        Standards of literacy and proficiency in English
level evaluation or in the same program for purposes of the
Comprehensive Assessment, equitable treatment requires           As an English-language educational institution, the College
that they be placed in similar conditions for developing the     believes strongly in enhancing students’ ability to use
course-associated competencies of the program, that their        English well in all areas of study and life. Consequently, for
learning be evaluated in a similar fashion, that the             all courses other than those where the primary language
requirements be similar from one student to the next, and        for the submission of assignments is not English, teachers
that all students receive the same kinds of information          are required to include evaluation of English proficiency in
concerning the different aspects of evaluation.                  their evaluation practices.

Consistent with the principle of transparent evaluation, the     In courses where the acquisition of English language skills is
grading of all evaluation tasks should be based on clearly       a primary learning objective, detailed marking criteria for all
stated criteria that have been communicated to students in       types of student work must be well-defined and
advance. Prior to each evaluation, students must be given        communicated to students. For these courses, there is no
complete and precise information about the requirement of        limit on the weight or value of this evaluation in calculating
the evaluation activity, the criteria that will be used in       a grade for the assignment.
evaluating their work, and the result of the evaluation and
how it will be used in the calculation of the final course       In courses where the acquisition of English language skills is
grade. Clear information about the methods and criteria for      not a primary learning objective, a minimum of 5% and a
this evaluation must be presented in the course outline.         maximum of 15% of the grade can be set aside for aspects
                                                                 of English proficiency (e.g., grammar, style, vocabulary) in
Teachers may choose to use particular evaluation tasks that      every paper, report or assignment.
must be completed by a group of students. Either
individual grades will be assigned to each student in the        2.5        Grading System
group or a single grade will be assigned to the entire group.
Where individual grades are to be assigned, the criteria         Final grades are given in percentage. The passing grade in
used for assigning those grades must be clearly specified        any course is sixty percent (60%). Final grades should reflect
when the task is announced or assigned. Otherwise, all           the extent of the achievement of the objectives and
members of the group should receive the same grade.              standards of a course and the cumulative mastery of
                                                                 certain competencies. A grade of 100% indicates that a
At the course level, students have the right to be informed      student has achieved all of the competencies evaluated to
at the beginning of the course about the timing and nature       the level of performance defined by the evaluation criteria.
of evaluation activities, including activities where a           The following grading scale is used at Champlain Regional
common grade is given for a group project. Consequently,         College:
during the session, students must be able to assess for
themselves how well they are doing in relation to their final    Grade         Judgement
course grade based on the results of their evaluations to        90-100%       Outstanding performance
date.                                                            80-89%        Very good performance
                                                                 70-79%        Good performance
Where multiple sections of the same course are offered in a      60-69%        Satisfactory performance
given session, departments must ensure consistency and           0-59%         Failure (unsatisfactory performance)
comparability in the marking criteria for evaluating student
learning and also equity in the types and forms of
evaluation.

                                                            Page 20
Consistent with principles of fairness and transparency, the       2.9          Final Examinations
use of grading on the bell curve is prohibited, as is the use
of bonus points for extra-credit evaluation.                       Final examinations are not required for courses. However,
                                                                   each course must have some form of final evaluation of
2.6       Scheduling - Evaluation Activities                       sufficient weighting to attest the student’s achievement of
                                                                   the competencies and the competency elements attached
Students will be informed in the course outline of tentative       to the course. This evaluation should account for a
evaluation dates and deadlines for the submission of               minimum of 40 percent of the final grade and may include a
assignments along with the penalties for late submission.          combination of multiple evaluations. The format of the final
                                                                   evaluation will be specified in the course outline.
In DEC programs, unless authorised by the Dean, class tests
and exams worth more than 20% may not be scheduled                 For DEC programs, the academic calendar includes a period
during the last two weeks of classes. Moreover, no more            of up to 10 days at the end of each fall and winter session
than one class test or exam worth 20% or less may be               for final examinations. The examination schedule is
scheduled during those two weeks.                                  approved by the Dean, and specifies the course number
                                                                   and title, section (file) number, as well as the date, time
The Academic Calendar of each campus specifies certain             and place of each final exam.
recurring dates on which, for reasons of religious
observance by a significant number of students,                    When feasible, a minimum of one day shall separate the
examination or tests may not be scheduled and may not be           commencement of final exams from the last day of classes.
set as due dates for assignments.
                                                                   Final examinations should take place during the final
Dates of some other recognized religious holidays cannot           examination period. Any departure from this rule requires
be determined far in advance. In the event an examination          authorization from the Dean/Director.
or assignment due date must be scheduled on such a date,
the student will be given reasonable opportunity to make           2.10         Evaluation in Workplace Internships
up the examination or submit the assignment at a later
date. However, it is the responsibility of students to inform      Although workplace internships are similar to other courses
their teachers at the beginning of the semester where              in that students receive final course grades, they are very
possible but at least two weeks in advance of such dates.          different in terms of the context within which the
                                                                   evaluation of student learning occurs.
2.7       Make-up Evaluations
                                                                   2.10.1       Eligibility Criteria/Conditions for Workplace
Students who, for College-authorized reasons, are absent                        Internship Sites
from class on the date a test is scheduled to be written or
                                                                   In order to ensure that evaluation demonstrates the
an assignment is due have the right to a make-up
                                                                   attainment of program competencies, a number of
evaluation. Scheduling of make-up evaluations is to be
                                                                   conditions must be met for a particular workplace setting
negotiated between the student and the teacher.
                                                                   to be acceptable as an internship site:
2.8       Mid-Term Evaluation
                                                                         there must be a clear link between the types of work
Each student will have access to a mid-term evaluation                   students will be performing at the internship site and
based on the results of summative evaluations which, in                  the stated competencies for the course and program;
total, account for a minimum of 15% of the final course                  the workplace must provide students with a work
grade. The format of this evaluation (either on-line or in               environment and tools that will allow them to perform
paper form), is the choice of each constituent campus.                   their duties in a professional manner;
                                                                         the workplace must provide supervision and support;
                                                                         the workplace supervisor must agree that student
                                                                         evaluations will be submitted to the College within
                                                                         clearly specified timeframes; and
                                                                         the workplace supervisor/evaluator cannot be a
                                                                         member of the student’s family.




                                                              Page 21
2.10.2       Evaluation at the Workplace Internship                            final course grade4, nor can its weight in calculating the
                                                                               final grade exceed 50%.
The internship-specific evaluation criteria, their format and
their weighting must be clearly explained to the workplace
                                                                               2.11         Reporting of Course Grades
supervisor prior to the beginning of the internship by a duly
appointed representative of the College. These internship-                     2.11.1       Confidentiality of Course Grades
specific evaluation criteria, their format and their weighting
must be clearly explained to students prior to the beginning                   Unless students have given written permission to do
of the internship:                                                             otherwise, student records, grades, and cumulative
                                                                               transcripts are confidential and given out only to the
    where the duration of the internship exceeds 120 hours,                    students themselves and to staff members who require
    provisions must be made for periodic formative                             such information in the performance of their duties. For
    evaluation throughout the internship in order to provide                   students under 18 years of age, the grades or transcripts
    students with feedback;                                                    will be released to the parent(s) or legal guardian(s) upon
                                                                               submitting a written request to the campus Registrar’s
    the final summative evaluation must take place not later                   Office. In order to maintain confidentiality, students’ marks
    than during the last week of the internship;                               cannot be posted publicly.
    prior to the final summative evaluation being submitted
    to the College, the workplace supervisor must review                       2.11.2       Submission of Final Course Grades
    the results of that evaluation with the students;                          Faculty are required to submit final course grades to the
    students must sign the evaluation form, signifying that                    office of the campus official charged with maintaining
    they have seen the results;                                                student academic records according to the agreed-upon
                                                                               due dates and methods for their particular campus of the
    students may add written comments on the evaluation                        College.
    form prior to its being submitted to the College;
    a copy of the completed final evaluation form must be                      2.11.3       Reporting of Final Course Grades to Students
    given to the students; and                                                 Final course grade results are communicated to students by
    whether or not students receive a passing final grade on                   means of the end-of-session transcript (Bulletin d’études
    the internship itself cannot be determined on the basis                    collégiales), according to forms and standards required by
    of completing a single task or project3. However, the                      the Ministry.
    quality of the students’ performance on the task or
    project may be used in determining the final internship
    grade.                                                                     Section 3.
                                                                               Special Cases of Course Level
2.10.3   Evaluation Criteria, Grading and the Final                            Evaluation
Course Grade
The evaluation methods (e.g., workplace supervisor’s
                                                                               This section addresses special cases in the evaluation of
evaluation, written internship report), grading criteria and
                                                                               student learning at the course level:
their weighting should be clearly described in the course
outline. Just as in any course, teachers should use their
                                                                                    evaluation of prior learning;
professional judgement in determining the final course
grade according to clearly specified criteria. What is unique                       course exemptions, equivalences and substitutions;
about a workplace internship is that teachers are not in a
                                                                                    cancellation of course registration;
position to personally evaluate all aspects of student
learning; they should in effect, share their evaluation                             withdrawal from a course;
responsibilities with the workplace supervisor.
                                                                                    accommodations for students with disabilities;
The workplace supervisor’s evaluation of student                                    evaluation in workplace internships; and
performance cannot be the sole basis for calculating the
                                                                                    course incompletes.




3
 The idea is to avoid situations where students could receive a failing
grade for failing to complete a particular task when the reasons for failure
                                                                               4
to complete are beyond their control (e.g., hardware malfunction,               Teachers have a professional responsibility to engage in their own direct
company bankruptcy).                                                           evaluation of student learning.

                                                                          Page 22
3.1        Evaluation of Prior Learning                            documentation that would be sufficient), the Dean/Director
                                                                   or Professional will consult with the Department concerned
Although the evaluation of prior learning is relevant in a         in order to determine appropriate methods for evaluating
general sense to decisions concerning a student’s                  the student’s prior learning. Thereafter, the process will be
admissibility to a particular program of studies, the focus        identical to that for the evaluation of experiential learning.
here is on the evaluation of prior learning in relation to         Each campus should keep track of all of the requests for
required courses in the student’s program of study.                equivalences or substitutions, whether they are granted or
                                                                   not. A systematic approach (using a database for instance)
3.1.1      Prior Learning in a Formal Educational Setting          would allow for a reliable mechanism to document and
Prior learning in a formal educational setting is defined as       monitor this phenomenon.
courses previously completed in secondary school, another
program at the same campus of the College, another                 3.1.2          Experiential Learning
campus of the College or at another college-level                  Experiential learning is defined as the acquisition or
institution, or at a university.                                   development of competencies (knowledge, skills or
                                                                   attitudes) through work or life experiences outside of an
Conditions and criteria                                            academic institution.
Occasions may arise when registered students request               Conditions and criteria
either equivalence or a substitution for a given course            Academic credit is not granted for experience alone, but
based on the assertion that they have already achieved the         rather for competencies acquired through experiential
competencies and objectives of that course by virtue of            learning. Such credit takes the form of being granted course
having previously passed another course.                           equivalence5 for a required course in the program in which
                                                                   the student is registered. Students must demonstrate to
With the exception of Regular Day courses associated with          the College’s satisfaction that they have acquired or
a program’s Comprehensive Assessment, all Regular Day              developed all of the competencies associated with that
and Continuing Education courses are eligible for the              required course to the same degree as if they had taken the
granting of either equivalence or a substitution on the basis      course.
of prior formal learning.
                                                                   The total number of General Education courses for which
Procedures                                                         students may receive an “EQ” on the basis of experiential
Students must first submit a formal request to the                 learning may not exceed a number equal to two thirds (2/3)
Dean/Director or designated Professional for an                    of the General Education credits required for the program.
equivalence (EQ), specifying that the request is being based
on prior formal learning. This request must be submitted           The total number of program-specific courses for which
prior to the session during which the course would                 students may receive an “EQ” on the basis of experiential
otherwise be taken. A separate request must be submitted           learning may not exceed a number equal to one-half (1/2)
for each course for which an equivalence or substitution is        of the program-specific credits required for the program.
being sought.
                                                                   Courses associated with a program’s Comprehensive
The Dean/Director or Professional will determine if the            Assessment are not eligible for the granting of an
prior course is listed in either the Equivalence Table or          equivalence based on experiential learning.
Substitution Table, as appropriate, as an acceptable
equivalent or substitute for the required course. If the           Procedures
prior course is listed, the equivalence or substitution will be    Students must first submit a formal request for an
granted. If the prior course is not listed, students may be        equivalence (see Procedures for Equivalences), specifying
required to supply additional documentation (transcripts,          that the request is being based on experiential learning.
course outlines, etc) in support of their request in order to      Along with the request, student should enclose any
evaluate the comparability of the two courses. After               documentation supporting their request. This request must
consultation with the Department concerned, the                    be submitted during the session prior to that in which the
Dean/Director or Professional will decide if the two courses       course would otherwise be taken. A separate request must
are comparable. If the courses are deemed to be                    be submitted for each course for which equivalence is being
comparable, the prior course will be added to the                  sought. Before the request will be processed, students
appropriate reference table (Equivalence Table or                  must pay any associated fees as provided for in Bylaw 6
Substitution Table).                                               (Bylaw Concerning Student Fees).
If the supporting documentation is deemed by the
Dean/Director or Professional to be insufficient for
establishing comparability between the two courses (and
the student is unable to supply any additional
                                                                   5
                                                                       College Education Regulations, Section V, Regulation 22.

                                                              Page 23
The Dean/Director or Professional will review the request             This exemption does not entitle the student to the credits
and supporting documentation and determine if there are               attached to the course in question. Instead, the total
sufficient grounds for proceeding with an evaluation of the           number of credits required by the program is reduced
student’s prior learning. If it is determined that the request        accordingly. Moreover, the competencies attached to the
merits consideration, the department concerned will be                course are deemed to have been “technically achieved” to
consulted in order to                                                 the same degree as if the course had in fact been taken and
                                                                      passed.
      identify the teacher who will be responsible for the
      evaluation, and                                                 Conditions, criteria
                                                                      The “DI” is assigned only in situations where the student is
      determine the appropriate evaluation method (e.g.:
                                                                      permanently unable to enrol in a required course and that
      portfolio, challenge examination) and criteria to ensure
                                                                      course cannot be replaced by another. Typically, this will
      that the students have attained the relevant
                                                                      involve one of the following specific scenarios:
      competencies to the appropriate degree.
After being notified of the chosen evaluation method and                   one or more Physical Education courses cannot be taken
the criteria to be used in grading it, students will decide if             due to medical or physical reasons or, in the case of
they wish to proceed.                                                      International Baccalaureate students, the courses are
                                                                           not required; and
If the students choose to proceed with the evaluation, the
                                                                           as the result of a program being revised or discontinued,
teacher responsible will submit the graded evaluation
                                                                           a particular course is no longer offered and no similar
materials to the Dean/Director or designated Professional
                                                                           course is available either at the College or at another
along with a report that summarizes the students’
                                                                           post-secondary institution.
performance. Students will be informed of the results of
the evaluation along with a formal notification of the final          Procedures for Exemptions (DI)
outcome for the request. The Dean/Director or designated              Requests for exemptions must be submitted prior to the
Professional will return the evaluation materials to the              registration period for the session in which the course
student.                                                              would otherwise be taken.

The following information or materials will be placed in the          In order to receive an exemption for medical reasons,
student’s academic file:                                              students must submit a request to the Dean/Director
                                                                      accompanied by a doctor’s note attesting to a permanent
      the student’s request form and supporting                       incapacity for a course or group of courses. The
      documentation;                                                  Dean/Director will review the request and supporting
                                                                      documentation, and then determine whether or not the
      details of the evaluation tools used;
                                                                      student is indeed unable to take the course. The
      the student’s copy of the exam, or detailed description         Dean/Director will then determine if there are any suitable
      of the requirements for the evaluation method (e.g.,            replacement courses at either the College or another
      portfolio);                                                     postsecondary institution. Only when it has been
                                                                      ascertained that the student is unable to take the course,
      details on administration of the evaluation;
                                                                      and there is a lack of a suitable replacement will the “DI” be
      teacher’s report on the results of the evaluation; and          granted.
      copy of the Dean/Director’s notification to the student
                                                                      Requests for an exemption based on course discontinuation
      of the final outcome.
                                                                      must be made to the Dean/Director who will review the
Complete dossiers/data should be kept on EQ requests                  request and verify that the course has indeed been
(related to experiential learning) as well to help monitor the        discontinued and that no suitable replacement course is
evolution of the students’ needs over time and as a means             available at either the College or another postsecondary
to offer a transparent approach.                                      institution. Only then will be “DI” be granted.

3.2          Course Exemptions, Equivalences and                      3.2.2       Equivalence (EQ)
             Substitutions
                                                                      An annotation of “EQ” in the remarks section of the
                                                                      transcript is used to signify that the College has determined
3.2.1        Exemption (DI)                                           that a student registered in a particular program has
                                                                      already covered the content and attained the objectives for
An annotation of “DI” in the remark section of the
                                                                      that course to a degree consistent with college-level
transcript indicates that the College has exempted a
                                                                      standards. Consequently, the student is awarded the
student from taking a course which is part of the program.
                                                                      credits attached to that course. Furthermore, the student

                                                                 Page 24
shall be deemed to have also achieved the competencies            program. This table will identify the most common courses
attached to that course to the degree specified in the            for which equivalences are sought on the basis of prior
official program description. However, the “EQ” does not          formal learning. For each of these courses, the table will
reduce the number of credits a student is required to             specify which courses from which institutions are
complete in a given program.                                      acceptable for granting equivalence.

Conditions, criteria                                              In all cases, the Dean will notify the student of the results of
In order to apply for an “EQ”, students must be currently         this evaluation process and the final determination of the
registered in a Regular Day or Continuing Education               request for equivalence. Only when a positive result is
program at the College.                                           obtained from this evaluation process will the Dean grant
                                                                  equivalence and enter an “EQ” on the student’s College
An “EQ” is granted only when students demonstrate to the          Studies Transcript.
satisfaction of the College that they have, by virtue of prior
learning experiences, already attained the objectives and
                                                                  3.2.3      Substitution (SU)
standards of the course for which the equivalence is
requested.                                                        An annotation of “SU” in the remarks section of the
                                                                  transcript signifies that the College has substituted one
Equivalence may be granted on the basis of prior schooling        course for another that the student would normally be
such as                                                           required to take in his program. This administrative
                                                                  measure is used to ensure that students can complete the
   secondary school courses that cover the content and            requirements for their diploma without having to take an
   meet the competencies of a course in the program in            undue number of additional courses. It is typically applied
   which the student is registered at the College (typically      when a student changes programs (or institutions) or when
   a technical program);                                          the revision of a program has resulted in the
                                                                  discontinuation or replacement of certain courses.
   college-level courses taken outside Québec that have
   content and competencies closely corresponding to
                                                                  When an “SU” is granted for a course, all of the
   those of the course for which the student is requesting
                                                                  competencies associated with the course are deemed to
   an EQ; and
                                                                  have been achieved to the same degree as if the student
   university courses that have content and competencies          had taken the course.
   closely corresponding to those of the course for which
   the student is requesting an EQ.                               Conditions, criteria
Equivalence may also be granted on the basis of prior
                                                                  Case 1: A substitution may be necessary when a required
learning acquired outside of an educational institution
                                                                  course is no longer offered because the student is
where the College has been able to determine that such
                                                                  registered in a program version the College is no longer
prior learning has enabled the student to master the
                                                                  authorised to offer. In order for a substitution to be made,
content and achieve the competencies associated with a
                                                                  a course must be found among those offered in the new
specific course in his program.
                                                                  program version that will achieve similar ends to those of
                                                                  the original course in terms of competencies and
Procedures for Equivalences (EQ)
                                                                  objectives.
Requests for equivalences and any required supporting
documentation in the Regular Day sector must be
                                                                  Case 2: A substitution may also be necessary when the
submitted to the Dean during the session prior to that in
                                                                  competencies and objectives associated with a required
which the course would otherwise be taken. In the
                                                                  course have already been achieved in a previous course or
Continuing Education sector, such requests should be
                                                                  courses of comparable weighting. This previous course may
submitted to the Director prior to the session in which the
                                                                  have been taken in (a) a different program at either the
course would otherwise be taken. The basis for the request
                                                                  same campus or at another institution or (b) the same
(i.e., prior formal education or experiential learning) must
                                                                  program at another institution where the program course
be clearly indicated on the application.
                                                                  mix differs from that of the current campus.
The Dean will review the request to ensure that it is eligible
                                                                  Procedures for Substitutions (SU)
for consideration and that the supporting documentation is
                                                                  In the regular Day sector, the process of seeking an SU is
complete. If both criteria have been met, the request is
                                                                  typically initiated by an academic advisor at the time of
then dealt with according to the procedures specified for
                                                                  registration. However, a student may also request a
the evaluation of prior learning.
                                                                  substitution by submitting a request to the Dean. In the
After consulting with the appropriate departments, the
Dean may establish an “Equivalence Table” for each

                                                             Page 25
Continuing Education sector, students must submit a                accommodations will be made and a record of these will be
request to the Director.                                           placed in the student’s file.
                                                                   Where the request for accommodation is based on pre-
Requests for a substitution must be accompanied by all             existing conditions, the student should normally notify the
documents required for the analysis of the request:                Dean/Director or designated Professional upon his
transcripts, course descriptions or any other pertinent            admission to the College or at the beginning of the session.
documents.                                                         In the event that situations arise during a session that
                                                                   require special accommodations (e.g., illness or accident),
After consulting with the appropriate department, the              the student should notify the Dean/Director or designated
Dean/Director may establish a “Substitution Table” for each        professional as soon as possible.
program. This table will identify the most common courses
for which substitutions are required or requested. For each        It is also possible that a student’s physical disability or
of these courses, the table will specify the eligible              medical condition may permanently preclude him from
substituting (replacement) course(s).                              taking a particular course (e.g., Physical Education). In such
The final decision to grant a “substitution” is made by the        situations, the student must seek an exemption for the
Dean/Director. If the decision is favourable, the course           course.
required in the student’s program will appear on the
student’s transcript, but with only the remark “SU”. The           3.5       Incomplete Courses
replacement course will appear on the student’s transcript.
                                                                   3.5.1     Temporary Incomplete (IT)
The campus Dean(s)/Director(s) should be responsible (via          An annotation of “IT” is an interim remark in the transcript
appropriate date bases) to keep track of all EQ, SU, DI,           used to indicate that a student has not yet completed all of
whether they are granted or not.                                   the work required to pass a course. The “IT” is assigned by
                                                                   the teacher when a student, for serious reasons, is granted
3.3       Withdrawal from a Course                                 extra time beyond the formal end of the session to
                                                                   complete required evaluation tasks or a final examination.
Students who withdraw from a course after the deadline
specified by the Ministry will receive a final course grade
                                                                   Conditions, criteria
based on evaluation work completed to that point.
                                                                   Teachers will only authorize an “IT” for serious reasons and
Students who withdraw prior to this deadline may do so
                                                                   when they are satisfied that the student has demonstrated
without penalty (College Education Regulations, VI.29)
                                                                   sufficient effort to merit an extension.
3.4       Accommodations for Students with Disabilities
                                                                   Procedures for Temporary Incomplete “IT”
Students with documented disabilities (e.g., hearing, visual,      The student may request an “IT” or the teacher may
or motor/coordination impairment, documented learning              propose it.
disability, or chronic medical condition) are entitled to          The deadline for the resolution of the “IT” will be
appropriate accommodations in the evaluation of their              determined by the Dean/Director for each session and will
learning. Such accommodations may include, but are not             be communicated to the teachers.
limited to, alternative forms of an evaluation task,               If the student fails to complete the necessary evaluation
extended time for completion, use of special materials or          tasks within the deadline, the teacher will assign a final
equipment, or the specialized assistance of another person.        course grade based on the course evaluation scheme and
                                                                   work completed.
Students needing special accommodations must submit a
written request to the Dean/Director or designated                 3.5.2     Permanent Incomplete (IN)
Professional, along with supporting documentation signed           An annotation of “IN” in the remark section of the
by a medical or qualified educational Professional. The            transcript signals that a student has registered for a course
Dean/Director or designated Professional will meet with            but has been unable to complete it due to reasons beyond
the student to discuss exactly what kinds of                       his or her control. It is assigned by the Dean/Director in
accommodations will likely be required for evaluation              exceptional circumstances as outlined by Ministerial
purposes. The Dean/Director or designated Professional             regulations. It is not intended to protect students from the
will then inform each of the student’s teachers of a need to       consequences of inappropriate behaviour or the common
make accommodations. The student will then meet with               difficulties often experienced by college students (e.g.,
each teacher to determine exactly what kinds of                    discouragement due to poor performance, difficulties
accommodations will have to be made for purposes of the            caused by poor judgment or time management,
evaluation of learning. The teachers will notify the               inappropriate choice of college program, personal
Dean/Director or designated Professional of exactly what           relationship problems, difficulty of transition from high
                                                                   school to college).

                                                              Page 26
Conditions, criteria                                               standards defined for their program of study. It is used by
There are only two acceptable reasons that may justify the         the College to ensure that students have achieved the
assignment of the “IN”:                                            attributes defined in the program’s Exit Profile.
                                                                   Each program committee, in collaboration with the
      the student has suffered the loss of a parent or             program-related departments, is responsible for the design,
      guardian, sibling, spouse or child during the session; or    preparation and evaluation procedures of the
                                                                   Comprehensive Assessment in consultation with the Dean.
      a health professional confirms in a written report (or
                                                                   The Comprehensive Assessment should focus on a
      form provided by the college) stating the reasons that a
                                                                   representative sample of the most important competencies
      student is not capable of attending classes for a period
                                                                   and attributes. It may encompass one or more methods of
      of three (3) weeks or more within the session.
                                                                   evaluation including examination, essay, performance,
Procedures for Permanent Incomplete (IN)                           portfolio, research project, oral report or other evaluation
Students (or their family, if they are under 18) are               activity appropriate to the program. All departments,
responsible for notifying the College immediately when             including those involved with the general education
they are unable to continue classes and request an IN              program components, are invited to participate in the
remark for those courses in which they are registered. The         development and implementation of the assessment.
written request for an IN is a confidential document.
Placed in a sealed envelope, it becomes a part of the              The Comprehensive Assessment is described in the
student’s file and will be examined by auditors from the           program approved by the Board of Governors. This
Ministry.                                                          description will be provided to the students at the outset of
                                                                   the program. More detailed information will be given to
The Dean/Director will thoroughly investigate the details of       students at the beginning of the term in which the
the circumstances presented by the student and any                 assessment will be taken, normally the final semester of the
medical professionals in order to justify the IN remark. The       program.
student may be required to divulge personal and
confidential information to the Dean/Director in order to          4.2       Recognition of Academic Achievement
validate the reason for the “IN”. This information will not
form part of the student’s permanent file but may be               4.2.1     Academic Achievement in DEC Programs
provided to the Ministry upon their request. The                   Each campus will establish a program of recognition for
Dean/Director may also request additional written                  academic achievement including such things as Dean’s lists
documentation from pertinent sources.                              and/or Honour Rolls. The criteria for achieving this
                                                                   recognition will be made available to students in campus
If, during the course of this investigation, the Dean/Director     publications such as the Student Handbook and the Campus
determines that the reasons presented in support of the IN         website.
remark fail to meet Ministerial requirements, the IN will not
be authorized. In such cases, the Dean/Director will ask the       4.2.2     Academic Achievement in AEC Programs
teacher to assign a final course grade based on the course
evaluation scheme and work completed.                              Certificate of Academic Excellence
                                                                   Graduating students who have not abandoned or failed any
                                                                   courses are eligible for the Certificate of Academic
Section 4.                                                         Excellence if they have obtained an overall final average of
                                                                   80% or above in their program.
Program-Level Evaluation of Student
                                                                   Director’s List
Learning                                                           Graduating students who have not abandoned or failed any
                                                                   courses are eligible for the Director’s List if they have
4.1          Comprehensive Assessment in DEC Programs              obtained an overall final average of 90% or above in their
                                                                   program. Students on the Director’s List receive a
The College Education Regulations stipulate that in order to       certificate recognizing their achievement.
graduate, students in a program leading to a Diploma of
College Studies must successfully complete a                       Other Forms of Recognition
Comprehensive Assessment. For purposes of this Policy,             Each campus may, if it so chooses, establish other forms of
“Comprehensive Assessment” is used to refer to the set of          recognition for academic achievement within AEC
evaluation activities that a program usually requires              programs.
students to complete in their last semester of studies.

The Comprehensive Assessment attests that students have
achieved an overall integration of the competencies and

                                                              Page 27
4.3          English Ministerial Examination                       Students must submit work in compliance with any such
                                                                   requirements. Students will be informed of these
All students in all programs leading to a DEC are required to      requirements and the penalties for non-compliance in the
take and pass an English Exit Examination in order to              course outline.
graduate. This examination, prepared by the Ministry in
collaboration with college English teachers, is uniform            5.1.3     Maintaining a Backup Copy of Work
across Quebec.
                                                                   Students are responsible for maintaining a backup copy of
The Ministry may impose uniform exit exams in other                all submitted assignments, whether in electronic or other
general education disciplines.                                     form. This serves as a safeguard in the event of any
                                                                   problems or questions concerning the submitted
                                                                   assignment.
Section 5.
The Evaluation of Learning and                                     5.2       Attendance

Student Academic Conduct                                           Students are responsible for satisfying all academic
                                                                   objectives as defined in each of their course outlines. They
                                                                   are therefore expected to attend all class sessions
5.1          Submission of Work                                    (including labs, field trips, etc.) and scheduled examinations
                                                                   following the date upon which they register for the course.
                                                                   Consequently, teachers are encouraged to maintain a log of
5.1.1        Deadlines
                                                                   student attendance.
Unless otherwise authorized, students must submit
assignments within the prescribed deadline. Teachers are           Attendance, in and of itself, is not an element of the
not obliged to accept assignments submitted after those            competencies associated with a given course. As such, it
deadlines unless the students’ situation is considered an          cannot be used as a component of the final course grade.
Extenuating Circumstance, (see Section 5.3 below). In such         Nonetheless, excessive absences may have consequences
cases, individual faculty may either grant students an             which affect the final course grade.
extension of the deadline for submitting an assignment
without penalty, or come to an agreement with the student          5.2.1     Excused Absences
on a revised deadline for submission, or make other
                                                                   Under certain circumstances, however, student absences
arrangements for writing a make-up test or exam or
                                                                   may be justified and students should not be penalized (see
alternative evaluation procedures as the case dictates.
                                                                   Section 5.3 on Extenuating Circumstances).
                                                                   Students are responsible for all material missed due to
Students must notify both the instructor and the office of
                                                                   absences, even when the reasons are acceptable. They are
the Dean/Director or designated Professional as soon as
                                                                   also responsible for completing all assignments, tests and
they become aware of an Extenuating Circumstance, as per
                                                                   examinations.
section 5.3, which might affect their work as soon as
possible,
                                                                   5.2.2     Excessive Absence
5.1.2        Style of Submitted Work                               Notwithstanding the provisions for various forms of
                                                                   excused absences, there is a point beyond which the extent
With the approval of their program or department,
                                                                   of a student’s absence jeopardises any realistic likelihood of
teachers may require that submitted work (e.g., papers, lab
                                                                   his being able to successfully complete the course
reports and so on)
                                                                   requirements. When students miss more than 10% of the
                                                                   total course time (classes, labs and/or internship) due to
      make use of particular methods for referencing or citing
                                                                   excused absences, they must meet with the teacher and
      source materials, for example, the use of a particular
                                                                   the Dean/Director. The purpose of this meeting is to
      style guide such as the American Psychological
                                                                   determine if and how the student can complete the course
      Association, Modern Languages Association, Chicago
                                                                   requirements within the current session or other timeframe
      Style Guide;
                                                                   agreed upon by the student, the teachers involved and the
      be in a particular format or medium, for example, typed      Dean/Director.
      rather than handwritten, electronic rather than
      hardcopy, or make use of a specific software                 5.2.3     Unexcused Absences
      application; and
                                                                   The maximum number of unexcused absences (excluding
      be submitted by means of an intermediary service, for        those which are deemed “acceptable”) before an instructor
      example, http//www.turnitin.com.                             prohibits further attendance and assigns the grade earned
                                                                   to-date in a course as the final grade for that course

                                                              Page 28
depends on local absenteeism policies that are described in        tests and/or exams and so on. Student notification of the
the outline for each course. The outline for each course will      Dean/Director or designated professional is an
indicate the maximum number of unexcused absences                  administrative necessity so that he or she can make a
(excluding those which are deemed “acceptable”) before an          determination as to whether the absence is excusable. The
instructor prohibits further attendance and assigns the            Dean/Director or the designated professional will, in turn,
grade earned to-date in a course as the final grade. In the        provide each of the teachers with written notice of the
Regular Day sector, these are usually departmental policies;       excused absence.
in the Continuing Education sector, these are campus
policies.                                                          If instructors have reason to suspect the validity of the
                                                                   reason for an absence, they may refer the matter to the
Failure to attend any classes                                      Dean/Director or designated Professional for further
Students who have registered for a course, have not                investigation.
attended any classes, whose absence has not been excused
on medical or other grounds by the Dean/Director, and              5.4       Student Conduct
have not officially withdrawn from the course prior to the
course drop deadline published in the campus Academic
Calendar will be prohibited from attending any further             5.4.1     Professional Conduct during a Workplace
classes in that course. The teacher will assign a final course               Internship
grade of zero (0) to such students.                                In the context of a workplace internship, students are
                                                                   expected to behave in a manner consistent with what they
Submission of assignments or writing of tests and exams            have been taught in their program, with the ethical and
Students who fail to submit an assignment on time as a             behavioural standards of the profession, the regulations of
result of an unexcused absence will be subject to any and          the placement setting (particularly in regard to
all applicable penalties, as described in the course outline.      confidentiality of information, and the health and safety of
                                                                   clients and fellow workers), and the specific authorizations
Students who fail to write a test or examination as a result       granted to them as part of the placement conditions. In
of an unexcused absence will receive a grade of zero (0) for       effect, certain professional behaviours are so important
that particular evaluation.                                        that, if they are not respected during a workplace
                                                                   internship, they call for immediate consequences. Students
5.3          Extenuating Circumstances                             must be informed, in advance, of these critical standards of
                                                                   behaviour and the consequences of not respecting them.
Some examples of Extenuating Circumstances which are
                                                                   This will be done by means of the course plan. Such
considered acceptable in order to justify students’ absences
                                                                   information must also be contained in the generic course
and/or delays for submitting work include
                                                                   outline.
      religious holiday or observance;
                                                                   Depending on the severity or frequency, such inappropriate
      college-sponsored activities (e.g., athletic competition,    behaviour by a student may result in an official warning and
      field trip and so on);                                       remedial action, short-term suspension or expulsion from
                                                                   the placement, or even expulsion from the program.
      illness or other medical circumstances (official
      documentation, signed by a medical doctor or other
                                                                   5.4.2     Behaviour in Courses
      health professional, stating the nature, dates and
      duration of the medical condition that necessitated the      Teachers have the right and the responsibility to act when a
      absence is required);                                        student’s behaviour is detrimental to the safety and well-
                                                                   being of either themselves or others when such behaviour
      serious family emergency; and
                                                                   disrupts the learning in the class. The Code for Student
      other reasons explicitly approved by the Dean/Director.      Conduct provides the rights and responsibilities of students,
                                                                   as well as the appropriate procedures for dealing with
In these cases, the students may be absent from the
                                                                   infractions of the Code.
College. In the case of absences for a period exceeding
three days, students must, upon their return, provide the
                                                                   5.5       Cheating and Plagiarism
office of the Dean/Director with supporting documentation,
providing specific reasons for the absence.                        Cheating and plagiarism are serious forms of academic
                                                                   dishonesty that are completely at odds with the values of
Students must notify both the instructor and the office of         the College and will be dealt with severely.
the Dean/Director or designated professional as soon as
they become aware of an Extenuating Circumstance which             The Dean/Director is responsible for keeping track of all
might cause them to miss classes, deadlines, scheduled             cheating and plagiarism incidents (along with their


                                                              Page 29
outcomes). The use of a data base is recommended to                5.5.2       Plagiarism
make tracking reliable and efficient in case of subsequent
                                                                   Plagiarism is a form of cheating and is defined as the use by
offences.
                                                                   a student of someone else’s language, ideas, or other
                                                                   original (not common-knowledge) material without
5.5.1     Cheating
                                                                   acknowledging its source. This applies to texts published in
Cheating is any deceptive or dishonest practice relative to        print or on-line, to manuscripts, and to the work of other
academic coursework and evaluation intended to provide             student writers6.
oneself with undeserved advantage. It is an offence against
the College, one’s teacher and one’s peers.                        Plagiarism occurs in all of the following cases:

Examples of cheating in testing situations include but are              verbatim quotes of any length without quotation marks
not limited to                                                          and without either a parenthetical reference or
                                                                        footnote to the original source, as well as to the
   copying or attempting to copy another’s work;                        complete reference in the bibliography;
   obtaining or attempting to obtain unauthorised                       paraphrased or summarized ideas where only a few
   assistance of any kind;                                              words have been changed and which contain all the
                                                                        same ideas and where a parenthetical reference or
   providing or attempting to provide unauthorized
                                                                        footnote to the original source as well as to the
   assistance of any kind;
                                                                        complete reference in the bibliography have not been
   possessing or using any unauthorized material;                       given; and
   possessing or using any unauthorized instruments which               reporting of statistical information without reference to
   can be used as information storage and retrieval                     the original source.
   devices;
   taking an examination, test, or quiz in someone’s place;        Teachers have an obligation to provide students in advance
                                                                   with clear information about the kinds of materials,
   having someone take an examination, test, or quiz in
                                                                   instruments or assistance that are permitted for a given
   one’s place; and
                                                                   evaluation. Furthermore, consequences of plagiarism will
   engaging in unauthorized communication during an                be explained in the course outline.
   examination, test or quiz.
                                                                   5.5.3       Consequences and Penalties
Teachers have an obligation to provide students in advance         The consequences for students found guilty of cheating or
with clear information about the kinds of materials,               plagiarism, and the penalties which follow, will vary
instruments or assistance that are permitted for a given           depending on the context of the incident. If the student
evaluation. Furthermore, consequences of cheating will be          chooses to avail himself of the right to appeal, the
explained in the course outline.                                   implementation of these sanctions will be deferred until a
                                                                   decision on the appeal has been rendered. All incidences of
Other examples of cheating in coursework and                       cheating and plagiarism are reported to the Dean’s office.
Comprehensive Assessments include but are not limited to
                                                                   5.5.4       Other Forms of Student Misconduct
   falsifying lab reports or any facts or sources in any
                                                                   Other forms of student misconduct not specifically
   assignment;
                                                                   addressed above are deemed to be not directly related to
   preparing an assignment for someone else or having              the evaluation of learning and are therefore dealt with
   someone else prepare an assignment;                             under the relevant terms of the specific campus’ Code of
                                                                   Student Conduct.
   knowingly allowing other students to copy work for the
   purpose of submitting as their own;
   dishonestly claiming to have submitted work which in
   fact was never submitted to the instructor;
   making false representation which may affect a grade
   (such as submitting a false medical certificate, etc.); and
   utilizing or providing any kind of prohibited assistance
   or collaboration.                                               6
                                                                    Adapted from: Council of Writing Administrators (2003). Defining and
                                                                   avoiding plagiarism: The WPA statement on best practices.
                                                                   (http://wpacouncil.org/files/WPAplagiarism.pdf).

                                                              Page 30
                                                                    competencies. The appeals procedure of the final grade for
Section 6.                                                          a course is regulated by the Collective Agreements between
Academic Appeals and Complaints                                     the Gouvernement du Québec and the unions representing
                                                                    faculty members. The collective agreements stipulate the
by Students                                                         creation of a Mark Review Committee7, consisting of three
                                                                    faculty members from the department involved including
                                                                    the teacher of the course concerned8, who reconsider the
6.1          Definitions
                                                                    students’ final mark.
For purposes of this Policy, the following definitions are
used:                                                               6.2.2        Other Circumstances– Procedure for Academic
                                                                                 Appeals and Complaints
An Appeal is defined as an application for the
reconsideration of an academic judgment or decision made            In circumstances other than final course grades (regular
by a faculty member or administrator.                               education), students are encouraged to first approach the
                                                                    teacher of the course concerned in order to resolve the
Examples would include, but are not limited to, such things         issue at an informal level.
as
                                                                    Students can be accompanied by a Student Council
      the grade on an assignment or other work;                     member who will act as an observer at all times during,
                                                                    and at all stages of, an Appeals and Complaints process,
      the final course grade;
                                                                    with the exception of the departmental appeals process
      a decision regarding a request for a course equivalence;      where the committee does not normally meet with the
      and                                                           student.
      a decision regarding an accusation of cheating or
                                                                    Step 1: Informal Level
      plagiarism.
                                                                    Appeals and Complaints should be addressed at the
                                                                    informal level first.
A Complaint is an expression of dissatisfaction with some
aspect of academic life governed by this Policy.                    1 The Teacher- Students, either as individuals or as a
                                                                      group, who have a complaint about a teacher of a
Examples would include, but are not limited to, such things           particular course must first approach the teacher to
as                                                                    discuss and try to settle the dispute.
                                                                    2 The department coordinator– If students find it
      failure to present a course outline;                            impossible to approach the teacher directly, or if the
                                                                      results of such a meeting are not satisfactory, they
      failure to follow the course outline in matters
                                                                      should then contact the teacher’s department
      concerning evaluation methods;
                                                                      coordinator. If the department coordinator is also the
      unfair or unreasonable evaluation methods or                    teacher in question, then students should approach a
      schedules;                                                      co-coordinator, if one exists. If not, the students should
                                                                      proceed directly to Step 2 (The Formal Level).
      failure to return assignments and evaluation materials
      within appropriate timeframes;
      failure to make reasonable accommodations for                 When the appeal or complaint reaches the level of
      students with documented disabilities or who are              department coordinator or co-coordinator, the teacher is
      subject to Extenuating Circumstances as defined in            entitled to be accompanied by a Union or a department
      Section 5.3; and                                              representative who acts as an observer, and all parties
                                                                    must be informed of the outcome of the informal
      unfairness of the grading scheme.                             procedure by the coordinator (or co-coordinator).

                                                                    Step 2: Formal Level
6.2          Academic Appeals and Complaints                        If the complaint or appeal reaches this level, it is important
                                                                    to note that both parties have the same rights. Both are
6.2.1        Review Committee/Final Course Grades                   entitled to be accompanied by their Union or Student
                                                                    Council representatives at all times during, and at all
In keeping with the underlying principles of this Policy, a
final course grade is assigned to a student by faculty
                                                                    7
members exercising their professional responsibilities and           FEC, Convention collective 2005-2010, 4-1.13, paragraph 6.
                                                                    8
                                                                     The exclusion of matters concerning final course grades does not apply in
expertise in evaluating student achievement of course               the case of Continuing Education courses.

                                                               Page 31
stages of, the formal procedures. These representatives act
as observers. Throughout the process, both parties have
                                                                 Section 7.
the right to be heard and to present evidence of their           Transcripts and Certification of
positions in light of evidence provided by the other.
                                                                 Studies
1 If the situation is not resolved at an informal level within
  ten working days of the original complaint being
                                                                 7.1          Transcripts
  launched, students may file a formal written complaint
  with the Dean responsible for student Appeals and
  Complaints. They must complete a standardized,                 7.1.1        Confidentiality
  written form. They must ensure that complete
                                                                 Student transcripts are subject to confidentiality provisions
  information on the incident(s) or event(s) in question is
                                                                 of governmental access to information legislation9. As such,
  given and it must be signed by the student(s) when
                                                                 unless the student gives the College written permission to
  completed. Unsigned complaints will not be considered.
                                                                 do so, no student records, grades or transcripts can be
Note A: To ensure fair, equitable and prompt treatment of        provided to anyone other than the student himself and
complaints, complainants are encouraged to sign a written        College staff members who must have access in order to do
consent form authorizing the college to forward a copy of        their jobs. Where the student involved is under 18 years of
the signed complaint to the concerned parties. If the            age, and the College has received a written request from
written consent form is not signed by the complainant(s),        the student’s parent(s) or other legal guardian(s),
the written complaint, with the names of signatories             transcripts will also be provided to said parent(s) or other
barred, will be forwarded to the pertinent parties.              legal guardian(s).

Note B: Formal written complaints must be typed to               7.1.2        End-of-Session Transcripts
prevent the identification of handwriting in the case where      At the end of each regular academic session, the College
the complainant(s) do not sign the written consent form.         issues registered students a cumulative transcript listing all
                                                                 the courses in which they had registered to date and the
2 In all cases, the Dean will send a copy of the formal,         final results obtained in each of those courses. This
  written complaint to the teacher concerned and to the          transcript shall conform to standards and formats
  department coordinator (or co-coordinator).                    prescribed by the Ministry.
3 If complaints relate to a teacher or a specific class, the
  Dean will work to ensure that the rights of all parties        7.1.3        End-of-Program Transcripts
  concerned are respected. The Dean will first attempt
  mediation with both parties to resolve the problem.            A final, end-of-program transcript will be issued to
4 If mediation is unsuccessful, the Dean will render a           registered students once they have successfully completed
  decision based on available supporting evidence from all       all program requirements, including the Comprehensive
  parties.                                                       Assessment as well as any Ministerial exit examinations,
5 For cases involving Continuing Education, written              and the completion of these requirements has been
  complaints will be forwarded to the Continuing                 verified by the Ministry.
  Education Director, who must ensure that the teacher
  concerned receives a copy of the complaint. The                This transcript shall conform to government-prescribed
  Continuing Education Director must then undertake              standards and formats.
  steps similar to 3 and 4 above.
                                                                 7.2          Certification of Studies

All concerned parties must be informed of the results of the
                                                                 7.2.1        Diplomas of College Studies (DECs)
formal procedure by the Dean. In the event that the results
of the formal procedure may lead to disciplinary action          Prior to recommending a student for graduation, the
against a teacher, the Dean will upon request from the           College verifies that the student has
teacher concerned or his designated union representative,
provide copies of the documentation gathered in step 4                 achieved the government-prescribed minimal education
above, with identifying information barred unless the                  requirements for admission to College;
parties have signed consent forms. The Dean will also send
                                                                       passed all the required courses and earned the attached
a letter to the complainant(s) informing them of the results.
                                                                       credits;

                                                                 9
                                                                  Act Respecting Access to Documents Held by Public Bodies and the
                                                                 Protection of Personal Information (Loi sur l’accès aux documents des
                                                                 organismes publics et sur la protection des renseignements personnels).

                                                            Page 32
      passed the program Comprehensive Assessment; and              8.1.1       Required Content
      passed the English Exit Examination and any other exit        Generic course plans should include the following
      exam which may be imposed by the Ministry.                    elements:

                                                                    Course Identification
Upon completion of this verification, the campus concerned
                                                                       Course identification
will notify the Director of Studies. In turn, the Director of
Studies will seek a recommendation from the College’s                    Course title and code, credits, weighting of course
Board of Governors to the Ministry that a Diploma of                     components (hours of classroom instruction, laboratory
College Studies be awarded to the student. The                           and homework);
government will only award diplomas to students upon
                                                                         Program or Department, name of the Champlain
receipt of the Board’s recommendation.
                                                                         campus.
7.2.2 Attestations of College Studies (AECs)
                                                                    Course context
Prior to recommending a student for graduation, the
                                                                       Place and role of the course in the program (specific
College verifies that the student has
                                                                       education component) or place in a sequence of courses
                                                                       (general education component).
      achieved the government-prescribed minimal education
      requirements for admission to College; and
                                                                    Course content and objectives
      passed all the required courses and earned the attached
                                                                       Ministerial and College program competencies achieved
      credits.
                                                                       by this course10:
                                                                         competency number and description;
Upon completion of this verification, the College’s Board of
Governors will approve the awarding of an Attestation of                 elements of competencies and descriptions; and
College Studies to the student.
                                                                         for each competency, whether it is fully achieved or
                                                                         partially achieved by the course.
Section 8.                                                               Program standards for student
Course Outlines                                                          achievement/performance, as prescribed by the
                                                                         Ministry or the College.
8.1         Generic Course Plans                                         Course policy for student absences.
For each course, there exists a generic course plan which                Any other pertinent learning objectives (or intended
serves as a model or template for the writing of specific                learning outcomes).
course outlines each session the course is offered. The
generic course plan is prepared in accordance with the              Instructional approaches and learning activities
competencies, objectives, standards and course content              Suggested instructional methods, learning activities,
given by the Ministry for that course. Therefore, it is an          expected student participation (in addition to regular
important tool for ensuring that course competencies are            attendance).
met and that consistency exists between different sections
of the same course taught in the same session, as well as           Evaluation of learning
from one session to another.                                           Recommendations concerning the nature or type of
                                                                       evaluations appropriate for the course;
For regular day courses, the generic course plans are
approved by the department and then the program                          Recommendations concerning the weighting of the
committee, if it is a program-specific course, and                       different evaluation activities in calculating the final
subsequently submitted to the Dean for approval. In the                  course grade.
event of major revisions, the generic course plan must be
re-submitted for approval.                                          Required materials
                                                                       Recommended or suggested texts and other material
For continuing education courses, the generic course plans             needed;
are approved by the Director. In the event of major
revisions, the generic course plan must be re-submitted for              Safety requirements, if applicable.
approval.
                                                                    10
                                                                      Competencies for DEC programs are defined by the Ministry; those for
                                                                    AEC programs are defined by the College.

                                                               Page 33
8.2         Course Outlines                                      Expectations of students
                                                                 Rules and penalties concerning tardiness, attendance,
The course outline is a commitment by the College to the         cheating and plagiarism, late submission of work, and non-
student. It is a thorough and reliable guide to the course.      conformity with presentation guidelines;
Its main purpose is to inform students of the content of the     References to other pertinent sections of this Policy; and
course, how it will unfold over the session and how and          Critical professional standards of behaviour and the
when student learning will be evaluated. In this regard, it is   consequences for not respecting them (workplace
one of the most important tools for achieving many of the        internships only).
Policy’s objectives.
                                                                 8.2.2           Approval process
8.2.1       Required content
                                                                 Regular Day courses
The course outline must be based on parameters set in the        Faculty members must submit for approval a proposed
generic course plan. The course outline must include, or         course outline to their Department Coordinator for each
refer to, the following elements:                                section/course that they are teaching. A copy of the course
                                                                 outline distributed to students must be filed for validation
Course identification                                            with
   Course title and code, credits, weighting of course
   components (hours of classroom instruction, laboratory               the Department Coordinator;
   and homework);
                                                                        the Program Coordinator; and
      Program or Department, name of the Champlain
      campus.                                                           the Dean.

                                                                 Continuing Education courses
Course context                                                   Faculty members must submit the proposed course outline
   The place and role of the course in the program and/or        to the Director for each section/course that they are
   place in a sequence of courses.                               teaching. The Director shall then approve the course
                                                                 outlines in order to verify that all sections of the same
Course content and objectives                                    course are equitable at all levels and that the course
The Ministerial and College program competencies                 outlines respect both the Policy and the generic course plan
achieved by this course;                                         for that course. A copy of the course outline distributed to
Competency number and description;                               students must be filed with the Director.
Elements of competencies and descriptions; and
For each competency, whether it is fully achieved or             8.2.3           Dissemination to Students
partially achieved by the course.
Any other pertinent learning objectives (or intended             In compliance with the College Education Regulations11,
learning outcomes); and                                          course outlines must be distributed during the first week of
                                                                 classes of the session to all students registered in regular
Instructional approaches and learning activities                 education courses and no later than the second course
Instructional methods, learning activities, expected student     class meeting in the case of Continuing Education courses.
participation (in addition to regular attendance).

Evaluation of learning
Clear information concerning the nature or type of
evaluations, weighting of the different evaluation activities
in calculating the final course grade;
Requirements concerning formats for the submission of
assignments, adherence to style guides, and submission of
assignments via intermediary services;
Specifications of the final evaluation;
Standards of literacy and the proportion of the grade on
assignments reserved for the quality of English;
Schedule showing breakdown of content and evaluations;
and Course policy for student absences.




                                                                 11
                                                                      Section V, Article 20.

                                                            Page 34
                                                                              Comprehensiveness
Section 9.                                                                    This criterion examines the extent to which the IPESA
Implementation, Evaluation and                                                contains all the necessary elements for guiding the
                                                                              evaluation of student achievement, particularly those
Revision of the Policy                                                        prescribed by the College Education Regulations, as well as
                                                                              the implementation, evaluation and revision of the policy
                                                                              itself.
9.1          Dissemination
Either the full Policy or a summary of relevant sections shall                Clarity
be published annually in the Student Handbook or                              This criterion examines the extent to which the elements of
equivalent document provided to students at each campus.                      the IPESA are presented in a sufficiently clear manner for all
In the event that students are initially only provided with a                 those affected by the policy (e.g., faculty, students). This
summary, they must also be provided with information on                       includes, but is not limited to the formatting and
how to obtain a copy of the full Policy.                                      organization of the text and how well each provision is
                                                                              explained.
A printed copy of the Policy shall be distributed to all
faculty and other College personnel affected by the policy.                   Coherence
                                                                              This criterion examines the extent to which the various
An electronic version of the full Policy shall be made readily                provisions of the IPESA are consistent with each other and
available on the websites of each of the College’s                            whether the relationships among its various provisions are
campuses, as well as on the main College website for                          logical. In particular, attention will be paid to the
dissemination to the College Community and the general                        coherence of the various measures with the stated
public.                                                                       principles that guide the policy and with the College’s
                                                                              espoused values.
Upon its adoption by the Board of Governors, a copy of this
Policy shall be submitted to the Commission d’évaluation                      Relevance
de l’enseignement collégial (CEEC). Any subsequent                            This criterion examines the extent to which the measures
amendments or revisions to the policy shall similarly be                      proposed in the IPESA are likely to promote the desired
submitted to the CEEC immediately upon their adoption by                      outcome of guaranteeing the quality of student
the Board of Governors.                                                       achievement evaluations and also achieve the stated
                                                                              objectives of the Policy.
9.2          Evaluation
                                                                              Data sources
9.2.1        Frequency and Circumstances for Evaluation                       Full evaluations of the Policy itself should include the
A full evaluation of the Policy, addressing both the quality                  following data sources:
of the policy itself and its implementation, shall take place
at least every five years. This evaluation will normally take                     the IPESA document;
place during a fall session so that any necessary revisions                       any explanatory documents or other media directed at
can be undertaken during the following winter session for                         students or faculty;
implementation in the subsequent fall session.
                                                                                  surveys and/or interviews with students;
Other evaluations of the Policy may be undertaken at the                          surveys and/or interviews with faculty; and
discretion of the CEEC. They may also be initiated by the
Board of Governors upon the recommendation of the                                 surveys and/or interviews with non-teaching staff
Director of Studies.                                                              affected by the policy.

9.2.2        Evaluation of the Policy                                         A database could be put into place to ensure reliable and
                                                                              easy tracking of these elements, as well as transparency in
For the purposes of evaluation of this Policy, the College                    the future.
has chosen to adopt the following criteria that are based on
those used by the CEEC in their evaluations of such policies                  9.2.3      Evaluation of Implementation of the Policy
throughout the college network12:
                                                                              For the purposes of evaluating the implementation of this
                                                                              Policy, the College has chosen to adopt the following
                                                                              criteria that are based on those used by the CEEC in their
                                                                              evaluations of such policies throughout the college
12
  Commission d’évaluation de l’enseignement collégial (January 1994).         network:
Evaluating Institutional Policies on the Evaluation of Student Achievement:
General Guidelines. Quebec City: Gouvernement du Québec.

                                                                        Page 35
Compliance                                                             cases of student appeals or complaints; and
This criterion examines the extent to which the measures
                                                                       working papers from meetings of the Commission of
proposed in the IPESA are actually being carried out in
                                                                       Studies.
order to evaluate the degree of conformity between what
is written and what is done.
                                                                 9.3          Revision of the Policy
Effectiveness
This criterion examines the extent to which the IPESA’s          9.3.1        Impetus for Revision
measures are successful in ensuring that student
                                                                 Revisions of the Policy may be initiated by any one or more
achievement is evaluated with valid, coherent, clear and
                                                                 of the following:
effective methods and instruments.
                                                                     results of annual monitoring processes;
Equivalence                                                            written request, submitted to the Director of Studies,
This criterion examines the extent to which the measures               from any of the sources below:
and mechanisms set forth in the IPESA help to produce
                                                                       Program Committee;
comparable evaluation practices and results, particularly in
multiple-section courses. It focuses on such issues as                 Department;
objectives, requirements, levels of difficulty, weighting and
                                                                       Dean or Director of Continuing Education;
application of grading criteria.
                                                                       Student government association;
Data sources
                                                                       Local Academic Advisory Committee;
Full evaluations of the Policy’s implementation should
include the following data sources:                                    Commission of Studies.
                                                                       results of a full evaluation of the IPESA;
   a representative sample of generic course plans, with
   their corresponding actual course outlines;                         request or recommendation from the CEEC; and
   cases of requests for EQs, SUs and DIs;                             changes in the College Education Regulations.
   cases of requests for ITs and INs;
                                                                 9.3.2        Revision Process
   incidents of alleged cheating or plagiarism;
                                                                 Upon completion of any necessary consultations, a final
   cases of make-up evaluations, with supporting
                                                                 draft of the revised policy will be prepared. The IPESA
   documentation and samples of the corresponding
                                                                 Review Committee, upon approving the final draft, will then
   original evaluations;
                                                                 recommend to the Director of Studies that it be presented
   the Comprehensive Assessment Plan for each technical          to the Commission of Studies.
   and pre-university program, along with a sample of
   actual evaluation reports;                                    With the agreement of the Director of Studies, the revised
                                                                 policy will be submitted to the Commission of Studies for
   surveys and/or interviews with students;
                                                                 discussion. It will then be presented to the Board of
   surveys and/or interviews with faculty;                       Governors for approval.
   surveys and/or interviews with non-teaching staff
                                                                 Upon the adoption by the Board of Governors of any
   affected by the policy;
                                                                 revisions to the policy, a copy of the revised Policy will be
   program evaluation reports and action plans;                  sent to the CEEC. Copies of the revised Policy will be
                                                                 further disseminated according to the provisions set forth
   annual reports from departments and programs;
                                                                 in section 9.1.
   annual reports from the College;
   strategic plans and strategic action plans;




                                                            Page 36
                    BYLAW NUMBER 8 CONCERNING STUDENT SUCCESS
Article 1 – GENERAL PROVISIONS                                   Article 2 – APPLICATION
1.01      Definitions                                            2.01      General Rules
The definitions set forth in Articles 1.01 of Bylaw Number 1     This Bylaw shall apply to full-time students in DEC or AEC
apply to Bylaw Number 8. For the purpose of this Bylaw,          programs, including in Session d’accueil, who:
the following expressions mean:
                                                                 a) Are diagnosed as being At-Risk at entry level;
a) “Regulation 3.3.2”:………………………...
                                                                 b) Fail more than one but fewer than half of their Course
   Regulation (RSQ, ch. C-29, r. 3.3.2) decreed by the
                                                                    Load in a given semester;
   Minister by virtue of article 24.4 of the Act which
   defines special cases in which a student is considered        c) Fail half or more of their Course Load in a given
   full-time notwithstanding article 24 of the Act;                 semester;
b) “Regulation 5.1.1”:………………………...                               d) Repeatedly find themselves in situations b) or c).
   Regulation (RSQ, ch. C-29, r. 5.1.1) decreed by the
   Minister by virtue of article 18 of the Act which outlines
                                                                 2.02      Exception
   the College Education Regulations;
                                                                 The Director of each teaching location may waive
c) “Regulation 5.3”:…………………………..
                                                                 application of this Bylaw for humanitarian reasons in rare
   Regulation (RSQ, ch. C-29, r 5.3) decreed by the Minister
                                                                 and exceptional circumstances. This waiver must be in
   by virtue of article 18.0.2, par. A) of the Act which
                                                                 writing and shall only be given in a case where the students
   outlines the Bylaws and policies which a college must
                                                                 can provide supporting documentation that they could not
   adopt;
                                                                 be fully devoted to studies for serious reasons such as the
d) “Full-time Student”: A student in a DEC or AEC program        student’s long term illness or the death of the student’s
   who holds this status in a given semester by virtue of        spouse or of a member of the student’s immediate family.
   article 24 of the Act or by Regulation 3.3.2;
                                                                 Article 3 – MEASURES
e) “Course Load”: The total number of course hours for
   which the student is registered in a given semester.          3.01      Measures for Academic Success
                                                                 The Director of each teaching location or his/her delegate
1.02      Designation                                            shall determine in which category, referred to in 2.01, a
This Bylaw adopted by virtue of Regulation 5.3 and which is      student is considered to be.
subject to the Act and all its regulations, is entitled “Bylaw
concerning Student Success” and is designated as Bylaw           3.02      Measures for At-Risk Students
Number 8.                                                        Incoming students who are diagnosed as being At-Risk at
                                                                 entry level are informed, at the very beginning of the
1.03      Responsibility for Application                         semester, of the support services that are available to them
The Director of Studies and the Directors of Champlain –         and are required to attend a meeting where these services
Lennoxville, Champlain – St. Lambert and Champlain – St.         are explained to them. Workshops and individual follow-up
Lawrence are jointly responsible for the application of this     are offered to them during the semester.
Bylaw.
                                                                 3.03      Measures for Students Who Fail More than One
1.04      Consultation with Commission of Studies                          Course, but Less than Half of Their Course Load
                                                                           in a Semester for the First Time
In accordance with article 17.0.2 of the Act, the Board shall
                                                                 These students shall receive a personalized letter urging
request the advice of the Commission of Studies on any
                                                                 them to take advantage of support services, especially as
proposed amendments to this Bylaw.
                                                                 related to their failed courses.

                                                                 3.04      Measures for Regular Day Students who fail
                                                                           More than One Course, but Less than Half of
                                                                           Their Course Load in Two Semesters or More
                                                                 These students will be required to meet with an Academic
                                                                 Advisor as early as possible in the next semester. The



                                                            Page 37
Advisor shall assess the student’s record and may require a
mandatory change in program.                                   3.06      Measures for Students Who Were Refused Re-
                                                                         admission and Who Spent at Least One
3.05      Measures for Students Who Fail Half or More of                 Semester Out of the College
          Their Course Load in a Semester – Academic
                                                               These students may be re-admitted on probation under
          Probation
                                                               certain conditions. Students must reapply for Admission to
Students who do not pass 50% of the course load in which       the College. Students who are re-admitted in regular day
they registered in a given semester are placed on academic     programs will be required to sign a readmission contract.
probation the following semester. The student is required
to meet with an Academic Advisor or, in the case of            Article 4 – PART-TIME STUDENTS
Continuing Education, a Director or Coordinator of
Continuing Education to sign a probation contract, which       The College may apply appropriate sections of this Bylaw to
clearly indicates the number of courses to be passed.          part-time students, as it deems necessary.
Remedial activities will also be recommended to the
student to improve chances of success.                         Article 5 – EFFECTIVE DATE
Students who do not pass more than 50% of their course         This Bylaw and any amendments thereto are effective for
Load for a second consecutive semester or who repeatedly       the session immediately following the date of adoption by
fail more than 50% of their Course Load while in Cégeps will   the Board.
be suspended from the College for up to one academic
year.




                                                          Page 38
                     OTHER ACADEMIC REGULATIONS & INFORMATION
A.         Course Loads                                             D.         Policy on Confidentiality
In order to complete their program within the prescribed            College policy and Bill 65 of the Province of Québec guarantee
period of time, students are expected to carry and attend a         the confidentiality of every student's file at Champlain. No
full course load (See “Programs” section of this calendar).         information can be released to anyone, including parents, or
In order to be considered a full-time student, the minimum          to any agency without the express written permission of the
number of courses that a student must register for and              student. The only exceptions are certain designated members
attend is four (or 12 hours of classes per week). Failure to        of the College administration, as well as the parents of
attend a course regularly may result in a retroactive change        students under 18 years of age. The College encourages all
from full-time status to part-time status. Part-time students       students, however, to keep their parents informed and
are required to pay fees at the rate of $2.00 per course hour.      involved in their education. The Academic Advisors are always
Permission to register as a part-time student must be               available to both parents and students to consult with regard
obtained from the Assistant Dean /Registrar                         to the subject of confidentiality.

Application to take an additional course in excess of the           E.        Course Withdrawals
regular course load for a program must be made at
                                                                    Students are permitted to withdraw from courses up to and
registration to the Registrar. In general, students would be                                 th*
                                                                    including September 19 in the Fall semester and February
eligible to take an extra                                              th*
                                                                    14 in the Winter semester. Students who stop attending a
course following a semester in which they have successfully
                                                                    course before these dates and who do not officially withdraw
completed a full course load appropriate for their program
                                                                    (in person at the Registrar’s Office) are considered to be
with a minimum 75% overall average.
                                                                    registered in the course and will receive a failure. In addition, if
                                                                    a student’s attendance in a course cannot be verified as of
B.         Course Adjustments                                                                        th
                                                                    September 20st or February 15 , and if the student is not in
Students should take great care in selecting their courses          actual attendance in at least 4 courses (or 12 hours per week),
during registration, as preference course change is not             the student’s status may be changed retroactively to part-
permitted. That is, courses may not be changed for                  time. At that moment, the student will be required to pay part-
personal reasons such as part-time jobs, teacher preference         time tuition fees required at the rate of $2.00 per course hour.
or time preference. Certain course adjustments will be              (*Ministerial dates)
                                     th
authorized up to and including the 5 day of classes in a
semester, but only for serious reasons such as correcting a         F.        College Withdrawals
placement level to a higher or lower version of a course.
                                                                    Students who must withdraw from the college are required
Students must see an Academic Advisor in order to make
                                                                    to complete the appropriate form at the Academic Advising
these changes.
                                                                    Office. Students who withdraw from all classes after
                                                                                                                           th
                                                                    September 19th in the Fall semester, or February 14 in the
C.         Program Changes
                                                                    Winter semester, will receive failures in all courses for
A student may request a change of program for the                   which they have registered and will be subject to
following semester. The deadlines for program changes will          regulations regarding re-admission.
be posted on the college website. These deadlines may be
extended if there is sufficient space in a program. Students        G.         Absences from Class
are not automatically accepted into a new program.
                                                                    Champlain College Saint-Lambert expects its students to
Decisions are based on several criteria such as high school
                                                                    attend classes on a regular basis. College Policy provides for
grades, prerequisite course grades and satisfactory
                                                                    a maximum of 10% of unexcused absences (See Section 5.2
performance in the student’s current program. A change of
                                                                    of the Institutional Policy on the Evaluation of Student
program does not automatically protect a student from the
                                                                    Achievement for details). However students must be
consequences of a failed semester, which could include
                                                                    careful not to abuse this flexibility. Students who have
being asked to leave the college.
                                                                    missed 10% of their classes without valid reason and who
                                                                    then expect consideration when they fall ill or encounter
                                                                    other serious problems may find themselves in jeopardy. In
                                                                    cases where teachers, with the advice of the College’s
                                                                    administration, determine that a student has abused the
                                                                    attendance regulations the teacher may refuse to accept
                                                                    further work for evaluation. This may occur even if some of
                                                                    the absences were excused.



                                                               Page 39
H.          Extended Absence, Absence from a Test, Exam           In both cases the College reserves the right to investigate
            or Lab                                                thoroughly the details of the circumstances presented by
                                                                  the student and medical professionals in order to justify the
Extended absence is defined as absence from class on two
                                                                  IN remark. The student may be required to divulge personal
or more consecutive occasions.
                                                                  and confidential information to the Assistant
                                                                  Dean/Registrar in order to validate the reason. The
Students who are absent for an extended period or who are
                                                                  Assistant Dean/Registrar may request additional written
absent from a Test, Exam or Lab must notify both their teacher
                                                                  documentation. All personal and detailed information
(see below) and the Office of the Registrar as soon as the
                                                                  provided to the Assistant Dean/Registrar is confidential and
absence becomes unavoidable
                                                                  will not form part of a student’s official file but will be
                                                                  provided to the Ministry of Education upon their request.
Notification of the teacher should be undertaken according
to instructions in the course outline. In the event that no
                                                                  Other Considerations:
specific instructions appear in the course outline, students
                                                                     If, during the course of investigation, the Assistant
must leave a Voice Mail message for the teacher and must
                                                                     Dean/Registrar determines that the reasons presented
then inform the Office of the Registrar of the nature of the
                                                                     in support of the IN remark are due to common
attempts that have been made to reach the teacher.
                                                                     difficulties often experienced by college students, the IN
                                                                     will not be authorized. Examples include (but are not
In all cases of extended absence or missed tests, exams or
                                                                     limited to) such things as situational “depression” or
labs, an original doctor’s note confirming a valid reason for
                                                                     “discouragement” resulting from poor personal
the absence must be provided as soon as possible to both
                                                                     judgment, from poor choice of college program, from
the teacher and the Office of the Registrar.
                                                                     personal relationships gone bad, or from the difficulty of
                                                                     transition from high school to college, etc.
Medical Appointments and Notes from Doctors:
  Students are reminded that Doctor’s appointments for                 In the event that the Assistant Dean/Registrar intends to
  non-emergency reasons must be scheduled outside                      refuse the authorization of an IN remark the Director of
  regular class time.                                                  Champlain College will be consulted before a final
                                                                       decision is rendered.
     Doctor’s notes that are submitted in order to justify an
     absence must be clear that an illness has been identified         Regulations of the Ministry of Education state clearly
     and must specify the period of unavailability. Vague              that IN’s must be requested within the semester in
     notes will not be accepted by the College (ex. notes that         which the absences occur. Requests for retroactive
     simply mention that a consultation has occurred are not           consideration for this status will not be considered for
     acceptable). All doctor’s notes are verified.                     reasons such as failure to know or understand the
                                                                       regulations, or for reasons of forgetfulness. The student
                                                                       (or his family if the student is under 18) is responsible
I.          Permanent Incompletes
                                                                       for notifying the College immediately when a student is
The remark IN (Permanent Incomplete) may be assigned by                unable to continue classes) and exceptions will not be
the Assistant Dean/Registrar to replace a numeric grade for            made.
serious reasons and under certain circumstances. The IN is
a privilege, not a right, and is only assigned for reasons that   J.        Taking Courses at Other Institutions (Cours
are determined by the College to be completely beyond the                   Commandites)
control of the student. The IN is not intended to protect
                                                                  Students already enrolled in the College who wish to take a
students from the consequences of inappropriate
                                                                  course for collegial credit in any other educational
behaviour or lapses of judgment. IN’s will not be authorized
                                                                  institution including another CEGEP must obtain prior
when the Assistant Dean/Registrar determines that a
                                                                  approval of an Academic Advisor. Such approval may be
student’s behaviour or judgment has caused the problem.
                                                                  granted only in cases where it is impossible for a student
Nor can the IN be assigned simply in order to prevent a
                                                                  to take the course at Champlain College Saint-Lambert.
student’s academic record from affecting future activities.
                                                                  Other specific restrictions may apply.
Evidence in support of an IN must be presented in writing
and evaluated by the Assistant Dean/Registrar.

There are only two acceptable reasons that may justify IN’s:
1. The student has suffered the loss of a parent, sibling,
   spouse or child during the semester;
2. A doctor confirms in writing that a student is not
   capable of attending classes for a period of one month
   or more.


                                                            Page 40
K.       Diplomas
                                                                 Academic Advising
The D.E.C. will be awarded to the student by the Ministère
de l’Éducation on the recommendation of the College.             Academic Advisors are available to assist students
Notice of receipt of the diplomas from the Ministère will be     throughout the academic year. Academic Advisors assist
sent to the students by mail. The students will be expected      students in the selection of their program of studies in
to pick up their diplomas in person at the Registrar's Office.   accordance with their individual aptitudes and career
As the diplomas are not issued immediately, the College          objectives which will lead to a D.E.C. (Diplôme des Études
indicates on the student's official transcript that the          Collégiales). Academic Advisors also provide support to
diploma has been recommended. This is sufficient for             student in finding appropriate university programs to suit
university admissions purposes. See also Section 7.2.1           their interests and abilities.
Diplomas of College Studies (DEC’s) under Institutional          During registration Academic Advisors help students with
Policy on the Evaluation of Student Achievement.                 timetable problems and assist them in selecting courses
                                                                 appropriate to their program of studies. Throughout the
L.       Transcripts                                             year, students can contact an advisor about the College's
                                                                 academic policies and procedures as detailed below:
Students who wish to have an official transcript of their
academic record sent to a university, employer or other          •    Academic standing
agency must complete a transcript request form at the
                                                                 •    Change of program
Registrar's Office. The transcript request forms are also
available online. The completed forms can be faxed or            •    Cours Commandites (Courses taken at another CEGEP)
mailed or you may send a letter by mail with the following       •    Course adjustment
information: full name and signature, your Champlain             •    Course load
student number (or birth date), your home address, the           •    Course selection
address of the recipient and a cheque or money order sent        •    Extra Course Requests
to:                                                              •    Graduate evaluation
                                                                 •    Registration
Champlain College Saint-Lambert
Records Office                                                   •    Review Board
900 Riverside Drive                                              •    Summer School courses
Saint-Lambert, QC
J4P 3P2                                                          Direct contact is maintained with Quebec's Anglophone and
                                                                 Francophone universities and universities across Canada
Official transcript fee: $5.00 per transcript request            and the U.S. Therefore Academic Advisors are able to assist
The transcript fee must be paid in advance. We accept            students in selecting CEGEP courses that will meet the
cash, cheque or money order.                                     prerequisites for admission to university programs across
Transcript requests must be made in person or by mail            Canada and the U.S.
(see information above).
                                                                 During the academic year arrangements are made by the
This should be done well in advance of the date by which         advisors for university representatives to visit the College.
the transcript is required.                                      The purpose of these visits is to provide information to
                                                                 students about the various programs offered and to answer
Grades that are sent to a student's home are considered          questions concerning admissions to the universities.
student copies only. Transcripts sent directly by the College
to the Admissions Offices of other colleges and universities
are considered official and are stamped accordingly.




                                                            Page 41
                                           CONTINUING EDUCATION
Adult students come to Champlain Saint-Lambert for a
variety of reasons. Many are seeking to upgrade their skills
                                                                  Training Programs
in order to meet the needs of new technology and for              Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) – LEA. 21
advancement in their present career. Others, especially           The goal of this program is to train students to perform the
women who have interrupted their careers to remain at             basic installation, operation and troubleshooting of CISCO
home with their children, are preparing for re-entry into         networking equipment. Additionally, by providing students
the job market. Still others are coming for personal              with the appropriate training, the program also aims at
development and for the pleasure of learning itself. To           preparing graduates to successfully complete the industry-
meet these needs, Continuing Education offers a variety of        recognized CISCO (CCNA) certification. Among the positions
training programs including: Cisco Certified Network              described by CISCO that a CCNA may fill are: Help Desk
Associate (CCNA), Information Technology (IT) Support             Specialist, Field Technician, Level 1 Systems Specialist and
Specialist, Specialist in Transportation and Logistics, and       Level 1 Systems Integrator.
Wireless Networking. Continuing Education also offers a
number of non-credit courses such as English Second               Business Management Excellence
Language (ESL) and Spanish, as well as a variety of               The Business Management Excellence (BME) Program is
computer, fitness, and personal interest workshops.               directed at two separate markets: first, those who wish to
                                                                  begin a managerial career with a company and second,
                                                                  those who wish to launch their own businesses. In both
Business & Industry Training Programs                             cases, the individuals who will be successful will be highly
Champlain Saint-Lambert, founded in 1971, has over the            self-motivated and self directed.
years built a solid reputation in Education, offering a
quality-learning environment with exceptional faculty, staff      Graduates of this program will:
and up-to-date modern facilities.                                         Be able to manage the day-to-day operations of a
                                                                          department, section or small business;
Business and Industry, our customized training division, offers
                                                                           Have the necessary skills to successfully operate
a variety of training options to best suit your needs. What
                                                                           their own business;
ultimately makes your business different from your
competitors is the quality of your employees. By giving your               Plan for the future growth and development of a
employees the training to be innovative and effective, you can             business.
gain and maintain the competitive edge in your market.
Champlain College’s Business and Industry can be your             EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION INDEPENDENT STUDIES
strategic partner in successfully reaching your objectives.       COURSES FROM A.E.C. – JEE.0K
Our classrooms provide hands-on training in Microsoft             The goals of the credit courses offered from the Early
Office and operating systems, network and network                 Childhood Education program are to enable a person to
security as well as help desk courses. In addition, our           develop the required skills to work as an Early Childhood
management courses include coaching, personal                     Educator with children of 0 to 12 years of age, and to foster
management and managing change as well as a wide range            the general development of children under their care. The
of one day seminars. Our Customer Service and Sales               credit courses are offered as an independent course of
course include sales management, customer service                 study and may either be accumulated with the objective of
management, cell center agent training, Phone and direct          obtaining an A.E.C., or may be taken independently by
sales. We also offer English, Mandarin, Italian and Spanish       students who wish to gain particular competencies targeted
language courses. Champlain College offers courses                by specific courses within the program. Successful
specially designed to respond to your training needs which        completion of all the courses contained in the competency-
can be given at your work place or at the College.                based Attestation JEE.0K, may allow students who meet the
We invite you to meet with us to set up your individually         eligibility requirements, to obtain the Early Childhood
customized program that will best suit your needs.                Education A.E.C. This A.E.C., combined with 3 years full-
                                                                  time work experience in a licensed child care setting, will
For more information please call (450) 672-6046.                  give the student the minimum requirements to work in the
                                                                  field, as per the regulations governing Child Care Centres in
                                                                  Québec. Graduates may also work in other types of child
                                                                  care centres such as school daycares, home daycare
                                                                  services, nursery schools and stop-over centres.




                                                             Page 42
Information Technology (IT) Support Specialist – LEA.1Q           companies, distribution centers, warehouses,
The goal of this program is to prepare students for               transportation companies (road, rail, maritime, and air) as
employment in positions such as Help Desk Agent or                well as in customs brokerage firms and companies involved
Technician. To increase the opportunities for employment, a       in logistics services. The job titles for which a graduate of
major goal of the program will be to prepare students to          the Program would be qualified include: dispatcher,
complete widely accepted certifications including CompTIA’s       customs agent, logistics and transportation technician or
A+, Microsoft Application Specialist (MCAS), Microsoft            coordinator, and warehouse supervisor.
Certified Professional (MCP), and HDI’s Help Desk Analyst.
                                                                  Wireless Networking – LEA. 1T
Special Care Counselling JNC.1G                                   The goal of this program is to train students to perform basic
Special Care Counsellors are trained to work with people          installation, administration and troubleshooting of Wireless
having difficulty with social integration or adaptation. The      Local Area Network (WLAN) equipment. Additionally, by
techniques used by the Counsellors will vary depending on         providing students with the appropriate training, the Program
the age group they will be working with: children;                also aims at preparing graduates to successfully complete the
adolescents; adults; or the elderly. Their role is to provide     Certified Wireless Network Administrator (CWNA)
support and guidance to socially conflicted youths; people        certification. This Program will provide additional, highly
with behavioural difficulties; people with physical and/or        sought after skills that will enhance the chances of graduates
mental-health problems; seniors having lost or losing their       for gaining advancement or avoiding layoffs if another
autonomy; and victims of violence. The graduates of the           downturn in the IT sector should occur.
AEC program in Special Care Counselling will be able to find
employment in public agencies such as the Ministry of
Health and Social Services and the Ministry of Education.
                                                                  Recognition of Acquired Competencies
Some of the organizations that hire Special Care                  The Recognition of Acquired Competencies (RAC) is a
Counsellors are: Social Service and Rehabilitation Centres;       process that allows students to obtain official recognition
Regular or Specialized Schools; Group Homes; Youth                for competencies acquired through training, life, or
Homes; Community Organizations; Homecare Centres; and             workplace experience. Students who qualify for RAC will
Hospitals                                                         utilize a collection of diverse and adapted tools to
                                                                  demonstrate that they possess the competencies
Specialist in Transportation and Logistics – LCA.CB               associated with their targeted program.
The goal of this program is to train students to fulfill a wide
                                                                  Continuing Education currently offers RAC for certain of its
range of technical roles in the logistics and transport sector,
                                                                  training programs. For more information on any of these
specifically in transportation, warehousing, distribution,
                                                                  programs, courses, or services, please call (450) 672-7364.
and other related areas of the supply chain and logistics
industry. Program graduates will work in manufacturing




                                                             Page 43
            EDUCATIONAL MEDIA CENTRE, LEARNING CENTRE & LIBRARY
Educational Media Centre                                          Learning Centre
Located on the second floor of E Block, the Educational           Located on the second floor of the library in B-301, the
Media Centre supports student learning through the use of         Learning Centre aims to enhance and support the
information technologies (IT). The Centre provides direct         educational programs of Champlain College Saint-Lambert
support to students via Help desks (located in rooms A136         by providing extended access to technological and
and E239), workshops on selected computer software                educational support services. Students may visit the
packages, and one-to-one technical assistance.                    Learning Centre to study with a tutor, to work on a
                                                                  computer, or to pick up a handout on study skills.
The Centre maintains fully equipped state-of-the-art
learning facilities and an IT infrastructure. The computer        Peer tutors are available in just about every subject. Our
labs are available for homework activities (when classes are      peer tutors take a course called “To Teach is to Learn”
not being held). The Writing Lab on the second floor of the       which focuses on tutoring skills and techniques. All requests
E Block, and the CTEC lab on the first floor of the F Block,      for help are carefully evaluated. If a tutor is not currently
are available to students throughout the entire school day.       available, an attempt will be made to find one or students
                                                                  will be direct to alternative sources of help. Computers are
All labs have Internet access and selected software that          accessible for student use during library hours. The Centre
supports the teaching curriculum. The labs are located in:        houses a variety of programs to assist students with word
                                                                  processing, Internet access and course related software.
A Block     A104, A110, A116, A132 and A136
B Block     Library; Learning Centre (Macs & PCs) and
                                             nd
            Centre d'aide en languesc (both 2 floor library)
C Block     C102 (Macs, PCs and scanner in CTEC lab)
                                                                  Library
E Block     E246 (Macs and PCs in the Writing Lab)                The George Wallace Library and Media Center occupies the
F Block     F233, F248 and F249                                   second and third floors of B-Block, with plenty of space for
G Block     G162                                                  quiet study as well as group work.
Students are asked to respect the "Rules for Student Use of
Computer Facilities" that are posted in each computer lab.        The Library collection consists of over 80,000 books,
                                                                  electronic reports, periodical titles, government
Other educational technologies available at Champlain             publications, videos/DVDs, CDs, cassettes, and CD-ROMs.
include a television studio, video editing suites, sound
studios and a digital imaging studio. These are used to fulfil    The Library Webpage provides a link to many useful tools
course assignments that require the production of                 that you will need to conduct your research. You will see
multimedia and hypermedia learning materials.                     links to the online Library Catalogue (or HIP) as well as to a
Operating hours for the Centre are posted.                        wide range of electronic products – online periodical
                                                                  databases providing indexing and full text to magazines,
                                                                  newspapers and academic journals as well as tips for
                                                                  searching the Internet. You will also find links to academic
                                                                  and statistical information on the internet, research
                                                                  strategy suggestions, and copies of the Style Guides for
                                                                  writing up that term paper!

                                                                  The Library provides over 30 computers in the main
                                                                  Reference Area for researching and writing up assignments.
                                                                  An additional 20 computers are also available in the B214
                                                                  Library instruction lab when no courses are being
                                                                  conducted. Wireless connectivity is available throughout
                                                                  the Library.




                                                             Page 44
Training in “information literacy” begins with a Library
orientation for all students as part of their first Humanities
course. In addition, a variety of workshops, online tutorials
are offered tailored to the needs of particular courses or to
introduce new technologies and services. A selection of
online “How to” videos are available to walk you through
searching our catalogue and databases. Cannot view them
from our webpage, they can also be accessed via the
Champlain Library’s Youtube channel at
http://www.youtube.com/champlibrary. Individualized help
from the Library Staff is also available for those using the
Library.

Located in the Library, the Media Center provides Graphic
Communication and Creative Arts faculty and students with
photographic and video equipment needed to do their
assignments. PC laptop computers with multimedia
projectors, slide projectors, CD players and cassette
recorders are available for in-class presentations by all
students who have obtained prior authorizations from their
teacher.

Borrowing Policy
Champlain College Saint-Lambert Faculty, Staff and
Students presenting a valid I.D. card may borrow books for
two weeks with renewal for an additional two weeks unless
the books have been requested by another borrower. To
make sure books are returned promptly and made available
to other students, fines for late returns are charged. See
handouts and postings for current rates. Fines and non-
returned items are considered as outstanding debt and may
affect re-registration and transcript production.

Library Hours (Fall 2010/Winter 2011)
      Monday to Thursday 7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
      Friday 7:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Media Center Hours (Fall 2010/Winter 2011)
    Monday to Thursday 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
    Friday 9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Please note that the Media Center is closed for breaks and
lunch.

Any changes in the hours will be posted in advance.




                                                           Page 45
                                 STUDENT SERVICES & STUDENT LIFE
Student Services & Activities                                   Student Life
The Campus takes pride in providing a favourable physical       Student life is an important part of the Champlain
and learning environment where academic and personal            experience, be it in terms of student government, an active
development can take place hand in hand. To this end            social calendar, a variety of leisure time activities, or a
Student Services personnel maintain a variety of services       wide-range of interest groups and clubs. There is something
and programs that adjust to the changing needs of students      for just about everyone, and opportunities abound for
during their collegial experience. At the level of supporting   students who want to get involved or who have new ideas
basic needs (mental well-being, health, sense of belonging)     to propose.
or at the level of fixing objectives and goals, making
choices, accepting responsibilities and consequences,           Student government falls under the auspices of the
Student Services is there to assist all students, whatever      Champlain Student Association with its ten-member
their age, in their quest for self-fulfilment.                  popularly elected student executive. With a substantial
For information on the following services and activities        annual budget drawn from the Student Association Fee, the
provided under the auspices of the Student Services             C.S.A. is able to get things done. It has representatives on
Department, individuals can consult their Student               the campus' Academic Council, Student Life Council and on
Handbook or enquiry can be made directly at the Office of       several campus committees. It is also present on the
Student Services.                                               College’s Commission of Studies. In addition, a student
                                                                representative sits on the College's Board of Governors
Athletics & Recreation          Insurance                       every other year.
Animation                       Leadership Development
Cafeteria                       Lost and Found                  For more information one can enquire at the Office of
Career/Life Planning            Orientation                     Student Services or directly to the Champlain Student
Counselling                     Student Rights                  Association
Employment                      Study Skills
Financial Aid                   Special Needs
Health Services                 Transportation
Housing                         Volunteering
Student Involvement

.




                                                           Page 46
                                                 SUMMER SCHOOL
Summer School is a limited optional session which is             Students who require courses to graduate at the end of
available for students who need to make up for failed or         Summer School are usually exempt from tuition fees,
dropped courses or for students who may have had a               although a small registration fee will apply. Non-graduating
reduced course load during their program. Restrictions do        students who take summer courses will be required to pay
apply to taking Summer School courses. The first priority is     tuition fees in the amount of $2.00 per course hour.
for students who require summer courses in order to
complete requirements for their program. Students may            Summer School timetables for Champlain College Saint-
also take Summer School in order to reduce their course          Lambert, as well as for all other Cegeps, are available online
load for the following semester, but they should consult an      and are posted on the Registrar’s Office bulletin board and
Academic Advisor to determine if there are any                   with the Academic Advisors in April of each year. These
consequences. For instance, a reduced course load may            timetables provide details on course offerings, dates and
make a student ineligible for the Dean’s List or Honour Roll     fees.
in a future semester.
                                                                 Please note: Students may take a Summer School course at
The selection of courses during the summer is limited.           another Cegep only if their requirements cannot be met at
Students are responsible for determining their Summer            Champlain College Saint-Lambert. Many courses are NOT
School requirements. Academic Advisors can advise a              available during Summer School or cannot be taken at
student about the possibilities for alternative courses in       other colleges. Students should consult with an Academic
Summer School that will replace, or substitute for, failed or    Advisor for more information.
dropped courses.

Summer School at Champlain College Saint-Lambert usually
begins during the first week of June, often on the first
Monday. The length of the Summer School session varies,
depending on the nature of the course. Math courses
usually extend until the end of July. Science courses usually
finish in mid-July. All other courses finish before the end of
June.




                                                            Page 47
                                FEES (All fees are subject to change without notice)
General Fees
 1.   ATTESTATION LETTERS         $3 per attestation            5.   NSF CHEQUES                  $15 per cheque
 2.   DUPLICATE SCHEDULES         $3 per schedule               6.   OFFICIAL TRANSCRIPTS         $5 per destination
 3.   COURSE DESCRIPTIONS         $5 per course                 7.   STUDENT TRANSCRIPTS          $3 per transcript
 4.   ID CARD REPLACEMENT         $5

Application, Registration and Student Fees
 8.   APPLICATION FEE                   $30 (non-refundable)
 9.   LATE REGISTRATION FEE             $50 (non-refundable)

 10. STUDENT FEES (per semester)        FULL TIME        PART TIME
       Registration Fee                 $20              $5 per course
       Student Service Fee              $25              $6 per course
       (ID card, academic, personal & career counselling, orientation & integration services, learning centres)
       Auxiliary Services Fees          $70              $15 per course
       (Financial aid counselling, health & social services, accident insurance, extended access to Internet/ computers,
       extended access to libraries and other facilities, socio-cultural & physical activities)
       Student Association Fee          $25              $25
      SUMMARY OF FEES: Full time students: $150 per semester (see No. 16 below);
                       Part time students (fin de DEC students only): $51 (1 course); $77 (2 courses); $103 (3 courses)
 11. OUTSIDE-PROGRAM COURSES            $6 per course hour
 12. FOREIGN STUDENT TUITION            $4644 per semester for full time students; $22.58 per course hour for part time
     FEE                                students (in addition to the fees described in No. 8 and No. 10 above)

 13. NON-RESIDENTS OF QUÉBEC            $1124 per semester ( full time students); $5.49 per course hour (part time students)
 14. PART-TIME TUITION FEES (permission of the Registrar is required): $2 per course hour
 15. INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE FEE: $400 per semester
 16. CHAMPLAIN COLLEGE FOUNDATION: The $150 Student Fee includes a $10 donation to the Champlain College Saint-
     Lambert Foundation. The Foundation is a non-profit organization which benefits Champlain students. The aim of the
     current fundraising drive is dedicated to upgrading the student space in the center of the “F-Block” including the
     Bandring and club offices. If students do not wish to contribute to the Champlain College Saint-Lambert Foundation,
     they may remit a $140 Student Fee.


Withdrawal & Refund Policy
 Before Course Confirmation                                     • Withdrawal after course confirmation must be done in
• Withdrawing before course confirmation must be done                person in the Registrar’s Office before the official
   in writing and submitted to the Registrar’s Office.               withdrawal dates (see above).
• Students who withdraw before course confirmation will         •    Students who withdraw after course confirmation (but
   receive a refund cheque for the amount paid in Student            before the withdrawal dates listed above) will receive a
   Fees. The refund will be mailed to the student’s address          refund cheque for the amount paid in Student Fees minus
   on file.                                                          $45 (Registration Fee and Student Association Fee). The
                                                                     refund will be mailed to the student’s address on file.
 After Course Confirmation                                      •    No refunds will be issued after the withdrawal deadlines
• Deadline to withdraw from courses is September 17th (Fall          listed above.
                               th
    semester) and February 14 (Winter semester). These
    dates are set by the Ministry and cannot be altered.



                                                          Page 48
                         AWARDS, MEDALS, PRIZES & SCHOLARSHIPS
Further information on the following awards can be                 Creative Arts Prize for the highest academic
obtained from the Director of Student Services.                    achievement in the Creative Arts Program.
                                                                   Dean Cheshire Memorial Award for outstanding
Entrance Scholarships                                              abilities in Studio Arts.
                                                                   Fouad Assaad Memorial Award in World Studies for
Champlain College Saint-Lambert offers a Scholarship               excellence in the World Studies Option.
Program for incoming students. One scholarship valued at           French Prize for high academic achievement as well as
$750 is awarded in each program to the student with the            personal commitment to learning.
highest academic average among students with averages of           Gail Sowerby Prize in Liberal Arts for high academic
80% or higher. The Entrance Scholarships are funded by the         achievement in the program.
Champlain College Saint-Lambert Foundation.                        Governor General's Medal for highest overall academic
                                                                   achievement.
Bourses d’excellence-Desjardins                                    Graphic Communications Prize for high academic
                                                                   achievement in Graphic Communications.
Thirteen Bourse d’excellence-Desjardins, sponsored by the
                                                                   Humanities Prize for high academic achievement in
Fédération des Caisses Desjardins du Québec, région Rive-
                                                                   Humanities.
Sud de Montréal, valued at $750 each, will be attributed to
                                                                   International Baccalaureate Prizes consists of two
students enrolled in a full-time program who have obtained
                                                                   separate nominations for high academic achievement in
the highest Cote de rendement collégial (cote R) in the two
                                                                   the IB program.
first semesters of their studies without having failed any
                                                                   Joy Smith Athletic Merit Award for an outstanding
courses. The recipients must have been enrolled at
                                                                   member of the intercollegiate athletic program who has
Champlain College Saint-Lambert in the same program
                                                                   maintained an above average academic record.
before and after the eligibility criteria.
                                                                   Lieutenant Governor Award for personal, collective and
                                                                   social commitment and outstanding achievement.
Convocation Presentations                                          Margery Langshur Prize for high academic achievement
    André E. LeBlanc Student Life Prize for significant            in English.
    contribution to the quality of student life on campus          Mathematics Prize for high academic achievement in
    while maintaining an above average academic record.            Mathematics, one for Science graduates and one for
    Association of Professionals’ Award for high academic          non-Science graduates.
    achievement awarded to a mature student. 22+                   Modern Language Prizes consist of two separate
    Biology Prize for high academic standing.                      nominations for high academic achievement in
    Business Administration Prizes for the highest                 languages.
    academic achievement in the Business Administration            Peter Swarbrick Memorial Award for excellence in
    Program.                                                       creative writing, journalism and public speaking.
    Champlain College Saint-Lambert Support Staff Union            Physical Education Prize for high academic achievement
    Award for an outstanding student who has been                  in Physical Education.
    involved in volunteer work on and off campus, and              Physics Prize for high academic achievement in Physics.
    who has maintained a good overall academic standing.           Potter Family Award is granted to a graduating student
    Champlain College Saint-Lambert Teachers’                      who is an inquiring, innovative scholar with a grade
    Association Awards for outstanding students (one for           average exceeding 85%.
    career program graduates and one for pre-university            Social Science Certificates of Merit consist of seven
    graduates) who have been involved in volunteer work            separate nominations granted for high academic
    on and off campus and who have maintained a good               achievement in Anthropology, Economics, Geography,
    overall academic standing.                                     History, Political Science, Psychology and Sociology.
    Champlain Regional College Board of Governors Merit            Social Science Program Prizes for high achievement in
    Award for highest overall academic achievement.                the Social Science and Commerce programs.
    Chemistry Prizes consist of two separate nominations           Tourism Excellence Prize for excellence in the Tourism
    for high academic achievement in chemistry.                    program.
    Computer Science Prize for excellence in the Computer          The Adam Taylor Memorial Award Celebrating Student
    Science program.                                               Diversity
    Creative Arts Certificates of Merit are granted for            In addition to the above, the following organizations
    outstanding abilities; one in each profile, Digital            also confer awards or scholarships to campus graduates:
    Imaging & Studio Arts, Photo/Design, and                       American Express, Fuller Landau, Quebec Association
    Film/Video/Communications.                                     of Retired Teachers (South Shore Chapter), Royal Bank,
                                                                   South Shore University Women's Club.


                                                         Page 49
                   International Baccalaureate Diploma Program (200.10 )
The IB Diploma program is designed for students who are            Mathematics TS 5, Secondary 5 Physics and Secondary 5
interested in a well-rounded, enriched and challenging             Chemistry Due to limited space in the program, and based
college education. It provides students with a broad and           on the overall average of previous Champlain IB students,
comprehensive education in Languages and Literature,               it is suggested that students applying to the IB Science
Mathematics, Experimental Sciences, Social Sciences and            program have an 80% overage average as well as a
the Humanities. The IB diploma, recognized by all Quebec           minimum of 80% in Chemistry, Physics and Mathematics.
universities as well as universities in Canada, the U.S. and       Additional admissions requirements can be found in the
countries around the world, is an excellent preparation for        admissions section of this calendar.
students intending to pursue university studies in Law,
International Relations, Literature, Engineering, Physical         Please refer to the 2011-2012 Admissions Handbook and
Sciences, Biological Sciences, Mathematics, Medicine, Social       Program Brochures for the 2011-2012 admissions
Sciences and Commerce either at home or abroad. In May             requirements.
of their final semester in the program IB students write a
total of six (6) IB examinations - three (3) at the Higher level   Second Language Curriculum
and three (3) at the Standard level. The subjects and level
of examinations students will write is determined by the           All IB students are required to follow a second language
specific IB Diploma program option for which they register.        curriculum. The two language options at Champlain are
                                                                   French and Spanish. In most cases, students will be
Cote de rendement (cote R)                                         required to take French as a second language. However,
                                                                   students with a sufficiently high level of ability in French as
Québec universities admit students on the basis of the             a mother tongue, will be offered the possibility of taking
“cote de rendement collégiale”, otherwise known as the             beginners Spanish instead of French. Please note that the
cote R. For students in the IB program Quebec universities         Spanish option is not available to students who have taken
assign a bonus to all IB students upon successful                  Spanish in high school.
completion of the IB program. McGill University and many
others actively recruit IB graduates.                              Fees

Admission Requirements                                             Students pay IB examination fees and administrative fees of
                                                                   $400 per term ($800 per year) as well as the Student Fee
All applicants to the IB diploma program should have a             (see fee section of this calendar). Financial assistance is
Diploma of Secondary Studies or its equivalent with a good         available through the Quebec Loans and Bursaries Program.
grounding in both English and French. Students applying to         Application forms are available at the College.
the IB Sciences option should have completed




                                                             Page 50
               International Baccalaureate Diploma Program Profile (200.10 )
IB Health Science Option (200.1H)                                                           IB Pure and Applied Science Option (200.1P)
                               Semester 1                                                                                  Semester 1
 101-NYA           General Biology I                                                         101-NYA           General Biology I
 109-10x-MQ        Physical Education 101 or 102                                             109-10x-MQ        Physical Education 101 or 102
                              (higher level)                                                                              (higher level)
 201-NYA           Calculus I                                                                201-NYA           Calculus I
                                               (higher level)                                                                              (higher level)
 202-NYA           General Chemistry I                                                       202-NYA           General Chemistry I
                                (higher level)                                                                              (higher level)
 203-NYA           Mechanics                                                                 203-NYA           Mechanics
                                                          (standard level)                                                                            (standard level)
 340-913           Introduction to Philosophy                                                340-913           Introduction to Philosophy
                                                             (standard/higher level)                                                                     (standard/ higher level)
 603-101           Introduction to Literature IB                                             603-101           Introduction to Literature IB
          Total: 7 courses                                                                              Total: 7 courses
                               Semester 2                                                                                  Semester 2
 109-10x-MQ        Physical Education 101 or 102                                             109-10x-MQ        Physical Education 101 or 102
                               (higher level)                                                                              (higher level)
 201-NYB           Calculus II                                                               201-NYB           Calculus II
                                              (higher level)                                                                              (higher level)
 202-NYB           General Chemistry II                                                      202-NYB           General Chemistry II
                                                         (higher level)                                                                              (higher level)
 203-NYC           Waves and Modern Physics                                                  203-NYC           Waves and Modern Physics
 345-101           Theory of Knowledge I                                                     345-101           Theory of Knowledge I
                                         (standard/higher level)                                                                     (standard/higher level)
 603-103           World Literature                                                          603-103           World Literature
          Total: 6 courses                                                                              Total: 6 courses
                               Semester 3                                                                                  Semester 3
                                              (Optional Course – See note below)                                                                    (higher level)
 101-BLB           General Biology II                                                        201-BLE           Probability and Statistics
                                                (higher level)                                                                      (higher level)
 201-BLE           Probability and Statistics                                                202-BLC           Organic Chemistry I
                                        (higher level)                                                                                        (higher level)
 202-BLC           Organic Chemistry I                                                       203-NYB           Electricity and Magnetism
                                                  (higher level)
 203-NYB           Electricity and Magnetism                                                 345-BJE           Justice, Knowledge, and the Ideal State
 345-BJE           Justice, Knowledge, and the Ideal State                                   345-102           Theory of Knowledge II
                                                                                                                                                   (standard/higher
 345-102           Theory of Knowledge II                                                    603-102           Shakespeare & Other Genres
                                                       (standard/higher                                        level)
 603-102           Shakespeare & Other Genres
                   level)
                                                                                             Second Language Courses
                                                                                                                               (standard level)
 Second Language Courses                                                                                 602-BMY     Français
                                   (standard level)                                                                                 (standard level)
             602-BMY     Français                                                                     or 602-991     Français A2
                                        (standard level)                                                                      (beginners)
          or 602-991     Français A2                                                                  or 607-101     Spanish
                                  (beginners)
          or 607-101     Spanish                                                                     Total: 7 courses
       Total: 7 or 8 courses                                                                                               Semester 4
                               Semester 4                                                    201-NYC     Linear Algebra
                                                                                                                                 (higher level)
                                         (higher level)
 201-NYC       Linear Algebra                                                                202-901     Topics in Organic Chemistry
 202-901       Organic Chemistry II                                                          203-902     Extra Topics in Physics
 203-902       Extra Topics in Physics                                                       340-220     Intro to Ethics
                                                                                                                               (standard/higher level)
 340-220       Intro to Ethics                                                               603-BME     Literature in Context
                                     (standard/higher level)
 603-BME       Literature in Context                                                         Second Language Courses
                                                                                                                                  (standard level)
 Second Language Courses                                                                                 602-911        Français
                                        (standard level)                                                                               (standard level)
               602-911        Français                                                                or 602-992        Français A2
                                             (standard level)                                                                    (beginners)
            or 602-992        Français A2                                                             or 607-201        Spanish
                                       (beginners)
            or 607-201        Spanish                                                                Total: 6 courses
          Total: 6 courses
                                                                                                 IB Pure & Applied Science students may add 201-BLD
                                                                                                 Calculus III if they have not taken 101-BLB Biology II.
  It is recommended that IB Health Science students who
                                                                                                 While Calculus III may be beneficial to further prepare for
  plan to enter a university program in Health Science are
                                                                                                 university studies, the course is not required for the
  strongly recommended to take General Biology II in their
    rd                                                                                           completion of the program and is thus considered by the
  3 semester.
                                                                                                 Ministry of Education as an “hors-programme” course. It is
                                                                                                 not required by universities for admission into science
                                                                                                 programs. The College’s priority is to build a course load
                                                                                                 that meets the official requirements of the IB Science
                                                                                                 program; since Calculus III is not a required course, any IB
                                                                                                 Science student wishing to take the course, space
                                                                                                 permitting, must pay an additional $6.00 per course hour.
                                                                                                 Please feel free to contact an Academic Advisor on this
                                                                                                 matter or any other questions related to admission
                                                                                                 requirements in university.

                                                                                       Page 51
                                               Science Program (200.B0)
Entrance Requirement                                                           Acquire the vocabulary appropriate to the scientific
                                                                               disciplines
In order to be admitted to a program leading to a Diploma                      Demonstrate oral expression during class presentations,
of College Studies (DEC), candidates must possess a                            demonstrations or group discussions
Secondary School Diploma or have completed a level of                          Be able to write clear essays, assignments & lab reports
education that is deemed equivalent by the College.
Applicants should also have successfully completed                          Use appropriate data processing technologies
Mathematics TS 5 or Mathematics SN 5, Chemistry 5 and                          Be able to use the principal types of data processing
Physics 5 at the high school level. Additional admissions                      software: word processing, spreadsheets and graphing
requirements can be found in the admissions section of this                    programs in the production of assignments or lab reports
calendar.                                                                      Be able to use the Internet / Library as a research and
                                                                               communication tool
Please refer to the 2011-2012 Admissions Handbook and                          Be able to use a computer for data input and analysis
Program Brochures for the 2011-2012 admissions                                 Be able to use a computer to help in the acquisition of
requirements.                                                                  knowledge—i.e. computer aided learning
General Program Goal                                                        Acquire personal skills
The Science program provides students with a balanced                          Be able to learn in an autonomous manner
education which integrates the basic components of a                           Demonstrate the ability to work in a cooperative
rigorous scientific and general education. Upon completion,                    manner with other members of a group or team
students are equipped to pursue university-level studies in                    Be aware of ethical issues in general and more
the areas of health or pure & applied science.                                 particularly those related to science and technology

Graduate Profile                                                            Integrative Activity

The graduate exit profile indicates to the student what he or               One of the requirements of the Science program involves a
she is expected to achieve by the time the program is                       concept known as integration: students are required to
completed. It is developed by examining the major goals of                  apply what they have learned in one discipline to solving a
the program and distilling them into a set of attributes that               problem in another discipline in science and mathematics.
represent the program at the local level. In addition, the                  In order to attain this competency, each student is required
profile also presents the abilities that will be used to assess             to successfully complete Biology 101-NYA, Chemistry 202-
each attribute. The attributes and abilities are:                           NYB, Physics 203-NYB and Mathematics 201-NYB which
                                                                            contain the IA. Each of the Biology, Chemistry, Physics and
Possess the knowledge required for a basic college-level                    the Mathematics departments are responsible for
scientific education                                                        implementing an IA in the previously listed courses.
    Demonstrate the attainment of the program specified
    competencies                                                            Comprehensive Assessment
    Demonstrate the power as well as the limitations of                     Prior to graduating from the Science program, Science
    science and technology in society                                       students must show that they have met the attributes
    Demonstrate the implications of scientific and                          contained in the Graduate Profile. Each Science department
    technological change for society                                        and the Mathematics department offers final year courses
    Establish links between the various subjects in the                     designed to assess all the attributes of the Graduate Profile
    program                                                                 by assessing several of the abilities listed therein.
Possess the ability to recognize and solve problems of a                    In order to demonstrate that they have met the attributes
scientific nature in a systematic manner                                    contained in the Graduate Profile, students must complete
    Identify a problem                                                      Physics 203-NYB and 3 courses selected from:
    Decide on the best method of solving the problem
    Gather and analyze data in a systematic manner                           101-BLB General Biology II         202-BLE Environmental Chemistry
    Execute experimental procedures with precision                           101-BLC General Biology III        203-BLD Electronics
                                                                             201-BLD Calculus III               203-BLE Energy & Modern Physics
    Draw logical conclusions from data analysis
                                                                             201-BLE Probability & Statistics   203-903 Computer Techniques in
    Integrate what has been learned and apply it to solving                                                     Physics
    problems in new situations                                               201-BLF Statistics
                                                                             202-BLC Organic Chemistry I        360-903 Computer Applications in
Communicate effectively                                                      202-BLD Organic Chemistry II       Mathematics
   Acquire college-level skills in English
                                                                            as well as:
   Acquire college-level skills in French as a second                        English BMA                        French BMP, BMK, BMH, or BMJ
   language                                                                  Humanities BMA                     Physical Education 101, 102, 1M3


                                                                  Page 52
                                         Health Science Profile (200.B1)
Health Science Profile (200.B1)                              The Health Science profile prepares students for studies at
                                                             university in areas such as:
All Science students require 26 courses to obtain the
Diploma of Collegial Studies. In addition to the 9                Biotechnology
compulsory Concentration courses, Health Science students         Dentistry
will add Chemistry 202-BLC, Biology 101-BLB and one               Dietetics
option course from Math or Science to complete the 12             Medicine
Concentration courses required for the diploma.                   Occupational Therapy
                                                                  Pharmacy
Students are strongly urged to consult an Academic Advisor        Physical Education
during their first year to ensure that they will take             Physiotherapy
appropriate courses in their second year to satisfy the           Veterinary Medicine
entrance requirements of the university program they
intend to follow.


                          Semester 1                         Option courses for Health Science students
603-1x1-01   English
345-101-MQ   Humanities                                      Biology
602-10x-MQ   French                                          101-BLC       General Biology III
109-10x-MQ   Physical Education 101 or 102
                                                             Chemistry
201-NYA      Calculus I
202-NYA      General Chemistry I                             202-BLD       Organic Chemistry II
203-NYA      Mechanics                                       202-BLE       Environmental Chemistry
       Total: 7 courses                                      Mathematics
                          Semester 2                         201-BLD       Calculus III
                                                             201-BLE       Probability & Statistics
603-BMA-LA   English
                                                             201-BLF       Statistics
345-102-MQ   Humanities
                                                             201-903       Computer Applications in Mathematics
109-10x-MQ   Physical Education 101 or 102
             Complementary                                   Physics
101-NYA      General Biology I                               203-BLD       Electronics
201-NYB      Calculus II                                     203-BLE       Energy & Modern Physics
202-NYB      General Chemistry II                            203-903       Computer Techniques in Physics
       Total: 7 courses
                          Semester 3
603-10x-MQ   English 102 or 103
345-BMA-LA   Humanities
             Complementary
101-BLB      General Biology II
202-BLC      Organic Chemistry I
203-NYC      Waves and Modern Physics
       Total: 6 courses
                          Semester 4
603-10x-MQ   English 102 or 103
602-BMx-LA   French
109-1M3-MQ   Physical Education
201-NYC      Linear Algebra
203-NYB      Electricity and Magnetism
             Option Course
       Total: 6 courses




                                                        Page 53
                                 Pure & Applied Science Profile (200.B2)
All Science students require 26 courses to obtain the                The Pure & Applied Science profile prepares students for
Diploma of Collegial Studies. Pure & Applied Science                 studies at university in areas such as:
profile students who are considering mathematics,
physics or engineering related programs, are strongly                   Agriculture
recommended to take Math BLD and one other Physics                      Architecture
option course. They must also add one other option                      Computer Science
course from Math or Science to complete the 12                          Engineering
Concentration courses required for the diploma.                         Forestry
                                                                        Geology
Students are strongly urged to consult an Academic                      Mathematics
Advisor during their first year to ensure that they will                Pure Sciences: Biology, Chemistry, Physics
take appropriate courses in second year to satisfy the
entrance requirements of the university program they
intend to follow.

                        Semester 1                                   Option courses for Pure & Applied Science
603-1x1-01      English                                              students
345-101-MQ      Humanities
602-10x-MQ      French                                               Biology
109-10x-MQ      Physical Education 101 or 102                        101-BLB       General Biology II
201-NYA         Calculus I                                           101-BLC       General Biology III
202-NYA         General Chemistry I                                  Chemistry
203-NYA         Mechanics
                                                                     202-BLC       Organic Chemistry I
          Total: 7 courses                                           202-BLD       Organic Chemistry II
                        Semester 2                                   202-BLE       Environmental Chemistry
603-BMA-LA      English                                              Mathematics
345-102-MQ      Humanities                                           201-BLD       Calculus III
109-10x-MQ      Physical Education 101 or 102                        201-BLE       Probability & Statistics
                Complementary                                        201-BLF       Statistics
201-NYB         Calculus II                                          201-903       Computer Applications in Mathematics
202-NYB         General Chemistry II
203-NYC         Waves & Modern Physics                               Physics

          Total: 7 courses                                           203-BLD       Electronics
                                                                     203-BLE       Energy & Modern Physics
                        Semester 3                                   203-903       Computer Techniques in Physics
603-10x-MQ      English 102 or 103
345-BMA-LA      Humanities
                Complementary
101-NYA         General Biology I
201-NYC         Linear Algebra
203-NYB         Electricity & Magnetism
          Total: 6 courses
                        Semester 4
603-10x-MQ      English 102 or 103
603-BMx-LA      French
109-1M3-MQ      Physical Education
                Option course
                Option course
                Option course

          Total: 6 courses




                                                           Page 54
          Explorations Science - Orientation & Integration Sessions (081.62)
Entrance Requirement                                                      Other Information
Diploma of Secondary Studies, or the equivalent,                          Students who apply for this preparatory year should be
including Math CST 5 and Physical Science                                 advised that it will require dedication and motivation on
                                                                          their part. The Sciences are among the most difficult
Explorations Science is limited in enrolment due to                       subjects at the college and university level. The amount
space constraints as well as its rigorous nature. As such                 of homework assigned will be considerable in order to
not all qualified candidates can be admitted. For                         maximize students’ preparation.
detailed admissions requirements please refer to the                      A proper science preparation requires one full year of
Admissions section of this calendar.                                      study. In the first semester, we will provide the basics of
                                                                          Physical Science and Mathematics. In the second
Please Note: The option is designed for students who                      semester we will cover the Cégep equivalent of
want to pursue a Science-related program or career but                    Chemistry 534, Physics 534 and an appropriate
are missing the required high school pre-requisite                        Mathematics course. Emphasis will also be placed on the
courses. This option is not open to students who passed                   development of study skills and scientific methodology
their high school math/science courses for entrance into                  which students must develop in order to succeed in
Science but their overall record results in a refusal. Nor is             Science.
it designed for students who have tried but failed these
prerequisite courses. Students who apply to this
Orientation & Integration session should be aware that it
will require dedication and motivation on their part.



                                                    Explorations Science
                          Possible combinations of semester courses depending on high school courses taken
 The Study Skills in Algebra or Trigonometry (Complementary course in Mathematics) offered in the first semester will offer content that
 is sometimes not covered in high school but which is desirable preparation for Calculus and Physics. The course will have a strong
 emphasis on developing mathematical maturity and discipline.
   Possible         Highest level math course             Courses that will be taken                  Courses that will be taken
                                                                          st                                          nd
 Combinations       completed in high school             at Champlain in 1 semester                  at Champlain in 2 semester
                                                    201-013 Algebra                             201-015 Functions & trigonometry


                                                    982-021     Physical Science                 202-006   Chemistry
      1               Math CST 5                                (similar to Physical Science 436
                                                                but with a broader curriculum)
                                                                                                           (equivalent to Chemistry 534)

                                                    360-D2G Complementary course in             203-006    Physics
                                                            Mathematics                                    (equivalent to Physics 534)
                                                    201-015     Functions & trigonometry        201-NYA    Calculus I
                                                                (equivalent to Math SN 5 or
                                                                ST5)
                      Math SN or
      2               Math ST 4
                                                    982-021     Physical Science
                                                                (similar to Physical Science 436
                                                                                                 202-006   Chemistry
                                                                                                           (equivalent to Chemistry 534)
                                                                but with a broader curriculum)
                                                    360-D2G Complementary course in             203-006    Physics
                                                            Mathematics                                    (equivalent to Physics 534)
                                                    201-NYA Calculus I                          201-NYB    Calculus II
                                                    101-NYA General Biology I                   202-006    Chemistry
                                                                                                           (equivalent to Chemistry 534)
                      Math SN or
      3               Math ST 5
                                                    982-021     Physical Science
                                                                (similar to Physical Science 436
                                                                                                 203-006   Physics
                                                                                                           (equivalent to Physics 534)
                                                                but with a broader curriculum)
                                                    360-D2G Complementary course in
                                                            Mathematics


                                                                Page 55
                                       Social Science Program (300.A0)
Entrance Requirement                                                     Graduate Profile
In order to be admitted to a program leading to a                        The graduate exit profile indicates what students are
Diploma of College Studies (DEC), candidates must                        expected to achieve by the time the program is
possess a Secondary School Diploma or have completed                     completed. It outlines three main areas of expertise:
a level of education that is deemed equivalent by the                    knowledge, thinking and learning in the social sciences.
College.                                                                 At Champlain these major areas and their related
                                                                         abilities are as follows:
Students who wish to enter the Commerce Option or
World Studies with Math should also have Math SN or                      Knowledge of disciplinary content means that students
Math ST 5.                                                               • identify the main disciplinary-specific and
                                                                            transdisciplinary facts, notions, terms, principles,
The detailed admissions requirements can be found in                        concepts and questions and apply this knowledge
the admissions section of this calendar.                                    appropriately
                                                                         • explain the major disciplinary-specific and
Social Science students who wish to take advanced                           transdisciplinary theories, laws, models, approaches and
Mathematics courses (Calculus I, Calculus II or Linear                      schools of thought in relation to their authors and
Algebra) should have the appropriate high school pre-                       concrete situations
requisite (Math SN or Math ST 5). Students who do not have
these prerequisites may register for the equivalent non-                 Knowledge of social science methods means that
credit course(s) at Champlain if space is available.                      students
                                                                         • use empirical evidence to support their conclusions
Program Overview
                                                                         • apply their knowledge of the scientific approach to
A major objective of the Social Science program is to                       empirical data
provide a progression of courses (Level I “Introductory”                 • demonstrate a knowledge and application of
courses followed by Level II “in-depth” courses) that help                  qualitative and quantitative research methods
students to understand the social sciences as an integrated
body of knowledge.                                                       Thinking like a social scientist means
                                                                         • demonstrating qualities associated with a scientific
By acquiring the basic concepts that are fundamental to                     mind and critical thinking
a full understanding of the social sciences, students are                • recognizing the utility as well as the limitations of
prepared to undertake a wide range of university                            theory
programs.
                                                                         • selecting appropriate theoretical frameworks to explain
                                                                            social issues
The Social Science program provides students with the tools
to address the challenges in life and to achieve a better                • situating various issues related to informed,
understanding of the cultures and environment of the world                  responsible participation in a world-wide context
in which we live.                                                        • understanding ethical issues across the disciplines
                                                                         • drawing connections between different disciplines
Upon completion of the Social Science program, students                  • drawing connections between knowledge in social
can pursue their university studies in the following fields:                science courses and everyday life that ultimately lead
                                                                            to an understanding of people, groups and cultures
Administration        Finance               Physical Education           • integrating learning acquired throughout the program
Anthropology          Geography             Political Science               by identifying key concepts, theories and methods
Civil Service         Foreign Affairs       Psychology                      from diverse disciplines and using these to analyze
Computer Science      History               Public Affairs                  social issues
Commerce              Industrial            Religion
Communications        Resources             Social Work
Decisional Sciences   Journalism            Sociology
Economics             Law                   Specialized Writing
Education             Marketing
English               Mngt. Info. Systems
                      Philosophy




                                                               Page 56
Successful students in the social sciences                               Comprehensive Assessment
• use learning strategies that allow them to reach their                 According to the Exit Profile for the Social Science
   short and long-term goals and serve as a solid
                                                                         program, successful students graduate with an
   foundation for future studies
                                                                         understanding of human phenomena from a social
• recognize main thesis and/or author’s purpose,                         scientific perspective. They acquire a thorough
   supporting details and the relationships among ideas                  knowledge of disciplinary content and research methods
   in different texts                                                    in the social sciences and extend their ability to think,
• communicate ideas clearly in written format                            communicate and learn effectively. The elements of the
• communicate ideas orally in a clear and coherent                       Exit Profile are practiced throughout the various social
   fashion                                                               science courses and especially in the final course, the
• work effectively as a member of a group                                Integration Seminar in the Social Sciences (see above).
• integrate their learning throughout the program                        The successful Integrated Interdisciplinary Paper that
• use appropriate self-assessment techniques to reflect                  students write in this course signals that the student has
   on their own learning                                                 met the criteria for the program’s Comprehensive
                                                                         Assessment.
• read and understand basic social science documents
   written in French
• use appropriate information-processing technologies
• demonstrate awareness of the need to develop
   lifestyle habits conducive to good physical, emotional
   and intellectual health

Integrative Activity
Social Science students must demonstrate that they have
integrated knowledge from their Social Science courses.
Although the integration of concepts, theories and
research methods occurs throughout the program it is the
main focus of the Integration Seminar in the Social
Sciences (ISSS) course offered the graduating semester. In
this course, students evaluate their learning approach and
review key concepts, theories and issues they have dealt
with in their Social Science courses. The focal point of the
course is the Integrated Interdisciplinary Paper in which
students examine a social issue from the perspective of at
least two social sciences disciplines and one theoretical
framework. Students present their major findings orally
and critically assess their final paper. This integrative
activity prepares the students for university studies and
meets the requirement of the Comprehensive
Assessment.




                                                               Page 57
                          General Option (300.AA) - Social Science Program (300.A0)
The General Option allows students to explore the social             Level I and Level II Disciplines
sciences before making a commitment to a particular
area of study.                                                       Students are limited to a maximum of six Level I courses
                                                                     and will complete six Level II courses as shown in the
                          Semester 1                                 chart above. Students must successfully complete the
603-1x1-01    English                                                introductory Level I course before advancing to Level II
345-101-MQ    Humanities                                             courses in a given discipline.
109-10x-MQ    Physical Education 101 or 102
                                   (Level I)
330-910       Western Civilization                                   Below is a semester break-down of the disciplines
                                             (Level I)
350-102       Introduction to Psychology                             available from which students may choose Level I and
              Level I Concentration Course                           Level II courses. Students should consult the course
              Level I Concentration Course                           descriptions to get more information on the content of
       Total: 7 courses                                              the Level I and Level II courses.
                          Semester 2
                                                                     Semester 1                     Semester 2
603-BMH-LA    English
345-102-MQ    Humanities                                             Anthropology                   Anthropology
602-10x-MQ    French                                                 Biology (see note below)       Biology (see note below)
              Complementary                                          Business                       Business
360-101       Quantitative Methods                                   Geography                      Geography
                                (Level I)
383-920       Macroeconomics
                                                                     Math (see note below)          History
              Level I Concentration Course
              Level II Concentration Course                          Political Science              Math (see note below)
                                                                     Sociology                      Political Science
       Total: 8 courses
                                                                                                    Psychology
                          Semester 3                                                                Sociology
603-10x-MQ    English 102 or 103
345-BMB-LA    Humanities                                             Semester 3                     Semester 4
602-BMx-LA    French
109-10x-MQ    Physical Education 101 or 102                          Anthropology                   Anthropology
300-101       Introduction to Methodology                            Business                       Business
              Level II Concentration Course                          Economics                      Economics
              Level II Concentration Course                          Geography                      Geography
       Total: 7 courses                                              History                        History
                                                                     Math (see note below)          Math (see note below)
                          Semester 4
                                                                     Political Science              Political Science
603-10x-MQ English 102 or 103
                                                                     Psychology                     Psychology
109-1M3-MQ Physical Education
           Complementary                                             Sociology                      Sociology
300-301    Integration Seminar in the Social Sciences
           Level II Concentration Course                             Biology 101-901 (Level I course), Statistics 300-202
           Level II Concentration Course                             (Level II course taken after Quantitative Methods) or
           Level II Concentration Course                             Calculus I 201-103 (Level I course) may be taken to meet
       Total: 7 courses                                              certain university prerequisites - see each course
                                                                     description for more information. These courses will
                                                                     count towards the required number of Level I or Level II
                                                                     courses needed to complete the diploma.




                                                           Page 58
                                Criminology (300.AC) - Social Science Program (300.A0)
The Criminology option is intended to give students a                             Level I and Level II Disciplines
background that permits them to apply to many fields of
study at university. The Criminology option is ideal for                          Students are limited to a maximum of six Level I courses
those students wanting to explore studies in                                      and will complete six Level II courses as shown in the
anthropology, criminology, psychology or sociology.                               chart above. Students must successfully complete
Criminology option students may pursue studies in law;                            introductory Level I courses before advancing to Level II
however, this is not intended to be a pre-law program.                            courses.

                            Semester 1                                            Following is a semester break-down of the disciplines
                                                                                  available from which students may choose their Level I
603-1x1-01      English
345-101-MQ      Humanities                                                        course. Students should consult the course descriptions
109-10x-MQ      Physical Education 101 or 102                                     to get more information on the content of the Level I
360-B2D         Intro to Forensic Science
                                              (Complementary)                     courses.
                                      (Level I)
330-910         Western Civilization
                                                   (Level I)
350-102         Introduction to Psychology                                        Semester 1                     Semester 2
                                                (Level I)
387-101         Introduction to Sociology
                                                                                  None                           Biology (see note below)
        Total: 7 courses                                                                                         Business
                            Semester 2                                                                           Geography
603-BMH-LA      English                                                                                          Math (see note below)
345-102-MQ      Humanities                                                                                       Political Science
602-10x-MQ      French
                                                  (Level II)
350-213         Psych. Devel. of Criminal Behav.                                  Semester 3                     Semester 4
360-101         Quantitative Methods
381-101         Introduction to Anthropology
                                              (Level I)                           None                           None
                                                           (Level II)
387-208         Sociology of Deviance, Law & Society
                Level I Concentration Course
        Total: 8 courses                                                          Biology 101-901 (Level I course) or Calculus I 201-103
                                                                                  (Level I course) may be taken to meet certain university
                            Semester 3                                            prerequisites - see each course description for more
603-10x-MQ      English 102 or 103                                                information. These courses will count towards the
345-BMB-LA      Humanities                                                        required Level I concentration course in the second
602-BMx-LA      French                                                            semester.
109-10x-MQ      Physical Education 101 or 102
300-101         Introduction to Methodology
                                                    (Level II)
381-205         Intro to Forensic Anthropology: CSI
        Total: 6 courses

                            Semester 4
603-10x-MQ English 102 or 103
109-1M3-MQ Physical Education
           Complementary
300-301    Integration Seminar in the Social Sciences
                                           (Level II)
330-205    History of Crime & Punishment
                             (Level I)
383-920    Macroeconomics
                                                  (Level II)
387-209    Sociology of Gender, Race & Justice
        Total: 7 courses




                                                                        Page 59
                        Education Option (300.AF) - Social Science Program (300.A0)
The Education Option is designed for anyone considering                     Level I and Level II Disciplines
a career in teaching or other fields related to education.
This option of this option is to give students a firm                       Students are limited to a maximum of six Level I courses
grounding in several social science disciplines relevant to                 and will complete six Level II courses as shown in the
education, specifically Anthropology, Psychology and                        chart above. Students must successfully complete
Sociology. While the Education Option focuses on                            introductory Level I courses before advancing to Level II
schooling it also provides an excellent preparation for                     courses.
any Arts program at university. The social science
perspectives and analytical and writing skills you acquire                  Following is a semester break-down of the disciplines
will be profitable whatever path you choose. This social                    available from which students may choose their Level I
science foundation will also give you a formidable                          course. Students should consult the course descriptions
background from which to pursue your teaching training                      to get more information on the content of the Level I
courses at university. You’ll get a preview of what                         courses.
learning to become a teacher may entail which may also
help you solidify or modify your goals.                                     Semester 1                     Semester 2
                                                                            None                           None
                           Semester 1
603-1x1-01    English                                                       Semester 3                     Semester 4
602-10x-MQ    French                                                        Geography                      Anthropology
109-10x-MQ    Physical Education 101 or 102
                                   (Level I)                                Math (see note below)          Biology
330-910       Western Civilization
350-102       Introduction to Psychology
                                                (Level I)                   Political Science              Economics
381-101       Introduction to Anthropology
                                                    (Level I)                                              Geography
387-101       Introduction to Sociology
                                             (Level I)                                                     History
       Total: 7 courses                                                                                    Math (see note below)
                                                                                                           Political Science
                           Semester 2                                                                      Psychology
603-BMH-LA    English                                                                                      Sociology
345-101-MQ    Humanities
                              (computer course recommended)
              Complementary
350-207       Child & Adolescent Psychology
                                                     (Level II)             Biology 101-901 (Level I course), Statistics 300-202
360-101       Quantitative Methods                                          (Level II course taken after Quantitative Methods) or
383-920       Macroeconomics
                                (Level I)                                   Calculus I 201-103 (Level I course) may be taken to meet
                                          (Level II)
387-206       Sociology of Education                                        certain university prerequisites - see each course
       Total: 7 courses                                                     description for more information. These courses will
                                                                            count towards the required number of Level I or Level II
                           Semester 3                                       concentration courses needed to complete the diploma.
603-10x-MQ    English 102 or 103
345-102-MQ    Humanities
602-BMx-LA    French
109-10x-MQ    Physical Education 101 or 102
              Complementary
300-101       Introduction to Methodology
                                               (Level II)
381-204       Myth of Race & Reality of Racism
              Level I Concentration Course
       Total: 8 courses

                           Semester 4
603-10x-MQ    English 102 or 103
345-BJB-LA    Humanities
109-1M3-MQ    Physical Education
300-301       Integration Seminar in the Social Sciences
              Level II Concentration Course
              Level II Concentration Course
              Level II Concentration Course
       Total: 7 courses




                                                                  Page 60
                       Psychology Option (300.AP) - Social Science Program (300.A0)
This option is for the student who is interested in                             Level I and Level II Disciplines
becoming a practicing or research psychologist. Typical
settings for careers in this area include: private clinics,                     Students are limited to a maximum of six Level I courses
mental health institutions, schools and large companies.                        and will complete six Level II courses as shown in the
You will be introduced to the study of areas such as:                           chart above. Students must successfully complete
Social Psychology, Human Development, Sports                                    introductory Level I courses before advancing to Level II
Psychology and the Psychology of Sexual Behaviour. This                         courses.
option will provide you with a solid preparation for
university studies in Psychology or in other social science                     Following is a semester break-down of the disciplines
disciplines.                                                                    available from which students may choose their Level I
                                                                                course. Students should consult the course descriptions
                          Semester 1                                            to get more information on the content of the Level I
                                                                                courses.
603-1x1-01    English
345-101-MQ    Humanities
602-10x-MQ    French                                                            Semester 1                     Semester 2
              Complementary                                                     Anthropology                   Anthropology
                                         (Level I)
350-102       Introduction to Psychology                                        Business                       Business
              Level I Concentration Course                                      Geography                      Geography
              Level I Concentration Course                                      Math (see note below)          Political Science
       Total: 7 courses                                                         Sociology                      Sociology
                          Semester 2
603-BMH-LA    English
                                                                                Semester 3                     Semester 4
345-102-MQ    Humanities                                                        None                           Anthropology
              Complementary                                                                                    Business
109-10x-MQ    Physical Education 101 or 102                                                                    Economics
                                   (Level I)
330-910       Western Civilization                                                                             Geography
                                     (Chosen by the department)
350-xxx       Level II Psych. Course
                                                                                                               History
360-101       Quantitative Methods
              Level II Concentration Course                                                                    Political Science
       Total: 8 courses
                                                                                                               Psychology
                                                                                                               Sociology
                          Semester 3
603-10x-MQ    English 102 or 103                                                Calculus I 201-103 (Level I course) may be taken in the
345-BMB-LA    Humanities                                                        first semester by students who are interested in pursuing
109-10x-MQ    Physical Education 101 or 102                                     their university studies in programs that require Math.
                               (Level I)
101-901       Human Biology
300-101       Introduction to Methodology
                                         (Chosen by the department)
350-xxx       Level II Psych. Course
                                  (Level I)
383-920       Macroeconomics
       Total: 7 courses

                          Semester 4
603-10x-MQ    English 102 or 103
602-BMx-LA    French
109-1M3-MQ    Physical Education
                         (Level II)
300-202       Statistics
300-301       Integration Seminar in the Social Sciences
              Level II Concentration Course
              Level II Concentration Course
       Total: 7 courses




                                                                      Page 61
                      Commerce Option (300.BB) - Social Science Program (300.A0)
The Commerce Studies Option is designed to provide                       Level I and Level II Disciplines
students with the strong social science background
sought by universities, as well as the required                          Students are limited to a maximum of six Level I courses
Mathematics courses (Calculus I, Calculus II and Linear                  and will complete six Level II courses as shown in the
Algebra) that will enable students to enter university                   chart above. Students must successfully complete
programs in Commerce and Business Administration.                        introductory Level I courses before advancing to Level II
                                                                         courses.
                          Semester 1
                                                                         Following is a semester break-down of the disciplines
 603-1x1-01    English
 345-101-MQ    Humanities
                                                                         available from which students may choose their Level I
 109-10x-MQ    Physical Education 101 or 102                             course. Students should consult the course descriptions
 201-103       Calculus I
                          (Level I)                                      to get more information on the content of the Level I
                                    (Level I)
 383-920       Macroeconomics                                            courses.
                                              (Level I)
 401-101       Fundamentals of Business
               Level I Concentration Course                              Semester 1                     Semester 2
         Total: 7 courses                                                Anthropology                   None
                          Semester 2                                     Biology (see note below)
                                                                         Geography
 603-BMH-LA    English
 345-102-MQ    Humanities                                                Political Science
 602-10x-MQ    French                                                    Sociology
                           (Level II)
 201-203       Calculus II
                                      (Level I)
 330-910       Western Civilization                                      Semester 3                     Semester 4
 360-101       Quantitative Methods
                                                (Level II)               None                           None
 401-206       Introduction to Accounting
         Total: 7 courses

                          Semester 3                                     Biology 101-901 (Level I course), may be taken to meet
 603-10x-MQ    English 102 or 103                                        certain university prerequisites - see course description
 345-BMB-LA    Humanities                                                for more information. It may be taken as the Level I
                                             (Complementary)
 420-D1L       Computer Applic. for Comm.                                course in the first semester.
 109-10x-MQ    Physical Education 101 or 102
 300-101       Introduction to Methodology                               Please Note: Calculus II is not required for entrance into
                                           (Level I)
 350-102       Introduction to Psychology                                the John Molson School of Business at Concordia
                                (Level II)
 383-201       Microeconomics                                            University. Therefore, students registered in the
         Total: 7 courses                                                Commerce option have two choices with regards to the
                          Semester 4                                     Math courses required. Students may choose to take
                                                                         Calculus II or Statistics. Students who choose Statistics
 603-10x-MQ English 102 or 103
 602-BMx-LA French                                                       201-BLF instead of Calculus II will not normally take 360-
            Complementary                                                300 Quantitative Methods. However, they must add
 109-1M3-MQ Physical Education                                           another Level II course to their program of studies.
 300-301    Integration Seminar in the Social Sciences                   Students who decide to take Statistics 201-BLF after they
                           (Level II)
 201-105    Linear Algebra                                               have already taken 360-300 Quantitative Methods will be
 401-20x    Marketing 201 or Commercial Law 203                          authorized to substitute Quantitative Methods as one of
         Total: 7 courses                                                their compulsory Complementary courses. In addition,
                                                                         students must take one additional Level II course.




                                                               Page 62
     World Studies without Math Option (300.WA) - Social Science Program (300.A0)
The World Studies Option is designed to prepare you for                Level I and Level II Disciplines
university studies with an international focus. The option
focuses on building a solid foundation in world                        Students are limited to a maximum of six Level I courses
geography, history, international economics and                        and will complete six Level II courses as shown in the
international politics. Students will participate in field             chart above. Students must successfully complete
trips to international organizations and attend seminars               introductory Level I courses before advancing to Level II
and conferences on international issues.                               courses.

                          Semester 1                                   Following is a semester break-down of the disciplines
                                                                       available from which students may choose their Level I
603-1x1-01    English
345-102-MQ    Humanities
                                                                       course. Students should consult the course descriptions
602-10x-MQ    French                                                   to get more information on the content of the Level I
109-10x-MQ    Physical Education 101 or 102                            courses.
                                 (Level I)
320-101       World Geography
                                    (Level I)
330-910       Western Civilization                                     Semester 1                     Semester 2
                                                (Level I)
385-101       Introduction to Political Science                        None                           Anthropology
       Total: 7 courses                                                                               Business
                          Semester 2                                                                  Sociology
603-BMH-LA    English
345-102-MQ    Humanities                                               Semester 3                     Semester 4
              Complementary                                            Recommended Courses:           Recommended Courses:
109-10x-MQ    Physical Education 101 or 102                            Geography 202                  Geography 202
360-101       Quantitative Methods                                     Geography 203                  Geography 203
                                (Level I)
383-920       Macroeconomics                                           Political Science 201          Political Science 201
                                          (Level I)
350-102       Introduction to Psychology
                                                                       Political Science 202          Political Science 202
              Level I Concentration Course
       Total: 8 courses
                                                                       or course(s) from the          or course(s) from the
                          Semester 3                                   following disciplines:         following disciplines:
603-10x-MQ    English 102 or 103                                       Anthropology                   Anthropology
345-BMB-LA    Humanities                                               Business                       Business
602-BMx-LA    French                                                   Sociology                      Sociology
300-101       Introduction to Methodology
                                  (Level II)
330-201       Twentieth Century                                        Biology 101-901 (Level I course), Statistics 300-202
              Level II Concentration Course                            (Level II course taken after Quantitative Methods) or
              Level II Concentration Course
                                                                       Calculus I 201-103 (Level I course) may be taken to meet
       Total: 7 courses                                                certain university prerequisites - see each course
                          Semester 4                                   description for more information. These courses will
603-10x-MQ English 102 or 103                                          count towards the required number of Level I or Level II
           Complementary                                               courses required to complete the diploma.
109-1M3-MQ Physical Education
300-301    Integration Seminar in the Social Sciences
                                       (Level II)
383-202    International Economics
                                  (Level II)
385-203    International Politics
           Level II Concentration Course
       Total: 7 courses




                                                             Page 63
          World Studies with Math Option (300.WC) - Social Science Program (300.A0)
While meeting the same objectives as the World Studies                 Level I and Level II Disciplines
Social Science profile, this profile provides you with the
mathematics courses necessary to enter the Commerce                    Students are limited to a maximum of six Level I courses
and Business Administration.                                           and will complete six Level II courses as shown in the
                                                                       chart above. Students must successfully complete
                          Semester 1                                   introductory Level I courses before advancing to Level II
                                                                       courses.
603-1x1-01    English
345-101-MQ    Humanities
109-10x-MQ    Physical Education 101 or 102
                         (Level I)
201-103       Calculus I
                                   (Level I)
320-101       World Geography
                                      (Level I)
330-910       Western Civilization
                                                (Level I)
385-101       Introduction to Political Science
       Total: 7 courses

                          Semester 2
603-BMH-LA    English
345-102-MQ    Humanities
109-10x-MQ    Physical Education 101 or 102
                          (Level II)
201-203       Calculus II
360-101       Quantitative Methods
                                     (Level I)
383-920       Macroeconomics
                                               (Level I)
350-102       Introduction to Psychology
       Total: 7 courses

                          Semester 3
603-10x-MQ    English 102 or 103
345-BMB-LA    Humanities
602-10x-MQ    French
              Complementary
                             (Level II)
201-105       Linear Algebra
300-101       Introduction to Methodology
                                (Level I)
383-201       Microeconomics
       Total: 7 courses

                          Semester 4
603-10x-MQ English 102 or 103
602-BMx-LA French
           Complementary
109-1M3-MQ Physical Education
300-301    Integration Seminar in the Social Sciences
                                       (Level II)
383-202    International Economics
                                  (Level II)
385-203    International Politics
       Total: 7 courses




                                                             Page 64
                 Creative Arts, Literature and Languages Program (500.A1)
Entrance Requirement                                               Facilities
In order to be admitted to a program leading to a Diploma          Champlain College Saint-Lambert’s facilities include:
of College Studies (DEC), candidates must possess a                • Amphitheatre with Film, Video, and Multi-media
Secondary School Diploma or have completed a level of                 Projection Facilities
education that is deemed equivalent by the College.                • Exhibition Spaces
Additional admissions information can be found in the              • Film Editing Facilities and Sound Studios
admissions section of this calendar.                               • Fully-equipped Photo Darkroom
Please refer to the 2011-2012 Admissions Handbook and              • Well-equipped Photo Studio
Program Brochures for the 2011-2012 admissions                     • Large, naturally lit Painting, Drawing and Printmaking
requirements.                                                         Studios
                                                                   • Macintosh Digital Imaging Studio for Graphics and
General Program Goal                                                  Animation
                                                                   • Multi-media Classrooms
Champlain College Saint-Lambert seeks to provide a high
quality of education for its students and to ensure that           • Three-camera Professional Television Studio and
graduates have the necessary knowledge, skills, and abilities to      Control Room
function effectively in their personal and professional lives.     • Digital Video Editing Suites
Champlain College Saint-Lambert places an emphasis on              • Video, Film & Photo Cameras, Tripods, Lighting Kits,
providing education that allows the student to acquire and            Microphones, etc. that may be borrowed by students.
integrate the general knowledge, intellectual skills, attitudes,
and experiences needed by an individual to achieve a level of                   Please visit our virtual gallery at:
competency appropriate to a two-year CEGEP pre-university                       www.creativeartschamplain.com
graduate, preparing for advanced studies at a university, while
functioning more fully as a person and as a member of society.     The Creative Arts option provides an introduction to art,
As such, through knowledge and experience, students will           culture and many forms of media. We emphasize a hands-
develop their abilities to work as members of groups and work      on approach to learning and creating. Our goal is to develop
with people who are different from themselves. Students will       creative, technically skilled, visually literate students who
also be encouraged to take specific courses in English,            have an opportunity to explore their emerging areas of
Humanities, and Physical Education that will be more relevant      interest. Our courses are designed to give students
to their field of study.                                           experience in writing, producing and critiquing their own
In designing the Creative Arts, Literature and Languages           work.
program at Champlain College Saint-Lambert, every effort was       In a common first semester, all students are introduced to a
made to create options that would best prepare the graduate        variety of traditional and new media in three introductory
for studies at the university level. Decisions on option           production courses. You will then choose one of three profiles
configurations were based on the academic needs of our             to specialize in over the next three semesters:
current student base entering universities.
                                                                   • Digital Imaging and Studio Arts
Creative Arts Option                                               • Film/Video/Communications
What you can expect from our Creative Arts option                  • Photography/Design
• Dedicated teachers, active in their fields, who care
                                                                   You will choose the profile that best suits your university
  about your success in Cegep, university, and on the job
                                                                   and/or career aspirations. We have arranged your courses
  market.
                                                                   into profiles so you are absolutely guaranteed to get the
• Small class sizes to foster intimate learning.                   courses you choose.
• A large variety of courses to choose from.
• A hands-on approach to learning about the media right
  from the start.
• Help in preparing a professional portfolio for university
  and job applications.
• Development of the skills you will need for success at
  university and in your career
• Specifically designed and equipped Creative Arts rooms
  and labs.


                                                              Page 65
Of course, choosing one profile doesn’t mean that you have       Modern Languages Option
no interest in the others. Therefore, the program has been
designed to permit students to take option courses from          The Modern Languages option is designed to give students a
the other profiles in your third and fourth semesters. These     thorough study of French, Spanish, and Italian. Students are
option courses and the three introductory courses                introduced to the culture and civilization of the languages
combined with the area of specialization give you a well-        that they study as they master grammar, critical reading and
rounded background suitable for admission to many                writing. The languages in this option were selected to
university programs in addition to those programs directly       provide students a proper preparation for advanced studies
related to Creative Arts and Communications.                     in domestic and international business, journalism,
                                                                 government, historical and medical research, architecture,
                                                                 teaching, interpretation and translation.
Portfolio                                                        The Modern Languages option emphasizes critical awareness
                                                                 of cultural variations and issues in world civilizations and global
Your final semester includes a course that is specially
                                                                 regions. Students are introduced to cultural and literary
designed to help you prepare a portfolio of your work. You
                                                                 analysis and research using primary texts, secondary literature,
will also be given help in writing your resume and a letter of
                                                                 and computerized data resources. Italian was chosen because
intent in time for you to submit applications to universities
                                                                 for many centuries, it has been the language of culture, and in
and/or industry.
                                                                 recent times Italy has become one of the world's leading
                                                                 industrial and economic powers. Spanish was chosen because
                                                                 it is the second most popular language of business after
                                                                 English and because of the economic and cultural
                                                                 development between Canada and the United States. French
                                                                 was chosen to ensure that our students leave the college with
                                                                 a mastery of both of Canada’s official languages.




                                                            Page 66
                             Creative Arts Profiles and Graduate Profile
Creative Arts Option                                                 • Be confident in their ability to recognise and experiment
                                                                          with many different means of communication using
Profiles
                                                                          various media.
There are three distinct profiles which share a common first
semester. As of the second semester, students specialize in          •    Be able to convey meaning through a variety of media
a profile of their choosing. In the third and fourth                      and technologies.
semesters, students in each profile are permitted to take an         •    Demonstrate abilities in a preferred medium as well as
optional course in profiles other than their own, thereby                 explain the theories relevant to the use of this medium.
giving each student a well-rounded exposure to various               •    Demonstrate understanding of the "production chain"
media used for expression.                                                of all the steps between conception and presentation of
                                                                          a project.
1.   Digital Imaging/Studio Arts allows students to create           •    Demonstrate self-motivation and the ability to meet
     works with traditional art-making techniques such as                 goals within deadlines.
     drawing, painting and sculpture, and with digital imaging       •    Demonstrate the ability to persevere and rework
     in both 2D and 3D applications. They will learn how the              projects to achieve high standards. Demonstrate the
     computer can be an artist's tool, how the screen is a kind           ability to work in a cooperative manner with members
     of canvas, and how sculpture can be designed in both real            of a team as well as independently.
     and virtual space. Students practise traditional art-making     •    Be able to present their work in a professional manner.
     techniques concurrently with the newer digital methods.
                                                                     •    Demonstrate the ability to transfer and apply skills to
                                                                          environments and/or problems different from those
2.   Film/Video/Communications is designed to educate                     with which they have experience.
     students about film and video from a variety of                 •    Be able to develop projects that will prepare them for
     perspectives - aesthetic, historical, technical, and                 university studies in either the Creative Arts field or in a
     theoretical. In addition to more traditional practices,              wide range of university programs outside of the
     students will be exposed to digital shooting and                     Creative Arts field.
     editing. Emphasis will be placed on teamwork and                •    Develop a portfolio for application to university
     individual responsibility used in a hands-on approach.               programs or to potential employers.

3.   Photo/Design teaches students about photography and             Additionally, graduates from the Digital Imaging/Studio
     design - expressive media which are strongly related.           Arts profile will:
     Students will learn design principles through the use of        • Be able to identify and describe the elements of 2- and
     the camera, along with darkroom skills which allow the             3-dimensional space, figure ground, value and form; the
     expression of their ideas. Students will also integrate            principles of rhythm, size, proportion and composition;
     media such as digital imaging into their work.                     and the expressive qualities of symbol and story.
                                                                     • Be able to identify and describe the elements of value,
                                                                        perspective and colour schemes; the principles of
Graduate Profile                                                        contrast, emphasis and unity; and the expressive
Graduates will:                                                         qualities of thematic development and sequence.
• Be able to define and produce an artistic work in their            • Demonstrate the ability to organize the elements and
   field of specialization.                                             principles to convey meaning through a variety of media
                                                                        and technology.
• Be familiar with current theories, trends, history, and
   practices of creative arts in their chosen field of               • Be able to discuss the creative process, especially in
   specialization.                                                      relation to their own production.
• Be familiar with and use the critical vocabulary                   • Be able to speak about their work in reference to
   pertinent to their specialization.                                   historical and/or contemporary art.
• Be able to situate the contemporary creative impulse
   within the history of art and ideas.
• Demonstrate an awareness of the historical and cultural
   influences in their chosen field of specialization.
• Show awareness of ethical issues in personal and work
   situations.
• Be skilled in methods of analysis and argument.
• Demonstrate the ability to think critically and creatively.

                                                                Page 67
Additionally, graduates from the Film/Video/Communications    Additionally, graduates from the Photo/Design profile
profile will:                                                 will:
• Demonstrate understanding and use of the core               • Demonstrate the ability to produce black and white
   vocabulary essential to the production and analysis of         photographs, including advanced printing skills using
   moving images within the broader context of                    fiber-base paper.
   communications.                                            • Demonstrate an understanding of the concepts of light
• Be able to identify, describe and participate in all            balancing and filtration in colour photography.
   aspects of the production chain including pre-             • Be able to use a wide range of natural and artificial
   production, production and post-production.                    lighting techniques.
• Be able to analyse and criticize aspects of image making,   • Be able to use basic techniques of production,
   image manipulation and interpretation.                         manipulation, and printing of digital images.
• Demonstrate the ability to translate a written/oral         • Demonstrate competent layout (page design) skills, as
   concept into moving images that convey an intended             well as poster design, in both traditional and digital
   meaning.                                                       media.
• Demonstrate the ability to combine sound with moving
   images to communicate a message clearly.




                                                         Page 68
           Creative Arts Profiles - Creative Arts, Literature & Languages Program (500.A1)
                           Visit the Creative Arts Virtual Gallery at www.creativeartschamplain.com
                                                 Semester 1 – Common to all profiles
                                              603-1x1-01       English
                                              345-101-MQ       Humanities
                                              109-10x-MQ       Physical Education 101 or 102
                                              602-10x-MQ       French
                                              510-101          Intro to Digital Imaging/Studio Arts
                                              511-101          Intro to Photo/Design
                                              530-101          Intro to Film/Video/Communications
                                                        Total: 7 courses

          Digital Imaging/Studio Arts                   Film/Video/Communications                             Photo/Design
                Profile (500.21)                              Profile (500.22)                               Profile (500.23)
                 Semester 2                                      Semester 2                                    Semester 2
603-BMH-LA      English                       603-BMH-LA       English                       603-BMH-LA       English
345-102-MQ      Humanities                    345-102-MQ       Humanities                    345-102-MQ       Humanities
602-10x-MQ      French                        602-10x-MQ       French                        602-10x-MQ       French
109-10x-MQ      Phys. Ed. 101 or 102          109-10x-MQ       Phys. Ed. 101 or 102          109-10x-MQ       Phys. Ed. 101 or 102
502-101         Art & Ideas                   502-101          Art & Ideas                   502-101          Art & Ideas
510-212         2D Digital Imaging            530-202          Television Studio             511-201          Colour Photography
510-204         Drawing                       530-203          Screen Studies                511-202          B & W Photo Workshop
510-205         Painting                      530-211          Digital Filmmaking II         511-203          2D/3D Design
       Total: 8 courses                                 Total: 8 courses                              Total: 8 courses
                  Semester 3                                     Semester 3                                    Semester 3
603-10x-MQ English 102 or 103                 603-10x-MQ English 102 or 103                  603-10x-MQ English 102 or 103
           Complementary                                 Complementary                                  Complementary
109-1M3-MQ Physical Education                 109-1M3-MQ Physical Education                  109-1M3-MQ Physical Education
502-201    Art & Media                        502-201    Art & Media                         502-201    Art & Media
510-301    Sculpture                          530-302    Film History: Selected Topics       511-301    Studio Photography
510-312    3D Digital Imaging                 530-311    Digital Filmmaking III              511-302    2D Computer Design
           Option Course                                 Option Course                                  Option Course
       Total: 7 courses                                 Total: 7 courses                              Total: 7 courses
                  Semester 4                                     Semester 4                                    Semester 4
603-10x-MQ      English 102 or 103            603-10x-MQ       English 102 or 103            603-10x-MQ       English 102 or 103
345-BMF-LA      Humanities                    345-BMF-LA       Humanities                    345-BMF-LA       Humanities
                Complementary                                  Complementary                                  Complementary
510-412         Advanced Digital Workshop     530-402          Canadian Film & Television    511-401          Advanced Photo Workshop
510-401         Advanced Workshop: Studio     530-411          Digital Filmmaking IV         511-402          Digital Photo Workshop
510-403         Creative Arts Portfolio:      510-403          Creative Arts Portfolio:      510-403          Creative Arts Portfolio:
                Digital Imaging/Studio Arts                    Film/Video/Communications                      Photo/Design
                Option Course                                  Option Course                                  Option Course
       Total: 8 courses                                 Total: 8 courses                              Total: 8 courses
        Digital Imaging/Studio Arts                     Film/Video/Communications                             Photo/Design
        option courses for students                      option courses for students                   option courses for students
       enrolled in other two profiles                   enrolled in other two profiles                enrolled in other two profiles
510-901         Drawing                     530-901            Production                    511-901          Black & White Photography
510-902         Computer Graphics           530-902            Film Studies                  511-902          Light & Image
510-904         Experimen. Tech. in Drawing 530-903            Production/Workshop           511-903          Story Telling
510-905         2D Comp. Anim. Workshop
510-907         Beyond the Object

Comprehensive Assessment                                                the attainment of the competencies and abilities outlined
                                                                        in the graduate profile. The comprehensive assessment is
Students are required to complete a Comprehensive                       produced in the Portfolio course during the fourth
Assessment prior to graduation. A portfolio is prepared that            semester.
reflects the skills developed during the students’ four
semesters at Champlain College Saint-Lambert. It reflects


                                                                 Page 69
 Modern Languages Profile (500.AD) - Creative Arts, Literature & Languages Program (500.A1)
Students placed in French 101 or 102 will take 602-111 in
their second semester. Students placed in French 103 will
take 602-112 in their second semester. Higher level
courses in Spanish are available for students whose
language skills are above the beginner’s level.

                           Semester 1
603-1x1-01      English
602-10x-MQ      French
109-10x-MQ      Physical Education 101 or 102
502-101         Art & Ideas
607-101         Spanish I
608-101         Italian I
603-110         International Literature
       Total: 7 courses

                           Semester 2
603-10x-MQ      English 102 or 103
345-101-MQ      Humanities
602-BMx-LA      French
                Complementary
502-201         Art & Media
607-201         Spanish II
608-201         Italian II
602-11x         Les mots de la culture (602-111)*
                or Littérature, culture et société (602-112)*
                * See note above
       Total: 8 courses

                           Semester 3
603-10x-MQ      English 102 or 103
345-102-MQ      Humanities
109-10x-MQ      Physical Education 101 or 102
                Complementary
607-301         Spanish III
608-301         Italian III
602-113         Le français à travers les âges
       Total: 7 courses

                           Semester 4
603-BMH-LA      English
345-BMF-LA      Humanities
109-1M3-MQ      Physical Education
607-401         Spanish IV
608-401         Italian IV
602-114         Production et créativité
       Total:    6 courses




                                                                Page 70
                                        Liberal Arts Program (700.B0)
Entrance Requirement                                            Integrative Activity
In order to be admitted to a program leading to a Diploma       To ensure that students are prepared for the integrative
of College Studies (DEC), candidates must possess a             assessment at the end of their studies, each compulsory
Secondary School Diploma including CST 4 Math or have           course has a requirement that students pass both the
completed a level of education that is deemed equivalent        summative assessment at the end of the course as well as
by the College. Additional admissions requirements can be       the general term work in order to earn a passing grade for
found in the admission section of this calendar.                the semester, in conformity with the local policy on the
                                                                assessment of student learning.
Please refer to the 2011-2012 Admissions Handbook and
Program Brochures for the 2011-2012 admissions                  Comprehensive Assessment
requirements.
                                                                To fulfill the program requirements for graduation,
Program Overview                                                students must complete a comprehensive assessment
                                                                activity. The comprehensive assessment will be met
The Liberal Arts program offers students the opportunity to     through the writing of an extended essay and a final essay
learn about major aspects of Western Civilization in an         exam. Both of these will require students to demonstrate
integrated manner. Students follow courses in literature,       their achievement of the abilities and knowledge objectives
philosophy, the humanities, religion, and history as well as    pursued by the program. These activities will take place
the history of art and science. Students have the               within 360-126 Liberal Arts Essay Seminar in their
opportunity to broaden their intellectual horizons by           graduating semester.
choosing additional courses (see Option courses below). In
the structured approach, students focus on one specific era     Exit Profile
in each semester, and are introduced to the literature, the
history and the philosophical currents of this defined          Upon graduation, the accomplished Liberal Arts student
period in each of the compulsory disciplines, thus              will possess abilities and competencies such as those listed
benefiting from a cross-fertilization of ideas. Graduates are   below:
well-rounded individuals with a broad understanding of the
dominant ideas of Western Civilization, a sense of the          The ability to situate the development of Western
humanistic tradition, and of what it means to be human          civilization, since ancient times, within its historical
while producing knowledgeable citizens. Students will be        context. Students will be able to:
expected to participate in a certain number of extra-           • Identify major trends in Western civilization over time
curricular cultural activities.                                 • Demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles
                                                                    associated with major political and intellectual
University Preparation                                              movements
                                                                • Relate ideas from one period to those of another time
The Liberal Arts program is unique insofar as it avoids over-
specialization and has been designed to prepare
                                                                • Explain the important facets of the dominant ideas of
                                                                    any given historical period.
academically oriented students for almost all university
programs. It does so by giving students the unique occasion
                                                                The ability to understand and appreciate major theories
to achieve coherence and breadth in their studies while
                                                                and forms of imaginative or artistic expression, and the
allowing them to enrol in a wide variety of subjects across
                                                                aesthetic sensibility in the arts and in literature. Students
the curriculum. The program is devised for students who
                                                                will be able to:
value freedom of choice in the selection of their courses as
well as an integrated and creative approach to their            • Demonstrate awareness of the salient aspects of major
collegial education. The program will be of special interest        theories and imaginative and artistic works
to students seeking an excellent preparation for eventual       • Explain the major attributes of important theories in
university studies in law, communication, journalism, social        Western thought
studies, education, and other liberal arts subjects.            • Acquire a critical attitude toward, and value for,
                                                                    renowned artistic and literary works from any given
                                                                    period
                                                                • Develop a sense of respect for achievement in the
                                                                    realm of imagination and art.




                                                           Page 71
                                         Liberal Arts Program (700.B0)
The ability to understand and evaluate important ideas in        The ability to use established bodies of work and
Western religious, philosophical and scientific thought,         appropriate methods of research specific to various fields
and value their character and influence in Western and           of learning. Students will be able to:
other societies. Students will be able to:                       • Follow the processes accepted by the specific discipline
• Make connections between important ideas in Western                in order to find appropriate information
   thought.                                                      • Use multiple sources in order to develop an appropriate
• Analyze the significance of religious, philosophical and           understanding of the material
   scientific thought within any given historical period.        • Record bibliographic information in the form accepted
• Develop an awareness of the importance of                          by the discipline
   mathematics to Western thought                                • Keep accurate reading and research notes
• Assess the contribution of religious, philosophical and        • Organize information logically and efficiently
   scientific thought to its own period and to subsequent        • Use the format, tone and terminology accepted by the
   eras.                                                             discipline
• Approach ideas deductively and inductively                     • Express results and ideas in clear, accurate terms
• Synthesize the details in order to make a judgment
   about the impact of the respective ideas upon the             The ability to use word processing, e-mail, the Internet
   specific period in which they appeared as well as upon        and online research through the library. Students will be
   subsequent periods.                                           able to:
• Develop critical thinking skills                               • Perform elementary tasks using computer software
• Assimilate and present ideas logically                            packages to create a document on the computer
                                                                 • Use the Internet and e-mail to locate and communicate
The ability to communicate clearly and coherently in both           information as well as to send files
written and spoken English. Students will be able to:            • Apply general technology skills to become
• Determine a focus for communicating                               knowledgeable about legal and ethical aspects of
• Choose ideas relevant to the topic                                information issues
• Structure the ideas around a main idea or thesis               • Search online databases, and use technology to support
• Present the ideas in a logical order                              written and oral presentations
• Use terminology appropriate to the topic and the               • Demonstrate respect for careful adherence to ethical
   discipline                                                       standards such as intellectual integrity and academic
• Use an acceptable academic tone                                   research work

The ability to demonstrate analytical and knowledge-             The ability to demonstrate awareness of the importance
building skills, and apply these skills in creatively solving    of the skills necessary to deal with academic and life
problems. Students will be able to:                              challenges. Students will be able to:
• Pose pertinent questions related to a task                     • Cope with a variety of life’s challenges, to support the
                                                                     development of a well-balanced lifestyle and to
• Investigate ideas related to a topic using a reasonable
                                                                     promote emotional well being, personal growth and
   number of sources
                                                                     decision-making skills
• Assess the relevance and limitations of sources by
   comparing different views about an issue
                                                                 • Develop self-confidence and self-understanding through
                                                                     the completion of the tasks associated with the
• Evaluate details for accuracy                                      program.
• Synthesize all information in order to make a reasoned         • Develop time-management skills and a corresponding
   judgement
                                                                     sense of achievement by meeting goals and completing
• Reflect on the significance of ideas and their                     projects on time
   contribution to Western civilization, in general, and to
                                                                 • Learn to cooperate with others and work in teams
   each individual as a member of our society.
                                                                     through interactions in and outside of the classroom
                                                                 • Develop sensitivity to individuals and a tolerance of
                                                                     other viewpoints and of cultural differences




                                                            Page 72
                        Liberal Arts: Ideas, Culture and Civilization Profile
                        Semester 1                                 Option Courses
603-101         Classical Literature                               Students must choose six or seven option courses. The number of
345-LA1-01      Knowledge and Forms of Knowledge                   courses students will take is dependent on the total number of
109-10x-MQ      Physical Education 101 or 102                      credits completed (between 12.66 and 14.00). Math and Science
330-101         Ancient World History                              courses have a higher credit value than the other courses. Option
340-101         Intro to Philosophy: Greece and Rome               courses must satisfy specific ministerial competencies. These
                Option Course                                      competencies will be met through selected courses from the
                Option Course                                      concentration areas listed below. Before each registration, Liberal
          Total: 7 courses                                         Arts students will be given a list of available option courses to
                                                                   choose from. Courses will vary each semester depending on
                        Semester 2                                 availability and space limitations. Students must have completed
603-102         Medieval and Renaissance World Literature          the proper pre-requisites before choosing an option course -
345-102         Medieval and Renaissance World Views               course descriptions are available in this Calendar.
602-10x-MQ      French
109-10x-MQ      Physical Education 101 or 102                      •    Anthropology
370-201         World Religions                                    •    Biology NYA or 901
300-201         Intro to Research Methods in Liberal Arts          •    Chemistry NYA
                Option Course
                Option Course                                      •    Digital Imaging/Studio Art

          Total: 8 courses
                                                                   •    Economics
                                                                   •    English Literature
                        Semester 3
                   th        th
                                                                   •    Film/Video/Communications
603-103         17 to 19 Century Literature                        •    Geography
330-301         Post-Classical History
340-301         Great Philosophical Ideas of the Modern            •    History
                World                                              •    Mathematics
520-301         The ‘Sense’ of Works of Art                        •    Modern Languages
360-301         Principles of Logic and Mathematical               •    Philosophy
                Language
                Option Course
                                                                   •    Photo/Design
                Option Course                                      •    Physics NYA
          Total: 7 courses                                         •    Political Science
                                                                   •    Psychology
                        Semester 4
                   th                                              •    Sociology
603-BMD-LA      20 Century Literature
345-BMD-LA      Understanding Ethical Issues
602-BMx-LA      French
109-1M3-MQ      Physical Education
360-401         History of Science & Scientific Methodology
360-402         Liberal Arts Essay Seminar
                Option Course
          Total: 7 courses




                                                              Page 73
   Sport Marketing & Management (410.D3) - Business Management Program (410.D0)
Entrance Requirement                                              Comprehensive Assessment
In order to be admitted to a program leading to a Diploma         The Comprehensive Assessment occurs in the Sports
of College Studies (DEC), candidates must possess a               Management Internship and comprises two components for
Secondary School Diploma or have completed a level of             evaluation:
education that is deemed equivalent by the College.               1. The Internship company’s evaluation of the student’s
Students should also have completed Math CST 4. Students             performance and competencies in the form of a
missing Math CST 4 should consult the Admissions Office              standardized questionnaire, worth 25% of the
for more information. Additional admissions requirements             evaluation.
can be found in the admission section of this calendar.           2. The student-written Internship Report and defence of
                                                                     the report is worth 75% of the evaluation.
Please refer to the 2011-2012 Admissions Handbook and
Program Brochures for the 2011-2012 admissions                    The report must include a brief description of the
requirements.                                                     organization that the student worked for and a detailed
                                                                  summary of how the student’s time was spent and what
General Program Goal                                              achievements were attained. The report must refer back to
                                                                  the Internship contract and must detail the personal
The three-year Sport Marketing & Management program is            learning objectives that were achieved. The report will refer
designed to prepare well-educated, competent, ethical and         to three management concepts that the student learned
purposeful graduates to enter the field of Sport Marketing        during his/her studies and describe how each can be used to
and/or Management as junior marketers, administrators and         explain the Internship experience. The report must detail
managers. This is accomplished by offering a program that         how management concepts were applied or, if applicable,
emphasizes a broad general education, strong critical thinking    why a concept wasn’t applied. The report must also include
skills, well-develop and relevant software skills,                samples of work completed during the Internship. After the
professionalism, and practical experience.                        report is submitted, the student must do an Internship
                                                                  Presentation and Defence. In front of a committee, the
Integrative Activity                                              student will place in context and review his/her Internship
Integrative activities are part of most program-specific          experience with the committee members. If the committee
courses. However, the major integrative activities are in the     determines that the Internship requirements designated at
form of the Practicum courses in sales and sport marketing -      any previous time have not been met, they may require that
reflecting the two main areas of study in the program - the       the student remediate to fulfill these requirements. For
Field Work in Sport/Independent Study course in the fifth         example, the committee could require the student to
semester. In the Practicum courses, students are coached          complete an additional literature review, relevant to the
through viable implementations of real-world cases. One of        Internship, or to back-up his/her report with data.
the biggest differences between the Practicum courses and         Students who do not attain the objectives will be informed
the other courses is that students will work on projects that     of what is lacking in their work and be allowed to re-submit
can be produced, marketed or sold. For these courses,             the assessment, either in the current session if time
students will be required to work in a group - forming a          permits, or in a subsequent semester.
Practicum executive of between three and five people. Each
person will have positions such as market researcher,             Graduate Profile
product manager, financial manager, and creative director.        Students graduating from the program will:
This will force students to be organized within their
                                                                  • Be able to express themselves logically and concisely in
executive, and to prove that they can work well as part of a
                                                                     written and oral formats in both English and French.
team. In the Practicum courses, students integrate the
knowledge and skill they amassed in previous courses and          • Demonstrate basic quantitative and technology abilities
develop a viable product or solution to a problem that is of         relevant to marketing and management (computer use,
high quality, delivered on time, on budget and to a market’s         e-mail, web searching, system software, Excel, Word,
satisfaction. The Field Work in Sport/Independent Study in           the Internet, Desktop publishing, Web publishing)
Sport is essential for providing hands-on experience in           • Demonstrate knowledge of a relevant background in
applying academic material in a non-academic setting. It also        history, social science and natural science
gives students the opportunity to integrate and apply what        • Be able to think critically and problem solve
they have learned in the classroom to a real job.                 • Understand ethical issues as they apply to sports,
                                                                     management and marketing
                                                                  • Behave according to the legal standards of business


                                                             Page 74
• Be able to situate various issues in management,              • Be able to understand and describe the life cycle of a
    marketing and sport related to informed, responsible             sports business and the factors that affect it such as
    participation in a world-wide and local context                  financial issues, budget constraints, community
•   Demonstrate the knowledge and application of                     relationships and the public image, political and
    management and leadership principles                             regulatory constraints, human resources and labour
•   Possess management and administrative aptitudes                  relations
    required for effective leadership within the sports         •    Be able to design mass media campaigns as well as
    management industry                                              define marketing mixes that are most appropriate to
•   Possess and demonstrate group and program leadership             reach target markets for sport products and services
    abilities                                                   •    Be able to apply various statistical techniques in the
•   Possess a knowledge of sport settings, services and              support of managerial decisions in the various
    legal issues specific to sport and education settings            functional areas of business including marketing
•   Possess well developed interpersonal skills which they      •    Be able to explain how an understanding of the global
    can apply in a training, customer service, or sales              environment and marketplace and the factors and
    setting                                                          events that can impact on it affect marketing and
                                                                     management in sport
•   Be able to read and understand, as well as create, basic
    financial statements                                        •    Be able to demonstrate the ability to maintain
                                                                     economically viable inventory levels and forecast market
•   Be able to read, understand and write basic business
                                                                     demand for wholesale and retail inventories for both
    documents and contracts in French
                                                                     sport and non-sport products
•   Be able to plan, organize, manage, and evaluate an
    event, product launch or facility management within a
                                                                •    Be able to demonstrate awareness of the need to
                                                                     develop lifestyle habits conducive to good physical,
    sport context
                                                                     emotional and intellectual health




                                                           Page 75
                          Sport Marketing & Management Profile (410.D3)
                           Semester 1                                                         Semester 2
603-1x1-01    English                                            603-BMC-LA      English
602-10x-MQ    French                                             345-102-MQ      Humanities
109-10x-MQ    Physical Education 101 or 102                      602-BMx-LA      French
410-101       Introduction to Sport Management                   410-201         Introduction to Accounting
410-102       Introduction to Marketing                          410-202         Consumer Behaviour
410-771       Introduction to Business Software Tools            410-203         Presentation Techniques for Marketers
330-907       History of Sports                                  412-901         Desktop Applications for Marketing
       Total: 7 courses                                                    Total: 7 courses
                           Semester 3                                                         Semester 4
603-10x-MQ    English 102 or 103                                 603-10x-MQ      English 102 or 103
345-102-MQ    Humanities                                         345-BMC-LA      Humanities
201-901       Managerial Statistical Methods                                     Complementary
410-301       Financial Management in Sport                      109-10x-MQ      Physical Education 101 or 102
410-302       Legal Issues in Sport                              383-901         Economics of Sports
410-303       Sports Marketing, Promotions & Fundraising         410-401         Sports Marketing Research
412-902       Webpage Design for Marketing & Sales               410-402         Retailing in Sport
602-928       Français écrit du travail                          410-404         Delivering Quality Customer Service
       Total: 8 courses                                                    Total: 8 courses
                           Semester 5                                                         Semester 6
109-1M3-MQ Physical Education                                    410-504         Media Relations in Sports
           Complementary                                         410-601         Global Marketing of Sport
410-501    Sales Force Training & Management                     410-602         Sales Practicum
410-502    Career Planning                                       410-603         Sports Marketing Practicum
410-503    Project Management: Sport Product Launch              410-604         Externship in Sport Management
           or Facilities Management
410-505    Sport Advertising
410-506    Field Work in Sport or Independent Study in Sport
       Total: 7 courses                                                    Total: 5 courses




                                                           Page 76
         Advertising Management (410.D4) - Business Management Program (410.D0)
Entrance Requirement                                              Comprehensive Assessment
In order to be admitted to a program leading to a Diploma         The Comprehensive Assessment occurs in the Advertising &
of College Studies (DEC), candidates must possess a               Media Internship and comprises two components for
Secondary School Diploma or have completed a level of             evaluation:
education that is deemed equivalent by the College.               1. The internship company’s evaluation of the student’s
Students should also have completed Math CST 4 Students              performance and competencies in the form of a
missing Math CST 4 should consult the Admissions Office              standardized questionnaire, worth 50% of the
for more information. Additional admissions requirements
                                                                     evaluation.
can be found in the admission section of this calendar.
                                                                  2. The student-written Internship Report and defence of
Please refer to the 2011-2012 Admissions Handbook and                the report worth 50% of the evaluation.
Program Brochures for the 2011-2012 admissions
requirements.                                                     For the latter, the report must include a brief description of
                                                                  the organization that the student worked for and a
General Program Goal                                              summary of the Internship accomplishments in which a
                                                                  description of how the student’s time was spent and what
In this three-year diploma option, students will develop the      achievement were attained is detailed. The report must
basic skills required for planning, creating and implementing     refer back to the Internship contract and must detail the
advertising and marketing communications activities. The          personal learning objectives that were achieved. The report
Advertising Management option is designed to provide              will refer to three management concepts that the student
students with a well-rounded understanding of the technical,      learned during his/her studies and describe how each can
creative and business aspects of the advertising industry.        be used to explain the Internship experience. Finally, the
Students will learn the importance of advertising in the          report must also include samples of work completed during
marketing mix while practicing their business, creative and       the Internship. After the report is submitted, the student
client-servicing skills. The option concludes with on-the-job     must do an Internship Presentation and Defence. In front of
fieldwork.                                                        a committee, the student will place in context and review
                                                                  his/her Internship experience with the committee
Integrative Activity                                              members. If the committee determines that the Internship
                                                                  requirements designated at any previous time have not
Integrative activities are included in most program-specific
                                                                  been met, they may require that the student does
courses. However, the major integrative activities are in the
                                                                  additional work to fulfill these requirements. For example,
form of the practicum courses in business-to-business (or
                                                                  the committee could require the student to complete an
industrial) advertising and campaign development for
                                                                  additional literature review, relevant to the Internship, or
consumer products and services (reflecting the two main
                                                                  to back-up his/her report with data.
areas of study in the program). In the practicum courses,
                                                                  Students who demonstrate that they have achieved the
students are coached through viable implementations of
                                                                  objectives of the program at an acceptable standard in the
real-world cases. One of the biggest differences between the
                                                                  comprehensive assessment will have the notation RE
practicum courses and the other courses is that students will
                                                                  (réussi; passed) entered on their transcript. Students who
work on projects that can be produced and executed while
                                                                  do not attain the objectives will be informed of what is
integrating the knowledge and skill that they amassed in
                                                                  lacking in their work and be allowed to re-submit the
previous courses and develop a viable campaign or solution
                                                                  assessment, either in the current session if time permits, or
to a problem. The campaign or solution must be of high
                                                                  in a subsequent semester.
quality, delivered on time and within budget and to a
market’s satisfaction. For these courses, students will be
                                                                  Graduate Profile
required to work in a group - forming a practicum executive
of between three and five people. Each person will have           Students graduating from the program will:
positions such as market researcher, public relations             • Be able to express themselves logically and concisely in
coordinator, financial manager and creative director. This will      written and oral formats in both English and French.
force students to be organized within their executive, and to     • Demonstrate basic quantitative and technology abilities
prove that they can work well as part of a team.                     relevant to advertising, marketing and management
                                                                     (computer use, e-mail, web searching, system software,
                                                                     Excel, Word,, Desktop publishing, Web publishing)
                                                                  • Be able to develop a well-structured and well-integrated
                                                                     marketing plan and an international marketing strategy
                                                                     appropriate to a variety of environments

                                                             Page 77
• Be able to think critically and problem solve using             • Be able to understand and describe the life cycle of an
    problem-solving and critical thinking skills to select,            advertising campaign and the factors that affect it
    analyze and interpret information                                  including issues, budget constraints, community
•   Understand ethical issues as they apply to management,             relationships and the public image, political and
    marketing and advertising                                          regulatory constraints, human resources and labour
•   Behave according to the legal standards of business                relations
•   Be able to situate various issues in management,              •    Be able to design mass media campaigns as well as
    marketing and advertising related to informed,                     define marketing mixes that are most appropriate to
    responsible participation in a world-wide and local                reach target markets for products and services
    context                                                       •    Be able to apply various statistical techniques in the
•   Be able to develop an advertising budget to coincide with a        support of managerial decisions in the various
    sales profit                                                       functional areas of business including marketing
•   Be able to plan, organize, manage and evaluate an event or    •    Be able to develop a well-structured and well-integrated
    product/service launch or a campaign                               marketing plan and an international marketing strategy
                                                                       appropriate to a variety of environments
•   Possess management and administrative aptitudes
    required for effective leadership within the advertising      •    Be able to demonstrate the ability to maintain an
    industry                                                           economically viable campaign-based on budget and
                                                                       campaign goals
•   Possess well-developed interpersonal skills which they
    can apply in a training, customer service, or sales setting   •    Be able to demonstrate awareness of the need to
                                                                       develop lifestyle habits conducive to good physical,
•   Be able to read and understand, as well as create, basic
                                                                       emotional and intellectual health
    financial statements
•   Be able to plan, develop and provide customer service




                                                             Page 78
                                Advertising Management Profile (410.D4)
                             Semester 1                                                           Semester 2
603-1x1-01     English                                               603-BMC-LA      English
602-10x-MQ     French                                                345-101-MQ      Humanities
109-10x-MQ     Physical Education 101 or 102                         602-BMx-LA      French
410-102        Introduction to Marketing                             410-202         Consumer Behaviour
410-121        The Business of Advertising                           410-221         Business Law in Advertising
410-771        Introduction to Business Software Tools               410-222         Principles of Advertising Management
530-941        Introduction to Television                            412-901         Desktop Applications for Print Marketing
      Total: 7 courses                                                         Total: 7 courses
                             Semester 3                                                           Semester 4
603-10x-MQ      English 102 or 103                                   603-10x-MQ      English 102 or 103
345-102-MQ      Humanities                                           345-BMC-LA      Humanities
109-10x-MQ      Physical Education 101 or 102                                        Complementary
410-201         Introduction to Accounting                           201-901         Managerial Statistical Methods
410-321         Public Relations and Event Planning                  410-404         Delivering Quality Customer Service
410-527         Business Communications in Quebec                    410-421         Interactive Advertising – Virtual Storefront
412-902         Webpage Design for Marketing and Sales               410-424         Financial Budgetary Control
602-928         Français écrit du travail                            410-524         Campaign Strategy Development
          Total: 8 courses                                                     Total: 8 courses
                             Semester 5                                                           Semester 6
109-1M3-MQ      Physical Education                                   410-621         Industrial Advertising Trade Shows Practicum
                Complementary                                        410-622         Internal Advertising Competition Practicum
410-322         Advertising Research                                 410-623         External Advertising Campaign Practicum
410-423         Global Marketing & International Advertising         410-624         Advertising & Media Externship
410-502         Career Planning
410-521         Media Sales Management
410-523         Strategic Media Planning
410-526         Commercial Management of Advertising
          Total: 8 courses                                                     Total: 4 courses




                                                               Page 79
       Graphic Communications (412.A3) - Office Systems Technology Program (412.A0)
Entrance Requirement                                            Software Skills:
In order to be admitted to a program leading to a Diploma
                                                                • Use and integrate software programs including Adobe
                                                                   Creative Suite (Photoshop, Illustrator, In-Design, Flash,
of College Studies (DEC), candidates must possess a
                                                                   Dreamweaver, Acrobat) and QuarkXPress, HTML and
Secondary School Diploma or have completed a level of
                                                                   JavaScript
education that is deemed equivalent by the College.
Additional admissions requirements can be found in the
                                                                Print and Multimedia Design Skills:
admissions section of this calendar
                                                                • Design page layouts
Please refer to the 2011-2012 Admissions Handbook and           • Create and edit graphic images
Program Brochures for the 2011-2012 admissions                  • Understand photographic aesthetics and basic visual
requirements.                                                       language concepts
                                                                • Design and produce promotional materials and
General Program Goal                                                publications including brochures, posters,
                                                                    advertisements, manuals, forms, newsletters,
Graphic Communications is a career program created to
                                                                    newspapers, magazines, and corporate identify kits
meet the needs of the current job market. This three year
program will prepare students to work in the dynamic and        • Create interactive multimedia presentations
rapidly growing communications design industry.                 • Create and design interactive web sites

Knowledge and practical experience:                             Communication Skills:
Champlain College Saint-Lambert's Graphic                       • Communicate orally in both English and French
Communications students will benefit from a hands-on            • Write and edit business and promotional documents in
approach that includes a professional Internship. This            English and in French
apprenticeship provides students with eight weeks of            • Apply effective human relations skills in the workplace
full-time work experience, and gives employers the
opportunity to evaluate their trainees as potential             Business Management Skills:
employees. The department has a well-established network        • Understand consumer behaviour and match appropriate
of organizations that participate in this project.                 media and messages
                                                                • Develop a business plan and understand what is
Students will also establish and manage their own business         required to succeed in a business venture
centre on site. This component of the program gives             • Organize and manage a graphic communication
students the opportunity to create promotional material,           business Coordinate design publishing projects from
design web sites and develop expertise in operating a small        idea to finalization
business.
                                                                • Troubleshoot technical and prepress issues
The Facilities:
                                                                Career Skills:
Graphic Communications labs are equipped with Macintosh         • Examine careers in the communications industry
and Windows computers with Internet access, laser and
                                                                • Use successful job search techniques to establish a
colour printers, scanners and digital cameras. Industry
                                                                   career
standard software is available on both platforms.
                                                                • Prepare professional résumés and job application letters
Graduate Profile                                                • Conduct successful job interviews
The mission of the Graphic Communications program is to         Personal Characteristics:
develop well-rounded, versatile graduates who are able to       • Demonstrate self-direction
design, produce and manage all aspects of
                                                                • Think critically and creatively
communications, including printed, multimedia, and Web
documents. Knowledgeable in the latest software, students
                                                                • Work independently and within a team
will have the creative and technical expertise to succeed in    • Understand ethical issues in personal and work
the exciting field of print and multimedia design and to help      situations
meet the needs of Quebec employers and the design               • Manage professional and personal responsibilities in the
community at large.                                                context of a healthy lifestyle




                                                           Page 80
                                 Graphic Communications Profile (412.A3)
                             Semester 1                                                       Semester 2
603-1x1-01    English                                            603-BMF-LA      English
              Complementary                                      602-10x-MQ      French
109-10x-MQ    Physical Education 101 or 102                      345-101-MA      Humanities
412-111       Graphic Communication I                            412-211         Business Communication
412-112       Microsoft Office                                   412-212         Graphic Communication II
412-113       Speaking for Success                               412-213         Digital Graphics II: Adobe Illustrator
412-114       Digital Graphics I: Adobe Photoshop                412-224         Page Layout I: InDesign
511-942       Introduction to Digital Photography                412-215         Advertising Communication
       Total: 8 courses                                                    Total: 8 courses
                             Semester 3                                                       Semester 4
603-10x-MQ    English 102 or 103                                 603-10x-MQ      English 102 or 103
345-102-MQ    Humanities                                         345-BMC-LA      Humanities
602-BMx-LA    French                                                             Complementary
109-10x-MQ    Physical Education 101 or 102                      412-411         Design for Advertising
412-311       Digital Graphics III: Integration                  412-414         Web Publishing II: Dreamweaver
412-313       Media Writing                                      412-432         Page Layout II: Advanced Adobe InDesign
412-352       Web Publishing I: HTML/XML                         412-423         Animated Graphics I: Flash
410-945       Consumer Behaviour                                 602-927         Français écrit du travail I
       Total: 8 courses                                                    Total: 8 courses
                             Semester 5                                                       Semester 6
109-1M3-MQ    Physical Education                                 412-611         Business Centre II
410-946       Entrepreneurship                                   412-612         Corporate Design
412-511       Animated Graphics II: ActionScripting              412-613         Multimedia and Print Portfolio
412-512       Business Centre I                                  412-614         Graphic Communications Externship
412-514       Magazine Publishing
412-515       PrePress
412-523       Career Planning
602-928       Français écrit du travail II
       Total: 8 courses                                                    Total: 4 courses


Please Note
Students who are considering a CEGEP or university
program that requires Mathematics may take the
equivalent of High School Math SN or ST 4 and/or SN or ST5
as extra courses. Please refer to the course descriptions for
Math 201-007 and Math 201-009 in the Social Science &
Commerce program.




                                                           Page 81
Comprehensive Assessment                                       Part 3: The Multimedia Portfolio includes:
Prior to graduation all Graphic Communications students
                                                               • A multimedia version of work produced in the last two
                                                                  years of the program that demonstrates the skills
are required to complete a Comprehensive Assessment
                                                                  acquired in all program courses
which comprises three components for evaluation
                                                               • The multimedia portfolio must include a variety of
Part 1: The externship project includes:                          documents created by the student including images,
                                                                  packaging, corporate identity kits, logos, web and
• Final evaluation from internship supervisor
                                                                  multimedia projects, posters, advertisements, at least
• A printed copy of the PowerPoint externship oral                two pieces of client work and at least three multi-page
  presentation                                                    documents.
• A self-evaluation of the internship experience               • The multimedia portfolio must be designed on a theme,
                                                                  must be interactive and must include elements that
Part 2: The Print Portfolio includes:                             identify the software used in each piece
• A printed version of work produced in the last two years     • The theme of the multimedia portfolio must be
   of the program that demonstrates the skills acquired in        consistent with the print portfolio
   all program courses
                                                               • The multimedia portfolio must identify the student and
• Printed work must include a variety of documents                include a résumé
   created by the student including images, packaging,
   corporate identity kits, logos, print versions of web and   All three parts will be assessed by a team of faculty
   multimedia projects, posters, advertisements, at least      members on the competencies and abilities outlined in the
   two pieces of client work, and at least three multi-page    Graduate Profile. Students must meet all objectives to pass
   documents                                                   the comprehensive assessment.
• The print portfolio must be designed on a theme              Students who do not attain the objectives will be informed
   reflecting the graphic nature of the program and must       of what is lacking in their work and be allowed to re-submit
   include elements that identify the software used, and       the assessment, either in the current session if time
   the background of each piece.                               permits, or in a subsequent semester.
• The theme of the print portfolio must be consistent
   with that of the multimedia portfolio
• The print portfolio must identify the student and
   include a résumé.




                                                          Page 82
                      Tourism Management (414.A3) - Tourism Program (414.A0)
Entrance Requirement                                               • mastery of problem solving
In order to be admitted to a program leading to a Diploma          • ability to apply the basic principles of Sales, Marketing
of College Studies (DEC), candidates must possess a                     and Promotion
Secondary School Diploma or have completed a level of              • ability to use modern technology
education that is deemed equivalent by the College.
Student should have completed Math CST 4. Additional               Develop and integrate a personal code of ethics.
admissions requirements can be found in the admissions
section of this calendar.                                          Apply an extensive knowledge of world tourist
                                                                   destinations.
Please refer to the 2011-2012 Admissions Handbook and
Program Brochures for the 2011-2012 admissions                     Have a practical knowledge of the structure and operation
requirements.                                                      of the following sectors of the Tourism Industry:
                                                                   • Accommodation
General Program Goal                                               • Adventure Tourism and Recreation
The Tourism Management program will prepare students to            • Attractions
the level of competency required for entry into the Tourism        • Events and Conventions
Industry. Through practical application of program content,        • Destinations
it equips students for their integration into professional life.   • Tourism Services
Throughout the six semesters of specialized study, it fosters      • Transportation
the acquisition, development and personalization of the            • Travel Trade
knowledge required of students as future professionals in
the Industry. Ultimately, students are trained to apply            Comprehensive Assessment
knowledge and skills acquired in the program into the
various and successive employment areas in which they will         All Tourism graduates are required to complete a
work. The specialization at Champlain College Saint-               Comprehensive Assessment process prior to graduation.
Lambert focuses on the development and promotion of                This will allow students to demonstrate the personal and
travel products.                                                   professional skills they have developed during their six
                                                                   semesters in the Tourism Management program at
Graduate Profile                                                   Champlain College Saint-Lambert. It reflects the attainment
                                                                   of the competencies outlined in the Graduate Profile. This
Students who complete the D.E.C. in Tourism Management             Comprehensive Assessment will consist of the total
will have received a comprehensive education providing             evaluation of the following three basic components:
them with a wide choice of employment opportunities. At
                                                                   • Tourism Showcase Portfolio
Champlain College Saint-Lambert, student preparation will
focus on the areas directly related to the development and
                                                                   • Work-study (an 8-week in-industry work study
                                                                       experience)
promotion of travel products. Therefore, students will
acquire the following knowledge and skills:                        • Exit Interview

Develop the ability to transfer the following skills into          Additional activities designed to recognize the
their work environment:                                            achievements of Tourism Management students
• communication skills in French, English and a working            Students will have the opportunity to participate in value-
   knowledge of a third language                                   added activities that may lead to industry certifications
• group interaction                                                and/or experience. The nature of these activities may vary
• critical thinking                                                from year to year, but will include opportunities such as:
• stress management
• time management                                                  The Certificate of Recognition for Tourism Work Experience
                                                                   Tourism students will be encouraged to work in the tourism
• information retrieval (research skills)
                                                                   industry during their two summer holidays. A set of specific
• computer literacy                                                guidelines and criteria for determining the type of work and
                                                                   other conditions to be met will be provided to all students
Perform efficiently in a business environment through:             in their first year. A committee of the faculty will evaluate
• knowledge of business practices                                  the work activity of each student to determine each
• interpersonal skills                                             person’s eligibility for the certificate.



                                                              Page 83
                                  Tourism Management Profile (414.A3)
Tourism Management is a three-year program which will             corporate and leisure travel companies. Tourism is
prepare students for career opportunities in the fast-growing     considered one of the largest and fastest growing industries
fields of Tourism and Hospitality. The program is designed to     in Québec. In addition, Montreal is the most popular region
allow the graduate to advance to entry-level positions in         visited by tourists in the Province of Québec, a dynamic
tourism. Students will benefit from training in the most          tourist centre in Canada and a major international tourist
recent technology (including Apollo and Sabre reservation         destination.
systems) and practical hands-on experience. Furthermore,
students will participate in a work-study session in the last     In addition to the specialized courses in Tourism
semester. This practical experience, combined with the            Management, students must complete 4 English courses, 2
ability to communicate in French, English, and a Spanish, as      French courses, 3 Humanities courses and 3 Physical
well as the students' enthusiasm for this field, can result in    Education courses.
a career in the following areas: tourism associations;
events, meetings and conventions; federal and provincial          Finally, 2 complementary courses must be selected from
ministries of tourism; public relations; airlines; cruiselines;   outside the Tourism program.
hotels and resorts; tour operators, wholesalers, and

                           Semester 1                                                       Semester 2
603-1x1-01    English                                             603-BMC-LA   English
602-10x-MQ    French                                              345-10A-MQ   Humanities
              Complementary                                       602-BMx-LA   French
109-10x-MQ    Physical Education 101 or 102                       414-211      Customer Service Management
320-122       World Geography                                     414-212      Tourism in U.S.A. and Mexico
414-111       Introduction to Tourism Management                  414-213      Industry Field Studies
414-112       Tourism in Québec and Canada                        414-225      Introduction to Tourism Marketing
414-113       Computer Applications for Tourism                   414-234      Tourism Research Methods
       Total: 8 courses                                                  Total: 8 courses
                           Semester 3                                                       Semester 4
603-10x-MQ    English 102 or 103                                  603-10x-MQ   English 102 or 103
345-102-MQ    Humanities                                          345-BMC-LA   Humanities
414-311       Destinations Analysis: Europe                       109-10x-MQ   Physical Education 101 or 102
414-312       Tourism Consumer Behaviour                          414-411      Destinations Analysis: Exotic
414-313       Sales Techniques                                    414-413      Hotel Operations
414-344       Sustainable Tourism Practices                       414-414      Customized Individual Travel
602-928       Français écrit du travail                           414-432      Tourism Marketing Applications
607-101       Spanish I                                           607-201      Spanish II
       Total: 8 courses                                                  Total: 8 courses
                           Semester 5                                                       Semester 6
              Complementary                                       414-536      Groups and Charters
109-1M3-MQ    Physical Education                                  414-612      Tourism Management and Trends
414-511       Finance for Tourism Operations                      414-613      Destination Evaluation: Case Studies
414-512       Human Resource Management                           414-614      Reservations
414-513       Tour Management                                     414-635      Tourism Promotion Applications
414-514       Tourism Promotion                                   414-656      Tourism Portfolio
414-515       Events, Meetings, Conventions                       414-617      Work Study
414-537       Career Planning
414-611       Tourism Law
       Total: 9 courses                                                  Total: 7 courses




                                                             Page 84
                                         Computer Science (420.A1)
                                         Computer Science Program (420.A0)
Graduate Profile                                                        Communications Skills
Graduates will be able to pursue careers in a variety of
                                                                        • communicate effectively in English (reading, writing,
                                                                          listening and speaking)
generic computer programming areas such as programming
for the web, programming for multimedia, applications                   • communicate with relative ease in French in a work
development for business, and systems design and                          environment
database administration. They will be able to write                     • manage and produce technical documentation
computer programs and develop websites with animation                   • conduct efficient, effective research
effects and eCommerce applications. Students will also                  • apply effective human relations skills in the workplace
learn how to use industry standard applications to create
graphic user interfaces and animations. Students will learn             Career/Professional Skills
about internet graphics, user interaction, multimedia                   • display critical-thinking and problem-solving skills
programming, and business programming. Graduates will                     appropriate to the computer technology field
be computer technology generalists with knowledge and                   • appreciate the functions and role of a programmer-
skills in programming, systems, networking and database                   analyst
structures; and computer technology specialists in
                                                                        • analyze a company’s characteristics, mode of operation
programming for the web, multimedia and business. The
                                                                          and flow of information
successful graduate will have acquired a comprehensive
training providing a wide range of competencies, including:             • analyze, plan and manage work activities
                                                                        • display awareness of professional issues as they affect
Computer Technology Skills                                                computer science, systems development, and
• Do problem solving, specifically:                                       programming
     solve computer-related mathematical and
                                                                        Personal Development
     statistical problems
                                                                        • demonstrate awareness of the importance of a
     analyze, develop and validate algorithms                              healthy lifestyle in the development of the whole
     analyze and correct existing systems and                              person
     programs                                                           • demonstrate awareness of the need to develop
• Do design and development, specifically:                                 lifestyle habits conducive to good health, such as
     use structured and object-oriented programming                        proper nutrition, sensible weight control and being
     languages                                                             physically active on a regular basis
     develop user interfaces                                            • demonstrate awareness of ethical issues in personal
     produce conceptual systems models using a CASE                        and work situations
     tool                                                               • demonstrate awareness of other world views and the
                                                                           ideas and values that make them different from our
     implement a networked computing environment
                                                                           own
     create and use databases and database
                                                                        • display development of the knowledge based skills of
     management systems
                                                                           definition, organization, classification and analysis
     use multimedia processing utilities
                                                                        • demonstrate the interpersonal skills required for
     design and develop applications in database,                          working in teams and in a client environment
     graphics and hypermedia environments                               • show respect for others and a professional level of
     logically organize data on physical and digital                       conduct
     media                                                              • learn independently and think critically and creatively
     use industry-standard applications for graphical
     user interfaces and animation                                      Comprehensive Assessment
• Do maintenance and support, specifically:
                                                                        Graduates are required to complete a Comprehensive
     install/customize/use operating systems                            Assessment prior to graduation. Students must have
     install and configure hardware and software                        successfully completed three courses prior to producing the
     modify existing applications using proper quality                  portfolio that will reflect the professional and personal skills
     assurance methods                                                  they have developed during the three-year program. These
     provide user support and training                                  courses are integrative activities involving all of the
                                                                        Computer Science program-specific competencies as either
                                                                        prerequisites or within the following courses:

                                                              Page 85
•   420-514   Practicum 1: System Development                             Part 3: College projects include:
•   420-612   Practicum 2: System Implementation                          • highlights from the systems analysis course - process
•   420-614   Portfolio                                                      and data models
•   420-611   Workstudy 2: Externship                                     • highlights of the final project - executive summary,
                                                                             user guide extracts, etc.
The “Practicums 1 & 2” are an integrative activity generally              • a reflection on the teamwork experiences in final
undertaken in pairs and involve students working on all                      project and other third year courses
phases of a live project (where possible) - analysis, design,
                                                                          • a review of experience with the various platforms.
development and implementation. The students will
perform a feasibility study, analyze the current situation,               General Program Goal
design alternative solutions, and present these to
“management” for a consensus on a plan of action. They                    In accordance with the general goals of the technical
then perform a detailed analysis and design of the proposed               training, the Computer Science program-specific
solution and develop it using a variety of software and                   component of the Programming for Web, Multimedia
programming languages which are generally previously                      and Business option aims to:
unknown to the students. All projects involve programming,                • enable students to acquire competence in the
database, graphical user interfaces and internet                              exercise of the occupation; to carry out the functions,
programming. The externship is an integrative activity that                   tasks and activities of the occupation at the level
provides students with an opportunity to use the                              required for entry into the job market;
knowledge and skills learned in a real-life industry setting              • help students integrate into professional life by giving
and to do this autonomously in an unfamiliar computer                         them a general knowledge of the job market; as well
environment. Students will be required to give an oral                        as an understanding of the specific context of the
presentation to their colleagues and faculty and to submit a                  selected occupation;
written report outlining the projects completed on stage,
                                                                          • foster the students’ personal growth and encourage
their work environment and a self-evaluation of their
                                                                              continuing professional development;
experience. The major part of the mark for the externship
component is an outside assessment by the company
                                                                          • provide for the future job mobility of students by
                                                                              helping them to acquire career-management skills.
supervisor. The portfolio will be assessed by the team of
“externship” teachers on the competencies and abilities                   Programming for Web, Multimedia and Business is a
outlined in the Graduate Profile. Students must meet all                  three-year option offering theoretical and practical work
objectives to pass the comprehensive assessment. Those                    in computer subjects. The option is designed for students
students not succeeding on their first try will be given an               entering the job market after graduation but students
opportunity to resubmit the portfolio one week later for re-              may also continue their education at the university level.
assessment. The portfolio consists of three parts as outlined             Students who intend to pursue university should consult
below:                                                                    an Academic Advisor. In certain instances advanced
                                                                          standing may be obtained at university for courses
Part 1: The overview includes:
                                                                          completed at the college level.
• an overview of/introduction to the portfolio
• an overview of the program completed                                    Entrance Requirement
• a self-assessment of the computer technology skills                     In order to be admitted to a program leading to a Diploma
  attained                                                                of College Studies (DEC), candidates must possess a
• a self-assessment of the communication skills attained                  Secondary School Diploma or have completed a level of
• a self-assessment of the career/business skills attained                education that is deemed equivalent by the College.
• a self-assessment of the personal characteristics                       Applicants should also have successfully completed
  attained                                                                Mathematics TS 5 or SN 5. Students who have Math CST
• a preliminary career plan - 1, 2 and 5 year plan                        4 will also be considered, and if admitted, will be
                                                                          required to take Math 201-009 (Functions) as an extra
Part 2: The work study project includes:                                  course. Additional admissions requirements can be found
• updated résumé                                                          in the admissions section of this calendar.
• mid-point and final evaluations from company
   supervisors                                                            Please refer to the 2011-2012 Admissions Handbook
• copy of official transcript                                             and Program Brochures for the 2011-2012 admissions
• hard-copy of the PowerPoint stage oral presentation                     requirements.
• a self-evaluation of the work study experience




                                                                Page 86
                                     Computer Science Profile (420.A1)
                          Semester 1                                                             Semester 2
603-1x1-01   English                                                603-BMC-LA      English
345-101-MQ   Humanities                                             345-101-MQ      Humanities
602-10x-MQ   French                                                 602-BMx-LA      French
109-10x-MQ   Physical Education 101 or 102                                          Complementary
201-921      Computing Mathematics                                  420-211         Computer Hardware Support and Maintenance
420-111      Computer Fundamentals and Applications                 420-212         JAVA Programming II
420-112      JAVA Programming I                                     420-213         Tools for Multimedia
420-113      Introduction to Multimedia & the Internet              420-214         Operating Systems
      Total: 8 courses                                                        Total: 8 courses
                          Semester 3                                                             Semester 4
603-10x-MQ   English 102 or 103                                     603-10x-MQ      English 102 or 103
             Complementary                                          345-BMC-LA      Humanities
109-10x-MQ   Physical Education 101 or 102                          109-1M3-MQ      Physical Education
410-921      Business Fundamentals for IT                           350-921         Human Relations
420-311      Interface Design using Photoshop & Illustrator         360-921         Quantitative Methods for CS Students
420-312      Database Fundamentals with ORACLE                      420-411         Business Systems Analysis
420-313      Developing Applications for J2EE                       420-412         VB.NET Programming
420-314      Networking and Internet Services                       420-413         Client/Server Web Programming
      Total: 8 courses                                                        Total: 8 courses
                          Semester 5                                                             Semester 6
420-511      Entrepreneurship for IT: Be Your Own Boss              420-611         Work Study II: Externship
420-512      Advanced Programming using Visual Studio               420-612         Practicum II: System Implementation
420-513      Database System Administration                         420-613         Emerging Technologies
420-514      Practicum I: System Development                        420-614         Portfolio/Comprehensive Assessment
420-515      Multimedia Programming using Flash
420-516      Work Study I: Career Planning
      Total: 6 courses                                                        Total: 4 courses




                                                              Page 87
                                      English (General Education Component)
Students must take four courses to complete their English General Education requirements. Depending on the results of the
English Placement Test, students will be placed in an English course as follows Introduction to Literature (603-1A1-01) or
Introduction to Literature and Composition (603-1B1-01 or 603-101-01). Students will take also one course in each of the
following categories: Literary Genres, Literary Themes and Specific Program - Block B.

Level I - Introduction to Literature or Level II - Introduction to Literature and Composition
These courses introduce students to thinking, talking and writing about literature at the college level. By the end of term,
successful students in both levels will be able to analyze a short story and write a 750-word theme analysis.

Literary Genres 603-102-MQ
Comedy                                       Image & Imagination: Introduction to Poetry              Short Fiction
Crime Fiction                                Introduction to Graphic Novels                           Studies in Genre
Children’s Literature                        Knightly Adventures                                      The Best of Popular Literature
Drama Survey                                 Life Writing                                             The Critic
Elizabethan Drama: Shakespeare               Literature and Music                                     The Epic
Fantasy Literature                           Magic Realism                                            The Essay: Ideas on Trial
Fiction into Film                            Modern Drama                                             The Genres of Literature
Gothic Fiction                               Satire                                                   The Novel
Greek Tragedy                                Science Fiction                                          The Western

The objective of these courses is to enable students to apply a critical approach to the study of literary genres. To this end,
students will learn to recognize literary genres and their conventions. Successful students will understand a work’s
relationship to literary and historical context and will produce a 1000-word literary analysis essay.

Literary Themes 603-103-MQ
The objective of these courses is to enable students to apply a critical approach to the study of literary themes. To this end,
students will learn to recognize a work’s literary themes, cultural context and value system. Students will analyze a text
from a thematic perspective and will produce a 1000-word literary analysis essay.
A Touch of Class: The 19th Century           International Literature                                 Quebec Literature
Ah, Love!                                    Irish Literature                                         Single Author Study
American Literature                          Is or Ain’t Your Blues Like Mine?                        Sport in Fiction
American Writers of the South                Linguistics & Literature                                 Studies in Theme
British Literature                           Literature of Scotland                                   The American West
Canadian Literature                          Literature and the Environment                           The Creative Self
Coming of Age                                Marginality: Gay & Lesbian Literature                    The Immigrant Experience
Contemporary Literature                      Medieval & Renaissance Literature                        The Rebel
Discord in Contemporary Drama                Multicultural Literature                                 Thinking about Learning
Dreams of Freedom                            Mythological and Religious Themes                        Travels and Journeys
Extreme Fiction                              Paths to Self-Realization                                Utopia/Dystopia
Images of Women                              Politics and Literature                                  War Literature

English Block B - 603-BMx
The objective of these courses is to enable students to communicate in forms appropriate to specific programs. To this end,
students will learn to recognize how fact and arguments are organized in different disciplines. Students will learn to develop
their own ideas into arguments, to organize them and to edit their work. At the end of the course, successful students will
produce a 1000 word analysis.
English for Science Programs                                               Literature in Context Course IV – Winter Semester
English for Professional Programs                                          Effective Communication for College Studies
Literature of the Twentieth Century                                        English for Arts Programs


English Exit Test
All students must write the Ministerial Examination of College English (better known as the English Exit Exam) prior to
graduation. Champlain College Saint-Lambert has one of the best results in the college system. Faculty members from the
English Department provide students with an excellent foundation to help them succeed with their college studies, leading
to a positive result on the required Ministerial exam.


                                                               Page 88
                             French/Français (General Education Component)
Cours de français
Le français est obligatoire au cégep. Les élèves sont classés dans l’un ou l’autre des quatre niveaux ci-dessous selon les
résultats qu’ils ont obtenus au secondaire. Ceux qui n'ont pas étudié le français au Québec sont évalués et classés
individuellement.

602-100-MQ       Français de base I*
602-101-MQ       Français et communication
602-102-MQ       Français et culture
603-103-MQ       Français et littérature

* Ceux dont les connaissances sont insuffisantes devront suivre un cours de mise à niveau non crédité, le 602-008/009,
avant le 602-100.

La formation en français comporte deux cours pour tous les élèves. Dans le premier, ils reçoivent une formation générale
commune à tous les programmes. Dans le deuxième, la formation inclut des éléments liés aux champs d’études des élèves.
Le deuxième cours, qui est au même niveau que le premier, est déterminé selon la table au bas de la page.

French Courses
French courses are mandatory in Cegep. Students are placed in one of the four levels that follow according to their high
school grades. Students who completed high school outside Quebec will be evaluated and placed on an individual basis.

602-100-MQ       Français de base I*
602-101-MQ       Français et communication
602-102-MQ       Français et culture
603-103-MQ       Français et littérature

* Students whose knowledge of the language is insufficient will be required to take a non-credit qualifying course, 602-
008/009, before 602-100.

All students must successfully complete two French courses. The first is a general course common to all programs. The
second is tied to the student’s field of study. The second course, which is at the same level as the first, is determined
according to the table below.

Programme de l'élève           Si le premier cours est le :                        le deuxième cours sera le :
Tous les programmes            602-100-MQ      Français de base I                602-BMP-LA      Français de base II
                               602-101-MQ      Français et communication         602-BMK-LA      Français et société I
Sciences                       602-102-MQ      Français et culture               602-BMH-LA      Français et sciences II
                               602-103-MQ      Français et littérature           602-BMJ-LA      Français et sciences III

Social Sciences (all options)
Creative Arts                 602-101-MQ       Français et communication         602-BMK-LA      Français et société I
Modern Languages              602-102-MQ       Français et culture               602-BMM-LA      Français et société II
Liberal Arts                  602-103-MQ       Français et littérature           602-BMN-LA      Français et société III
Graphic Communications

Sport Marketing & Mgmt
                               602-101-MQ      Français et communication         602-BMQ-LA      Français et professions I
Advertising Management
                               602-102-MQ      Français et culture               602-BMR-LA      Français et professions II
Tourism Management
                               602-103-MQ      Français et littérature           602-BMS-LA      Français et professions III
Computer Science




                                                              Page 89
                                  Humanities (General Education Component)
Students must take three courses to complete their Humanities requirements. One course will be taken from each of the
three categories described below. The order of courses is as follows:
 st
1 Course      Knowledge: Organization and Utilization (345-101-MQ)
 nd
2 Course      Worldviews (345-102-MQ)
 rd
3 Course      Block B – Program Specific (345-BMx-LA)

Knowledge: Organization and Utilization – 345-101-MQ
Education and Social Change                                        Religion and Knowledge
The Development of Knowledge                                       Knowledge and Media
Gender and Knowledge                                               The Vision of Art
Knowledge, Science and Philosophy                                  Theory of Knowledge I (for IB)
Ancient World Knowledge                                            Science and History
Knowledge & Forms of Knowledge in the Ancient World (for           Knowledge and Conspiracy Theories
Liberal Arts)

Courses in this group examine ways of knowing, ways of assessing knowledge and truth and the difference between
knowledge and belief. Students will begin to understand how knowledge can be organized, analyzed and related to
historical context. Students will consider if knowledge is used to restrict or contribute to the progress of a society.

Worldviews – 345-102-MQ
Buddhist and Christian Worldviews                                  Democracy and Cultural Diversity
Green Living                                                       The Humanist Tradition
Jewish and Muslim Worldviews                                       The Roots of Western Worldviews
Classical and Contemporary Worldviews                              Theory of Knowledge II (for IB)
Mythologies                                                        Utopias and Social Criticism
Medieval and Renaissance (for Liberal Arts)

A worldview touches every aspect of a person’s life. A worldview may be common to an entire civilization or historical period, or
specific to a particular social group or philosophical outlook. Courses in this group examine how ideas, values and experiences
inherent in a worldview influence an individual’s understanding of the world. Students will analyze and compare the central ideas
of two or more worldviews with the goal of understanding how worldviews both reflect and shape societies.

Humanities Block-B – Special Program – 345-BMx


345-BMA - Ethical Issues in the Sciences
345-BMB - Ethical Issues in the Social Sciences
345-BMC - Ethical Issues in the Professional Programs
345-BMD - Ethical Issues (for Liberal Arts)
345-BME - Justice, Knowledge and the Ideal State (for IB)
345-BMF - Ethical Issues in Creative Arts and Modern Languages

Courses in this group require students to examine the connection between ethical choices and social responsibility. A
number of theories and principles of ethical decision-making are introduced. Students are required to consider opposing
sides of issues by applying ethical theories. In particular, students will focus on issues related to their program of study.




                                                            Page 90
                           Physical Education (General Education Component)
All students are required to take three courses in Physical Education to fulfill the requirements for the Diploma of Collegial
Studies. Students must complete Physical Education 103 and Physical Education 104 before taking Physical Education 105.

Fitness & Wellness – 109-101-MQ
Cardio Boxing                                                     Mountain-Biking (semi-Intensive)
Athletic Skills                                                   Mountain Trail Hiking (semi-Intensive)
Badminton                                                         Pilates
Basic Trail Hiking (semi-Intensive)                               Soccer
Cross-Country Skiing (semi-Intensive)                             Total Body Conditioning
Games                                                             Volleyball
Group Fitness                                                     Weight Management
Indoor Climbing (semi-Intensive)

The general objective of the Physical Education 103 courses is to encourage students to be physically active. Through
exposure to a variety of physical activity situations, and measurement techniques, students will learn to specify the physical
activities which are best suited to their personal abilities, areas of interest, and needs. Lifestyle behaviours will be explored
to emphasize the connection between lifestyle choices and wellness. Please Note: Students must purchase a manual for
the 109-101 courses.

Physical Activity – 109-102-MQ
Aerobics                                                          Racquetball
Alpine Activities (intensive)                                     Skating Skills
Aquatics                                                          Skill Acquisition/Athletic Skills
Badminton                                                         Soccer
Basketball                                                        Swimming
Cross-Country Skiing (intensive)                                  Tennis
Dance                                                             Volleyball
Group Fitness                                                     Waterfront Activities (intensive)
Hockey                                                            Weight Training
Kayaking (intensive)                                              Yoga

The general objective of the Physical Education 104 courses is to encourage students to attain a sufficient level of
competency in a particular activity, to enable them to continue this activity and develop an active lifestyle. Students will
learn to set personal objectives, to progressively improve their motor skills, to apply the rules of the activity, and to
evaluate the attainment of these objectives.

Physical Education 105-1M3-MQ
Badminton                                                         Soccer
Basketball                                                        Stress Management
Cross-Country Skiing (intensive)                                  Swimming
Alpine Activities (intensive)                                     Tennis
Figure Skating                                                    Total Body Conditioning
Fit for Life                                                      Volleyball
Hockey                                                            Waterfront Activities (intensive)
Racquetball                                                       Weight Training

The general objective of the Physical Education 105 courses is to provide the students with the opportunity to plan, manage
and practice a personalized program in an activity of their choice. They will learn to organize and evaluate the activity in a
safe and efficient environment with a health perspective in mind.




                                                            Page 91
                         Complementary Courses (General Education Component)
Complementary courses provide students with an opportunity to take courses outside of their area of concentration. All
students are required to take two Complementary courses. The Complementary courses are divided in five major domains –
see each domain below. Each domain is divided into two sets. Students may register in only one course per set.

Domain 1: Social Sciences
Courses in the Social Sciences domain MAY NOT BE TAKEN by students in Social Science or Introduction to College Studies.
Set 1                                                          Set 2
Geography: Planetary Challenge                                 Philosophy: God, Science and the Universe
Psychology: Introduction to Social Sciences                    Philosophy: Human Rights, the Individual and Society
Political Science: Politics and Society                        Philosophy: The Great Religions of the Western World
Sociology: An Introduction to Social Life

Domain 2: Science and Technology
Courses in the Science and Technology domain MAY NOT BE TAKEN by students in Health or Pure & Applied Sciences.
Set 1                                                          Set 2
Biology: Sharing the Environment                               Characteristics and Mental Skills of Elite Athletes
Biology: Biological Perspectives on Sex                        Chemistry and the Environment
Motivational Synergistics
Nutrition and Health Management
Philosophy: Nature, Science and Society
Philosophy: Technology, Nature and Environmental Issues
Strategies for Successful College Studies

Domain 3: Modern Languages
Courses in the Modern Languages domain MAY NOT BE TAKEN by students in Modern Languages.
Set 1                                                          Set 2
Les mots de la culture                                         Italian II
Littérature, culture et société                                Le français à travers les âges
Italian I                                                      Spanish II
Spanish I

Domain 4: Language of Mathematics/Computer Science
Courses in the Language of Mathematics and Computer Science domain MAY NOT BE TAKEN by certain students. See
individual course descriptions for eligibility.
Set 1                                                          Set 2
Introduction to Desktop Publishing                             Introduction to Programming with C++
The Technical Image                                            Programming with Visual Basic
Using Application Software: Microsoft Office                   Study Skills in Algebra
Using Spreadsheet Applications Software (Excel)                Study Skills in Functions
Web Page Design

Domain 5:       Art and Aesthetics
Courses in the Art and Aesthetics domain MAY NOT BE TAKEN by students in Creative Arts.
Set 1                                                          Set 2
Behind the Camera: Photo                                       Behind the Camera: TV Studio
Introduction to Film Studies                                   Creative Imaging with Photoshop
Introduction to Studio Arts                                    Creative Writing
Modern Art: Concepts and Practices                             Introduction to Flash
Public Speaking for Beginners                                  2D Computer Animation Workshop
The Arts in Review                                             Music: Back and Forth, From Jazz to Rap to Techno
Topics in Literature
Writing about Music
Writing for Journalism


                                                          Page 92
                      Math Chart for Explorations, Science and IB Science
Math Entrance Requirement for Explorations: Math CST 5
Math Entrance Requirement for Sciences: Math SN or ST 5
Math Entrance Requirement for IB Sciences: Math SN or ST 5 with a minimum grade of 80%

Students who are lacking CST 5 Math SN or ST 4 can register for the equivalent courses - Algebra 201-013 and Functions
with Trigonometry 201-015. These courses cannot count toward any diploma requirement. They are considered as extra
courses outside the program.


 High School Math SN 5 or ST 5                High School Math CST 5                  High School Math SN 4 or ST 4




                                                        201-013
                                                        Algebra




                                                        201-015
                                                     Functions with
                                                     Trigonometry




                                                       201-NYA
                                                       Calculus I



                                                        201-NYB
                                                       Calculus II



                                                                                     Note: In exceptional cases, Math
                                                        201-NYC
                                                                                     201-NYC may be taken concurrently
                                                     Linear Algebra                  with Math 201-BLD




     Option Course                  Option Course                     Option Course                Option Course
                                                                                                     201-903-LA
                                       201-BLE                          201-BLF
        201-BLD                                                                                      Computer
                                      Probability                      Descriptive
       Calculus III                                                                                 Applications
                                      & Statistics                      Statistics
                                                                                                  in Mathematics

NOTE: The optional courses may not be offered every semester. Please consult the sessional timetable for more
information.


                                                          Page 93
                                    Math Chart for Social Science
Math Entrance Requirement for Social Science (Commerce and World Studies with Math): Math 526 or Math SN 5 or ST5.


Students who are lacking Math CST 5 or Math SN 5 or Math ST 5 and who wish to continue their Math studies, may register
for the equivalent courses - Algebra 201-013 and Functions with Trigonometry 201-015. These courses cannot count toward
any diploma requirement. They are considered as extra courses outside the program.


High School Math SN 5 or ST 5                High School Math CST 5                   High School Math SN 4 or ST 4




                                                      201-013
                                                      Algebra




                                                     201-015
                                                  Functions with
                                                  Trigonometry




                                                      201-103
                                                     Calculus I




                                                      201-203
                                                     Calculus II




                                                     201-105
                                                  Linear Algebra




                                                       Page 94
                                 Course Descriptions in Numerical Order
Biology
101-901-RE                                                                    101-B1A-LA
Human Biology for the Social Sciences                                         Biology: Sharing the Environment
(Biology for Social Science students only)                                    (Complementary course - not open to Science students)
This course is intended to focus the student’s attention                      We are living in an increasingly interconnected world;
on the biological concepts that link mind and body.                           certainly this is evident in the global nature of many
Students will be introduced to the basic characteristics of                   environmental problems. Decisions made by individuals
life and how they apply to the human situation. After an                      often have far-reaching consequences. By focusing on
introduction to the cell and its functions, the nervous and                   ecological concepts and principles that govern how nature
endocrine systems will be studied in terms of how they                        works, this course provides a foundation for understanding
regulate the body’s activities and maintain a constant                        environmental problems and examines ways in which we
internal state in a changing environment. The course will                     can build a safer and more habitable world. Attention is
conclude with a brief introduction to the perpetuation of                     given to how individual involvement can help solve these
life through reproduction and genetic principles. This                        problems.
course will also include laboratory exercises that will                       Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
provide an opportunity for students to better visualize
aspects of the phenomenon of life.                                            101-B1B-LA
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                               Biology: Biological Perspectives on Sex
                                                                              (Complementary course - not open to Science students)
101-942-LA                                                                    This course focuses on the wide variety of relatively new
Environmental Systems II                                                      findings on the biology of sex. By examining human sexual
(Environmental Systems for International Baccalaureate                        anatomy and physiology, we develop a firm foundation for
students only)                                                                further investigating conception control, developmental
Ecosystems form the focus of this course. By studying                         biology, sexual disorders, sexually transmitted diseases and
energy flow and matter transfer within key examples of                        patterns of human sexual response. We give the course an
food webs, students will see how ecological principles                        added dimension by putting the human condition in the
apply to many current environmental issues. Natural                           context of the biology of sex. On completion of this course,
control systems will be contrasted with the potentially                       students will be able to explain and demonstrate the
disruptive effects of human activity and intervention.                        essentials of scientific thought, and to explain the essential
Critical issues related to changes in biological diversity                    characteristics of "the scientific method" as it applies to the
will be highlighted. Students will apply elements of the                      biology of sex and show how science and technology are
experimental method to the study of habitats.                                 interrelated. Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00 Prerequisite: 320-941
                                                                              101-BLB-05
101-943-LA                                                                    General Biology II
Environmental Systems III                                                     (Biology for Science and International Baccalaureate
(Environmental Systems for International Baccalaureate                        Science students only)
students only)                                                                Through a comprehensive introduction to the structure
A thorough comprehension of the environment will be pursued                   and function of life’s molecular, cellular and organismal
by studying how human or natural events such as the release                   machinery, this course will assist in showing how
of phosphates can result in modifications to the ecosystems.                  scientists answer the question, “What makes life tick?”
The student will have the occasion to discover and apply a                    An integrated set of laboratory investigations provides
series of techniques allowing the study of various aspects of                 supplementary practical experience. Note: This course is
terrestrial ecosystems (sampling, quadrat, indices of diversity).             recommended for individuals planning to enter the
Practical activities will engage students in all aspects of the               Biological or Health Sciences (including Medicine) at
scientific approach.                                                          university. Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.66 Lab: 2
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                               hours/week Absolute Prerequisite: 101-NYA
Prerequisite: 320-101 & 101-942




                                                                    Page 95
Biology (continued)
101-BLC-05                                                                101-NYA-05
General Biology III                                                       General Biology I
(Biology for Science students only)                                       (Biology for Science and International Baccalaureate
This course allows students to develop a comprehensive                    Science students only)
understanding of life at the organismal level by studying the             Science students taking this course acquire a broad base in
body structure, function and its development. Laboratory                  the life sciences. The four unifying concepts of genetics,
work related to plan cloning, in-vitro fertilization and                  diversity, cell theory, and evolution combine to form a
dissections give students a unique, hands-on, experience.                 strong foundation for further study. Topics developed
This course is only offered once a year and can be taken                  include human heredity, genetic engineering, evolutionary
before, during or after 101-BLB. This course is                           theory, unity in diversity, and cell reproduction. By
recommended for students planning to enter the biological                 following an investigative format, the laboratory activities
or health sciences (including Medicine) at university,                    provide a wide range of practical experience with
however, pure and applied science students can also take it.              biological tools and research approaches. Note: This
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.66 Lab: 2 hours/week                         course is required for all science students.
Prerequisite: 101-NYA, 101-BLB or permission from the                     Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.66 Lab: 2 hours per week
Biology Department


Physical Education
109-101-40                                                                109-101-36
Fitness & Wellness (Sports Conditioning)                                  Fitness & Wellness (Winter Activities-Semi-intensive)
(Physical Education)                                                      (Physical Education)
This course will emphasize fitness and wellness; students                 Objective of this course will be met through seven
will achieve the objectives by training mostly the                        classes at the college and two compulsory one-day trips
secondary components of fitness (speed, agility,                          to Mt. St-Bruno and Mt. St-Hillaire either cross country
quickness). Joint and core stability, static and dynamic                  skiing and/or snowshoeing.
balance, and flexibility will also be explored. This course               Units: 1.00
would interest those interested in improving their
athletic performance.                                                     109-101-01
Class: 2 hours/week Units: 1.00                                           Fitness & Wellness (Group Fitness)
                                                                          (Physical Education)
109-101-31                                                                Participation activities will include cardio-boxing, step
Fitness & Wellness (Cardio Boxing)                                        workouts, hi & low impact aerobics, power yoga as well
(Physical Education)                                                      as types of circuit and interval training. Some muscle
With an emphasis on fitness and wellness, students will                   conditioning and stretching techniques will also be
be introduced to a variety of topics relating to their                    emphasized.
personal health and well being. Students will explore                     Class: 2 hours/week Units: 1.00
their lifestyle choices and test various components of                    109-101-02
fitness in order to determine their current fitness levels.
Each week students will participate in a fitness boxing                   109-101-39
workout, muscular conditioning exercises and stretching.                  Fitness & Wellness (MIND BODY ACTIVITIES)
Class: 2 hours/week Units: 1.00                                           (Physical Education)
                                                                          The objectives of this course will be met during 11
109-101-35                                                                classes at the College and one compulsory weekend day
Fitness & Wellness (Pilates)                                              at Mount Royal. With an emphasis on health, wellness
(Physical Education)                                                      and lifestyle this class will introduce the student to
Pilates is a method of muscular conditioning that                         various activities such as yoga, pilates, tai chi and trail
emphasizes core strength, body awareness, proper                          hiking in order to enhance their self-awareness and
alignment and a balanced flow of movement. Performed                      develop a better understanding of how “mindful”
on a mat, using body weight and light resistance                          exercise benefits both one’s physical and psychological
exercises, this class will give students the opportunity to               well-being. In addition to these activities, students will
engage in a Pilates fitness regime designed to                            explore and assess their current lifestyle choices and test
complement cardiovascular exercise, sport conditioning                    various components of fitness in order to determine
and a healthy lifestyle.                                                  their current level of fitness.
Class: 2 hours/week Units: 1.00                                           Units: 1.00

                                                                Page 96
Physical Education (continued)
109-101-07                                                                109-101-20
Fitness & Wellness (Total Body Conditioning)                              Fitness & Wellness (Basic Trail Hiking-Semi-Intensive)
(Physical Education)                                                      (Physical Education)
Students will do various types of conditioning and resistance             In this class the objectives will be met through seven
training exercises to improve all aspects of their physical               classes at the college followed by two (compulsory) one-
fitness.                                                                  day walking trips at Mount Royal and Mount St-Bruno
Class: 2 hours/week Units: 1.00                                           Park.
                                                                          Units: 1.00
109-101-08
Fitness & Wellness (Cross-Country Skiing - Semi-                          109-101-24
Intensive)                                                                Fitness & Wellness (Games)
(Physical Education)                                                      (Physical Education)
Objectives of this course will be met through seven classes               The emphasis of this course is on physical fitness and
at the college and two compulsory one-day trips to Mont                   wellness; one of the strategies to attain these ends will
St-Bruno and Mont Orford on a Saturday and/or a Sunday.                   be through the use of various games such as basketball,
There is an obligatory transportation fee for this course.                volleyball, badminton, soccer, European handball. There
Equipment will be provided.                                               will be a theory component; however, whenever possible
Units: 1.00                                                               the content will be dealt with through physical activity.
                                                                          Class: 2 hours/week Units: 1.00
109-101-09
Fitness & Wellness (Mountain Trail Hiking - Semi-Intensive)               109-101-38
(Physical Education)                                                      Fitness & Wellness (Running Semi-Intensive)
The objectives of this course will be met through seven                   (Physical Education)
classes and two one-day compulsory hiking trips in the                    The objectives of this course will be met during 11
Eastern Townships. During the theory sessions and hikes,                  classes at the College and one compulsory weekend day
students will test various physical components of their                   at Mont St.-Bruno. In addition to a strong emphasis on
bodies and experience the benefits of physical activity                   fitness and wellness, students will be introduced to the
outdoors. There is an obligatory transportation fee for this              basics of running, running technique, safety
course. Equipment will be provided. Units: 1.00                           considerations and various training methods. Practical
                                                                          running sessions will be held outdoors.
109-101-10                                                                Units: 1.00
Fitness & Wellness (Indoor Climbing - Semi-Intensive)
(Physical Education)                                                      109-102-02
Objectives for this course will be met during nine classes                Alpine Activities – Intensive
at the college and three half-day or evening sessions at                  (Physical Education)
an indoor climbing facility. Students will be introduced to               Downhill skiing and snowboarding; open to all skill
climbing etiquette, safety and communication signals as                   levels from beginner to advanced. The course takes place
well as climbing and belaying techniques. Students must                   during the winter break. Students will improve their skills
arrange their own transportation to the facility and there                through student centred teaching and increase their
is a fee for this course. Equipment will be provided                      knowledge base by becoming familiar with the Canadian
Units: 1.00                                                               Technical Approach to skiing and boarding. This course
                                                                          may be given either as day trips or as a three-day
109-101-18                                                                overnight trip; details are provided in the timetable.
Fitness & Wellness (Mountain-Biking - Semi-Intensive)                     There is an obligatory transportation, ski-lift ticket, and
(Physical Education)                                                      group instruction fee associated with this course. If the
In this course, the objectives will be met through seven                  course is given as an overnight trip, the fee also includes
classes at the school and two one-day biking sessions in                  meals and lodging. Ski or board rental is extra.
the Bromont area. All levels of biking will be offered from               Units: 1.00
relatively flat bike trails to advanced cross country
mountain bike trails at the Canadian Bike Centre in
Bromont. There is an obligatory transportation fee for
this course. Bike rental is an additional cost at
approximately $30.
Units: 1.00



                                                                Page 97
Physical Education (continued)
109-102-40                                                              109-102-39
Recreational Hockey                                                     Yoga
(Physical Education)                                                    (Physical Education)
The recreational ice hockey course will focus on the basis              The practice of yoga makes the body strong and flexible;
skills needed to actively participate in the game of                    it also improves the functioning of the respiratory,
hockey. The skills that will be covered include, forward                circulatory, digestive, and hormonal systems. Yoga brings
and backward skating, stopping and starting, shooting,                  about emotional stability and clarity of mind, enhancing
stick handling, passing and game situations. The basic                  the mind-body connection. In this introductory course,
rules and strategies of the game will be covered.                       students will experience yoga postures (asanas) and
Students participating in the course will be transported                breathing techniques (pranayama) as well as meditation
to and from the arena. Required equipment includes                      and deep relaxation. Students will learn how the practice
helmet, skates, gloves and stick. (Figure skates and ski                of yoga can reduce stress and anxiety, and improve
gloves are accepted) Students who successfully complete                 concentration and focus. Through sequenced exercises
the course will have an improved ability to skate as well               (vinyasas) and movements, the student will come to feel
as the knowledge to participate in the game at the                      more balanced, centered, coordinated, flexible and
recreational level Class: 2 hours/week Units: 1.00                      strong. Class: 2 hours/week Units: 1.00

109-102-32                                                              109-102-03
Group Fitness                                                           Badminton
(Physical Education)                                                    (Physical Education)
This course is designed to offer the student an                         The objective is to introduce the basic skills and strategy of
opportunity, in a group setting, to learn sequences of hi               recreational badminton. The following skills and theory will
and lo impact aerobic routines, cardio-box to music and                 be covered: grip, services, forehand and backhand
the many uses of the step and sequences to work with it;                underhand shots, overhead clear, smash and drop, net play,
to explore the options of circuit and interval training and             rules, scoring and tactics for singles and doubles play, and
to learn to work with heart rate and rate of perceived                  the purchasing and maintenance of equipment.
exertion as a means to reach objectives. Muscle                         Class: 2 hours/week Units: 1.00
conditioning and flexibility will also be included.
Class: 2 hours/week Units: 1.00                                         109-102-05
                                                                        Basketball
109-102-35                                                              (Physical Education)
Weight Training                                                         This course is designed to develop and improve various
(Physical Education)                                                    technical, tactical, physical and psychological skills
This course will teach basic exercises using both free                  enabling the student to enjoy the game on a recreational
weights and machines. The primary emphasis will be on                   or competitive basis. FIBA rules, regulations and
using correct technique and improving muscle tone and                   organization of basketball will also be covered.
strength. Students will do a variety of weight training                 Class: 2 hours/week        Units: 1.00
programs and will progress at their own rate. Theory                    109-102-11
topics include guidelines for beginners, rules of safety,
principles of weight training, the relationship between                 109-102-11
the number of repetitions and the weight lifted, and                    Cross-Country Skiing - Intensive
physiological benefits of weight training.                              (Physical Education)
Class: 2 hours/week Units: 1.00                                         Students will be exposed to the various skills required in
                                                                        cross country skiing, and will learn how these skills are
109-102-43                                                              developed and evaluated. Skills include flat skiing,
Ultimate Frisbee                                                        climbing descents and turns as well as waxing
(Physical Education)                                                    information. This course will be held on one Saturday in
This course is designed to introduce students to the skills             mid-December followed by three days in January.
and strategy involved in ultimate Frisbee. An emphasis                  Students will ski in ability groups at Orford Park and Mont
will be placed on learning different throws, as well as                 Bruno Park. There is an obligatory transportation fee for
offensive (i.e. the stack) and defensive tactics (i.e.,                 this course. Equipment will be provided.
marking, the force). The underlying principle of ultimate,              Units: 1:00
the spirit of the Game, will be stressed.
Class: 2 hours/week Units: 1.00



                                                              Page 98
Physical Education (continued)
109-102-10                                                               109-102-20
Canoeing-Intensive                                                       Soccer
(Physical Education)                                                     (Physical Education)
Students will be exposed to the various skills required in               This course is designed to develop and improve various
canoeing and will learn how these skills are developed                   technical, tactical, physical and psychological skills
and evaluated. This course will be held on three                         enabling the student to enjoy the game on a recreational
consecutive days at both the Parc national des Iles-de-                  or competitive basis. FIFA rules, regulations and
Boucherville and Parc de la Rivière des Mille-Iles and is                organization of indoor and outdoor soccer will also be
designed for the beginner to intermediate paddler.                       covered.
There is an obligatory transportation and equipment                      Class: 2 hours/week        Units: 1.00
rental fee associated with this course.
Units: 1:00                                                              109-102-23
                                                                         Swimming
109-102-12                                                               (Physical Education)
Skating Skills                                                           For the beginning or recreational swimmer, this course will
(Physical Education)                                                     offer an opportunity to learn the five basic swimming
This course is designed to teach the fundamental skills of               strokes. The theory component will cover the physical
ice skating to enable the student to enjoy the activity on               principles of swimming and water safety knowledge.
a recreational level. Content of the course will include                 Transportation by bus to and from the pool is provided.
equipment selection, skating skills including turns, stops,              Class: 2 hours/week       Units: 1.00
use of edges and crosscuts all for the purpose of hockey,
ringette, figure skating or pleasure skating.                            109-102-25
Transportation by bus to and from the rink is provided.                  Tennis
Students must supply their own skates.                                   (Physical Education)
Please note: This is not a hockey course.                                This course covers all the basic strokes in tennis including
Class: 2 hours/week       Units: 1.00                                    serve, forehand, backhand, volley and overhead, as well as
                                                                         the basic strategy of singles and double play. In addition,
109-102-14                                                               the purchasing and maintenance of equipment will be
Kayaking - Intensive                                                     covered. There is an obligatory transportation fee
(Physical Education)                                                     associated with this course. Equipment will be provided.
Students will be exposed to the various skills required in                Class: 2 hours/week Units: 1.00
kayaking and will learn how these skills are developed
and evaluated. This course will be held on three                         109-102-26
consecutive days both the Parc national des Iles-de-                     Volleyball
Boucherville and Parc de la Rivière des Mille-Iles and is                (Physical Education)
designed for the beginner to intermediate paddler.                       This course is designed to develop basic skills and
There is an obligatory transportation and equipment                      interest in volleyball for the student's enjoyment as a
rental fee associated with this course.                                  recreational activity. Basic skills such as volleying,
Units: 1.00                                                              bumping, serving, setting and spiking will be covered
Absolute Prerequisite: Student must be comfortable in                    along with the rules of the game. Offensive and
the water.                                                               defensive tactics will also be introduced.
                                                                         Class: 2 hours/week        Units: 1.00
109-102-16
Racquetball                                                              109-102-28
(Physical Education)                                                     Dance
This course introduces the student to the basic skills and               (Physical Education)
strategy, along with the rules and regulations of the game.              This course is designed to introduce the student to basic
Course content includes types of serves and service returns,             dance styles, and through working with music, to develop
forehand, backhand, passing shots, defensive shots, and                  an awareness and appreciation of rhythmical forms and
back wall play. Basic singles and doubles strategy will be               body expression. The student will take part in compositions
dealt with. There is an obligatory transportation fee                    and choreography.
associated with this course. Equipment will be provided.                 Class: 2 hours/week Units: 1.00
Class: 2 hours/week Units: 1.00




                                                               Page 99
Physical Education (continued)
109-102-42                                                          109-1M3-31
Snowboarding                                                        Winter Activities
(Physical Education)                                                (Physical Education)
Students will be exposed to the various skills required in          Students will meet once during the first week of the
snowboarding and will learn how these skills are                    semester to plan and design their own personal fitness
developed and evaluated. This course will be held on                program. They will then follow this personal program
three full days in January at Mt. Bromont and/or Mt.                throughout the fall semester and then participate in 3
Orford Ski Centre and is designed for the beginner to               compulsory Day trips in January at Mt. St-Bruno, Mt. St-
intermediate snowboarder. There is an obligatory                    Hilaire, and Mt. Orford Parc. The aim of this course is to
transportation and lift ticket fee associated with this             explore the possibilities of developing and maintaining
course. Students must either own or rent equipment (at              an active lifestyle through winter-related activities such
an extra charge).                                                   as, cross-country skiing, snowshoeing, and/or hiking.
Class: 2 hours/week Units: 1.00                                     There is an obligatory transportation fee associated with
                                                                    this course.Class: 2 hours/week Units: 1.00
109-102-41                                                          Prerequisite: 109-101 and 109-102
Downhill Skiing
(Physical Education)                                                109-1M3-01
Students will be exposed to the various skills required in          Active Living - Badminton
skiing and will learn how these skills are developed and            (Physical Education)
evaluated. This course will be held on three full days in           Students will have the opportunity to plan, manage and
January at Mt. Bromont and/or Mt. Orford Ski Centre and             practice a personalized program in badminton which
is designed for the beginner to intermediate skier. There           specifically meets his/her needs and interests. This will
is an obligatory transportation and lift ticket fee                 be done with a health perspective in mind.
associated with this course. Students must either own or            Class: 2 hours/week Units: 1.00
rent equipment (at an extra charge).                                Prerequisite: 109-101 and 109-102
Class: 2 hours/week Units: 1.00
                                                                    109-1M3-02
109-1M3-29                                                          Active Living - Ice Activities
Active Living -Team Games                                           Students will explore a variety of ice activities which
(Physical Education)                                                included skating, ringette, broomball, and ice hockey.
The 105 Team Sports course is designed to introduce the             Students will create and follow their own individualized
student to a variety of recreational team sports and give           training program and have the ability to incorporate on-
each student an opportunity for continued involvement               ice related activities that can be continued for life and
in physical activity. Students will have the opportunity to         contribute to a healthy lifestyle.
learn the basic rules and strategies of each sport and              Class: 2 hours/week Units: 1.00
incorporate their knowledge into game situations. Lead-             Prerequisite: 109-101 and 109-102
up and modified games will help the student improve the
skills required to play each sport at the recreational level.       109-1M3-03
The student will also work toward specific goals and build          Active Living – Basketball
a personalized training program which can be continued              (Physical Education)
upon completion of this course. Successful students will            The student will learn how to improve his/her basketball
have learned to responsibly engage in physical activity in          skills to be able to continue this sport on a recreational
order to promote a healthy and active lifestyle. Team               basis, thus contribute to a healthy lifestyle. The students
sports covered in course are subject to change but                  will also help plan, manage and practice a program
generally include basketball, volleyball, floor hockey,             specific to their own needs and interests.
ultimate frisbee, soccer, and doubles badminton.                    Class: 2 hours/week Units: 1.00
Class: 2 hours/week       Units: 1.00                               Prerequisite: 109-101 and 109-102
Prerequisite: 109-101 and 109-102




                                                             Page 100
Physical Education (continued)
109-1M3-04                                                             109-1M3-08
Active Living - Cross-Country Skiing -                                 Active Living - Racquetball
(Physical Education)                                                   (Physical Education)
Students will explore the full meaning of the term "lifetime           Students will have the opportunity to plan, manage and
activity." Through exposure to the ski industry, a thorough            practice a personalized program in racquetball which
knowledge of the equipment required, facilities available              specifically meets his/her needs and interests. The
and associated costs will be determined. The student will              student will take an active role in the evaluation of this
develop physical skills in cross-country skiing so that the            course. There is an obligatory transportation fee
activity can be continued for life and contribute to a                 associated with this course. Equipment will be provided.
healthy lifestyle. No previous experience is required. This            Class: 2 hours/week Units: 1.00
course will be held on one Saturday in mid-December                    Prerequisite: 109-101 and 109-102
followed by three days in January. Students will ski in ability
groups at Mont Orford and/or Mont Bruno. There is an                   109-1M3-10
obligatory transportation fee for this course. Equipment               Active Living - Waterfront Activities -
will be provided.                                                      (Physical Education)
Units: 1.00                                                            Students will meet once during the first week of the
Prerequisite: 109-101 and 109-102                                      semester to plan and design their own personal fitness
                                                                       program. They will then follow this personal program
109-1M3-06                                                             throughout the winter semester and then participate in 3
Active Living - Weight Training                                        compulsory Day trips at the end of May at the Olympic
(Physical Education)                                                   Basin, Parc national des Iles-de-Boucherville and Parc de
This course will start with a review of basic weight training          la rivière des Mille-Iles. The aim of this course is to
exercises to enable students to plan, manage and practice              explore the possibilities of developing and maintaining
personalized programs according to their own objectives                an active lifestyle through water-related activities such as
and abilities. Each student will keep a record of his/her              canoeing, kayaking, and dragon boating. There is an
workouts so that progress can be monitored.                            obligatory transportation and equipment rental fee
Class: 2 hours/week Units: 1.00                                        associated with this course.
Prerequisite: 109-101 and 109-102                                      Units: 1.00
                                                                        Absolute Prerequisite: Student must be comfortable in
109-1M3-07                                                             the water.
Active Living – Alpine Activities -                                    Prerequisite: 109-101 and 109-102
(Physical Education)
Students will explore the full meaning of the term                     109-1M3-12
"lifetime activity." The student will develop physical skills          Active Living - Fit for Life
in downhill skiing or snowboarding so that the activity                (Physical Education)
can be continued for life and contribute to a healthy                  Students will set goals based on their present lifestyle
lifestyle. The course takes place during the Christmas                 and use the components of fitness to develop and
vacation over three days at the Bromont Ski Center. No                 manage a workout regime to meet their specific needs
experience is necessary. Students must either own                      and interests, and to pursue an active lifestyle on a
equipment or rent. There is an obligatory transportation               recreational or competitive basis. Regular evaluation is
and ski-lift ticket fee associated with this course. An                encouraged to make necessary adjustments.
information sheet is available during registration. Units:             Class: 2 hours/week Units: 1.00
1.00                                                                   Prerequisite: 109-101 and 109-102
Prerequisite: 109-101 and 109-102




                                                                Page 101
Physical Education (continued)
109-1M3-13                                                          109-1M3-17
Active Living – Aquatic Activities                                  Active Living - Volleyball
(Physical Education)                                                (Physical Education)
Students will have the opportunity to plan, manage and              In this course volleyball skills and theory will be covered.
practice a personalized program in swimming which                   The student will learn how to improve his/her skills and
specifically meets his/her needs and interests. Students            conditioning to be able to continue this activity on a
will also have the opportunity to participate in other              recreational basis. The student will help to plan, manage
aquatic activities such as water jogging, water polo,               and practice a program specific to their needs and
water aerobics and various aquatic games.                           interests.
This course is not open to non-swimmers                             Class: 2 hours/week        Units: 1.00
Class: 2 hours/week       Units: 1.00                               Prerequisite: 109-101 and 109-102
Prerequisite: 109-101 and 109-102                                   109-1M3-19
                                                                    Active Living - Soccer
109-1M3-16                                                          (Physical Education)
Active Living - Tennis                                              The student will learn how to improve his/her soccer
(Physical Education)                                                skills to be able to continue this sport on a recreational
The student will learn how to plan, practice and manage             basis, thus contribute to a healthy lifestyle. The student
a tennis program appropriate for their level. This will be          will also help to plan, manage and practice a program
done with a health perspective in mind. There is an                 specific to their needs and interests.
obligatory transportation fee associated with this course.          Class: 2 hours/week        Units: 1.00
Equipment will be provided.                                         Prerequisite: 109-101 and 109-102
Class: 2 hours/week      Units: 1.00
Prerequisite: 109-101 and 109-102


Mathematics
201-013-50                                                          201-103-RE-I
Algebra                                                             Calculus I - Math Methods
Non-Credit College Preparatory Math (Note: This course              (Math for International Baccalaureate students only)
will be considered as an extra credit for Diploma                   Calculus I Commerce curriculum will be augmented to
purposes)                                                           meet the requirements of the IB Mathematics Methods
This is an algebra course for students who have not                 S.L. Syllabus. This course is for students in the IB who
successfully completed High School Math Topics include              intend to write the Mathematics Methods S.L.
basic algebra, equations, and graphs.                               examination. Topics include: limits, continuity,
Class: 6 hours/week        Units: 3.33                              differentiation, curve sketching, maxima and minima,
Absolute Prerequisite: Math CST 5, H. S. Math 416 or                differentials and antiderivatives. Examples and
514                                                                 applications will be drawn from economics, business and
                                                                    social sciences.
201-015-50                                                          Class: 5 hours/week Units: 2.66
Functions with Trigonometry                                         Absolute Prerequisite: 80% or better in High School
Non-Credit College Preparatory Math (Note: This course              Math SN 5 or ST 5,
will be considered as an extra credit for Diploma
purposes)                                                           201-103-RE
This functions course is for students who have not                  Calculus I
successfully completed High School Math Topics include              (Math for Social Science students only)
basic functions and their graphs with special emphasis on           Topics in this course include: limits, continuity,
polynomial functions, absolute value, roots, reciprocals,           differentiation, curve sketching, maxima and minima,
conics, logarithmic and exponential functions,                      differentials and antiderivatives. Examples and
trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric functions,           applications will be drawn from economics, business and
and their applications.                                             social sciences. Class: 5 hours/week Units: 2.66
Class: 5 hours/week Units: 2.66                                     Absolute Prerequisite: Math SN 5 or ST 5, H.S. Math 526
Absolute Prerequisite: Math SN 4 or ST 4, H.S. Math 426,            or 536 or 201-015
436 or 526, or 201-013




                                                             Page 102
Mathematics (continued)
201-105-RE                                                          201-921-LA
Linear Algebra                                                      Computing Mathematics
(Math for Social Science students only)                             (Math for Computer Science students only)
Topics include: systems of linear equations, matrices,              The aim of this course is to give students the
determinants, the dot and cross products, vectors, three-           mathematical knowledge and skills needed (1) for
dimensional geometry, linear programming and other                  analysis of the computing and information system that
applications. Examples and applications will be drawn from          are the subject of the rest of the courses in this program.
economics, business and social sciences.                            (2) the analytical skills that are required by any
Class: 5 hours/week Units: 2.66                                     professional in the information technology field. Topics
Absolute Prerequisite: Math SN 5 or ST 5, H.S. Math 526             covered in the course are discrete mathematics and
or 536 or equivalent,                                               linear algebra among others
201-103 or 201-NYA                                                  Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
                                                                    Absolute Prerequisite: Math SN 5 or ST 5 or 201-015
201-203-RE
Calculus II                                                         201-BLD-05
(Math for Social Science students only)                             Calculus III
Topics in this course include: review of differentiation,           (Math for Science students only)
integration techniques, applications of integration,                This course is strongly recommended for students planning
improper integrals and infinite series. Applications and            to enter engineering or a science/math program at
examples will be drawn from economics, business and                 university. Topics include infinite series, vectors and
social sciences.                                                    three-dimensional geometry, functions of several variables,
Class: 5 hours/week Units: 2.66                                     partial derivatives, multiple integrals and differential
Absolute Prerequisite: 201-103 or 201-NYA                           equations.
                                                                    Class: 5 hours/week Units: 2.66
201-901-LA                                                          Absolute Prerequisite: 201-NYB & 201-NYC (in
Managerial Statistical Methods                                      exceptional cases, 201-NYC may be taken concurrently
(Math for Sports Marketing/Advertising Management                   with 201-BLD)
students only)
This course gives an introduction to business statistics,           201-BLE-05
methods of describing, summarizing, graphically                     Probability and Statistics - Higher Level
presenting, measuring and analyzing statistical data using          (Math for International Baccalaureate students only)
a statistics computer package. Students will be exposed             Probability and Statistics curriculum will be augmented
to the theoretical underpinnings of management                      to meet the requirements of the IB Mathematics HL
decision tools including probability distributions,                 syllabus. This course is for students in the IB programs,
covariance applications, sampling distributions, control            who intend to write the Mathematics HL Examination.
charts, estimation and hypothesis testing. Emphasis will            Class: 5 hours/week Units: 2.66
be on how to apply various statistical techniques in the            Prerequisite: 201-NYB, 201-203
support of managerial decisions in the various functional
areas of business including marketing.                              201-BLE-05
Class: 5 hours/week Units: 2.66                                     Probability and Statistics
Prerequisite: Math SN 5 or ST 5 or 201-015                          (Math for Science students only)
                                                                    This course is recommended for students planning to
201-903-LA                                                          enter Health Science, Applied Science, Applied
Computer Applications in Mathematics                                Mathematics, or Management programs at university. It is
(Math for Science students only)                                    an introductory course at a more mathematical level than
This course is an introduction to the use of computers in           Statistics BLF. Topics covered include: Permutations and
mathematics and to the application of mathematics to                combinations, probability, Bayes Theorem, discrete and
computing. It is a combination of both a traditional                continuous probability distributions, moments, descriptive
numerical methods class with a more modern hands-on                 statistics, estimation of parameters, interval estimation,
experimental approach. Class work is almost entirely                central limit theorem, and testing of hypotheses.
carried out in the Microsoft spreadsheet program, Excel.            Class: 5 hours/week Units: 2.66
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.66 Lab: 2 hours/week                   Absolute Prerequisite: 201-NYA
Prerequisite: 201-NYB                                               Co-requisite: 201-NYB & 201-NYC
Recommended: 201-NYC



                                                             Page 103
Mathematics (continued)
201-BLF-05                                                          201-NYB-05
Statistics                                                          Calculus II
(Math for Science students only)                                    (Math for Science students only)
Descriptive statistics: probability, binomial, Poisson and          Topics include: review of differentiation, anti-derivatives,
normal distributions, estimation of parameters, testing of          definite integrals; application of integrals to areas,
hypotheses (including the use of chi-square), correlation           volumes and arc length; techniques of integration,
and regression are covered in this course, with emphasis            improper integrals and infinite series. Class: 5
on intuitive justification and problem solving. Class: 5            hours/week Units: 2.66
hours/week Units: 2.66                                              Absolute Prerequisite: 201-NYA
Absolute Prerequisite: H.S. Math SN 4 or ST4 or
201-007                                                             201-NYC-05
                                                                    Linear Algebra - Higher Level
201-NYA-05 I                                                        (Math for International Baccalaureate students only)
Calculus I - Higher Level                                           Linear Algebra Science curriculum will be augmented to
(Math for International Baccalaureate students only)                meet the requirements of the IB HL syllabus. Topics
Calculus I Science curriculum will be augmented to meet             include: systems of linear equations, matrices,
the requirements of the IB HL Mathematics Syllabus. This            determinants, the dot and cross products, vectors and
course is for students in the IB who intend to write the            vector spaces, three dimensional geometry, linear
Mathematics HL examination. Topics include: limits,                 transformations, complex numbers and applications.
continuity, differentiation, curve sketching, maxima and            Class: 5 hours/week Units: 2.66
minima, differentials, antiderivatives, and science                 Absolute Prerequisite: High School Math SN 5 or ST5 or
applications.                                                       equivalent
Class: 5 hours/week Units: 2.66
Absolute Prerequisite: 80% or better in High School                 201-NYC-05
Math SN 5 or ST5                                                    Linear Algebra
                                                                    (Math for Science students only)
201-NYA-05                                                          Topics include: systems of linear equations, matrices,
Calculus I                                                          determinants, the dot and cross products, vectors and
(Math for Science students only)                                    vector spaces, three dimensional geometry, and
Topics include: limits, continuity, differentiation, curve          applications.
sketching, maxima and minima, differentials,                        Class: 5 hours/week Units: 2.66
antiderivatives, and science applications. Class: 5                 Absolute Prerequisite: H.S. Math SN 5 or ST5 or equivalent.
hours/week Units: 2.66
Absolute Prerequisite: 70% or better in H.S. Math SN 5
or ST5 or 201-009

201-NYB-05 I
Calculus II - Higher Level
(Math for International Baccalaureate students only)
Calculus II Science curriculum will be augmented to meet
the requirements of the IB HL Mathematics Syllabus.
Topics include: review of differentiation,
anti-derivatives, definite integrals; application of
integrals to areas, volumes and arc length; techniques of
integration, improper integrals and infinite series.
Class: 5 hours/week Units: 2.66 Absolute
Prerequisite: 201-NYA




                                                             Page 104
Chemistry
202-006-06                                                             202-BLC-05
Introduction to Chemistry                                              Organic Chemistry I
(Chemistry for Explorations Science Students only)                     (Chemistry for Science and International Baccalaureate
This course is the equivalent of the high school Chem.                 students only)
534 course. The course will enable students to acquire an              Organic Chemistry, the chemistry of carbon and its
understanding of basic chemical principles. This course                compounds, is essential for an understanding of the
will focus on the following subject areas: nomenclature,               chemistry of life processes. It is fundamental to medicine
stoichiometry, gas laws, equilibrium, acids and bases and              and biology since living organisms are, aside from water,
electrochemistry.                                                      composed largely of organic compounds. The language,
Note: This course will be considered as an extra credit                fundamental concepts and theories, as well as recent
for Diploma purposes. Class: 4 hours/week Units: 3.33                  advances in organic chemistry will be presented. The
Lab: 30hours/semester Absolute Prerequisite: Physical                  accompanying laboratory work will help familiarize the
Science 430 or 982-021 and Math 201-007                                student with the methods and techniques used by the
                                                                       organic chemist in the synthesis, purification and
202-901-TU                                                             characterization of organic compounds.
Tutorial in Organic Chemistry IB                                       Topics include: Lewis theory of acids and bases, the
Chemistry for International Baccalaureate Students                     kinetics and theory of reaction mechanism,
only)                                                                  stereochemistry, and systematic nomenclature of organic
This tutorial is similar in content to 202-BLD-05 for the              compounds. A substantial part of the course is devoted
regular Health Science students, but is limited to topics              to the detailed survey of the properties, reactions and
required to prepare students for the IB Chemistry Higher               stereochemistry of the following classes of organic
level exam.                                                            compounds: cyclic and acyclic alkanes, alkenes and
Absolute Prerequisite: 202-BLC                                         alkynes, alkyl halides and aromatic compounds. NOTE:
                                                                       Organic Chemistry I is a required course for students
202-B2A-LA                                                             registered in the Health Science profile.
Chemistry and the Environment                                          Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.66 Lab: 30
(Complementary course – not open to Science Students)                  hours/semester
This course is designed to help the non-science student                Absolute Prerequisite: 202-NYA and 202-NYB
to understand how environmental issues are affecting us
in our daily lives and the future life of this planet. Topics          202-BLD-05
include the greenhouse effect and climatic change, the                 Organic Chemistry II
depletion of the ozone layer, agricultural chemicals,                  (Chemistry for Science students and IB students only)
radiation and nuclear power, acid rain, hazardous waste                Determining both the presence and the nature of small
and alternative energy sources. Lectures will be                       amounts of organic compounds in the environment or in
supplemented with group presentations and class                        the human body is very important. To analyse for the
discussion. There will be several laboratory exercises                 presence of organic substances in matter requires using
where students will be able to prepare ethanol, soaps                  certain techniques such as infrared (i.r.) and nuclear
and plastics.                                                          magnetic resonance (n.m.r.) spectroscopy. To determine
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                        the amount of a trace organic compound present in a
                                                                       urine sample, a combination of gas chromatography and
                                                                       mass spectrometry may be used. These techniques will
                                                                       be discussed and the student will be able to record i.r.
                                                                       spectra as well as analyze other spectra. The student will
                                                                       also learn how to synthesize and carry out reactions with
                                                                       the following classes of compounds: alcohols, aldehydes,
                                                                       ketones, carboxylic acids, Ethers and Amines.
                                                                       Spectroscopy will be applied so as to help in the
                                                                       appreciation of the structure of such compounds. NOTE:
                                                                       This course is strongly recommended for students who
                                                                       wish to enter the Health and Biological Science programs,
                                                                       including Medicine, at university.
                                                                       Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.66 Lab: 30
                                                                       hours/semester
                                                                       Absolute Prerequisite: 202-BLC



                                                                Page 105
Chemistry (continued)
202-BLE-05                                                         202-NYB-05
Environmental Chemistry                                            General Chemistry - Part II
(Chemistry for Science students only)                              (Chemistry for Science and International Baccalaureate
The goal of this course is to enable the student to                students only)
understand and apply the chemical principles underlying            Subjects covered in this course are based on modern
current environmental problems of acid rain, ozone                 concepts of chemical equilibrium and thermodynamics.
depletion, greenhouse effect, waste disposal, heavy                Topics include: the equilibrium constant expression, gas
metals, pesticides and radiation. Students will also use           phase equilibria, thermochemistry, first and second laws of
chemical principles to evaluate the environmental impact           thermodynamics, equilibria in solutions of acids and bases,
of the manufacture and disposal of common consumer                 equilibria in saturated solutions, equilibria in the redox
products such as soaps, detergents, bleaches, plastics,            systems, electrochemical cells and the Nernst equation,
cosmetics, food, beverages, paper, furniture and                   phase equilibria and chemical kinetics.
clothing. Laboratory work will emphasize the modern                Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.66 Lab: 2 hours/week
analytical methods for the determination of chemical               Absolute Prerequisite: 202-NYA
contaminants in the environment.
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.66
Lab: 2 hours/week
Absolute Prerequisite: 202-NYA and 202-NYB

202-NYA-05
General Chemistry - Part I
(Chemistry for Science and International Baccalaureate
students only)
This course is a more intensive study of the topics
presented in an introductory H.S. chemistry course with
emphasis on the mathematical aspects where possible.
Topics are based on the concepts of modern atomic
theory and quantum mechanics and include: atomic
structure, periodic table, ionic bonding, covalent
bonding, molecular geometry, descriptive chemistry of
metals and non-metals with emphasis on the reactions of
acidic and basic oxides, the relationship between the
chemical structure and physical properties of substances,
and colligative properties. Class: 3 hours/week Units:
2.66
Lab: 2 hours/week




                                                            Page 106
Physics
Physics 203-001-50                                                   203-BLD-05
General Physics                                                      Electronics
(Physics for Explorations Science Students only)                     (Physics for Science students only)
This course is for students who have never taken Physics             This is an introductory course in Electronics that will
534 in high school. Content: Vectors: Graphical and                  present a thorough examination of BJT amplifiers and
component methods. Force, displacement and velocity                  operating principles. Mathematical models and
applications. Static Equilibrium: Newton's 1st and 3rd               theoretical analyses will be complemented by closely
Laws. Kinematics: 1-d motion, constant acceleration,                 related experiments.
graphs and equations. Dynamics: Newton's 2nd Law.                    Content: Solid State Physics; diodes, power supplies; DC
Causes of acceleration. Work/Energy: Basics of work,                 models, bias circuits, and feedback; stability and design;
energy, and power. Work/energy as an alternative to the              small signal models and analysis, class A and B operation, AC
2nd Law. Electricity and Circuits: Charge, Coulomb's law,            circuit analysis, advanced circuit analysis, communications
batteries, voltage, current, resistance, power, Ohm's                technologies.
Law, series/parallel circuits, Kirchhoff's Rules. Geometric          Class: 1 hour/week Units: 2.66 Lab: 4 hours/week
Optics: Reflection, refraction, mirrors, lenses, optical             Absolute Prerequisite: 203-NYC Co-requisite: 203-NYB
devices. Hydrostatics: Pressure, density, buoyant forces,
Archimedes' Principle.                                               203-BLE-05
Class: 3 hours/week Units:2.66                                       Energy and Modern Physics
Lab:2 hours/week                                                     (Physics for Science students only)
Absolute Prerequisite: Physical Sciences 430 or 982-003              This course is intended for students who wish to pursue
and Math 201-013                                                     future studies in engineering, architecture, or in a
(Note: This course will be considered as an extra credit             physical science. The subject matter will include some
for Diploma purposes)                                                topics already treated in Physics NYC, but will be covered
                                                                     in greater depth, and will vary to some extent, according
203-902-LA                                                           to the interests of the professor and of the class. The
Extra Topics in Physics                                              topics will be chosen from the following areas: Relativity,
(Physics for International Baccalaureate students only)              Quantum Physics, Nuclear Physics, Thermodynamics, and
This course is similar in content to the 203-BLE-05 course           Astrophysics. Additional topics such as superconductivity,
described below, but it is limited to topics required to             Fibre Optics, Chaos Theory, etc. may be covered. The use
prepare students for the IB Physics Higher Level exam.               of computers, online resources, and independent study
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                      will be more prominent than in previous courses in the
Co-requisite: 203-NYB                                                regular Physics series.
                                                                     Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.66 Lab: 2 hours/week
203-903-LA                                                           Co-requisite: 203- NYB
Computer Techniques in Physics
(Numerical Methods Course for Science students only)                 203-NYA-05
Students in this course will learn how to use a                      Mechanics
programming language and spreadsheet methods to                      (Physics for Science and IB Science students only)
simplify the solving of Physics problems. These                      This course offers a mathematical treatment of the basic
techniques are becoming increasingly common in many                  laws and principles of mechanics. Content: Vector
professions, and such skills will be valuable well beyond            analysis, forces, friction, equilibrium, one-dimensional
the specific Physics and Mathematics topics that will be             motion, motion in a plane, laws of motion, universal
used to demonstrate them. Topics to be treated include:              gravitation, work energy theorem, potential energy,
projectile motion with air resistance, satellite motion and          conservation of energy, conservation of momentum,
orbits, moments of inertia and rigid body rotation,                  collisions, rotational kinematics and dynamics, and
uncertainties and error analysis, charged particle motion,           angular momentum.
thermodynamic cycles, radioactivity, circuit analysis, and           Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.66 Lab: 2 hours/week
other such problems that can be efficiently solved by                Absolute Prerequisite: H.S. Physics 534 or 203-006;
numerical methods.                                                   Co-requisite: Calculus
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.66 Lab: 2 hours/week
PR: 203-NYC




                                                              Page 107
Physics (continued)
203-NYB-05                                                               203-NYC-05
Electricity and Magnetism                                                Waves and Modern Physics
(Physics for Science and IB Science students only)                       (Physics for Science and IB Science students only)
This course is a study of the fundamental laws of                        This course is an introduction to waves, optics, and
electricity and magnetism. It is designed to provide                     selected topics in modern Physics. Content: Simple
students with an understanding of electromagnetic                        harmonic motion, harmonic
phenomena and some applications. Content: Coulomb's                      waves, superposition principle, standing waves,
law, electric field, Gauss' law, electrical potential,                   resonance, sound waves, Doppler effect, electromagnetic
capacitors, physical effect of a dielectric, DC circuits,                waves (qualitative), Huygens' principle, reflection,
electrical instruments, Kirchhoff's rules, electromotive                 refraction, mirrors, lenses, optical instruments,
force and internal resistance, magnetic field, Biot-Savart               interference, diffraction, polarization, photoelectric
law, Ampere’s law, Faraday's law, inductance,                            effect, de Broglie waves, wave particle duality,
introduction to AC. Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.66                      uncertainty principle, the Bohr atom, nuclear physics and
Lab: 2 hours/week                                                        radioactivity.
Absolute Prerequisite: 203-NYA & 203-NYC                                 Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.66 Lab: 2 hours/week
Co-requisite: Calculus II                                                Prerequisites: Physics 203-NYA and Calculus I


Methodology
300-101-LA                                                               300-202-LA
Introduction to Methodology in the Social Sciences                       Statistics in the Social Sciences
(Methodology for Social Science Students only)                           (Level II for Social Science students only)
Students will examine the entire process of doing                        This course will apply advanced statistical tools, based on
research in the social and human sciences. They will see                 probability theory, to decision-making in research with
what is meant by the scientific method, the difficulties                 an emphasis on the use of research design in Psychology.
involved in doing research with humans and ethical                       It is recommended for students who wish to pursue
considerations that affect researchers' work. Students                   university studies in psychology. Although it is offered as
will learn which research techniques are used in the                     a required course to students in the Psychology option, it
different disciplines they are studying. They will use their             is also open to students from all Social Science program
knowledge of quantitative methods and research                           options who wish to expand their knowledge of statistics
techniques to evaluate research reported in the media,                   and research methods beyond the Quantitative Methods
texts and journals, and they will create, implement and                  course.
report on a research project of their own.                               Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.00
Prerequisite: 360-101, or 201-337, or 201-BLF                            300-301-LA
                                                                         Integration Seminar in the Social Sciences (I.S.S.S.)
300-201-LA                                                               (Methodology for Social Science Students only)
Introduction to Research Methods in the Liberal Arts                     This course offers students the unique opportunity to
(Methodology for Liberal Arts students only)                             consolidate some of the links among the disciplines in
This course introduces students to the use of proper                     the social sciences. Each student will select and research
research methods in the Liberal Arts. Students will practice             a social issue, write an academic paper, and present their
the various research and expository skills needed to write a             findings orally. In the paper, the student will analyze the
scholarly ten-page research essay (e.g., critical evaluation of          issue from two social science disciplines and one
primary and secondary sources, organized note-taking, and                theoretical framework. This process will serve as an
writing of increasingly well-structured and clearly expressed            excellent preparation for university studies. The
drafts). During the lab period students will have the                    successful paper will also meet the criteria for the
opportunity to improve their computer skills.                            Program’s Comprehensive Assessment.
Class: 2 hours/week Lab: 2 hours/week Units: 2.00                        The I.S.S.S. course must be taken at Champlain College
                                                                         Saint-Lambert only in the final semester of the Social
                                                                         Science program. Students will not be granted
                                                                         permission to enrol for this course at another Cegep.
                                                                         Class: 3 hours/week
                                                                         Units: 2.00 Prerequisite: 300-101-LA




                                                                  Page 108
Geography
320-101-LA                                                            320-201-LA
World Geography                                                       Understanding the Earth
(Level I Geography for Social Science students only)                  (Level II Geography for Social Science Students only)
The aim of this course is to provide the student with an              An understanding of the fascinating and complex web of
overview of the Earth's physical environment, human                   relationships that order our physical environment is
patterns and cultural diversity. While the approach is                fundamental to any student interested in pursuing studies
necessarily general, the student will gain a clear image of           in Geography, the Earth Sciences or to those merely
the complex patterns of the human-environment                         curious about their physical surroundings. The course is
relationship. Contents include the following: The Earth as            designed to provide a basic knowledge of environmental
Habitat - the major physical patterns: climatic,                      processes with a minimal background in Geography. This
hysiographic, hydrogeographic, and biogeographic. The                 course is structured around four elements: The
Earth as Human Environment - the major human                          atmosphere - the nature and general patterns of climate
patterns: demographic, cultural, political and economic.              and weather; the hydrosphere - both marine and fresh
Strength in Diversity - selected regions as examples of               water environments; the biosphere - soils, vegetation and
the integration of physical and human patterns.                       biogeography; and the lithosphere - the "solid" earth and
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                       the development of landscapes. Emphasis is placed on the
                                                                      interaction of people and their environment using local
320-122 -LA                                                           examples.
Destination Information I: World Geography                            Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
(Geography for Tourism students only)                                 Prerequisite: 320-101-LA
The focus of the Destinations courses is to provide and
analyze Regional, National and International tourist                  320-202-LA
information. Students will use geographic vocabulary,                 A Global Village Divided
models, diagrams, maps and statistical tables. They will              (Level II Geography for Social Science Students only)
analyze the destination areas according to their physical,            The aim of the course is to examine the relationship of
historical, political and economic conditions. They will              cities to the cultural and political evolution of
also locate and categorize the main points of interest                humankind. To analyze from a geographical perspective
typical of the destination and assess its tourist potential,          the phenomenon of urbanism and its impact on the
taking into account different types of tourist motivation.            decision making process worldwide from the financial
Positive and negative impacts of tourism on the                       "shrines" in the downtowns of New York, London or
destination will be considered, as well as current news               Tokyo to the shantytowns of South Africa, Africa and Asia
events. Each destination will be evaluated as a potential             all the way down to the slums of the Western World.
source of travelers for Quebec and Canada. Students will              With the ongoing technological revolution since the past
participate in learning activities including group                    few decades, humanity has conquered distance in an
interaction, role play, audio-visual analysis, tour design            unprecedented speed and the world is getting closer to
and research work. Students will be asked to apply their              each other as never before. This phenomenon could
knowledge and analytical skills to increasingly complex               never have occurred had it not been for the cities which
traveling challenges.                                                 are deciding for the best and the worst humanity has to
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66                                       offer to itself. The concepts which the course brings
                                                                      forward will enable the student to understand why while
                                                                      humanity as a whole is increasingly becoming a global
                                                                      village. We as members of states and nations are ever
                                                                      divided behind frontiers and boundaries, and why
                                                                      "Polis," the Greek word for city, is almost synonymous
                                                                      with the political process.
                                                                      Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
                                                                      Prerequisite: 320-101-LA




                                                               Page 109
Geography (continued)
320-203-LA                                                           320-944-LA
Planetary Challenge                                                  Environmental Systems IV
(Level II Geography for Social Science Students only)                (For International Baccalaureate students only)
This course acquaints the student with contemporary                  This course aims at ensuring an integration of the elements
world problems from a Geographic perspective. Topics                 seen in the preceding courses. Using theme seminars and
covered are drawn from amongst a variety of themes                   case studies involving the exploitation of energy and food
which may include: environmental changes in the                      resources, the student will learn how to distinguish the
atmosphere, water and on land, population issues, global             concepts of natural capital and natural income. The student
inequality, agriculture and nutrition, resource                      will also be able to calculate, using appropriate data, the
exploitation, and sustainability of current practices.               ecological influence of given populations. The analysis of
These topics are pursued using active student                        these results will make it possible for the student to
participation in group activities, classroom discussion and          understand the concept of limited capacity of a system and
individual assignments and research.                                 to identify realistic solutions that would permit concordance
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                      between the demands of the human population with
Prerequisite: 320-101-LA                                             regards to the limited capacity of the environment. This
                                                                     course will also provide a review and preparation for the
320-941-LA                                                           final examination of the International Baccalaureate in
Environmental Systems I                                              Environmental Systems.
(For International Baccalaureate students only)                      Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
This course aims at making it possible for the student to            Prerequisite: 101-943-LA
learn about the four major systems that must be
considered in any study of the environment. Through                  320-A1A-LA
case studies, the student will understand how the                    Geography: Planetary Challenge
hydrosphere, the atmosphere and the lithosphere                      (Complementary course – not open to Social Science
converge to form the ecosphere. The student will be                  and Introduction to College Studies students)
taught to understand the relationship that exists                    This course is designed to acquaint the student with
between our natural habitat and patterns of human                    contemporary world problems which have wide spatial
settlement. At the end of this course, the student will be           implications. The main themes are: regional inequalities in
able to work with various tools to study and understand              production and consumption, overpopulation, malnutrition,
the concepts of physical space such as geographical                  the division of mankind into "developed" and "under-
charts, topographic cuts and also the pattern of                     developed" based on concepts of dominance and
settlement on the planet (demographic pyramids, graphs               dependence rather than interdependence, human
etc). Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                migrations and dislocations, culture and political conflicts,
                                                                     over-exploitation of finite resources, deterioration of the
                                                                     natural and human environment, predictions for the future,
                                                                     and ways of re-establishing equilibrium. The prime objective
                                                                     of the course is student input through active participation in
                                                                     discussions, debates, presentations and research.
                                                                     Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00




                                                              Page 110
History
330-101-LA                                                            inflation, violence, race and foreign policy will be
The Ancient World                                                     examined in the light of these "past challenges".
(History for Liberal Arts students only)                              Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
The objective of this course is to give students an                   Prerequisite: Western Civilization 330-910-RE
overview of the major periods, cultures and                           330-203-LA
achievements, and historical development of ancient                   East Asia
civilization, in particular Graeco-Roman civilization.                (Level II History for Social Science students only)
Students will become aware of the originality of ancient              The most dynamic and fastest growing region in the
arts, ideas and institutions, and of the historical                   world today, East Asia- China, Japan, India, S.E. Asia and
influences of Graeco-Roman culture in the classical and               Indonesia- has also often set the pace in the past. This
post-classical periods. The major forms of literature of              course examines these historic backgrounds and
the ancient world will be introduced through the study of             illustrates the richness of the civilizations of this
representative works, in English translation, from the                extraordinary part of the world. As the upcoming leader
major periods under study. In addition, students will be              of the area, backed by the depth of its historical legacy
shown the comparative context of the study of                         and traditions, China assumes a central place in our
civilizations in antiquity, a context which includes pre-             study, but the ALittle Dragons@ - South Korea, Taiwan,
Classical and non-Mediterranean civilizations. Finally,               Singapore, Malaysia and Thailand also claim attention.
students will be provided with an overview of the kinds               Present and future developments and challenges of
of evidence and methods of investigation on which                     these Pacific Rim countries are also surveyed. By the end
knowledge of the ancient world is based.                              of this course, students will be able to situate the specific
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                       contribution of social science to the understanding of
                                                                      this important region and assess potential career
330-201-LA                                                            possibilities related to this emerging area.
Twentieth Century                                                     Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
(Level II History for Social Science students only)                   Prerequisite: Western Civilization 330-910-RE
This course attempts to bring the student into contact
with the major events and issues confronting the world                330-204-LA
today. Beginning with the glorious "Belle Époque" period              Genocide and Holocaust
and the Imperialist climax of Europe, it examines the                 (Level II History for Social Science students only)
tensions that led to the catastrophe of the First World               This course will apply the general knowledge and skills
War. The immediate effects of this watershed were the                 acquired in the Western Civilization course to more
developments of Fascism, Communism, The Depression                    intensely focus on the question of genocide and the
and World War Two. During the contemporary Atomic                     Holocaust as historical phenomena. As such, the course
Age, Space Age and Computer Era, the course examines                  will analyse the history of genocide form Antiquity to
the crises of the Cold War, Environment and the Third                 recent cases such as Rwanda. The course will begin with
World. Possible future global developments are also                   an overview of the main theories, typologies and
debated, using an interdisciplinary approach.                         definitions of genocide as well as key concepts such as
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                       war crimes, crimes against humanity and ethnic
Prerequisite: Western Civilization 330-910-RE                         cleansing. We will then analyze possible cases of
                                                                      genocide such as Miletus in Ancient Greece, the Roman
330-202-LA
                                                                      destruction of Carthage, the crusade against the
American People
                                                                      Albigensians, the Mongol conquests, the colonization of
(Level II History for Social Science students only)
                                                                      the Americas, the Holocaust, Cambodia and Rwanda.
This course will cover the sweep of American experience,
                                                                      Finally, the course will examine the question of denial
from pre-Columbian times to the present. The challenges                                                                    th
                                                                      and falsification in key cases of genocide in the 20
facing the early makers of the United States in
                                                                      century.
exploration and discovery; in society and
                                                                      Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
culture-building; in settlement and constitution making;
                                                                      Prerequisite: Western Civilization 330-910-RE
in civil war; business, immigration and "foreign
entanglements" will be examined in a general way, with
attention to the American capacity to adapt, adopt and
change. Present U.S. crises involving the cities, pollution,




                                                               Page 111
History (continued)
330-205-LA                                                             330-907-LA
History of Crime and Punishment                                        History of Sport
(History for Criminology students only)                                (History for Sport Marketing students only)
This history course will examine the development of                    This course will take the evolution of the ideas and
crime and punishment from ancient to modern times.                     practices of sport from Prehistoric times to our own
Specific focus will be paid to how the definition of crime             contemporary era. It will focus on the “Age of Progress”
and the purpose of punishment change both over time                    (1860-1914) and the extraordinary leap forward in
and in different societal settings. Other topics include the           leisure and affluence that lead to the regularization of
historical context of theories that explain the causes and             rules and codes. During our own Global Age, aspects of
treatment of crime, historical examples of concepts and                professionalism, the growth of expectations and
systems of justice and historical methods of deterrence,               motivation will supplement views on sportsmanship,
punishment and rehabilitation. The evolution of state                  fitness and recreation.
mechanisms that deal with crime, law enforcement,                      Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
policing and prison systems will be examined.
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                        330-910-RE
Prerequisite: Western Civilization 330-910-RE                          Western Civilization
                                                                       (Level I History for Social Science students only)
330-206-LA                                                             This course is an introductory survey of the main
Rome: War, Culture, and Society                                        developments in the West from Paleolithic times to the
(Level II History for Social Science students only)                    present. Beginning with the momentous Neolithic
Why did Rome last for so long and what lessons can be                  Revolution, it traces the origins of Civilization through
learned from this successful civilization? This course will            the River Valleys and its expansion during the great
provide students with an in-depth survey of the                        Mediterranean era of Greece and Rome. The Middle
                                                           th
civilization of ancient Rome, from its beginnings in the 8             Ages are examined, leading to the Renaissance and the
                      th
century BCE to the 7 century CE. The themes of                         Age of Exploration and Discovery. European State
republicanism, expansionist foreign policy, military                   building during the Enlightenment lead up to the
dictatorship, imperialism, religious conflict, religious               enormous changes brought about by the Industrial and
extremism, and decline of empires as found in the study                Political Revolutions, whose ripple effects on Science and
of ancient Rome will all be compared to the present day.               Technology, Liberalism, Socialism, Nationalism and
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                        Imperialism have worked themselves through the
Prerequisite: Western Civilization 330-910-RE                          tremendous upheavals of this century.
                                                                       Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
330-301-LA
Post-Classical History
(History for Liberal Arts students only)
Beginning with a brief survey of the Medieval Era, Age of
Discoveries and the Age of Reason, the course sharpens
its focus as it approaches the great Age of Revolutions
both political and economic, around 1760. It then
examines in a general way, the exhilarating Age of
Progress, highlighting the glories and tensions of
Europe’s “Belle Époque” period and follows
developments in Liberalism, Socialism, Nationalism and
Imperialism prior to the cataclysm of the Great War in
1914. Changes and continuities relating to that enormous
watershed will be tracing movements in economic,
ideological and military affairs, and especially since
World War II, those accelerating features of the social,
cultural, scientific and technological scene, affecting our
lives.
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00




                                                                Page 112
Philosophy
340-101-LA                                                          340-301-LA
Introduction to Philosophy: Greece and Rome – The                   Great Philosophical Ideas of the Modern World
Roots of Western Philosophy                                         (Philosophy for Liberal Arts students only)
(Philosophy for Liberal Arts students only)                         This course will consider some of the great philosophical
The philosophers of ancient Greece are the chief                    ideas of the 17th and 18th centuries, a period which saw
architects of the Western intellectual tradition. This              the establishment of the foundations for our own
course is designed to introduce students to the writings            contemporary world, through a survey of the theories of
and ideas of some of these philosophers with a view to              modern philosophers and a study of their historical
fostering a better understanding of our model of the                context, the course will consider such questions as: can
world and of our place in it. Through a careful                     humans know and explain the universe? What is
examination of the views held by the Sophists, Socrates,            knowledge? What is truth? Does a God exist? What is
Plato, Aristotle, and the stoics, students will explore             liberty? What is happiness? These questions will be
some of the outstanding issues of philosophy.                       studied through a careful reading of selected texts by
Throughout the investigation of these issues students will          Descartes, Hume, Kant, Locke, and Rousseau.
be encouraged to become more aware of their own                     Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
beliefs and to critically assess the grounds upon which             Absolute Prerequisite: Philosophy 340-101-LA
they rest.
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                     340-913-91-IB
                                                                    Introduction to Philosophy
340-214-LA                                                          (Philosophy for International Baccalaureate students
Philosophy of Technology                                            only)
(Philosophy for Liberal Arts students only)                         In this course, the first in the sequence of IB Philosophy
This course is designed to complement the two required              courses, students will be introduced to some of the
philosophy courses offered in Liberal Arts. They may be             principal ideas and problems of Western philosophy. The
taken as part of the College block component in the                 following questions, among others, will be addressed:
program. Courses actually offered in a given semester               What is Amind@? Does the external world truly exist?
will be listed in the master timetable.                             What, if anything, can be known with certainty to be
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                     true? What is truth? Do human beings survive death? Is
                                                                    free will an illusion? In their exploration of these
340-220-78-IB                                                       questions and the various answers which have been
An Introduction to Ethics: Social & Political Ethics                proposed to them, students will be encouraged to
(Philosophy for International Baccalaureate students                engage in both conceptual and logical analysis with a
only)                                                               view not only to better understand the issues involved in
The quest for human nature - that is, the search for a              approaching these questions but also to improve their
better understanding of us as individuals and members               critical thinking skills. Throughout the semester students
of societies - has always been at the heart of                      will be encouraged to become more aware of their own
philosophical investigations. In this course, the third in          beliefs and to critically assess the grounds upon which
the sequence of IB Philosophy courses, students will                they rest.
explore some of the key ideas and theories about human              Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
nature. The following questions, among others, will be
addressed: What is a person? What are the key                       340-A2D-LA
manifestations of personhood? What, if anything, makes              Meaning, and Life’s Problems: Exploring Philosophy
human beings different from nonhuman animals? What                  (Complementary course - open to all students)
defines our uniqueness? Are human beings endowed                    The study of philosophy is the study of ourselves and our
with free will or are they programmed by their genes?               world – an attempt to explain the deeper meaning of
Are members of Homo sapiens naturally inclined to be                things. What does it mean to be human? Is there a soul
selfish and aggressive or not? Is the nature of men and             or life after death? What is the best way to organize
women fundamentally different or similar? To what                   society? Can war ever be justified? How should we think
extent does the environment shape and modify human                  about science and new technologies? How should we
nature? Throughout the semester students will be                    approach relationships, sex and love? What is the
encouraged to critically assess their views and                     difference between appearances and reality? This course
assumptions about human nature.                                     will look at questions such as these, basing the discussion
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                     on a close study of the ideas found in the tests by some
                                                                    of the great philosophers in history.
                                                                    Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00


                                                             Page 113
Humanities
345-101-14                                                             345-101-MQ
Theory of Knowledge I                                                  Religion and Knowledge
(Humanities for International Baccalaureate students                   (Humanities – Knowledge)
only)                                                                  Since their inception, religions have offered various truth
This is the first course of a two course sequence in the               claims about the world, the fundamental mysteries of the
Theory of Knowledge. The principal objective of these                  universe and existence. This course will compare scientific,
courses is to develop student awareness of and sensitivity             philosophical and other types of knowledge with religion in
to similarities and differences in the forms of knowledge.             order to determine whether indeed there is such a things as
Two general questions are at the heart of these courses:               religious knowledge.
How do I know that something is the case (i.e., true)? and             Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
how are knowledge claims within a particular discipline
justified? In this first course, the role of language in               345-101-MQ
conditioning thinking and feeling, the various forms of                Science and History
logical inquiry, and the nature of science will be explored.           (Humanities – Knowledge)
The main objective of this course is to develop student                In this course we examine how we come to know in
ability to communicate effectively, and to think clearly and           Science and how such knowing has revolutionized the
logically. To achieve these objectives, the course will begin          way in which we see the world and ourselves. In our
by considering the nature of language, the role it plays in            analysis we also explore the possible limits to such
shaping and transmitting ideas and information, and its                knowledge, for example, the limits to self-understanding.
connection with knowledge and values. Attention will also              We also examine knowing in History and compare it with
be devoted to the study of logic. Deductive logic, as well as          knowing in Science. Is the process of knowing the same
inductive logic, will be explored together with an                     or different? And how do we come to know about
examination of some of the more common informal                        History? We shall see how our way of viewing historical
fallacies. The course will conclude with an examination of             events influences our lives.
natural science and the pattern of inquiry peculiar to it.             Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
                                                                       345-101-MQ
345-101-MQ                                                             Knowledge, Science, and Philosophy
The Vision of Art                                                      (Humanities – Knowledge)
(Humanities – Knowledge)                                               All humans seek to understand the world and their own
This course looks at the visual art as a form of                       individual existence. It has long been believed that
knowledge. Students will study a wide variety of artwork               philosophy could offer us knowledge in such matters,
and will place each piece in its cultural and historical               knowledge of the "highest kind" known as wisdom. Does
context. A variety of artwork and topics, for example                  philosophy truly offer knowledge? If so, what kind of
gender and beauty, war and destruction, culture and                    knowledge would wisdom be? How can we achieve it?
religion, social change and consumerism will be                        This course will attempt to answer these questions by
examined in order to highlight how culture, time, place                considering the nature of knowledge itself and by
and social context can affect the interpretation and                   examining the origin, historical development, and
representation of ideas. Students will think critically                methods of Science, and by comparing and contrasting
about what the artists and their societies ‘knew’ to be                scientific knowledge with philosophy in order to
true and compare this with their own knowledge base                    determine whether indeed there is such a thing as
and value system.                                                      "philosophical knowledge".
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                        Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33




                                                                Page 114
Humanities (continued)
345-101-MQ                                                            345-101-MQ
Gender and Knowledge                                                  Education and Social Change
(Humanities – Knowledge)                                              (Humanities – Knowledge)
This course explores the relationship between gender                  As a student you have probably asked yourself if the
and what we know. It will examine how nature (the                     knowledge you are pursuing is worthwhile. What kinds of
biological make-up of an individual) and nurture (the                 knowledge are valued by our society and how is it reflected
environment) affect gender definition and gender roles,               in education systems? How does schooling take into
as well as how we acquire, transmit and shape                         account differences in how people learn? This course will
information and ideas.                                                look at various educational approaches, or ways of
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                       organizing knowledge, in relation to social values. We will
                                                                      start with a historical overview of key educational thinkers
345-101-MQ                                                            and movements, including the emergence of mass
                                                                                            th
The Development of Knowledge                                          education in the 19 century. We will then study critiques of
(Humanities – Knowledge)                                              traditional schooling as well as alternative movements, such
This course explores how humans have developed                        as free schooling and popular education. Students will apply
explanations of the world and how fundamental                         theories of critical pedagogy, addressing issues of equity in
elements of knowledge continue to undergo change,                     the context of increasingly diverse classrooms, technological
often through contributions from the humanities.                      change and the ascendancy of media culture. Class: 4
Students will undertake an analysis of the development                hours/week Units: 2.33
of one or more different fields of knowledge and
consider how and why the fields have evolved through                  345-101-MQ
the years.                                                            Knowledge and Forms of Knowledge in the Ancient World
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                       (Humanities - Knowledge for Liberal Arts students only)
                                                                      In this course, the first of three courses in the Liberal Arts
345-101-MQ                                                            Humanities sequence, students will first examine the
Knowledge and Media                                                   various components of knowledge: beliefs, truth claims,
(Humanities – Knowledge)                                              views of truth, and the processes of justification and
This course explores the role of the media in the                     validation. The nature and impact of language on beliefs
acquisition of knowledge, particularly as a means of                  and the view of knowledge will also be examined. This
transmitting and shaping information and ideas. Media                 will be followed by a consideration of the development
forms to be addressed range from the print medium to                  of various forms of knowledge in the Ancient and the
the electronic media. Student will analyse and assess the             Classical World: notably astronomy, mathematics,
impact of various media upon the individual's claim of                biology and philosophy. Throughout the semester
knowledge.                                                            students will be encouraged to relate the topics studied
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                       to material covered in their other courses, notably to
                                                                      philosophy, and to their own experiences in acquiring
345-101-MQ                                                            knowledge.
Ancient World Knowledge                                               Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
(Humanities – Knowledge)
Students will study the nature, scope, and development of             345-101-MQ
fields such as science, religion and the arts in the ancient          Knowledge and Conspiracy Theories
world. These developments will be examined for their                  (Humanities - Knowledge)
contributions to different ways of knowing the world based            ‘To conspire’ is ‘to plot or plan secretly with others’,
on their distinct principles, assumptions and methods of              usually with illegal or evil intent and often within the
explaining reality.                                                   structure of real or alleged ‘secret societies’. Accounts of,
 Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                      and public fascination with conspiracy theories and
                                                                      secret societies appeal variously to the deluded, the
                                                                      disenchanted and the disenfranchised. They also attract
                                                                      the powerful establishment. This course will explore the
                                                                      relationship between knowledge, power and control.
                                                                      Students will apply theories of knowledge and principles
                                                                      of critical thinking to both historical and contemporary
                                                                      conspiracy theories.
                                                                      Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33



                                                               Page 115
Humanities (continued)
345-102-MQ                                                              345-102-MQ
Theory of Knowledge II                                                  Green Living
(Humanities for IB students only)                                       (Humanities – Worldviews)
This course is the second and final course in the Theory of             Ecology is more than the central element in a particular field
Knowledge sequence. Building on the ideas studied in ToK                of academic study, or the concern of political parties and
I, students, in this course, will consider questions and                pressure groups. Ecological responsibility as a worldview
issues connected with “knowledge” and “knowing” in the                  requires understanding of a particular philosophy. Students
social sciences, history, ethics and aesthetics. In particular          will explore the question of what constitutes a worldview
students will explore the relationship between objects of               and the philosophy of green living as an example of this.
knowledge and the socio-cultural context of the "patterns               They will gain some insight into the origins of modern
of inquiry" connected with their construction. The                      ecological thinking and the significant ways this may differ
following are among some of the more specific questions                 from or clash with other worldviews.
to be considered: Are "facts" objective, or are they theory             Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00 Prerequisite: 345-101-
laden? Are there historical facts which all historians must             MQ
acknowledge? Is the fact-value dichotomy tenable, or is it
a vestige of a discredited epistemology? Is the scientific              345-102-MQ
method the only reliable method available to human                      Democracy and Cultural Diversity
agents seeking knowledge? Are there “objective”                         (Humanities – Worldviews)
standards in ethics or are all moral judgements                         Through many centuries, governments often abetted by an
“subjective”? Throughout the course students will be                    established religion, treated their people as if they were
encouraged to engage in a review of their own                           homogeneous, and did not hesitate to enforce certain
assumptions regarding the nature of knowledge and the                   values, customs and beliefs. Once the principles of
methods of knowing whereby it is acquired. The course                   democracy have been truly embraced, such an attitude can
will conclude with an examination of the nature of “truth”.             hardly be maintained. Any true democracy must come to
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                         terms with such concepts as multiculturalism and pluralism.
Absolute Prerequisite: Theory of Knowledge I                            In this course students will explore the question of what
                                                                        constitutes a worldview, and they will consider the extent to
345-102-MQ                                                              which different worldviews may be compatible within a
The Humanist Tradition                                                  democratic society. Attention will also be given to the
(Humanities – Worldviews)                                               relationship between different societies with differing
In recent times Humanism has been both praised and                      predominant worldviews.
condemned as the predominant philosophical driving                      Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00 Prerequisite: 345-101-
force in the most highly developed parts of the world. In               MQ
this course students will explore the question of what
constitutes a worldview, and will examine the philosophy                345-102-MQ
of Humanism as a particularly important modern example.                 The Roots of Western Worldviews
Along the way they should gain some insight into the                    (Humanities – Worldviews)
origins of modern Humanism, and into the most significant               Students will be introduced to some of the worldviews that
ways in which it may differ from and clash with other                   are the origin of Western Civilization. These worldviews
worldviews.                                                             have shaped our present vision of the world, our social
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00 Prerequisite: 345-101-                  institutions, morality, religions, and lifestyles. Students will
MQ                                                                      explore the themes and issues which the earlier expressions
                                                                        of the Christian worldview attempted to address. This will
                                                                        allow students to determine the extent to which the early
                                                                        Christian worldview was influenced and shaped by its
                                                                        historical context and the ideas and views of the classical
                                                                        age. Class: 3 hrs/week Units: 2.00 Prerequisite: 345-
                                                                        101-MQ




                                                                 Page 116
Humanities (continued)
345-102-MQ                                                                345-102-MQ
Buddhist and Christian Worldviews                                         Mythologies
(Humanities – Worldviews)                                                 (Humanities – Worldviews)
Students will investigate how Buddhism and Christianity                   This course will provide a basic introduction to myth and its
regard people and the surrounding world. Among the topics                 importance in shaping worldviews. Students will study a
to be examined are their conceptions of the sacred, as well               wide range of mythology, placing each myth in its cultural
as their specific ideas, texts, practices, institutions and art.          and historical context. A thematic and comparative
Students will explore the impact of the modern world on                   approach will be taken allowing students to explore the
Buddhists and Christians, and their responses to it.                      similarities and differences between myths and to interpret
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                           the ways in which mythology can reflect worldviews.
Prerequisite: 345-101-MQ                                                  Contemporary approaches to mythology will also be studied
                                                                          in order to examine the influence of myth on current
345-102-MQ                                                                beliefs, values and worldviews.
The Classical and Contemporary Worldviews                                 Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
(Humanities – Worldviews)                                                 Prerequisite: 345-101-MQ
Students will examine the nature and significance of the
varied achievements of Ancient Greece. In particular,                     345-102-MQ
students will consider the defining concepts and values of                Jewish and Muslim Worldviews
Greek society within the fields of politics and government,               (Humanities – Worldviews)
education, athletics, science, and the arts. In addition,                 Judaism and Islam, two faiths that began in the Middle-East,
students we will trace their influences upon many of the                  have spread throughout the world and influence
same areas of modern life.                                                international news every day. They are as similar in some
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                           respects and different in others, but they are both much
Prerequisite: 345-101-MQ                                                  misunderstood. This course will compare the important
                                                                          aspects of the history, personalities, ideas, texts, practices,
345-102-MQ                                                                institutions, and art in the worlds of Muslims and Jews.
Medieval and Renaissance Worldviews-LA                                    Special attention will be paid to the roles of these faiths in
(Humanities - Worldviews for Liberal Arts students only)                  the everyday lives of their believers. Students will explore
This course will introduce students to the worldviews of                  the impact of the modern world on Judaism and Islam and
early Christianity and to Medieval and Renaissance                        the several responses to it, such as reform, modernization,
worldviews. This will be done through a consideration of the              secularization and fundamentalism.
views of Augustine as well as through a study of various                  Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
themes and aspects of the Medieval mind: love, death,                     Prerequisite: 345-101-MQ
chivalry, symbols, the quest for perfection, the view of time
and space, the ideals of monasticism, the plague, music and               345-102-MQ
art, etc. The course will then move on to a consideration of              Utopias and Social Criticism
the outstanding worldview of the Renaissance: Humanism.                   (Humanities – Worldviews)
To better understand these worldviews, students will also                 A utopia is a perfect society; a dystopia is a society in
be introduced to various aspects of the Medieval world and                chaos. Utopian thinkers use creativity and social criticism
its civilization.                                                         to envision and share the ways individuals could best live
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                           together. This class will explore the dream of utopia and
Prerequisite: 345-101-MQ                                                  the nightmare of dystopia through an examination of the
                                                                          worldviews expressed in the art, literature, philosophy,
                                                                          theology or politics of utopian and dystopian thinkers.
                                                                          Further, the impact of these ideas in shaping a
                                                                          contemporary or future society will be considered.
                                                                          Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00 Prerequisite: 345-101-
                                                                          MQ




                                                                   Page 117
Humanities (continued)
345-BMA-LA                                                            345-BMD-03
Ethical Issues in the Sciences                                        Ethical Issues for Liberal Arts
(Humanities for Science students only)                                (Humanities for Liberal Arts students only)
This course is designed to acquaint students in the                   This course is designed to acquaint students in the
science program with the fundamental principles of                    Liberal Arts program with fundamental principles of
ethics and a number of major ethical theories. Students               ethics, and with a limited number of major ethical
will then have the opportunity to test and apply these                theories. The students will then have the opportunity to
theories to some common ethical problems. A                           test and apply these theories and principles in regard to
substantial part of the course will be devoted to                     some frequently encountered ethical problems of special
analyzing ethical issues that are especially relevant to the          interest to Liberal Arts students.
science program.                                                      Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                       Prerequisite: 345-101-MQ and 345-102-MQ
Prerequisite: 345-101-MQ & 345-102-MQ
                                                                      345-BME-LA
345-BMB-LA                                                            Justice, Knowledge and the Ideal State
Ethical Issues in the Social Sciences                                 (Humanities for IB students only)
(Humanities for Social Science students only)                         How should we live? What does it mean to live a “good”
This course is designed to acquaint students in the Social            life? Is there an ideal way of organising society? What kinds
Science program with the fundamental principles of ethics             of moral or political obligations, if any, do we have? How
and a number of major ethical theories. Students will have            should we approach controversial political or moral issues?
the opportunity to test and apply these theories to some              This class will examine these and similar questions by
common ethical problems. A substantial part of the course             studying one optional theme in the International
will be devoted to the analyzing ethical issues that are              Baccalaureate Philosophy syllabus (either “Political
especially relevant to the Social Science program.                    Philosophy” or “Theories and Problems of Ethics”) and
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                       through a close reading of one of the following texts:
Prerequisite: 345-101-MQ & 345-102-MQ                                 Aristotle's “Nicomachean Ethics”, Immanuel Kant’s
                                                                      “Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals”, Friedrich
345-BMC-LA                                                            Nietzsche’s “On the Genealogy of Morals”, John Stuart Mill’s
Ethical Issues in the Professional Programs                           “Essay on Liberty” or Charles Taylor’s “The Ethics of
(Humanities for Sport Marketing/Advertising, Graphic                  Authenticity”. Topics singled out for discussion may include
Com., Tourism and Computer Science students only)                     the different forms of ethical theory, the origins and nature
This course is designed to acquaint students in the                   of value and value judgements, self-interest versus altruism,
professional programs with fundamental principles of                  the concept of liberty and its relation to social or political
ethics and a number of major ethical theories. Students               life, authority, sovereignty, power, and corruption, human
will have the opportunity to test and apply these theories            rights and their denial, and retributive versus distributive
to some common ethical problems. A substantial part of                justice. Students will examine these and other issues by
the course will be devoted to analyzing ethical issues                means of lectures, structured discussions, workshops, oral
which are especially relevant to the professional                     and written reports, and other learning activities. This
programs.                                                             course is intended to allow students to apply concepts and
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                       techniques acquired in TOK I and II and the introductory
Prerequisite: 345-101-MQ & 345-102-MQ                                 course in philosophy. It will also permit them to acquire new
                                                                      skills and knowledge in philosophical analysis while applying
                                                                      skills from previous semesters.
                                                                      Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
                                                                      Absolute Prerequisite: Theory of Knowledge II




                                                               Page 118
Humanities (continued)
345-BMF-LA
Ethical Issues in Creative Arts and Modern Languages
(Humanities for Creative Arts and Modern Languages
students only)
This course is designed to acquaint students in the
Creative Arts and Modern Languages programs with the
fundamental principles of ethics, and a number of major
ethical theories. Students will then have the opportunity
to test and apply these theories to some common ethical
problems. A substantial part of the course will be
devoted to analyzing ethical issues that are especially
relevant to these programs.
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
Prerequisite: 345-101-MQ & 345-102-MQ


Psychology
350-102-RE                                                           350-202-LA
Introduction to Psychology                                           Psychology of Sexual Behaviour
(Level I Psychology for Social Science students only)                 (Level II Psychology for Social Science students only)
How do people learn? What is memory and why do we                    There are many myths and prejudices surrounding sexual
forget? How do brain processes affect my behaviour and               behaviour. The goal of this course is to provide, in place of
even my moods? These and many more questions will be                 these, an understanding of sexual behaviour that is both
addressed in Introduction to Psychology. This course is              flexible and scientifically based. This will involve an
compulsory for all Social Science students and will provide          examination of the following topics: Psycho-physiological
you with a strong basis in psychological concepts, theories          and socio-cultural factors in sexual behaviour, psychosexual
and research methods. Equipped with this knowledge, you              development, varieties of sexual orientations, psychological
will be able to pursue further studies in Psychology.                aspects of marriage, family life, and parenthood,
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                      contraception and abortion, venereal diseases, and failures
                                                                     in sexual response.
350-201-LA                                                           Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
Lifespan Development                                                 Prerequisite: Psychology 350-102-RE
(Level II Psychology for Social Science students only)
This course will explore the changes and challenges across           350-203-LA
the stages of development of the human life span. We will            Social Psychology
begin with prenatal development and continue through                 (Level II Psychology for Social Science students only)
infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and death and            As one branch of the larger discipline of Psychology,
dying. Specific issues surrounding psychological                     Social Psychology seeks to understand and clarify the
development, including the impact of heredity and                    influence and power that the group and individuals have
environment and the role of the family will be addressed.            over us. This course will, in effect, look at how what is
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                      going on outside of you affects what is going on inside of
Prerequisite: Psychology 350-102-RE                                  you.
                                                                     Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
                                                                     Prerequisite: Psychology 350-102-RE




                                                              Page 119
Psychology (continued)
350-204-LA                                                           350-208-LA
Psychology of Human Relations                                        Selected Topics in Applied Psychology
(Level II Psychology for Social Science students only)               (Level II Psychology for Social Science students only)
This course is designed to help you identify, understand             This course will provide an opportunity for students to
and analyze the factors that influence your relations with           explore selected topics in Psychology at a more advanced
others. The basic idea of this course is that this                   level. It will build upon the content of the Introduction to
understanding will lead to clear communication. Class                Psychology course. Each selected topic will deal with a
exercises will focus on self-observation, on awareness of            different area of psychology, for example developmental,
communication styles and on strategies to improve                    social, and abnormal, etc. This course will provide you
human relations.                                                     with a greater appreciation of the many areas of
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                      specialization within the domain of psychology.
Prerequisite: Psychology 350-102-RE                                  Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
350-205-LA                                                           Prerequisite: Psychology 350-102-RE
Psychology of Mental Health
(Level II Psychology for Social Science students only)               350-209-LA
This course is designed to examine the relativity of the             Sports Psychology
mental health - mental illness continuum. The historical             (Level II Psychology for Social Science students only)
roots and myths of mental health will be studied, and                This course will examine the concepts and theories in Sports
special treatment will be given to interventions used by             Psychology. Topics will include: history of sports psychology,
psychologists to deal with the wide range of mental                  professional issues and ethics for sports psychology,
health issues. Topics discussed will focus on personality            motivation and learning, and intervention for athletic
theories, stress and stress management, psychological                performance enhancement and physical fitness. Social
disorders, psychotherapy and treatment, and the                      psychological dimensions in sport and coaching will also be
psychological aspects of physical health.                            examined. This course may be of particular interest to
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                      student athletes in any sport and to students interested in
Prerequisite: Psychology 350-102-RE                                  physical activity and physical education.
                                                                     Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
350-206-LA                                                           Prerequisite: Psychology 350-102-RE
Psychology of Learning
(Level II Psychology for Social Science students only)               350-210-LA
This course will allow you to explore how learning occurs            Theoretical Perspectives in Psychology
as well as some of the unique social, cultural and                   (Level II Psychology for Social Science students only)
psychological factors in the student that affect learning.           This course will explore human behaviour from the five
You will analyze different theories of learning, gain                main theoretical approaches: the biological approach,
insight into your own process of learning, and apply                 the behavioural approach, the cognitive approach, the
principles of effective learning to concrete situations.             psychoanalytic approach and the humanistic approach.
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                      The focus will be on how these approaches can be
Prerequisite: Psychology 350-102-RE                                  applied to the understanding of individual and social
                                                                     phenomena.
350-207-LA                                                           Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
Child and Adolescent Development                                     Prerequisite: Psychology 350-102-RE
(Level II Psychology for Social Science students only)
This course will study children and adolescents by                   350-211-LA
exploring their physical, cognitive, social and emotional            The Mind-Body Connection
development. These changes will be analyzed within the               (Level II Psychology for Social Science students only)
contexts of family, peer groups and school. Since this is a          This course will examine the impact of the mind,
required course in the Education Option, particular                  including attitudes, emotions and personality, on the
attention will be placed on the factors that influence               body. In particular, it will critically analyze the scientific
adjustment within the school setting.                                research that claims that mental factors such as
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                      personality style, perception, and stress can impact upon
Prerequisite: Psychology 350-102-RE                                  physical reactions including health and disease. It will
                                                                     attempt to uncover the biological, cognitive and affective
                                                                     processes that underlie the mind-body connection.
                                                                     Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
                                                                      Prerequisite: Psychology 350-102-RE


                                                              Page 120
Psychology (continued)
350-212-LA                                                              350-921-LA
Abnormal Psychology and Criminal Behaviour                              Human Relations
(Level II Psychology for Social Science students only)                  (Psychology for Computer Science students only)
This course will examine patterns of abnormal behaviour,                The course material will be divided into 4 parts. First,
particularly those that lead to deviant or criminal behaviour.          students examine the basic elements involved in working
This course will also examine the definition and treatment              with and understanding the differences of individuals in
of abnormal disorders. Abnormal behaviour will be viewed                the work environment. Secondly, we’ll turn our attention
in terms of a complex interaction between psychological,                to the dynamics underlying small group interactions and
biological and sociocultural factors. Topics will include:              some general principles of interpersonal influence.
theoretical perspectives on abnormal behaviour,                         Thirdly, we’ll look at the organization itself, for effective
classification and assessment of abnormal behaviour,                    operations, and how the individual can adjust to
personality disorders, mood disorders, anxiety disorders,               inevitable bureaucracy. Finally, we’ll turn our gaze to the
psychotic disorders, disorders involving sexuality, substance           subject of self-management with an accent on
abuse and dependence.                                                   developing your own career interests, improving work
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                         habits, and time-management.
Prerequisite: Psychology 350-102-RE                                     Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00

350-213-LA                                                              350-A1A-LA
The Psychological Development of Criminal Behaviour                     Psychology: Introduction to Social Sciences
(Level II Psychology for Social Science students only)                  (Complementary course - not open to Social Science and
This course examines criminal behaviour though various                  Introduction to College Studies students)
theoretical perspectives in psychology. An overview of                  This course is designed to explore the discipline of
life-span development is initially presented and followed               Psychology. Special emphasis will be given to topics that are
by etiological factors of criminal behaviour as they relate             relevant to the modern world. The course will focus on the
to personality, biology, learning, cognition, social factors,           following main perspectives in psychology; psychodynamic,
and mental disorders. These lessons are then followed by                behavioural, humanistic, biological and cognitive
teachings relevant to prevention and treatment of                       approaches. Evaluation will involve regular tests, a research
criminal behaviour.                                                     essay and projects related to the application of psychology.
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                         Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
Prerequisite: Psychology 350-102-RE


Methodology
360-101-LA                                                              reasoning, the relation between logic and mathematics,
Quantitative Methods in the Social Sciences                             the relation between knowledge and mathematics, the
(Methodology for Social Science students only)                          nature and place of truth and validation within
Unemployment figures, the success rates of various                      mathematics, and the place of beauty of mathematics.
diets, polls on people's political preferences, teams'                  The course will include: sections on propositional logic;
standings in various leagues, athletes' records, number of              numbers and infinity; and simple axiomatic systems. It
cases of child abuse - data like these surround us. The                 will also include a laboratory component made up of
aim of this course is to give students the tools to assess              exercises to allow students to explore and better
this kind of information to help them become more                       understand these themes and topics.
confident and critical consumers of numerical or                        Class: 3 hours/week Lab: 2 hours/week Units: 2.66
quantitative data. Students will learn how information is
quantified and how to read and evaluate numbers                         360-401-LA
reported in the media and in texts and journals.                        History of Science & Scientific Methodology
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.00                                         (Methodology for Liberal Arts students only)
                                                                        This course helps students examine the strengths and
360-301-LA                                                              weaknesses of the scientific approach to knowledge. It
Principles of Logic and Mathematical Language                           combines an historical perspective of selected advances
(Methodology for Liberal Arts students only)                            in science with an on-going critique of the ways science is
This course is designed to allow students to investigate                done. Students will be expected to ‘do’ science as well as
themes and topics related to one of the major areas of                  study it: there will be practical as well as theoretical
human thinking and knowledge: logic and mathematics.                    components to the course.
The course will consider such topics as the nature of                   Class: 3 hours/week Lab: 2 hours/week Units: 2.66

                                                                 Page 121
Methodology (continued)
360-402-LA                                                       360-921-LA
Liberal Arts Extended Essay Seminar                              Quantitative Methods for CS Students
(Methodology for Liberal Arts students only)                     (Methodology for Computer Science students only)
The seminar will focus on a key theme in Western                 This course will acquaint students with the fundamental
                                                       th
Civilization as well as review the humanities in the 20          concepts and basic techniques of quantitative methods and
century. The theme selected will be announced at the             their use in the computer science field. Among the topics
beginning of the semester; this theme will be examined           covered are discovery of fundamental concepts and skills of
through readings and discussions of these readings. The          quantitative reasoning by exploring real-world data from
seminar will also be the framework within which students         many disciplines and data collection, organization, display,
will be required to write the extended essay and the final       analysis, probability simulation, variation and sampling, and
exam required in the program’s comprehensive assessment.         expected values. Students work with graphing hardware
Class: 3 hrs/week Units: 2.00 Prerequisite: 300-201              and software tools.
                                                                 Class: 1 hour/week Lab: 2 hours/week Units: 1.66
                                                                 Absolute Prerequisite: 201-921


Complementary
360-A2E-LA                                                       360-B1C-LA
Culture of Food                                                  Nutrition and Health Management
(Complementary course - open to all students)                    Complementary course - open to all students)
Does food affect culture or is culture affected by food?         This course enables student to realize the components
The aim of the Culture of Food is to explore the various         and lifelong benefits of good nutrition and health
answers to this fundamental question. The cultural               management practices and empowers them to apply
meanings of food and how they influence our lives will be        these principles in their everyday lives. A pedagogical
examined through the study of language, symbolism,               approach that utilizes higher order thinking
traditions and rituals. Through readings, research, food         communication, leadership and management processes
excursions and “tastings”, students will explore the             is used to integrate topics into the study of individual and
diverse cuisines of Latin America, the Mediterranean, the        family issues. Topics include the impact of daily nutrition
Orient and North America. This course will encourage             and health management practices on long-term health
students to develop an awareness of a variety of cuisines        and wellness; physical, social and psychological aspects
and cultures of the modern world. By the end of this             of healthy nutritious and health management choices;
course students will be able to make comparisons, draw           selection of nutritious meals and snacks based on the
relationships and reflect upon the meaning and the               daily recommendations; weight management; and other
reason behind food habits of the different cultures that         related issues.
surround them. Students from all disciplines and                 Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
programs of the college can greatly benefit from this
course.                                                          360-B1D-LA
Note that Podcasting and Moodle will be used for the             Motivational Synergistics
presentation of material and testing and students may be         (Complementary course - open to all students)
required to pay a nominal fee for the food tasting               This course is required for all first semester students
sessions.                                                        enrolled in the Introduction to College Studies integrative
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                  sessions for Creative Arts, Social Science or Career
                                                                 programs. It is designed to facilitate a successful
360-B1B-LA                                                       adjustment to life at Champlain Saint-Lambert by
Strategies for Successful College Studies                        introducing the students to the culture, guiding
(Complementary course - open to students)                        principles, and resources of the college while allowing
This course is designed to prepare students for success          you to develop the skills necessary to succeed in Cegep.
throughout their academic career. Topics will include:           Through seminars and labs, the student is expected to
critical thinking, goal setting, time management, note           develop the academic skills and values that support
taking, reading, test taking, school and community               student success at Champlain.
resources, health, nutrition, relationships and                  Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
motivation.
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00




                                                          Page 122
Complementary (continued)
360-B1E-LA                                                           360-D1A-LA
                              st
Tourism and Travel in the 21 Century                                 Using Application Software: Microsoft Office
(Complementary course - not open to Tourism students)                (Complementary course - not open to Sport Marketing,
This course is a window on the world through various                 Advertising Management, Graphic Communications,
perspectives on the components and issues of tourism.                Tourism Management and Computer Science students)
Case studies focus on the impacts and trends of tourism              This course introduces students to the fundamentals of
– one of the fastest growing sectors of the global                   Microsoft Office. Students will learn the correct way to
economy. Tomorrow’s travel opportunities, such as                    create documents, workbooks, databases, and
adventure and eco-tourism, will be discussed as well as              presentations for professional purposes. You will also
examples of smart and responsible travel.                            acquire experience in integrating information among the
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                      applications. Methodology: lectures, multimedia
                                                                     demonstrations and hands-on applications.
360-B2C-LA                                                           Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
Characteristics and Mental Skills of Elite Athletes
(Complementary course - open to all students)                        360-D1B-LA
This course will explore the factors that drive people like          Web Page Design
Tiger Woods, Sydney Crosby, Roger Federer and                        (Complementary course - not open to Graphic
Williams' sisters to become highly successful athletes and           Communications and Computer Science students)
the mental skills they use to achieve exceptional                    The objective of this course is to facilitate the production of
performances. We will examine the major influences that              a simple, but effective, individual Web page. In order to
contribute to the development of talent and expertise in             achieve this objective the student is expected to acquire
sports and in other domains, and study the psychological             practical familiarity with, and basic competence in the use
factors and mental skills that contribute to the                     of: an IBM compatible computer running under Windows;
achievement of elite performances.                                   Web navigation and other Internet tools including search
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                      “engines”; application software for processing different
                                                                     media files; hypertext database design and HTML coding
360-B2D-LA                                                           and editing; basic multi-media design techniques.
Introduction to Forensic Science                                     Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
(Complementary course - not open to Science students)
Crime Science Investigation (CSI) is a popular theme in              360-D1C-LA
television and film, but they usually do not explain how             The Technical Image
forensic scientists are able to collect information and              (Complementary course - not open to Graphic
help identify the perpetrator. This course introduces                Communications and Computer Science students)
students to the science behind some of the basic                     This course provides an introduction to technical drawing
techniques used in Forensics, such as Chemical Analysis,             using the computer. Students will learn how to prepare and
Blood Typing, DNA Fingerprinting, and Collision Analysis.            present technical drawings using a Computer Aided Drafting
The course will be based on the study of a set of crime              and Design (CAD) system. Upon completion of the course,
scene cases from the different perspectives of Biology,              the student will be able to sketch a complete layout for a
Chemistry and Physics. It will be taught by a group of               dimensioned working drawing, and to use a CAD system to
three teachers, one from each discipline, who will focus             produce a properly scaled plot of a full working drawing.
on how scientific methods can be applied to improve the              Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
reliability of evidence from a crime scene.
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00




                                                              Page 123
Complementary (continued)
360-D1D-LA                                                          360-D2G-LA
Using Spreadsheet Applications Software (Excel)                     Study Skills in Algebra
(Complementary course - not open to Sport Marketing,                (Complementary course, see NOTE below)
Advertising Management, Graphic Communications and
Computer Science students)                                          360-D2H-LA
This course introduces students to the creation,                    Study Skills in Functions
management, and analysis of a computerized spreadsheet.             (Complementary course, see NOTE below)
Students examine basic concepts and acquire experience
creating and manipulating spreadsheets, charts and                  NOTE: Required for students in the Explorations program.
databases using Microsoft Excel. The use of formulas and            Open to non-Science students as follows: (1) For students
functions, data tables and problems requiring “what-if”             who have passed High School SN 4 or ST4 or Math SN 5 or
analysis are covered as well as methods of sorting, filtering,      ST5 but who are not yet sufficiently confident to go on to
and making a Web query. Methodology: lectures, computer             Math SN 5 or ST5 or Calculus I. (2) For students currently
demonstrations and Web access, practical and theory tests.          enrolled in Math 013 (SN 4 or ST4) or Math 015 (Math
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                     SN 5 or ST5) but who need additional reinforcement of
                                                                    their Math skills.
360-D1K-LA                                                          These courses will help the student develop and strengthen
Introduction to Desktop Publishing                                  skills necessary to succeed in college level science and
(Complementary course – not open to Graphic                         mathematics courses. Emphasis will be placed on
Communications, Computer Science and Tourism                        communication in the language of mathematics including
Management students)                                                correct notation, terminology, and the ability to use
In this course, students will learn how to create personal          mathematics and science textbooks.
and professional looking documents. You will acquire the            Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
necessary design techniques to publish your resume,
newsletters, and advertising brochures.                             360-E1A-LA
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                     Introduction to Film Studies
                                                                    (Complementary course - not open to Creative Arts
                                                                    students)
360-D2A-LA                                                          This course is designed to change the way students see films
                                        ++
Introduction to Programming with C                                  - by introducing them to the specialized language of film
(Complementary course - not open to Computer Science                making. We will look at specific elements such as types of
students)                                                           shots, camera movement, lighting, set design, sound,
Students will develop a working knowledge of the program            editing techniques and narrative structure in order to better
development environment, and will be able to correctly              understand how film works as an art form. Using this
utilize software techniques fundamental to the                      knowledge, the student will analyze the ways in which film
programming process. Through the development of                     makers convey meaning, message and mood in their films.
algorithms, the student will be able to break down a                Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
                                     ++
problem into its component parts. C is a structured
programming language with which the student will develop            360-E1B-LA
logically sound and maintainable solutions. One additional          The Arts in Review
hour of homework per week is required in order to                   (Complementary course - not open to Creative Arts
complete the work assigned.                                         students)
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                     In this course, students will learn to understand the
                                                                    aesthetic values of different art forms, and to gain an
360-D2B-LA                                                          appreciation for the diversity and scope of the arts.
Programming with Visual Basic                                       Students will be introduced to different modes of
(Complementary course - not open to Computer Science                analysis and criticism by reading and writing reviews of
students)                                                           books, films, the performing arts and exhibitions at
This course introduces the student to VB for Windows.               Montreal galleries and museums. Students will examine
This course stresses good programming practices and                 their responses to different art forms and will share their
provides insights into the major applications of                    reactions with others.
computers. Students interested in this course should                 Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
have a basic knowledge of using a computer. All
programming concepts will be reinforced with class
exercises and lab assignments.
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00

                                                             Page 124
Complementary (continued)
360-E1C-LA                                                          360-E2D-LA
Writing for Journalism                                              Writing about Music
(Complementary course - open to all students)                       (Complementary course - open to all students )
This course concentrates on the art and science of                  In this course, students will identify and react to the basic
writing for the news media. Reporting techniques,                   elements of music: melody, harmony and rhythm, and they
journalistic principles, news story construction, and copy          will learn to provide critical commentary on musical trends.
editing will be examined, as will opinion and feature               Students will understand how musical styles influence or
writing.                                                            reflect artistic, historical or social developments.
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                     Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00

360-E1E-01                                                          360-E2E-LA
Topics in Literature                                                Modern Art: Concepts and Practices
(Complementary course - open to all students)                       (Complementary course -not open to Creative Arts
Students in this course will study relevant works in a way          students)
that establishes their relationship to one another                  The art of our century is different in many ways from the
through a common motif or recurrent literary theme.                 art of the past. These differences are the source of
Students will trace common ideas, aesthetic forms and               aesthetic pleasure for some, and bewilderment for
contexts in a selection of works from diverse periods and           others. What is modern art, and how is it made? Using a
cultures.                                                           mixture of art making, art history and art theory,
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                     students will gain access to the principal ideas and
                                                                    techniques of modern art.
360-E2A-LA                                                          Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
Behind the Camera: Photo
(Complementary course - not open to Creative Arts                   360-E2F-LA
students)                                                           Behind the Camera: TV Studio
This course is an introduction to the basic concepts and            (Complementary course - not open to Creative Arts
techniques of photography. Taking photographs, developing           students)
black-and-white film, and making enlargements will be               This course introduces the student to the fundamentals
covered in detail. The course includes lectures,                    of television, stressing teamwork and studio production.
demonstrations and practice sessions both in the classroom          After learning the basic technical aspects of television
and in the darkroom.                                                production, students will proceed with the production of
Class: 3 hrs/week Units: 2.00                                       their own T.V. material.
                                                                    Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
360-E2C-01
Introduction to Studio Art                                          360-E2G-LA
(Complementary course - not open to Creative Arts                   2D Computer Animation Workshop
students)                                                           (Complementary course - not open to Creative Arts
This course is designed to introduce students to some               students)
practices in studio/fine arts production. Students will             Students are introduced to basic techniques of computer
acquire a basic competency in several areas of study.               animation using desktop-based software such as
There will be practical exercises which will cover                  MacroMedia’s Flash. Upon completion, students will be able
techniques in both 2D and 3D traditions: drawing,                   to demonstrate competence with Vector and Paint-based 2-
modeling, carving/printing and assemblage will be                   D graphics production; produce animation sequences using
included. Students will learn to work with varied                   a range of animation techniques; complete a short
materials such as pencil, pastels, paper, plasticine and            animated work illustrating skills acquired during the course;
clay.                                                               and incorporate sound and other multimedia elements into
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                     a presentation.
                                                                    Class: 3 hrs/week Units: 2.00




                                                             Page 125
Complementary (continued)
360-E2H-LA                                                              360-E2L-LA
Creative Imaging with Photoshop                                         Public Speaking for Beginners
(Complementary course - not open to Creative Arts                       (Complementary course - open to all students)
students)                                                               Much of “whom” and “what” we are is dependent on our
This course is designed as a general introduction to the                ability to express ourselves verbally to others. The art of
image editing software known as Adobe Photoshop. It is a                public speaking is one of the foremost mediums of self-
hands-on computer workshop teaching the fundamental                     expression. This course is designed to give students
tools and techniques of 2D image manipulation. This course              competency in the art of oral communication and to give
is geared toward students who want the basics on editing,               confidence in having the capacity to speak effectively and
creating and manipulating images. Students will learn how               openly in a variety of situations. Emphasis will be placed
to scan images, use selection tools, work with layers, use              on speaking techniques and clarity of expression. A
paint and retouching tools, and deal with masks, filters,               further emphasis will be to assist the students to develop
objects, text and colour. Resolution concepts, managing file            ideas and concepts so that they can project and
formats and preparing files for output will be introduced.              communicate these thoughts with a personable style and
Students will be able to produce basic artwork containing               a logical order of delivery.
multiple images, text and effects. Assignments will be single           Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
page image documents such as posters, flyers and cards. An
emphasis will be placed on developing unique imagery and                360-E2M-LA
visual idiom, while integrating digital technology.                     Music: From Jazz to Rap to Techno
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                         (Complementary course - open to all students)
                                                                        Words and music combine to affect our thoughts and
360-E2J-LA                                                              emotions. Contemporary music styles like Rap, Rock,
Creative Writing                                                        Blues, Jazz, Techno and Trance are connected in many
(Complementary course - open to all students)                           ways to each other and to older forms of music. This
This course is designed for students who have a special                 course will explore these various forms of music to find
interest in creative writing. Students will learn to recognize          out what they have in common and what makes each
what makes good writing good, whether it is poetry, fiction,            distinct. Students will also learn about a wide variety of
plays, or essays. Students will complete various writing task           vocal styles and some of the basic music tools that artists
and learn to critique their efforts and those of their peers.           use to express themselves, in order to understand how
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                         musicians and recording artists put message and melody
                                                                        together in both new and old style songs.
360-E2K-Introduction to Flash                                           Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
(Complementary course – not open to Graphic
Communications, Computer Science and Creative Arts                      370-201-LA
students)                                                               World Religions
Flash is a major content-creation technology used to                    (Religion for Liberal Arts students only)
create interactive, visually stunning, sound and video-rich             This course traces the development of religious ideas in
web sites. It can also be used to produce standalone                    both the Western and Eastern traditions. It examines the
movies that can be distributed on CD. In this course, you               beliefs and historical contexts of the three Semitic religions -
will explore the basics of Flash and, through the creation              Judaism, Christianity and Islam - as well as Hinduism,
of stimulating hands-on projects, will learn how to create              Buddhism and Taoism. In each case the influence of other
Flash objects and symbols with drawing and text tools,                  religions and systems of thought is taken into consideration.
use animation techniques, import media elements, and                    Comparative themes are examined to see how each
write basic ActionScript. You will learn the steps involved             religious worldview answers basic questions of human
in putting together a Flash project and how to effectively              existence. Throughout the course key texts from each
work as part of a project team.                                         religion are studied in English translation.
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                         Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00




                                                                 Page 126
Anthropology
381-101-LA                                                          381-202-LA
Introduction to Anthropology: Understanding Ourselves               Early Civilizations: Origin and Development
(Level I Anthropology for Social Science students only)             (Level II Anthropology for Social Science students only)
This course introduces the student to the most                      This course investigates the origins of human behaviour
fascinating study of them all...ourselves! Who are we?              and its development up to and including the emergence
What does it mean to be human? Where do we come                     of the earliest civilizations of the ancient world. We trace
from? How are we similar and how are we different from              our cultural development from the making of the first
one another and the rest of nature? Were we separately              tools, the discovery of fire, the beginnings of religion, art,
created or did we evolve from a common ancestor?                    social stratification to the invention of agriculture, law
What forces shaped us in the past? What were we like                and warfare and the emergence of the first cities and
during prehistoric times? When, where and how did we                civilization. Early centers of civilization in the Middle East,
become civilized? What was early civilization like? In              Africa, Europe, India, Asia and the Americas are
contrast, what are we like today? Are human races real?             examined as well as other mysteries from our past...the
Why are there so many different Araces@ and languages               Nazca lines, Easter Island, Stonehenge, etc. The methods
on the planet? Why do people eat such different foods,              and techniques of modern archaeology are also
wear different clothing, treat sex and marriage so                  presented.
differently, and worship such different gods? Why does              Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
each group cherish its own way of life while often hating           Prerequisite: Anthropology 381-101-LA
others? These and many other important questions will
be answered as we begin to explore our biological and               381-203-LA
cultural past and present on the planet earth.                      Cultures of the World: Diversity and Development
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                     (Level II Anthropology for Social Science students only)
                                                                    This course explores the diversity of modern day human
381-201-LA                                                          cultures and the concept of "development" within a
Bones, Chimpanzees and Darwin:                                      global context. Industrial societies like our own are
The Story of Humankind                                              compared with the non-industrial majority of the world:
 (Level II Anthropology for Social Science students only)           hunter-gatherers, tribal herders, gardeners and peasant
This course is an introduction to the biological                    farmers. Emphasis is placed on the variety of tools,
development of our species: from our prehistoric origins            techniques we use to get food, shelter, clothing, etc.
to our present day diversity and future. Special attention          from diverse natural environments; how we structure
is given to Darwin, the Theory of Evolution and the                 work, trade and use of resources into very different
contributions of primatology to understanding our past.             economies; how we structure our social relations and
The different stages of human evolution from ALucy@ to              educate our children within very different forms of
Neanderthal man and Cro-Magnon are covered and the                  family, kinship and marriage; the variety of ways in
relationships between biological development, cultural              which we communicate through our languages and arts;
achievements and environment are examined. Finally,                 the various means by which we determine our leaders,
taking into account past physical trends, environmental             maintain law and order and make war; and finally, the
conditions and technological breakthroughs (genetic                 diverse magical, religious and scientific attempts we
engineering), we discuss our biological future.                     make at explaining our lives. The course concludes by
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                     examining the problems of cross-cultural
Prerequisite: Anthropology 381-101-LA                               communication, contact, change, cooperation and
                                                                    development.
                                                                    Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
                                                                    Prerequisite: Anthropology 381-101-LA




                                                             Page 127
Anthropology (continued)
381-204-LA                                                             381-205-LA
The Myth of Race and the Reality of Racism                             An Introduction to Forensic Anthropology -
(Level II Anthropology for Social Science students only)               Crime Scene Investigation
This course examines human physical diversity from                     (Level II Anthropology for Social Science students only)
historical, biological and cultural perspectives. We see               This course introduces the students to the world of
how human biological differences have been perceived                   forensic sciences and the contributions of
and studied through the ages. Special attention is given               anthropologists in this fast growing field. Techniques and
to the contributions of the biological sciences (genetics)             methods of physical anthropology/archaeology are
to our present day understanding of physical variability.              applied in the investigation of crime scenes, natural
Topics covered also include controversial issues such as               disasters, violations of human rights and mass murders
race and behaviour, and race and intelligence. Finally, we             through the recovery and analysis of skeletal and other
analyze the causes and consequences of racism through                  human remains. Topics to be covered include basic
various case studies (Nazi Germany, South Africa, the                  dental and skeletal anatomy, determination of age, sex,
United States, Quebec and Canada, etc.).                               stature, ancestry (racial/ethnic affiliation), presence of
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                        trauma and time of death as well as issues related to
Prerequisite: Anthropology 381-101-LA                                  human rights.
                                                                       Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
                                                                       Prerequisite: Anthropology 381-101-LA
Economics
383-201-LA                                                             383-203-LA
Microeconomics                                                         Money and Banking
(Level II Economics for Social Science students only)                  (Level II Economics for Social Science students only)
The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with          This course covers the development of money and banking,
the principles and tools of microeconomic analysis. The                with emphasis on Canada. The following topics are studied:
topics to be treated include: demand and supply, costs of              functions and characteristics of money, money supply,
production, pricing and output determination in different              inflation, Canadian Capital Market, the money and bond
market structures, business organization, government                   markets, financial intermediaries, chartered banks and how
regulation of business, distribution of income and labour              they create money, the Bank of Canada and its functions,
organizations.                                                         international monetary systems.
Class: 3 hrs/week Units: 2.00                                          Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
Prerequisite: Microeconomics 383-920-RE                                Prerequisite: Microeconomics 383-920-RE

383-202-LA                                                             383-901-LA
International Economics                                                Economics of Sport
(Level II Economics for Social Science students only)                  (Economics for Sport Marketing students only)
This course is concerned with all economic activities                  This course in microeconomics teaches the sport
involving passage across a national frontier. Among the                product, service, or facility manager how to use limited
topics to be studied are: the mechanisms of foreign                    resources to meet needs. It examines consumer demand,
exchange rates, the balance of international payments,                 supply, prices and the role of market structures in
international trade and the theory of comparative                      making decisions about what to do, what to buy, what to
advantage. Also covered are: the economics of tariff and               sell and what to pay in a business environment. It also
current international economic affairs, including free                 looks at sport as an economic phenomenon and activity,
trade between Canada and the United States, foreign                    and presents the economic principles of sports planning.
ownership, and the control of the Canadian economy.                    Lecture topics include the basic concepts of economy,
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                        the importance of sports to the national economy, the
Prerequisite: Microeconomics 383-920-RE                                public economy and physical culture, the economy of
                                                                       sports clubs and organizations, and the economic impact
                                                                       of sport.
                                                                       Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.00




                                                                Page 128
Economics (continued)
383-920-RE
Macroeconomics
(Level I Economics for Social Science and International
Baccalaureate students only)
The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with
the principles and tools of macroeconomic (global) analysis.
The topics to be treated include: inflation, unemployment,
money and banking, taxation, government spending,
exchange rates, business cycles, national income,
international trade and economic growth.
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00


Political Science
385-101-LA                                                             385-201-LA
Introduction to Political Science                                      Canadian and Quebec Politics
(Level I Political Science for Social Science students only)           (Level II Political Science for Social Science students only)
This course focuses on the foundations and processes of                This Level II course helps the student develop an
political life. It builds the necessary theoretical as well as         understanding and appreciation of his and her own
historical, geographical and economic content knowledge                municipal, provincial and federal political systems and
required for understanding politics. It introduces students to         how they function. The student will learn to analyze the
the application of the basic terminology, concepts and                 changes that Canada and Québec are facing, due both to
theories of politics, as well as to current facts and events of        the external pressure of the global marketplace and to
contemporary political life. The course also familiarizes the          criticisms of the way Canadian federalism works, with
student with the rights, obligations and processes of                  special emphasis on the place of Québec in the
informed citizenship at the local, regional, national and              federation. It is a course where the student has easy
international levels. For students who are going to continue           access to the field and could carry out fieldwork. Topics
in the discipline of political science, the course sets the            covered in the course: foundations and institutions of
groundwork for the actualization of higher level abilities in          parliamentary democracy; the politics of language and
Level II courses.                                                      Québécois nationalism; intergovernmental relations; the
Topics covered in the course: scope, fields of specialization          Canadian and Québec party systems and electoral
and methods of political science; basic concepts of the                systems; political culture, interest groups and public
discipline: power, legitimacy and authority, society, state,           opinion; public policy
government, regime, sovereignty, law, international order,             Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
etc.; typologies of governments, political parties, interest           Prerequisite: Political Science 385-101-LA
groups, political cultures, ideologies, electoral systems,
policy making; theoretical frameworks: system theory,                  385-202-LA
structural functionalism, behaviouralism, conflict theory;             Comparative Politics – Latin America
links between political science and the other disciplines of           (Level II Political Science for Social Science students only)
the social sciences in the understanding of human                      This Level II course helps the student develop and apply
phenomena; data banks and references in political science.             the comparative method to the study of political systems
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                        in the contemporary world. It focuses on contemporary
                                                                       forms of government, political cultures, ideologies,
                                                                       constitutional frameworks, designs of governmental
                                                                       institutions, party systems, interest groups, electoral
                                                                       systems and public policy. Topics covered in the course:
                                                                       the comparative method in political science; comparative
                                                                       theoretical frameworks; industrialized democracies;
                                                                       current and former communist regimes; developing and
                                                                       less developed political regimes; selected area studies
                                                                       including Europe, North America, Africa, Latin America,
                                                                       the Middle East, Asia.
                                                                       Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
                                                                       Prerequisite: Political Science 385-101-LA



                                                                Page 129
Political Science (continued)
385-203-LA                                                             385-A1A-LA
International Politics                                                 Political Science: Politics and Society
(Level II Political Science for Social Science students                (Complementary course - not open to Social Science and
only)                                                                  Introduction to College Studies students)
This Level II course helps the student understand the                  This course acquaints you with approaches used in the field
interesting and complex world of international politics. It            of political science and encourages a greater understanding
explains the foundations of the international system, its              of contemporary Canadian political and social issues. The
players and institutions. It helps the student analyze themes          main themes of the course are the development of
such as the end of the Cold War, North South relations,                Canadian federalism over time, and the changing political
ethnic conflicts, the politics of energy, the emergence of             landscapes in Quebec and Canada throughout the twentieth
new regional trading blocks, global economic                           century. The student will learn to analyze the kinds of
interdependence, the role of the United Nations,                       pressures Canada is now facing, due both to global markets
international law and the erosion of state sovereignty by              and to provincial demands for more powers within the
new transnational forces. Topics covered in the course:                federal system. We will discuss numerous current social
emergence of the field of international relations;                     issues, and you will be encouraged to formulate your own
theoretical frameworks for understanding international                 viewpoints about past and present trends. We will consider
behaviour; critical approaches to international politics;              various scenarios for the future of Quebec and Canada.
territory, sovereignty and statehood; the challenges of                Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
ethnic identity and of globalization; governments and
foreign policy; international security; the unequal
distribution of wealth; human rights and environmental
decay.
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
Prerequisite: Political Science 385-101-LA

385-204-LA
Modern Political Ideas
(Level II Political Science for Social Science students
only)
This Level II course helps the student understand the
foundations of modern political thought and its links to
political action. The students will learn to identify
principal modern political thinkers and their contribution
to political thought. They will also learn to compare and
analyze basic concepts of politics through the writings of
these thinkers. Topics covered in the course historical
foundations of modern political thought; analytical
framework for comparing political thinkers; basic
concepts of political thought such as state, nation,
government, sovereignty, equality, liberty, property,
justice, law, etc.; the link between political thought and
political ideology; modern political ideologies:
conservatism, liberalism, nationalism, socialism,
communism, fascism, liberation ideologies and ecology
as ideology.
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
Prerequisite: Political Science 385-101-LA




                                                                Page 130
Sociology
387-101-LA                                                                387-206-LA
Introductory Sociology                                                    Sociology of Education
(Level I Sociology for Social Science students only)                      (Level II Sociology for Social Science students only)
Do you ever wonder why people do what they do? Do you                     What’s the difference between education and school? What
think about who you are and why you are that way?                         makes a good school? Is it all academic? What about the
Sociology can give you insights into the workings of human                social world of school? In this course we link the personal
behaviour and the social world around you. Students will be               experiences that we all have of school to the sociological
introduced to the discipline of sociology by focusing on the              theories of education. Education will be analyzed from the
relationship of individuals to others and to the society                  micro-level interpersonal interactions of the classroom to
around them. Interpreting the world with a sociological                   the macro-level of the organization of schools and how they
imagination allows us to see the common behaviour                         fit with other institutions such as the family and work. The
patterns in groups of people and the social forces that                   functions of education will be covered and the relationship
underlie, mould and shape us as individuals. Topics include               of education to social inequality.
culture, socialization, prejudice and discrimination and                  Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
social inequality.                                                        Prerequisite: Sociology 387-101-LA
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
Prerequisite: Sociology 387-101-LA                                        387-207-LA
                                                                          Sex, Race and Class - Diversity and Inequality
387-202-LA                                                                (Level II Sociology for Social Science students only)
Social Change - Societies in Flux                                         Are we all equal? Then why do some people drive BMWs
(Level II Sociology for Social Science students only)                     and some ride the bus? Why do some wear designer
Do you sometimes tire of hearing older people’s stories                   clothes, have great multimedia systems in their homes and
about the ‘good old days’? Did you ever stop to think why                 others have to struggle to get enough to eat? Diversity is a
their lives seem so different? Social change is increasing and            major feature of Canadian society and it is multi-faceted.
moving more and more quickly. Ten years ago cell phones,                  We are each ‘placed’ in the social ranking system partially
wireless technology and computers were much less                          by virtue of our sex, race and ethnicity. We will focus on the
common. What impact has this had and how can you figure                   theories and impact of the social stratification in our society.
it out? The goal is to make students aware of social change               The consequences of the social class of one’s family of
and its effect on the individual. Basic sociological theories             origin, race, ethnicity, sex, level of education and occupation
and models of social change explain the dynamics of society               will be analyzed. Possible solutions to the problems of
and the structural changes in social institutions, historically           inequality will be discussed.
as well as today.                                                         Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
Prerequisite: Sociology 387-101-LA                                        387-208-LA
                                                                          Sociology of Deviance, Law and Society
387-204-LA                                                                (Level II Sociology for Social Science students only)
Sociology of the Family                                                   This course provides students with an introduction to the
(Level II Sociology for Social Science students only)                     study of deviance, criminal behaviours and the law.
The family is one of the most basic widespread and long-                  Students will examine deviant and criminal behaviours
lasting institutions in society. This course will help students           from a sociological perspective. This could include serial
understand and appreciate some of the major processes,                    murder, gangs, substance abuse and organized crime, sex
relationships, trends and issues in family life. Topics include:          work and witchcraft. In addition they will be introduced
the role and place of the family in society; mate selection               to aspects of sociology of law and systems of social
and marriage; divorce; changes in the family in the last few              control such as the police. Class: 3 hours/week Units:
decades; and current issues affecting family life.                        2.00
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                           Prerequisite: Introduction to Sociology 387-101-LA
Prerequisite: Sociology 387-101-LA




                                                                   Page 131
Sociology (continued)
387-209-LA                                                            387-A1A-LA
Sociology of Gender, Race and Justice                                 Sociology: An Introduction to Social Life
(Level II Sociology for Social Science students only)                 (Complementary course - not open to Social Science and
In this course we will examine the taken for granted                  Introduction to College Studies students)
assumption that the legal system treats us all equally. We            This course introduces students to elements of social life
pride ourselves as Canadians as having created an                     viewed from a multi-disciplinary social science perspective.
egalitarian society but it is true that everybody is equal            The course emphasizes the theories and methods of
before the law? Do people suffer from discrimination at               sociology and examines the approaches taken by other
the hands of the justice and juvenile justice system? Are             social sciences, notably, psychology, anthropology and
criminals, crimes and victims distinguished by gender and             political science. The course focuses on the social (group)
race? How do race and gender play a role in the justice               environment, the influence of existing, ongoing social
we received? Are incarceration rates and sentencing                   structures that transcend and outlast individual members
“fair”? This course looks at the intersection of gender,              and how society transmits its expectations on individuals
race and justice in Canada today and in the past. Specific            through its institutions and agencies of socialization and
issues to be addressed may include the treatment of                   social control. Students learn the meaning and significance
Aboriginal youth, family violence, crimes against women,              of concepts such as culture, socialization and social
racial profiling and the idea of restorative justice.                 stratification and study social issues, such as
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                       multiculturalism, poverty and racism in the context of
Prerequisite: Introduction to Sociology 387-101-LA                    ongoing and constant social change and examine their own
                                                                      values in regard to these issues.
                                                                      Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
Business
401-101-LA                                                            401-202-LA
Fundamentals of Business                                              Management
(Level I Business Administration for Social Science                   (Level II Business Administration for Social Science
students only)                                                        students only)
In this course, students will be introduced to a broad                In this course students will study the functions and
range of topics related to the structures and operations              techniques of managing an organization such as a small
of business in Canadian society. Specific functions of                or medium sized business. They will develop an
business such as marketing, finance, human resources,                 appreciation for various business management concepts
management, production of both goods and services and                 and will apply these concepts to real world cases. Topics
IT for business will be introduced, giving the student a              include the basic principles and practices of managing
general understanding of how business functions.                      contemporary businesses, the challenges associated with
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                       managing people, the importance of total quality
                                                                      management and the importance of financial
401-201-LA                                                            management.
Marketing                                                             Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
(Level II Business Administration for Social Science
students only)                                                        401-203-LA
This course will explore the influence of marketing on the            Commercial Law
consumer decision-making process. A combination of                    (Level II Business Administration for Social Science
lectures and case studies will include the study of consumer          students only)
behavior, market research, product policy, pricing,                   This in-depth course provides the student with an
advertising and distribution, including global and internet           understanding of the business environment from the
channels and e-commerce. The student will develop the                 legal point of view. The basic legal structure in Quebec
knowledge necessary to analyze marketing situations using             and the various laws which affect individuals and
appropriate concepts and theories and be able to apply                business enterprises will be studies; both laws and court
marketing concepts to respond to real world case studies.             decisions will be examined. While the accent is on
Students will also gain some familiarity with marketing on            business situations, students considering further studies
the web using current software.                                       in law at the university level many also find this course of
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                       interest.
Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Business 401-101-LA                     Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
                                                                      Prerequisite: 401-101-LA



                                                               Page 132
Business (continued)
401-204-LA                                                           410-101-LA
Entrepreneurship                                                     Introduction to Sport Management
(Level II Business Administration for Social Science                 (Business Administration for Sport Marketing students
students only)                                                       only)
This course explains the entrepreneurial way of thinking             This is an introductory course in Sport Management. A
and acting, methods of testing the feasibility of an idea,           broad range of topics related to the structures and
skills needed to succeed in business, methods of raising             operations of sports businesses and organizations in
capital, marketing possibilities and how to develop a                Canadian society and in the global environment will be
business plan. The students will gain an understanding of            introduced. Specific functions of these organizations such
the nature of innovation, the personal risk required, and            as marketing, finance, human resources management
the legal implications of being an entrepreneur. They will           and production of both goods and services will be
work on a business plan for a new business, and this will            presented, giving a general understanding if what is
require researching opportunities, analyzing the financial           required to work in sport management. Upon successful
criteria, and preparing and presenting a workable                    completions of the courses, students should be able to
proposal to a potential source of financing. The proposal            understand the work functions associated with
will be prepared using appropriate information                       management of various sport enterprises in the context
technology.                                                          of Canadian business including professional and
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                      participatory sport organizations, to describe career
Prerequisite : 401-101-LA                                            opportunities available in sports and recreation
                                                                     management, including possibilities for self-employment,
401-205-LA                                                           understand the fundamentals of economics, accounting,
Financial Investment Planning                                        marketing and public relations, facility and event
(Level II Business Administration for Social Science                 management in sport business, and be familiar with the
students only)                                                       international aspect of sport business related to
The student will be introduced to various investment and             professional and Olympic sport and sport tourism
insurance vehicles available from financial institutions.            Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
The techniques of planning for the individual financial
needs and the tax implications of these plans will be                410-102-LA
explored.                                                            Introduction to Marketing
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                      (Business Administration for Sport Marketing and
Prerequisite: 401-101-LA                                             Advertising Management students only)
                                                                     This course is designed to introduce students to marketing
401-206-LA                                                           concepts and principles. The course focuses on the
Introduction to Accounting                                           relationship between organizations and the ultimate
(Level II Business Administration for Social Science                 consumer, expressed through the marketing mix.
students only)                                                       Essentially, studies are concentrated on the nature and
This introductory course covers the transactional                    behaviour of supplying organizations, nature and behaviour
recording of cash receipts and cash payments, banking                of the ultimate consumer and the various marketing mix
procedures, the handling of the general ledger and the               elements (product, price, place, promotion) which are used
preparation of financial statements. Students will learn             by organizations to satisfy needs and wants of consumers.
how to apply the basic principles of accounting to                   While the course has a theoretical base, practical
practical situations and will develop the technical ability          application of the concepts of marketing to ‘real world’
to record, summarize, report and interpret financial data.           situations - particularly in a sport context - is an essential
The major topics to be covered include: the functions of             part of the course. Students will be taught that effective
accounting in a business setting; recording business                 marketing enhances an organization’s overall success.
transactions; the adjusting process; completing the                  Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
accounting cycle and end of period accounting
procedures; accounting for a merchandising concern;
information systems, and ethical issues in accounting.
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
Prerequisite: 401-101-LA




                                                              Page 133
Business (continued)
410-121-LA                                                            410-203-LA
The Business of Advertising – The Advertising Industry                Presentation Techniques for Marketers
(Business Administration for Advertising Management                   (Business Administration for Sport Marketing students
students only)                                                        only)
This is an introductory course in which the Advertising               In this course, students learn how to pitch an account,
Management student examines the advertising agency                    deal with clients in a retail environment, set up a sales
business, its structure, its relationship to clients, media           space to present a product or service, provide customer
organizations and suppliers as well as its responsibility to          support, and or address a room full of people. The
the business community and to the consuming public.                   emphasis is on improving the student’s presentation
Students will study both the advertising industry and the             presence and skills and developing them into confident,
various job functions that support it as well as the                  successful speakers. The course covers: body language;
relationship of the various positions in an advertising               speech patterns; “canned” vs. “impromptu” style; the art
agency.                                                               of answering questions; interacting with the media;
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                       developing and delivering a presentation; and using
                                                                      visual aids for sales.
410-201-LA                                                            Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66
Introduction to Accounting
(Business Administration for Sport Marketing and                      410-221-LA
Advertising Management students only)                                 Business Law in Advertising
This course provides an introduction to the basic                     (Business Administration for Advertising Management
accounting principles and practices as used in a double-              students only)
entry system using industry-standard accounting
software. Emphasis is placed on analyzing and recording
of business transactions and preparation of financial                 The students in this course will become familiar with the
statements as well as understanding the complete                      legislative foundations of advertising and with the legal
accounting cycle.                                                     issues in advertising management. Topics include: the
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                       Court system, false and misleading advertising,
                                                                      substantiating advertising claims, price and credit
410-202-LA                                                            advertising, contests and promotions, advertising to
Consumer Behaviour                                                    children, packaging and labeling issues, drugs and
(Business Administration for Sport Marketing and                      cosmetics advertising, intellectual property concerns
Advertising Management students only)                                 with respect to trademarks, patents, and copyright,
This course presents the study of consumer behaviour                  misappropriation of personality factors, and the privacy
with the intent of allowing students to be able to choose             law. There will be a look at uniquely Quebec and
appropriate media and messages for promoting products                 Canadian issues and some Court cases.
and services and develop appropriate marketing
strategies. It addresses consumer behaviour from both a               Class: 3 hours/week     Units:2.00
managerial and consumer perspective. Students learn
about how consumers make routine and complex                          410-222-LA
decisions; what cognitive and experiential processes are              Principles of Advertising Management
involved in these decisions; how behaviour is affected by             (Business Administration for Advertising Management
the individual consumer’s personal characteristics and by             students only)
culture and reference groups; and the implications of                 This course is designed to give students an understanding
consumer behaviour for marketing strategy.                            of the basic system of management and administration
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66                                       of the advertising campaign development process within
Prerequisite: 410-102                                                 a full-service advertising agency. Students will also
                                                                      examine the content of advertising services agreements
                                                                      and agency remuneration options as well as methods of
                                                                      campaign monitoring and control.
                                                                      Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00




                                                               Page 134
Business (continued)
410-301-LA                                                           410-321-LA
Financial Management in Sport                                        Public Relations and Event Planning
(Business Administration for Sport Marketing students                (Business Administration for Advertising Management
only)                                                                students only)
Students will analyze the relationship between finance               This course will introduce the advertising student to the
and the sport industry. They will review the basics of               business and practice of public relations and event
finance and relate them to sport organizations.                      planning. Students will learn how to apply their strategic
Important current financial issues will be discussed in              and creative thinking to this particular form of
relation to public and private sector funding, fundraising           communication as it is used in the overall marketing mix
for sport organizations, professional sport, collegiate              and as it is integrated with advertising and sales
athletics, and major events such as the Olympics. The                promotion activity.
financial and economic aspects of sport facility                     Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66 Prerequisite:
construction will also be discussed
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66                                      410-322-LA
Prerequisite: 410-201                                                Advertising Research
                                                                     (Business Administration for Advertising Management
410-302-LA                                                           students only)
Legal Issues in Sport                                                Market research is the way we learn about consumers
(Business Administration for Sport Marketing students                and it is the activity that allows marketing actions to be
only)                                                                tailored to consumer needs and characteristics. Because
                                                                     the ability to plan, conduct and interpret marketing
Students will familiarize themselves with the legislative            research is a critical skill in sport marketing, this course
foundations of sport and the legal issues in sport                   will emphasize research as an aid to management
management. Topics include: the Court system, sports                 decision making. This course is an introduction to the
agents, sport contracts, negligence and liability, sports            various sources and types of research used in advertising
crimes, drugs and sports, labour issues, intellectual                and it provides the “core knowledge” necessary to
property matters in sport including trademarks,                      advertising professionals in every discipline. Students will
copyright and patent factors, international issues and the           learn about the purpose and goals of research, when and
Olympic movement. Appropriate Court cases will be                    how to use it and what primary and secondary resources
examined in the course                                               are available. Assignments are designed to develop
                                                                     critical thinking abilities to gather, analyse, interpret and
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                      apply primary and secondary research.
                                                                     Class: 4 hours/week Units 2.33 Prerequisite: 201-901
410-303-LA                                                           or permission from the Department Coordinator
Sport Marketing, Promotions & Fund Raising
(Business Administration for Sport Marketing students
only)                                                                410-401-LA
Students will study the manner in which marketing concepts           Sports Marketing Research
and strategies are applied to the sport industry. Developing         (Business Administration for Sport Marketing students
marketing plans and programs for companies and                       only)
organizations in the sport industry is an integral part of this      Market research is the way we learn about consumers and
course. The specific nature of sports industry marketing             it is the activity that allows marketing actions to be tailored
such as: pro and amateur sports, profit and non-profit               to consumer needs and characteristics. Because the ability
organizations, sport sponsorships, sports equipment firms,           to plan, conduct and interpret marketing research is a
licensing/merchandising and the commercial media’s crucial           critical skill in sport marketing, this course will emphasize
relationship with sports will all be examined in this course.        research as an aid to management decision making.
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                      Students will learn how to develop, execute and interpret
                                                                     market research. A class project includes field research in a
                                                                     sport-related domain. Topics include: research design,
                                                                     qualitative and quantitative techniques, questionnaire
                                                                     design, research trends, and measurement instruments.
                                                                     Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33 Prerequisite: 201-901
                                                                     or permission from the Department Coordinator




                                                              Page 135
Business (continued)
410-402-LA                                                             410-424-LA
Retailing in Sport                                                     Financial Budgetary Control
(Business Administration for Sport Marketing students                  (Business Administration for Advertising Management
only)                                                                  students only)
Retailing in Sport explains the buying and merchandising               The student will be introduced to how companies
process at the retail level. This course examines the role of          financially control and monitor their activities. Emphasis
retailing and techniques for buying for different types of             will be placed on project budgetary control techniques
stores. Planning and managing the merchandise assortment               and procedures such as those commonly used in
to include inventory management, merchandise flow,                     advertising agencies as well as advertisers.
assortment planning and use of the computer in                         Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66
merchandising are also introduced. The intent of this course
is to give the student a broad overview of the role of                 410-501-LA
merchandising at the retail level while discussing the many            Sales Force Training and Management
dimensions of the buyer’s job.                                         (Business Administration for Sport Marketing students
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66                                        only)
                                                                       The main emphasis of this course is to present the selling
410-404-LA                                                             function as a process which requires careful planning and
Delivering Quality Customer Service                                    execution. Students will be introduced to the various
(Business Administration for Sport Marketing and                       sequential steps or phases involved in personal selling as
Advertising Management students only)                                  well as methods for improving the effectiveness and
Companies communicate with their customers on a                        efficiency of each of these selling phases. A sales role—
routine basis through customer service contacts dealing                playing exercise will be executed by the students to give
with a range of issues from information requests to                    them experience in selling an actual product and
handling a customer problem. Students will be                          negotiating a sales contract. They will showcase their
introduced to the concept of quality service and its                   selling skills in both an oral and written presentation. In
importance to building and maintaining company or                      addition students will be introduced to basic principles of
brand image.                                                           sales management such as selecting or hireling a sales
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66                                        force, training/coaching sales representatives, motivating
                                                                       the sales force and measuring sales force productivity.
410-421-LA                                                             Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
Interactive Advertising and the Virtual Storefront
(Business Administration for Advertising Management                    410-502-LA
students only)                                                         Career Planning
Interactive advertising is an important component of the               (Business Administration for Sport Marketing and
promotional mix. Attention is given to evaluating direct               Advertising Management students only)
and interactive advertising and promotion strategies, the              This partially web-based course has two goals. First, it
role and uses of new communication technologies,                       will assist students in discovering how their abilities,
audience targeting, message design and creation,                       interests, personality and values determine their life-
specialized media and message-delivery methods and                     work plan. Students will develop an understanding of
consumer databases. Establishing a Virtual Storefront                  their career goals and develop a plan for achieving those
and planning how it operates on a daily basis will allow               goals. Second, it will provide students with the
students to appreciate and experience the opportunities                knowledge, skills and attitudes to market themselves to
afforded by the fast growing direct response industry.                 an employer and to effectively gain rewarding
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66                                        employment using career connections. It will prepare
                                                                       students to conduct an effective job search in light of
410-423-LA                                                             today’s challenging job market. Class: 3 hours/week
Global Marketing and International Advertising                         Units: 1.66
(Business Administration for Advertising Management                    Prerequisite: Completion of all program-specific courses
students only)                                                         from semesters 1 to 4 or permission from the
Global marketing explores every aspect of the process of               Department Coordinator
planning and implementing marketing strategies and
advertising campaigns in a global marketplace. Students
gain an appreciation of world markets, global trends and
cultural issues relevant to international marketers.
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66


                                                                Page 136
Business (continued)
410-503-01                                                            media planning and campaign monitoring. Other
Project Management: Sport Product Launch or Facility                  promotional issues such as merchandising, licensing and
Management                                                            sponsorships will also be examined in relation to their
(Business Administration for Sport Marketing students                 importance in achieving communication objectives.
only)                                                                 Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66
This course introduces students to project management.                410-506-LA
Students will learn the processes, techniques and                     Field Work in Sport or Independent Study in Sport
methods to organize, plan, direct and control a project in            (Business Administration for Sport Marketing students
order to achieve an agreed outcome on time and on                     only)
budget. Students will plan the launch of a sport product              Students will be required to complete field work or an
or manage a sport facility or event. This will require                independent study in a sport-related organization in a
students to involve both their “hard” skills, such as the             management or marketing capacity and will be evaluated
ability to create Gantt charts, and “soft” skills, such as            on their performance. Alternatively, students may opt to
the ability to manage inter-group politics and conflict. To           do an independent research study on a current topic in
facilitate the final project, students will be introduced to          sport management and marketing, subject to the
sports and recreation facilities and their standard                   permission and stipulations of their supervisor.
operational procedures, including elements of the                     Class: 4 hours/week Units: 1.66
management process with respect to facility design,
personnel management, marketing and feasibility.                      410-521-LA
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                       Media Sales Management
                                                                      (Business Administration for Advertising Management
410-504-LA                                                            students only)
Media Relations in Sports                                             This course explores the process of selling advertising
(Business Administration for Sport Marketing students                 space for both traditional and interactive media and
only)                                                                 focuses on the three keys to advertising sales success:
This course provides the student with an understanding                personal skills, selling skills and product knowledge.
of media relations and its importance to sport marketing.             Students will learn to develop personal skills such as
Emphasis is placed on the particular promotional                      attitude, emotional intelligence, communication,
techniques used in developing and managing an effective               listening to and understanding people. Selling skill to be
sports media relations program. Students will learn how               taught include prospecting, presenting, negotiating,
to write press releases, develop media guides or kits,                closing the sale and servicing the customer. Product
develop and manage special events designed for media                  knowledge to be covered includes the major media types
coverage like awards banquets and press conferences,                  such as newspapers, television, radio, magazines,
manage the media interview process and game day                       outdoor and interactive
press-box operations. In addition, students will be able to           Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
combine these learned promotional techniques with
their skills in desktop publishing towards the                        410-523-LA
development of promotional materials required in a                    Strategic Media Planning
sport media relations program                                         (Business Administration for Advertising Management
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66                                       students only)
                                                                      Students will be introduced to the basic principles of
410-505-LA                                                            media planning and its importance to the success of
Sport Advertising                                                     advertising campaigns. The factors that affect a planner’s
(Business Administration for Sport Marketing students                 decisions as to which media to employ and to what
only)                                                                 extent, will be the focus of this course. Students will also
This course explores the use of advertising by a variety of           understand the role of the media department in
sports organizations and businesses to achieve their                  controlling and monitoring advertising campaigns.
communication goals. The main focus of this course is                 Students will learn how to plan media usage for an
toward students understanding the process (es) involved in            advertising campaign by doing a situational analysis,
developing effective advertising campaigns. As such,                  identifying the specific challenges to be considered in the
students will plan and develop, as well as present,                   planning, establishing pertinent operational objectives,
advertising campaign plans for a sports product or service.           selecting the appropriate methods and planning tools to
Students will be introduced to advertising, planning                  meet the objectives and plan out the implementation of
components such as advertising research, setting                      the strategy.
advertising objectives, creative strategy development,                Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00


                                                               Page 137
Business (continued)
410-524-LA                                                             launching an existing product into new markets, and
Campaign Strategy Development                                          designing and implementing international marketing
(Business Administration for Advertising Management                    strategies.
students only)                                                         Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66
This core subject for Advertising Management students                  410-602-LA
builds on the material previously studied. Advertising                 Sales Practicum
Design and Production, Advertising Research and                        (Business Administration for Sport Marketing students
Principles of Advertising Management option students                   only)
will research, analyse, develop and present complete                   This course is an introduction to professional selling
advertising campaigns. This includes market analysis,                  methods and provides an interactive simulated business
advertising strategy, sales promotion, media plan and                  situation intended to present the participants with realistic
creative executions. A realistic budget must be used to                sales situations in Quebec. Students develop skills through
complete the campaign. Class: 3 hours/week Units:                      role playing and product presentations. Topics include steps
1.66                                                                   of the selling process, proper selling techniques to
                                                                       organizations, consumer psychology,
410-526-LA                                                             Time management and dealing with clients in a commercial
Commercial Management of Advertising                                   establishment.
(Business Administration for Advertising Management                    Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
students only)                                                         Prerequisite: 383-913
Students will be introduced to the basic methods and
techniques currently used in managing the advertising                  410-603-LA
function within a corporate context. Emphasis will be                  Sports Marketing Practicum
placed on quantitative management analysis techniques                  (Business Administration for Sport Marketing students
such as: trend forecasting, break-even analysis, marginal              only)
analysis and response modelling techniques.                            This course provides the student with an opportunity to
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 3.00                                        put into practice many of the marketing and
                                                                       management skills learned in the previous semesters by
410-527-LA                                                             planning, executing and evaluating sport-related events.
Business Communications in Québec                                      Working in groups, students will choose to organize
(Business Administration for Advertising Management                    events both inside and outside the college in conjunction
students only)                                                         with business organizations. Responsibilities of the
This course presents the basic principles involved in                  students include creating events, selling the event to
professional business communications in Québec.                        internal and external partners to obtain their support,
Students will learn written and oral forms of business                 planning, creating promotional and advertising material,
communications in both official languages, from writing a              staffing, executing and evaluating their events. Successful
memo, a business report through to oral presentations                  events may lead to offers of internships and/or
and conducting business meetings.                                      employment by external
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66                                        Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33

410-601-LA                                                             410-604-LA
Global Marketing of Sport                                              Sport Management Internship
(Business Administration for Sport Marketing students                  (Business Administration for Sport Marketing students
only)                                                                  only)
Successful consumer marketing in today’s competitive                   Students will get on-the-job learning experience in a
world requires an understanding of the global environment              segment of the sports industry in a management, sales or
and marketplace and the factors and events that can impact             marketing capacity for a minimum of 5 weeks.
on it. In this practical overview, the effects of the rapidly          Class: 13 hours/week Units: 5.00
changing international scene on consumer marketing and                 Prerequisite: 410-502 or permission from the
new product introduction will be discussed. Students will              Department Coordinator
focus on how to identify international market opportunities
and select/develop/exploit business opportunities. Topics
include global planning, global competition, country- and
regional-specific marketing, introducing a new product or




                                                                Page 138
Business (continued)
410-621-LA                                                              410-624-LA
Practicum – Industrial Advertising & Trade Show                         Advertising & Media Internship
(Business Administration for Advertising Management                     (Business Administration for Advertising Management
students only)                                                          students only)
This course examines the advertising procedures and                     Students will complete practical work experiences in
techniques used when companies strive to sell their                     advertising, sales, creativity, management and research
products or services to other organizations. This vast                  with advertisers, agencies media or auxiliary services.
sector of “business to business” advertising or “B2B” will              This course is designed to introduce the students to the
be explored and examined in terms of the specific nature                realities of the workplace through practical training with
of advertising campaign development. Trade shows are                    a participating employer. Externship is a self-directed
also an important aspect of the business to business                    practical subject that provides the student with
marketing process. Students will visit several trade shows              experience and work within the industry before
closed to the public to meet and network with organizers                graduation. Before leaving on the work-study, students
and exhibitors in different industries.                                 will prepare for their internship by researching the
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 1.66                                         company that they will work for and by improving on
                                                                        those skills where they may have a weakness.
410-622-LA                                                              Class: 13 hours/week Units: 4.66
Practicum – Internal Advertising Competition                            Prerequisite: 410-502 or permission from the
(Business Administration for Advertising Management                     Department Coordinator
students only)
Students will form advertising agency teams which will                  410-771-LA
compete against each other by developing, presenting                    Introduction to Business Software Tools
and selling advertising campaigns for the same product                  (Business Administration for Sport Marketing and
or service. Experienced advertising agency people know                  Advertising Management students only)
that after they have created appealing advertising                      This course teaches the productivity software tools used
concepts and prepared an effective advertising                          in business including e-mailers, browsers, word
campaign, the next crucial step is to sell the campaign to              processing, spreadsheets, accounting and presentation
its intended client. No matter how great a campaign plan                graphics. The main focus of the course is on the use of
is, if it is not successfully presented to the client, it will          spreadsheets and the Internet to help solve problems
not go forward. Effective presentation skills are often the             and deal with the daily activities to support the running
key to both corporate and personal success in advertising               of a business. The overall objective of the course is to
agencies. Senior positions in agencies are usually                      prepare students to be able to learn the features of
reserved for those who can persuade and convince as                     business software tools and apply these tools to
well as create.                                                         efficiently and effectively solve problems. An emphasis
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.00                                         will be placed on spreadsheet software and how it can be
                                                                        used effectively as a productivity tool in business.
410-623-LA                                                              Class: 5 hours/week Units: 2.66
Practicum – External Advertising Campaign
Development                                                             410-921-LA
(Business Administration for Advertising Management                     Business Fundamentals for IT
students only)                                                          (Business Administration for Computer Science students
This course is designed to give students a realistic                    only)
advertising campaign experience. Students will develop a                Study of essential business understandings, knowledge, and
major advertising campaign from start to finish for a                   skills required for our students to interact effectively with
company in the Montreal area and present their                          others in the place of work and in the business community.
campaign to company executives. Students will employ                    Students will learn the theory and practice of recording and
and implement the skills learned in the program and                     reporting financial events for service and merchandising
apply them to solving an actual business advertising                    businesses. Many decisions in business are made based on
problem.                                                                accounting information, both historical (based on past
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                         events) and projected (based on estimates of the future).
                                                                        Understanding accounting as an efficient way of measuring
                                                                        and communicating financial information on the financial
                                                                        status of various business entities is the foundation for any
                                                                        successful business information system implementation
                                                                        Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66


                                                                 Page 139
Business (continued)
410-945-LA                                                         410-946-LA
Consumer Behaviour                                                 Entrepreneurship
(Business Administration for Graphic Communications                (Business Administration for Graphic Communications
students only)                                                     students only)
This course presents the study of consumer behaviour               In this course students will experience the
with the intent of allowing students to be able to choose          entrepreneurial way of thinking and acting, learn to
appropriate media and messages for promoting products              develop a business plan and gain an understanding of
and services and develop appropriate marketing                     what is required to succeed in a business venture. They
strategies. It addresses consumer behaviour from both a            will research business opportunities, analyze market
managerial and consumer perspective. Students learn                possibilities and develop financial criteria to present a
about how consumers make routine and complex                       workable proposal for a new business.
decisions; how behaviour is affected by the individual             Methodology: Multi-media lectures, videos, web
consumers personal characteristics and by culture and              research and exercises using business plan writing
reference groups; and the implications of consumer                 software.
behaviour for marketing strategy.                                  Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
Methodology: lectures, computer demonstrations, Web                Prerequisite: 412-112 and 412-211
access, practical and theory tests
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 1.66


Graphic Communications
412-111-LA                                                         412-113-LA
Graphic Communication I                                            Speaking for Success
(Concentration course for Graphic Communications                   (Concentration course for Graphic Communications
students only)                                                     students only)
This course introduces students to digital graphic design          Oral communication is a measurable skills and a valuable
and includes the fundamentals of visual design for print           asset. Effective communication skills will improve
and screen media. Students will be introduced to                   students’ critical thinking, clarify their ideas, and improve
typography and will learn to use type as a graphic                 their chances of employability. This course teaches
element. They will learn about line, shape and texture             students how to speak clearly and confidently in a variety
and be encouraged to sketch out ideas to illustrate their          of situations. You will learn individually as well as within
concepts. Various approaches to problem solving of                 a team, how to plan, organize, and deliver a speech. The
graphic concepts will help students develop their                  preparation, writing, and presentations will be an
imagination. Methodology: lectures, on-screen computer             integral part of this course.
demonstrations, hands-on applications and theory                   Methodology: lectures, Web research, team projects,
and/or practical tests.                                            individual and group presentations.
Class: 1 hour/week Lab: 2 hours/week Units: 2.00                   Class: 2 hours/week Lab: 1 hour/week Units: 2.00

412-112-LA                                                         412-114-LA
Microsoft Office                                                   Digital Graphics I: Adobe Photoshop
(Concentration course for Graphic Communications                   (Concentration course for Graphic Communications
students only)                                                     students only)
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of             Using Adobe Photoshop, the powerful industry standard
Microsoft Office – a package of integrated software                image editing program, students will learn how to
applications. Students will learn the concepts of Word,            manipulate digital images. They will study image
Excel and PowerPoint and acquire experience in                     structure, resolution and colour models. Students will
integrating information among these applications.                  explore techniques and program features to create and
Methodology: lectures, multimedia demonstrations and               edit original and composite artwork as well as alter
hands-on applications.                                             photographs, process scanned images, and optimize
Lab: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                      sophisticated graphics for print and digital end uses.
                                                                   Methodology: on-screen computer demonstrations,
                                                                   hands-on tutorials, creative projects, and tests.
                                                                   Lab: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33




                                                            Page 140
Graphic Communications (continued)
412-211-LA                                                          412-214-LA
Business Communication                                              Page Layout 1: QuarkXPress
(Concentration course for Graphic Communications                    (Concentration course for Graphic Communications
students only)                                                      students only)
Clear communication is the basis for business success.              QuarkXPress is used by designers, writers, typesetters,
Students will develop the ability to plan, write, edit and          and document producers to create professional-quality
format effective business documents. They will learn and            publications ranging from print media, such as
apply specific writing techniques and organizational                newspapers and magazines, to on-line web sites. This
strategies to compose clear, concise and purposeful                 course will provide students with basic working
business messages.                                                  knowledge of QuarkXPress in the areas of typography,
Methodology: lectures, Web research, writing and                    page layout, and graphics manipulation. Topics covered
editing exercises.                                                  include an introduction to QuarkXPress, working with
Class: 1 hour/week Lab: 2 hours/week Units: 2.00                    text, creating and editing styles and colours, creating
                                                                    tables, working with master pages and style sheets.
412-212-LA                                                          Student projects include designing and producing
Graphic Communication 2                                             identity kits, posters, magazines covers, and newsletters.
(Concentration course for Graphic Communications                    They will also compile a desktop publishing portfolio.
students only)                                                      Methodology: multimedia lectures, hands-on tutorials,
Good visual communication can be a very powerful tool.              performance assessments, design critiques, client based
This course continues the basics covered in Graphic                 work and theory tests.
Communication I. Students will have the opportunity to              Lab: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
apply their design skills and techniques by creating                Prerequisite: 412-114
original designs using Photoshop, Illustrator, QuarkXPress
and InDesign. Typography color and layout are explored              412-215-LA
in greater depth.                                                   Advertising Communication
Methodology: lectures, on-screen demonstrations,                    (Concentration course for Graphic Communications
practical and theory tests.                                         students only)
Lab: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                       Students will be introduced to advertising concepts and
Prerequisite: 412-111                                               principles. They will examine the Canadian advertising
                                                                    industry and understand how advertising impacts the
412-213-LA                                                          success of specific corporate objectives. Students will
Digital Graphics 2: Adobe Illustrator                               learn how to formulate and communicate the right
(Concentration course for Graphic Communications                    message to a well-defined target audience and how to
students only)                                                      produce an integrated communication plan.
In this course, students will produce vector illustrations          Methodology: Multimedia presentations, videos,
to be used in print media. They will become skilled at              research assignments, lectures, creative projects and
mastering Illustrator drawing tools and techniques                  theory tests.
including: creating paths using the pen tool, creating              Class: 1 hour/week Lab: 2 hours/week Units: 2.00
shape and text objects, working with gradient mesh,
applying appearance attributes and working with layers
and transformation tools. Students will also learn how to
prepare files for use by service bureaus and printers.
Methodology: on-screen demonstrations, hands-on
exercises, content-driven projects and tests.
Lab: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33




                                                             Page 141
Graphic Communications (continued)
412-224-LA                                                          412-352-LA
Page Layout 1: Adobe InDesign                                       Web Publishing I: HTML/XML
(Concentration course for Graphic Communications                    (Concentration course for Graphic Communications
students only)                                                      students only)
InDesign is used by designers, writers, typesetters and             This course provides comprehensive instruction in basic
document producers to create professional-quality                   to advanced elements of the HyperTextMarkup Language
publications ranging from print media, such as                      (HTML) and its XML-compatible variant, XHTML in a
newspapers and magazines, to web sites. This course will            practical approach. The use of graphics on Web pages is
provide students with basic working knowledge of                    discussed in detail, including file size and image
InDesign in the areas of typography, page layout and                optimization. Students will learn and apply design
graphics manipulation. Topics covered include an                    principles including structure, transition and hierarchy
introduction to InDesign, working with text, creating and           considerations. Additional topics include storyboards,
editing graphics and colours, creating tables, and working          type and layout compatibility with CSS styles, as well as
with master pages and style sheets. Student projects                information designed to meet accessibility requirements.
include designing and producing identity kits, posters,             Methodology: on-screen demonstrations, slide lectures,
magazine covers, and newsletters. Students will also                hands-on tutorials and practical applications.
compile a desktop publishing portfolio.                             Lab: 5 hours/week Units: 2.67
Methodology: on-screen computer demonstrations,                     Prerequisite: 412-114
hands-on tutorials, creative projects, and tests.
Lab: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                       412-313-LA
Prerequisite: 412-114                                               Media Writing
                                                                    (Concentration course for Graphic Communications
412-311-LA                                                          students only)
Digital Graphics III: Integration                                   This project based course teaches students how to
(Concentration course for Graphic Communications                    function as a writer and editor in a digital publishing
students only)                                                      environment. Students will write an article geared
This course will give students more advanced skill levels           towards magazine publication; produce an advertising
when manipulating two-dimensional computer graphics                 campaign; a media release; a newsletter; and a web
in Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator. They will focus on              page. They will also prepare a cover letter and a résumé
preparing images for print and on creating and preparing            for a position in the publishing industry, along with a
graphics for the Web. Topics will include photo                     portfolio containing samples of their work.
restoration and alteration, creating optimized images               Methodology: slide lectures, writing and editing
and animated GIFs.                                                  exercises, student-based multimedia presentations and
Methodology: on-screen computer demonstrations,                     compiling a portfolio of media publications.
hands-on tutorials, creative projects and tests                     Class: 1 hour/week Lab: 2 hours/week Units: 2.00
Lab: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                       Prerequisite: 412-211
Prerequisite: 412-114 and 412-213

                                                                    412-411-LA
                                                                    Design for Advertising
                                                                    (Concentration course for Graphic Communications
                                                                    students only)
                                                                    This project-based course provides hands-on experience
                                                                    in producing promotional documents. Building on the
                                                                    skills learned in Advertising Communication, students will
                                                                    design and produce advertisements for print and web, as
                                                                    well as a promotional advertising campaign.
                                                                    Methodology: Multimedia presentations, writing and
                                                                    editing exercises, creative projects, researching on the
                                                                    Web.
                                                                    Class: 1 hour/week Lab: 2 hours/week Units: 2.00
                                                                    Prerequisite: 412-215 and 412-311




                                                             Page 142
Graphic Communications (continued)
412-422-LA                                                          412-432-LA
Page Layout II: Adobe InDesign                                      Page Layout II: Advanced Adobe InDesign
(Concentration course for Graphic Communications                    (Concentration course for Graphic Communications
students only)                                                      students only)
Students will learn the tools and features of Adobe In-             This course builds on the skills learned in Page Layout I
Design, a powerful page layout tool, to produce a variety           and is designed to teach students advanced page layout
of complex documents such as booklets, catalogues,                  techniques using Adobe InDesign. Classes focus on the
annual reports and manuals. The students will produce               development of effective page layout and design
press-ready files.                                                  techniques through hands-on exercises and creative
Methodology: Multimedia presentations, hands-on                     design analysis. Topics include: working with long
computer tutorials, theory and practical tests and design           documents such as booklets, catalogues, manuals and
projects.                                                           annual reports. Students will produce press-ready files.
Lab: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                       Methodology: Multimedia presentations, hands-on
Prerequisite: 412-214 and 412-311                                   computer tutorials, theory and practical tests and design
                                                                    projects.
412-423-LA                                                          Lab: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
Animated Graphics I: Flash                                          Prerequisite: 412-224 and 412-311
(Concentration course for Graphic Communications
students only)                                                      412-511-LA
Macromedia Flash is a powerful Web animation and                    Animated Graphics II: ActionScript
multimedia authoring program. In this course, students              (Concentration course for Graphic Communications
will design and produce animations, interactive Flash               students only)
Web sites and more complex stand-alone movies                       ActionScript is the programming language that enables
designed to achieve specific objectives. They will learn            you to use Flash to create highly interactive multimedia-
how to create Flash objects and symbols using drawing               based Web sites, games, product demos, educational
and text tools, apply animation techniques, import media            materials and more. Students will learn and apply
elements, and write simple ActionScript code. Students              ActionScript to develop interactive Flash projects and will
will analyze and understand the requirements of                     produce a multimedia portfolio showcasing the body of
multimedia project production and management,                       work they have produced in the Graphic
including how to produce a persuasive project proposal.             Communications Program.
Methodology: On-screen computer demonstrations,                     Methodology: on-screen computer demonstrations,
hands-on exercises, creative projects, and tests.                   hands-on exercises, creative projects and tests.
Lab: 5 hours/week Units: 2.67                                       Lab: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
Prerequisite: 412-311                                               Prerequisite: 412-413

412-414-LA                                                          412-512-LA
Web Publishing II: Dreamweaver                                      Business Centre I
(Concentration course for Graphic Communications                    (Concentration course for Graphic Communications
students only)                                                      students only)
Dreamweaver is a powerful Web page authoring and                    In this course, students will learn how to establish and
Web site management software program and HTML                       organize a graphic communication business. They will
editor. In this course students learn and apply software            work with clients to apply design, marketing and
features to design, code and create professional-looking            management techniques while operating and staffing the
Web pages, Web sites and Web applications. Emphasis is              Business Centre. Emphasis will be placed throughout the
placed on creating dynamic and interactive Web sites                course on pricing client projects, organizing personnel
that are both visually appealing and functional. Students           resources, as well as on managing the finances of the
will create Web graphics and text for use in their                  business.
assignments. Incorporating JavaScript code within                   Methodology: lectures, case studies, videos, team
Dreamweaver will introduce students to the                          projects and hands-on experience in running the Graphic
programming aspects of Web page design.                             Communications Business Centre.
Methodology: demonstrations, lectures, hands-on                     Lab: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
computer tutorials, theory and practical tests and a final          Prerequisite: 412-432, 412-413 & 412-414
project.
Lab: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
Prerequisite: 412-311 and 412-312


                                                             Page 143
Graphic Communications (continued)
412-523-LA                                                          412-611-LA
Career Planning                                                     Business Centre II
(Concentration course for Graphic Communications                    (Concentration course for Graphic Communications
students only)                                                      students only)
This course provides students with the necessary job and            Students will work with clients to apply graphic design,
career management tools they need to reach their full               marketing and management techniques while operating
career potential. Self-assessment exercises, company                and staffing the Business Centre.
research, networking, job search strategies, letters of             Methodology: Hands on experience in operating a small
application, resumes, videotaped professional                       graphic design business, assistance from design experts
interviews, and follow-up techniques will ensure                    and guest speakers, as well as extensive experience in
students have the knowledge, the skills and the strengths           working with Mac and PC platforms will give students the
to begin their professional career.                                 tools and know-how to get started in the graphics design
Methodology: lectures, research of the workforce and                industry.
employment agencies using the Internet, professional                Lab: 5 hours/week Units: 2.67
videotaped TV studio interviews.                                    Prerequisite: Successful completion of all courses from
Class: 1 hour/week Lab: 2 hours/week Units: 2.33                    semester one to semester five with the only exception
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all courses from             being two core courses.
semester one to semester four with the only exception
being two core courses.                                             412-612-LA
                                                                    Corporate Design
412-514-LA                                                          (Concentration course for Graphic Communications
Magazine Publishing                                                 students only)
(Concentration course for Graphic Communications                    Branding is the art of creating widespread recognition for
students only)                                                      a company’s products and services. In this project-based
This project-based course provides first-hand experience            course, students will learn the fundamentals of effective
in producing multi-page print documents. As members of              brand design for print media and the Internet. Topics
a creative team, Graphic Communications students will               include: the history of corporate identities, an overview
develop skills as decision-makers, media writers, editors,          of the brand design process and the challenges of
designers, page composers and pre-press specialists.                changing corporate identities. Students will plan and
Students will develop a newspaper, a print magazine as              design corporate documents and build online branding
well as a Web-based version (E-Zine).                               tools using Photoshop, Illustrator, Dreamweaver,
Methodology: multi-media lectures, journalistic writing             QuarkXPress and InDesign.
assignments, guest speakers, team work and real life                Methodology: Web research, lectures, practical
exposure to the importance of meeting deadlines.                    applications and theory tests.
Class: 1 hour/week Lab: 3 hours/week Units: 2.33                    Lab: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
Prerequisite: 412-311, 412-312 and 412-313                          Prerequisite: 412-432 and 412-414

412-515-LA                                                          412-613-LA
Prepress                                                            Multimedia and Print Portfolio
(Concentration course for Graphic Communications                    (Concentration course for Graphic Communications
students only)                                                      students only)
Students will be introduced to the preparation required             Students will design and produce a portfolio that will
to output professionally printed files on both Macintosh            demonstrate their professional expertise, technical skills
and Windows platforms. The following topics will be                 and creativity by showcasing selected works.
covered: the production process, technical constraints              Methodology: Guest speakers and creative projects.
and how to accurately prepare images and files with                 Lab: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
respect to anticipated methods of production for the                Prerequisite: Successful completion of all courses from
service bureaus and print shops.                                    semester one to semester five with the only exception
Methodology: Demonstrations, lectures, practical                    being two core courses.
applications, theory tests, and guest lecturers or site
visits.
Lab: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
Prerequisite: 412-411 and 412-432




                                                             Page 144
Graphic Communications (continued)
412-614-LA                                                           412-902-LA
Graphic Communications Externship                                    Web Page Design for Marketing and Sales
(Concentration course for Graphic Communications                     (Graphic Communications for Sport Marketing and
students only)                                                       Advertising Management students only)
This externship gives students the opportunity to apply              This course combines the practical aspect of Web design
their knowledge in a professional environment. Students              with Dreamweaver. In this course students learn and
will actively participate in the job placement process and           apply software features to design, code and create
work with the instructor to find employment for an                   professional-looking Web pages and Web sites. Students
eight-week stage in the graphic communication field.                 begin by understanding the research capability of the
Methodology: on-the-job training and employer                        Web. They also gain knowledge of marketing and
evaluation, written experiential report.                             business strategies necessary to produce an effective
Class: 1 hour/week                                                   Web site.
Lab: 17 hours/week Units: 7.00                                       Methodology: Multimedia presentations, hands-on
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all courses from              computer tutorials, creative projects, theory and
semester one to semester five with the only exception                practical tests and a final project.
being two core courses.                                              Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66 Prerequisite: 412-901

412-901-LA
Desktop Applications for Print Marketing
(Graphic Communications for Sport Marketing and
Advertising Management students only)
This course focuses on computer software tools used to
prepare marketing materials. Students gain experience in
developing promotional material such as brochures,
posters, advertising copy and coupons using page layout
software. They also learn the fundamentals of design
theory which permits them to put together marketing
communications that will grab the attention of the
intended audience.
Methodology: Multimedia presentations, hands-on
computer tutorials, creative projects, theory and
practical tests and a final project.
Class: 5 hours/week Units: 2.66 Prerequisite: 410-102


Tourism
414-111-LA                                                           Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.00
Introduction to Tourism Management
(Concentration course for Tourism students only)                     414-113-LA
This course will give the students an understanding of               Computer Applications for Tourism
the tourism industry, its structure, the 8 sectors, and its          (Concentration course for Tourism students only)
basic terminology. The past, present and the future of               In this course students will examine the importance of
tourism will be studied in terms of global and national              technology and computer applications for the travel and
perspectives. The focus of the course will be on tourism             tourism industry. Topics that will be addressed will include
entry-level employment and management careers.                       the essentials of computer systems, Microsoft Office, the
Students will be encouraged to practice time                         use of the Internet, as well as technological advances as
management and other study techniques.                               they pertain to the travel and tourism industry.
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.00                                      Simultaneously, lab emphasis will be on learning to work
                                                                     with the computer as an effective tool.
414-112-LA                                                           Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.00
See 414-613-LA Course for description
Tourism in Québec and Canada
(Concentration course for Tourism students only)



                                                              Page 145
Tourism (continued)
414-211-LA                                                            414-225-LA
Customer Service Management                                           Introduction to Tourism Marketing
(Concentration course for Tourism students only)                      (Concentration course for Tourism students only)
In this course, students will examine all the components              This course will analyze the range of tourism supply by
involved in providing excellent customer service. Particular          categorizing different products and services. Tourist
emphasis will be placed on welcoming tourist clients - the            products and services will be considered from the point
hospitality process of customer service in the various                of view of business marketing. Students will not only
tourism sectors. Moreover students will learn the                     compare various products, services, and attractions, but
importance of professionalism when working with tourists              also identify business opportunities.
and will include developing skills on how to intervene in             Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66
situations that require protocol, how to resolve conflicts,           Prerequisite: 414-111
and how to use the phone as a means of rendering quality
customer service. Guest speakers and outings will                     414-311-LA
complement the course.                                                See 414-613-LA Course for description
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.00                                       Destination Analysis: Europe
                                                                      (Concentration course for Tourism students only)
414-212-LA                                                            Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.00
See 414-613-LA Course for description                                 Prerequisite: 320-122, 414-112 and 414-212
Tourism in U.S.A. and Mexico
(Concentration course for Tourism students only)                      414-312-LA
Class: 5 hours/week Units: 2.66                                       Tourism Consumer Behaviour
Prerequisite: 320-122 and 414-112                                     (Concentration course for Tourism students only)
                                                                      This course will analyze customer behaviour in Tourism.
414-213-LA                                                            Students will explore psychological theories of
Industry Field Studies                                                perception, personality, and motivation as they relate to
(Concentration course for Tourism students only)                      tourist behaviour. Personal factors and interpersonal
Training for career in tourism cannot go without being                factors affecting decision making; market segmentation;
exposed to the tourism industry outside the college. All              target market selection; positioning; and statistical travel
tourism businesses are different in terms of their                    data will be included.
operations, how they are managed, and what the                        Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
responsibilities are of their employers. The course, then,            Prerequisite: 414-225
gives the students the necessary eye-opener into several
tourism service companies to gain an early understanding of           414-313-LA
the working world. This will also facilitate the student’s            Sales Techniques
preparation for a career orientation in the tourism industry.         (Concentration course for Tourism students only)
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66                                       This course will focus on applying tourism sales techniques.
                                                                      Particular emphasis will be placed on examining the ethical
414-214-LA                                                            standards expected of a sales person in Tourism, processing
Tourism Research Methods                                              information on products, services and target clients. In
(Concentration course for Tourism students only)                      addition, students will learn how to make contact with
This course is a step-by-step guide to researching and                present and potential clients. Moreover, the different steps
writing about topics pertinent to the Tourism Industry,               in the sales process will be looked upon and students will
including starting your own business. During the                      apply these skills in various tourism sector situations
semester a practical “hands-on” approach will provide                 including telephone sales. Furthermore, students will be
the framework for understanding how to assess, read,                  asked to search for sponsors in their participation of a sales
evaluate and manage information. By the end of the                    event. Finally, understanding and applying the principles of
course the students will have examined the entire                     interval selling will be covered.
process of doing research and will have designed a                    Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.00
research project of their own. Accordingly, computers
will support this dynamic process as the learner advances
through the different stages of research.
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
Prerequisite: 414-113




                                                               Page 146
Tourism (continued)
414-314-LA                                                            414-414-LA
Sustainable Tourism Practices                                         Customized Individual Travel
(Concentration course for Tourism students only)                      (Concentration course for Tourism students only)
More and more tourism businesses try to integrate                     An individual's uniqueness often provides the starting point
sustainable development principles to maintain and grow               to planning an individualized itinerary that will meet their
their companies in environmentally and socially                       personal expectations and budget. Professional planners
responsible ways. In this course knowledge will be                    must be able to interpret this individual's needs in addition
acquired and applied to face the challenge of making                  to knowing geography, world-wide infrastructure, and
tourism more sustainable tomorrow through the                         terminology as it pertains to the multitude of individual
operational management practices of tourism                           travel components. More importantly, planners must also
businesses.                                                           identify, categorize and interpret the resources available to
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                       them. In this course, students will assume the role of travel
                                                                      planners and learn how to identify the components of a
414-411-LA                                                            request for travel arrangements. Then students will learn
See 414-613-LA Course for description                                 how to differentiate between various prices (interpret and
Destination Analysis: Exotic                                          apply correct construction techniques) and their formats
(Concentration course for Tourism students only)                      and given various client descriptions, construct complete
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.00                                       client itineraries detailing all activities and costs.
Prerequisite: 320-122, 414-112, 414-212 and 414-311                   Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.00
                                                                      Prerequisite: 414-225
414-412-LA
Tourism Marketing Applications                                        414-511-LA
(Concentration course for Tourism students only)                      Finance for Tourism Operations
This course focuses on the essentials of tourism service              (Concentration course for Tourism students only)
marketing and the application of marketing activities.                Monitoring and analyzing the financial performance of a
Particular emphasis will be placed on how tourism                     tourism business is an essential management responsibility.
businesses set marketing objectives, select a target market,          Accounting principles, financial statements, and budgeting
decide on a marketing mix, set prices, and how to elaborate           are unfamiliar territory for most tourism professionals.
a marketing plan                                                      However it is important for future managers in any tourism
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                       business to acquire a general understanding of financial
Prerequisite: 414-312                                                 aspects. This course gives students understanding and skills
                                                                      in performing basic financial tasks in certain tourism
414-413-LA                                                            business situations.
Hotel Operations                                                      Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66
(Concentration course for Tourism students only)                      Prerequisite: Completion of all concentration courses in
                                                                            st    th
In this course the intricacies of travel automation will be           the 1 to 4 semesters, as well as completion of the
introduced. Classes are designed to prepare the student to            majority of the core courses, including: 2 English, 2
function effectively in an automated environment through              Humanities, 2 Physical Education courses and 1
the use of a central reservation system. During this course,          complementary.
students will perform basic functions on computer
reservation systems pertinent to the accommodations
sector.
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66
Prerequisite: 414-211 & 414-225




                                                               Page 147
Tourism (continued)
414-512-LA                                                           414-515-LA
Human Resource Management                                            Events, Meetings and Conventions
(Concentration course for Tourism students only)                     (Concentration course for Tourism students only)
This course will focus on supervising a small work team.             Students will examine the entire process of organizing
Students will learn how to recruit, select, train and                meetings, events and conventions including site
prepare employee orientation as well as learn the basis              inspection, developing the program, reservations, and
of working with unions and the Charter of Rights.                    post-convention activities meeting. Together with guest
Moreover, students will learn how to evaluate and                    speakers from the industry, this course will offer
motivate employees. Particular emphasis will be placed               students a hands-on approach to enable them to
on applying the acquired skills to various tourism careers.          elaborate their own project.
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66                                      Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66
Prerequisites: 414-211, 414-213 AND completion of all                Prerequisite: Completion of all concentration courses in
                                st    th                                  st    th
concentration courses in the 1 to 4 semesters, as well               the 1 to 4 semesters, as well as completion of the
as completion of the majority of the core courses,                   majority of the core courses, including: 2 English, 2
including: 2 English, 2 Humanities, 2 Physical Education             Humanities, 2 Physical Education courses and 1
courses and 1 complementary.                                         complementary.

414-513-LA                                                           414-516-LA
Tour Management                                                      Groups & Charters
(Concentration course for Tourism students only)                     (Concentration course for Tourism students only)
This course allows students to differentiate between the             Tour operators are the key organization in the travel
roles of a tour manager and a tour guide. It provides                package industry, providing the logistical skills needed to
them with the skills required to manage a tour. It will              package transportation, accommodation and destination
allow them to identify their own leadership style, to learn          activities in ways which appeal to the traveling public. In
how to assess the needs of a tour group, to select and               this course students will analyze different kinds of group
format information which they will be called upon to                 packages, discover the reasons for their popularity and
provide during a tour, to administer a tour budget, to               learn how to put together a total tour package. Particular
apply general principles of hospitality in a specialized             emphasis will be placed on creating and pricing tours as
context, and to report professionally on the tour.                   well as contracting of services.
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.33                                      Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.00
Prerequisite: Completion of all concentration courses in             Prerequisites: 414-414 AND completion of all
      st    th                                                                                        st   th
the 1 to 4 semesters, as well as completion of the                   concentration courses in the 1 to 4 semesters, as well
majority of the core courses, including: 2 English, 2                as completion of the majority of the core courses,
Humanities, 2 Physical Education courses and 1                       including: 2 English, 2 Humanities, 2 Physical Education
complementary.                                                       courses and 1 complementary.

414-514-LA
Tourism Promotion: Techniques
(Concentration course for Tourism students only)
In this course students will explore some of the
techniques currently employed in the fields of
information and tourism promotion in Quebec.
Advertising, personal selling, merchandising, sales
promotion, public relations and publicity, posters,
brochures, and slogans will be explored. The class will
also look at successful tourism promotion campaigns.
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
Prerequisites: 414-312, 414-412 AND completion of all
                                st    th
concentration courses in the 1 to 4 semesters, as well
as completion of the majority of the core courses,
including: 2 English, 2 Humanities, 2 Physical Education
courses and 1 complementary.




                                                              Page 148
Tourism (continued)
414-517-LA                                                             414-613-LA
Career Planning                                                        Destination Evaluation: Case Studies
(Concentration course for Tourism students only)                       (Concentration course for Tourism students only)
This capstone course prepares the students for their                   The focus of these courses is to provide and analyze
Work-study by putting their focus on their career path in              Regional, National and International tourist information.
Tourism. Students will be assessing their strengths and                Students will use geographic vocabulary, models,
weaknesses in terms of knowledge and skills.                           diagrams, maps and statistical tables. They will analyze
Opportunities will be provided to facilitate the transition            the destination areas according to their physical,
from the academic to the real work environment,                        historical, political and economic conditions. They will
including the update of their C.V.’s, preparation for the              also locate and categorize the main points of interest
job interview. Discussions will take place about                       typical of the destination and assess its tourism potential,
professional behaviour, work ethics, dress code,                       taking into account different types of tourist motivation.
workplace situations, performance, and evaluation. As                  Positive and negative impacts of tourism on the
part of this course students will be doing research on                 destination will be considered, as well as current news
several tourism careers which includes an in-depth                     events. Each destination will be evaluated as a potential
interview with a Tourism Management professional.                      source of travelers to Quebec and Canada. Students will
Students are responsible for the preparation of a report               participate in learning activities including group
that both describes and justifies their career                         interaction, role play, audio-visual analysis, tour design
concentration objectives and choice of Work-study                      and research work. Students will be asked to apply their
placement.                                                             knowledge and analytical skills to increasingly complex
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 1.66                                        traveling challenges.
                                               st nd   rd  th
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all 1 , 2 , 3 , 4               Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.00
      th
and 5 semester courses.                                                Prerequisite: 320-122, 414-112, 414-212, 414-311 and
                                                                       414-411
414-611-LA
Tourism Law                                                            414-614-LA
(Concentration course for Tourism students only)                       Reservations
This course familiarizes the student with legal tourism                (Concentration course for Tourism students only)
principles and procedures at the international, federal,               In this course, issues and procedures for reservations will
provincial and municipal levels using a problem-solving                be examined as they pertain to the tourism and travel
approach. Student will understand and apply: (1) legal                 sectors. Consequently the focus will be on data based
rights, responsibilities and procedures affecting tourism              systems as they apply to today’s industry and more
industry suppliers (like airlines, cruise-lines, and hotels),          specifically for the management of reservations. This
their representatives and agents (like travel agencies and             course will continue to develop the student’s knowledge
wholesalers); (2) approaches to prevent legal problems                 and understanding of automation and the principles
from arising.                                                          apply to many sectors of the travel and tourism industry.
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66                                        Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66

414-612-LA                                                             414-615-LA
Tourism Management and Trends                                          Tourism Promotion Practicum
(Concentration course for Tourism students only)                       (Concentration course for Tourism students only)
In this course, students will learn to recognize social changes        The promotion skills acquired in the Tourism Promotion
                                                                                 th
likely to influence tourism management practices. They will            course (5 semester) will now be applied. This will
recognize trends in consumerism and marketing as well as               involve formulating promotion objectives, brochure
establish connections between trends and foreseeable                   creation, organizing public presentations and the
changes in the tourism industry.                                       production of a complete promotion plan.
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66                                        Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00 Prerequisite: 414-514




                                                                Page 149
Tourism (continued)
414-616-LA                                                           414-617-LA
Tourism Portfolio                                                    Work-study
(Concentration course for Tourism students only)                     (Concentration course for Tourism students only)
This course focuses on continuing the preparation for the            This last course is the second required element of the
Work-study and the development of a Tourism                          comprehensive assessment. Here, students will apply
Management portfolio. This portfolio is a required                   their acquired knowledge and skills in an actual tourism
element of the Comprehensive assessment for every                    work environment. It involves work-study placement,
graduating student. To properly prepare students for                 working in a Tourism host institution in at least two (2)
their Work Studies and future careers. The development               different departments for eight (8) weeks, regular
of a portfolio reflects the learning and achievements                progress reporting, the preparation of a work-study
obtained throughout the program. The Portfolio must                  report, and an evaluation during and at the end of the
include original copies of substantive reports,                      work-study period.
assignments, and projects, in a way that shows                       At the end of the process, all students are called back to
professionalism and that “markets” the student. The                  the college for one day intensive evaluations which
completeness, professionalism and quality of the                     includes an oral presentation of their work-study and
portfolio will be evaluated in the course. A successful              Portfolio before a panel of faculty and industry
portfolio will contain documents reflecting the students’            professionals. This will complete the Comprehensive
attainment of competencies and abilities outlined in the             Assessment for the Tourism Program.
Tourism Graduate Profile and a conclusion representing               Total hours: 18 hours Units: 3.67
the students’ personal reflection of their own progress              Prerequisite: Successful completion of ALL courses in
over the 3 years of the program.                                     the Tourism program
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66
                                              st  nd  rd th
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all 1 , 2 , 3 , 4
      th
and 5 semester courses.


Computer Science
420-111-LA                                                           420-112-LA
Computer Fundamentals and Applications                               Java Programming Level 1
(Concentration course for Computer Science students                  (Concentration course for Computer Science students
only)                                                                only)
Course provides an overview of computer hardware,                    This is a first course in Computer Science using the
software, and operating system concepts used on                      programming language Java. It covers the fundamentals
computer systems. It provides instruction in Windows                 of programming and of computer science. The principal
desktop operating system for personal computers.                     objective is to allow students without a background in
Emphasizing customization, managing and                              computer programming to become capable
troubleshooting including command and line                           programmers through learning the Java programming
environment and OS utilities to manage and                           language. Students will learn problem-solving techniques
troubleshoot. Other topics include commonly used                     and gain experience detecting and correcting software
internal and external commands including the use of                  errors though several programming assignments. The
subdirectories and creating basic batch files. Finally               course will also cover the standard libraries for string
control panel customization, OLE usage, printing and the             processing, mathematical routines, and input and output
basic concepts and terminology of networking will be                 streams.
covered as well. The second part of the practical                    Class: 3 hours/week Lab: 3 hours/week Units: 2.66
coverage includes an introduction to the Microsoft Office
spreadsheet and database principles and applications
that will be used in other courses of the program.
Class: 1 hour/week Lab: 2 hours/week Units: 1.33




                                                              Page 150
Computer Science (continued)
420-113-LA                                                         420-213-LA
Introduction to Multimedia and the Internet                        Tools for Multimedia
(Concentration course for Computer Science students                (Concentration course for Computer Science students
only)                                                              only)
This course provides an introduction to key Internet, web          This course introduces students to the fundamentals of
and multimedia technologies. Students will learn about             multimedia production. In a hands-on class, students will
how the Internet is employed in the business world. The            learn the essentials of program design and authoring
course will cover the uses and delivery of multimedia              software in an integrated computer environment.
over the Internet. Each student will gain hands-on                 Students will learn how to combine graphics, audio and
experience in creating web sites with XHTML and CSS                text to create programs for industrial and educational
files that incorporate multimedia files.                           applications. It covers the web tools in a suite such as
                                                                   Adobe Suite . Each project teaches product fundamentals
420-211-LA                                                         in the context of building a commercial website.
Computer Hardware Support and Maintenance                          Lab: 4 hrs/week Units: 2.00
(Concentration course for Computer Science students                Prerequisite: 420-113
only)
This course will give a broad overview of computer                 420-214-LA
hardware, provide detailed information about the system            Operating System
board, and provide a detailed look into storage devices.           (Concentration course for Computer Science students
This course also covers the different hardware                     only)
components and peripheral components you may                       The course provides students with an introduction to
experience in a normal technician’s daily job. Though              administering the Solaris Operating Environment, and the
students may have general experience with                          essential tools to be able to perform system administration
troubleshooting computer problems or issues, there are             tasks. The course describes how to install and manage the
many details that the course covers which students may             Solaris system software, how to manage devices such as
not have experienced yet or may need to refresh their              disk drives and printers, how to manage the Solaris boot
knowledge on. The vital goal is to show them how to                process, how to provide system security and perform file
build the computer which entails how to choose the                 system backups and restores. Students are taught how to
components, how to assemble them, and how to install               maintain Sun systems, configure and troubleshoot the NFS,
the operating system and additional software.                      and configure the Network Information System (NIS)
Lab: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66 Prerequisite: 420-111                environment
                                                                   Lab: 4 hours/week Units: 2.00
420-212-LA                                                         Prerequisite: 420-111
Java Programming level 2
(Concentration course for Computer Science students                420-311-LA
only)                                                              Interface Design
In the second course of the Java sequence, we will study           (Concentration course for Computer Science students
more advanced features of this object-oriented                     only)
programming language: how to build attractive graphical            Building on the principles learned in tools for multimedia,
user interfaces, how to create interactive web-based               students will learn to manipulate graphics and text in
programs, how to work with files, databases and                    more sophisticated ways for use in print layout as well as
multimedia objects. We will not only study how to                  multimedia. An emphasis will be placed on techniques in
achieve all of these goals, but we will also create working        interactive design concepts to create cross-platform,
programs containing database connectivity, inner classes,          low-bandwidth animations utilizing a vector based
collection classes and threads and see how students can            application. The course looks at the development of well-
apply all their new skills in a realistic project.                 designed architectures and coherent interfaces for
Lab: 5 hours/week Units: 2.33                                      multimedia, and emphasizes how user-centered design
Prerequisite: 420-112                                              can shape information to meet audience
                                                                   needs. Organizational schemes, navigational structures,
                                                                   modular layout, principles of interface design, and
                                                                   usability approaches will all be examined.
                                                                   Lab: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66
                                                                   Prerequisite: 420-213




                                                            Page 151
Computer Science (continued)
420-312-LA                                                         420-314-LA
Database Fundamentals                                              Networking and Internet Services
(Concentration course for Computer Science students                (Concentration course for Computer Science students
only)                                                              only)
This course introduces students to basic database                  This course is intended to provide students with the
modeling, design, and implementation concepts and                  knowledge necessary to understand and identify the
techniques. Entity-Relationship (E-R) modeling                     tasks involved in supporting networks. It is a course
methodology is described in detail and students learn              designed to provide an overview of networking concepts
how to model information requirements and develop                  and how they are implemented in a Windows
conceptual models from user specifications. Relational             environment. The focus of the students will be on
database theory is presented including the description of          performing desktop and server installation and
the relational model and theory of Normal Forms.                   configuration tasks, as well as network and operating
Transformations techniques between the E-R and                     system management tasks. The TCP/IP protocol suite,
relational models are described. Database programming              essential network security concepts, including
using SQL is introduced in lectures and supported by               authentication, encryption and firewalls, routing and
practical exercises using ORACLE (a relational DBMS). In           related IP addressing schemes are covered. Content also
addition, students learn to create PL/SQL blocks of                includes selected topics in Web server, File Server,
application code that can be shared by multiple forms,             Printer Server support and LAN/WAN connectivity.
reports, and data management applications.                         Lab: 4 hours/week Units: 2.00
Lab: 5 hours/week Units: 2.66                                      Prerequisite: 420-211 & 420-214
Prerequisite: 420-212
                                                                   420-411-LA
420-313-LA                                                         Business Systems Analysis
Developing Applications using J2EE                                 (Concentration course for Computer Science students
(Concentration course for Computer Science students                only)
only)                                                              From problem definition and planning to project
Developing Applications provides an introduction to the            proposals and systems design, this course gives students
Java TM 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition (J2EE). It is               a thorough understanding of the entire Systems
intended for students who have a good working                      Development Life Cycle. Replete with both “hard” and
knowledge and understanding of the Java 2 Platform,                “soft” skills, this semester long course builds a sound
and need to have an introduction to the J2EE platform.             strategy for analyzing business processes and
J2EE is a platform for developing distributed enterprise           demonstrates how to apply concepts and practical
applications using the Java programming language. This             techniques within the context of an experiential learning
course focuses on servlets and, JavaBeans for handling             environment. Students emerge from this course with a
business logic and data access throughout the enterprise.          firm base of systems foundations as well as a greater
It also introduces Java Server Pages as a mechanism for            understanding that doing the right things is just as
presenting information to users.                                   important as doing things right. Students will also learn
Lab: 5 hours/week Units: 2.66                                      how to document requirements in both business and
Prerequisite: 420-212                                              systems use case diagrams using the Unified Modeling
                                                                   Language (UML)
                                                                   Class: 2 hours/week Lab: 3 hours/week Units: 2.66
                                                                   Prerequisite: 420-312 & 420-314 & 410 -921




                                                            Page 152
Computer Science (continued)
420-412-LA                                                          420-511-LA
VB.NET Programming                                                  Entrepreneurship for IT: Be Your Own Boss
(Concentration course for Computer Science students                 (Concentration course for Computer Science students
only)                                                               only)
The goal of this course is to provide our students with             This course will take students through the process to
the knowledge and skills needed to develop Microsoft                conceive, create, run and potentially sell a business. The
.NET-based applications by using Visual Basic .NET. The             goal is to provide solid background with practical
course begins by providing a look at the different                  application of important concepts for our students that
components of the .NET frameworkNext, the basic                     may have limited experience in an entrepreneurial
building blocks of the VB.NET language including                    environment. The course relies on classroom discussion,
variables, conditionals and looping are discussed                   participation, guest speakers, basic case analysis and the
followed by details on how to use fields, properties,               creation of a business plan based on each student’s
methods, classes, and namespaces.                                   specific area of interest.
Object-oriented features found in VB.NET are also                   Class: 2 hours/week Lab: 1 hour/week Units: 1.66
covered so that students understand how to control                  Prerequisite: 350-921 & 360-921
concepts such as inheritance, method overriding,                    Successful completion of all 420 courses from semester
interfaces, and object hierarchies. After covering the              1 through 4
fundamentals of VB.NET, the course introduces files and
arrays, ADO.NET data access technologies, by                        420-512-LA
demonstrating how to leverage these technologies in                 Advanced programming using Visual Studio
Windows Forms.                                                      (Concentration course for Computer Science students
Lab: 5 hours/week Units: 2.66                                       only)
Prerequisite: 420-312                                               In this course the fundamentals of Web application
                                                                    implementation using ASP.NET will be covered. We start
420-413-LA                                                          with an overview of the .NET Framework. We then
Client/Server Web Programming                                       examine key features of ASP.NET such as Web Forms,
(Concentration course for Computer Science students                 server controls, user controls, state management,
only)                                                               validation of user input, and tracing and debug features.
This course introduces PHP, the most widely-used open               Steps on how to secure, configure and deploy web
source server-side web scripting language. PHP is ideal             applications will be introduced as well as calling Web
for web page development, database interaction, and                 services, incorporate XML data into web applications,
the creation of dynamic web sites. Students will learn              and ADO.NET to access data bases. All sample code,
professional PHP developer techniques, become familiar              demonstrations, and lab exercises are given in either
with PHP utilities, and learn how to organize PHP code              Visual Basic and / or C#. This course assumes that the
for efficient and enjoyable programming. Students will              students are familiar with Hypertext Markup Language
learn how to use a web editor to store content and                  (HTML), client-side and server-side scripting, introduction
configuration in a database (mySQL), manipulate it with a           to ASP.NET, Microsoft ActiveX Data Objects for .NET
server-side script (PHP) and present it with HTML. This is          (ADO.NET), and a Microsoft .NET-based programming
an excellent opportunity for students to learn how to               language.
create practical web applications and understand                    Lab: 5 hours/week Units: 2.66
professionally written PHP code.                                    Prerequisite: 420-412 & 420-413
Lab: 5 hours/week Units: 2.66
Prerequisite: 420-311 & 420-312




                                                             Page 153
Computer Science (continued)
420-513-LA                                                            420-515-LA
Database System Administration                                        Multimedia Programming using Flash
(Concentration course for Computer Science students                   (Concentration course for Computer Science students
only)                                                                 only)
The second in a database course sequence related to                   Students will apply the principles of object oriented
ORACLE technology that deals with the administration                  programming in order to create scripts for the
and implementation of a relational database system.                   manipulation of video, graphics, and text to construct a
Students will gain a conceptual understanding of the                  complete multimedia presentation. They will use Flash to
Oracle database architecture and how its components                   create appealing digital environments in which people
work and interact with one another. Students will also                can interact. Interactivity navigation will be explored to
learn how to create an operational database and                       create features where the user can not only view content
properly manage the various structures in an effective                but also make and manipulate content. Text, animation,
and efficient manner. Topics covered may include:                     motion graphics, audio and video will be controlled using
embedded SQL; PL/SQL; advanced/optimized SQL                          rollovers, clicks, drags, hit tests, and keyboard entry.
queries; transaction management including concurrency                 Students will learn to dynamically control movie clips
and recovery; schema refinement; higher-level normal                  using properties such as rotation, movement,
forms; integrity; security; and database administration               transparency, and size.
development.                                                          Lab: 4 hours/week Units: 2.00
Lab: 5 hours/week Units: 2.66                                         Prerequisite: 420-212 or 420-413
Prerequisite: 420-411 or 420-412
                                                                      420-516-LA
420-514-LA                                                            Work Study: Career Planning
Practicum 1: System development                                       (Concentration course for Computer Science students
(Concentration course for Computer Science students                   only)
only)                                                                 The course is designed to provide a strong finish to your
The practicum 1 sets up a typical environment for the                 college career, while introducing you to opportunities in
development of a detailed proposal for a software-                    a variety of business environments that depend on
business, multimedia or web related real life system                  information technology in their daily activities. The
project. The instructor will assist each group of student in          understanding of industry trends in those businesses and
choosing an appropriate project topic and in refining the             developing verbal, written and visual communication
proposal through all stages from initial outline to final             techniques applied to professional situations, including
formal design specification. The completed proposal will              professional development and career planning are
serve as the blue print of the project to be implemented              covered.
in the Practicum 2 – System implementation. The course                Class: 3 hours/week Lab: 2 hours/week Units: 2.00
involves scheduled milestones, periodic meetings, group               Prerequisite: 350-921 and successful completion of all
discussions, and walkthrough sessions. The practicum is               420 program courses from semester 1 through 4
graded on theory on systems principles and usage of
CASE tools and a project document encompassing the                    420-611-LA
milestones completed during the course.                               Work Study I: Externship
Class: 2 hours/week Lab: 5 hours/week Units: 3.33                     (Concentration course for Computer Science students
Prerequisite: 350-921                                                 only)
Successful completion of all 420 courses from semester                This twelve week work study experience provides the
1 through 4                                                           student with the knowledge and skills acquired within a
                                                                      real-world situation, and to become familiar with one
                                                                      company’s approach to the IT industry. Students will gain
                                                                      invaluable work experience and hone their
                                                                      communication, time management, planning and group
                                                                      interaction skills.
                                                                      Successful completion of all 420 program courses from
                                                                      semester 1 through 5 with the only exception being 1
                                                                      general education course in either English, Humanities,
                                                                      French, Complementary or Physical Education and not a
                                                                      block-B in English, Humanities or French.
                                                                      Lab: 18 hours/week Units: 6.33



                                                               Page 154
Computer Science (continued)
420-612-LA                                                           420-614-LA
Practicum 2: System Implementation                                   Portfolio
(Concentration course for Computer Science students                  (Concentration course for Computer Science students
only)                                                                only)
This capstone course provides depth in the application               Portfolios are being used as an assessment tool and as a
and integration of core system development and                       general record of student achievement while studying in
implementation concepts. Emphasis is placed on the                   our faculty. A portfolio allows students to integrate text
integration of systems analysis/design techniques                    and the full range of digital media, including photos,
learned in the Practicum 1 course with concepts of                   illustrations, data sheets, audio, video recordings, data
operating systems, data structures, file and database                and information into programming assignments which
processing, computer architecture and software                       will be marked according to criteria’s established by the
engineering. This is a project course that requires                  instructors for all course’s final projects. It is
significant collaborative in and out-of-class work, written          acknowledged that electronic media, specifically in our
documents and oral presentations. Students will carry                field, is well suited to portfolio use and development.
out autonomous milestones using different software                   Successful completion of all 420 program courses from
development tools. Traditional structured programming,               semester 1 through 5 with the only exception being 1
scripting programming and/or object oriented                         general education course in either English, Humanities,
programming may be used in the various projects to be                French, Complementary or Physical Education and not a
implemented.                                                         block-B in English, Humanities or French.
Lab: 6 hours/week Units: 3.00                                        Class: 2 hours/week Lab: 1 hour/week Units: 1.33
Prerequisite: 420-514 & either 420-515 OR 420 512
                                                                     420-D1L-LA
420-613-LA                                                           Computer Applications for Commerce
Emerging Technologies                                                (Complementary course for Commerce Option students
(Concentration course for Computer Science students                  only)
only)                                                                This course introduces students to computer software
This course was designed with a focus on some of the                 that is needed in order to be well-prepared to enter
major technologies that are already being deployed, as               Commerce at university or to function in any kind of
well as those that will be deployable within the next one            business environment. Students will learn the correct
to three years.                                                      way to create documents, workbooks, spreadsheets,
Lab: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66                                        databases and presentation for professional purposes.
Prerequisite: 420-514 & either (420-515 or 420-512)                  Students will also acquire experience in integrating
                                                                     information among the various software applications,
                                                                     e.g., how to import EXCEL documents into Word, how to
                                                                     integrate Word documents, spreadsheets and databases
                                                                     into presentation software, etc.
                                                                     Class: 3 hours/week Units 1.66




                                                              Page 155
Creative Arts
502-101-LA                                                           510-101-LA
Art & Ideas                                                          Intro to Digital Imaging/Studio Arts
(Concentration course for Creative Arts students only)               (Concentration course for Creative Arts students only –
This course focuses on the inherent human urge to                    all profiles)
express knowledge, emotions, values and beliefs                      This course, and the profile it introduces, was designed with
artistically. By looking at works of art from different              the belief that artists working in the digital field will go much
cultures and historical periods, students will explore a             further if they have a firm footing in studio arts practice. In
wide range of artistic expression in different fields                this introductory course, we attempt to take into
including the visual arts, literature, music and dance.              consideration the needs of students from all areas of
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                      creative arts. This course will lay the foundation for more in-
                                                                     depth study of combined fields of digital imaging and the
502-101-01                                                           studio arts. We will concentrate on principles of spatial
Art & Ideas                                                          organization that are fundamental to all forms of expression
(Concentration course for Modern Languages students                  in the visual arts. Students will learn through practice that
only)                                                                various qualities of the same thing (i.e., line) can create
This course surveys characteristic works of different                different messages. They will also begin discussion of visual
cultures and their socio-historical context and focuses on           signs and symbols as they relate to meaning.
the human artistic expression of knowledge, emotions,                Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66
values and beliefs. Various forms of artistic expression
will be explored: the art of writing, literature, painting,          510-202-LA
sculpture and architecture.                                          2D Computer Imaging
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                      (Concentration course for students in Creative Arts -
                                                                     Digital Imaging/Studio Arts profile only)
502-201-LA                                                           This course uses the computer as an important research
Art & Media                                                          tool in the exploration of visual language, design and the
(Concentration course for Creative Arts students only)               creative process. Working with Photoshop, students will
This course will examine cultural movements of the past,             learn to create, manage and manipulate graphic files, while
gradually bringing the student into the current period.              developing their own imagery and visual ideas. An emphasis
Touching on many issues of contemporary culture, the                 will be placed on integrating the students’ digital experience
student will be shown how to question and analyze                    with the rest of the studio practice. Students will be graded
creation, meaning, and interpretation of cultural                    on their mastery of technical skills and their creativity at
phenomena. Helping the student to identify the most                  finding solutions to 2D design problems. The course will
important contexts surrounding culture will help them to             start with 3 weeks of experiments in image manipulation,
be critically informed as they participate within it.                followed by 3 thematic projects. The themes proposed:
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                      Surrealist Collage, Drawing from Music and Self-Portrait will
                                                                     emphasize aspects of visual language and design. Students
502-201-02                                                           will be encouraged to create links between formal aspects
Art & Media                                                          of digital image-making with content and meaning.
(Concentration course for Modern Languages students                  Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
only)                                                                Prerequisite: 510-101 or with written permission from
Picking up where Art & Ideas left off, this course will              instructor
continue the survey of Western Civilization up to the
present time. Throughout the course, students will
appreciate the socio-historical and technological reasons
that led one movement into the next. Some trends of the
Modern Era will be discussed more closely for their
importance. Examples from different artistic domains will
be used to substantiate and clarify in the mind of the
students the meaning of the various currents.
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00




                                                              Page 156
Creative Arts (continued)
510-204-LA                                                              510-302-LA
Drawing                                                                 3D Computer Imaging
(Concentration course for students in Creative Arts -                   (Concentration course for students in Creative Arts -
Digital Imaging/Studio Arts profile only)                               Digital Imaging/Studio Arts profile only)
The first step in learning to draw is learning to see and               Alias/Wavefront Maya is a recognized 3D modeling
translate. Working primarily from observation students will             animation tool in the film industry. This course will be an
learn a variety of visual skills and approaches to drawing.             introduction to the ways in which Maya can be used to
There will be experimentation with such things as color,                create objects and scenes. Students will complete a
perspective systems, and the description of light. The                  series of class activities that will be geared towards
concepts of illusion, abstraction, and realism will be applied          making the student familiar with this digital sculptural
and reinforced. Finally, students will learn about critical             environment. Students will learn to create objects in
language used to discuss the formal aspects of artwork in               nurbs and polygons, they will also be introduced to
relation to meaning.                                                    animating. They will develop a personal project,
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00 Prerequisite: 510-101 or                integrating notions acquired in the Digital Imaging and
with written permission from instructor                                 Studio Arts profile. Students will be graded on their
                                                                        mastery of technical skills and their creativity at finding
510-205-LA                                                              solutions to 2D and3D design projects.
Painting                                                                Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
(Concentration course for students in Creative Arts -                   Prerequisite: {510-202 and 510-204} or with written
Digital Imaging/Studio Arts profile only)                               permission from instructor
During this course students will be exposed to painting as a
means of exploring and understanding the external and                   510-401-LA
internal worlds. They will learn how colour, composition and            Advanced Workshop: Studio Arts
imagery can be made expressive of ideas and feelings.                   (Concentration course for students in Creative Arts -
Through critical process, they will develop a language to               Digital Imaging/Studio Arts profile only)
discuss formal aspects of painting in relation to meaning.              In this advanced course, students will be asked to produce a
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                         personal body of work in response to thematic parameters
Prerequisite: 510-101 or with written permission from                   established by the instructor. The themes introduced will
instructor                                                              attempt to address issues pertinent to contemporary art as
                                                                        a fluctuating entity in the post modern era. Materials and
510-301-LA                                                              techniques will be dictated by the students’ interpretation
Sculpture                                                               of the theme, and should not be limited to those previously
(Concentration course for students in Creative Arts -                   learned. The student will be required to do readings to aid
Digital Imaging/Studio Arts profile only)                               in situating their interpretations in relation to current art
Sculpture is a discipline where space, volume and content               discourse.
can be approached in a variety of ways. Building on the                 Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
experiences of the second semester courses, students will               Prerequisite: {510-204 and 510-205 and 510-301} or
develop a practical understanding of sculpture as a                     with written permission from instructor (any
contemporary practice in art. Students will learn about                 prerequisite failed may be taken concurrently with 510-
concepts and techniques in sculpture which they will be                 401)
able to apply to the 3D Computer and Advanced Studio
courses in their fourth semester. They will also further
develop critical language by analyzing and critiquing their
own process and production in written form.
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
Prerequisite: 510-101 or with written permission from
instructor




                                                                 Page 157
Creative Arts (continued)
510-402-LA                                                             Prerequisite: 510-101 or with written permission from
Advanced Digital Workshop                                              instructor
(Concentration course for students in Creative Arts -                  510-902-LA
Digital Imaging/Studio Arts profile only)                              Computer Graphics
In this advanced course students are given the                         (Option course for students in Creative Arts -
opportunity to develop a more personal body of work                    Film/Video/Communications and Photo/Design profiles
with digital tools. Students will work by proposal, for                only)
which they must do research into a contemporary digital                This option course is designed to give students an
art practice. Work will be reviewed in class critiques and             introduction to various ways to create digital images that
presentations. Both written and verbal analysis will be a              can be used for computer graphic. Students will learn to
requirement. Depending on the dictates of their                        create, manage and manipulate digital graphics files,
proposals, students will be encouraged to look beyond                  using Photoshop as their primary tool. Students will be
the platforms they have already learned for the                        graded on their mastering of technical skills, creativity in
completion of their work.                                              solving problems and how well they link the formal
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                        aspects of art-making with content and meaning.
Prerequisite: 510-202 or with written permission from                  Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66
instructor (any with 510 prerequisite failed may be
taken concurrently -402)                                               510-904-LA
                                                                       Experimental Techniques in Drawing
510-403-LA                                                             (Option course for students in Creative Arts -
Integrated Project/Portfolio                                           Film/Video/Communications and Photo/Design profiles
(Concentration course for students in Creative Arts -                  only)
Digital Imaging/Studio Arts profile only)                              In this course students will be exposed to experimental
In this course, students integrate the skills and knowledge            techniques in drawing which contribute to their visual
acquired in the program. They prepare a portfolio for                  understanding. Using collage, colour, and mixed media,
application to university programs, technical schools, or              students will consider the problems and challenges of
related employment. The portfolio will consist of slide                composition, movement, change and related issues. This
documentation and examples of work completed in                        drawing course allows for direct hands on experimentation
previous courses, a statement of intent, a letter of                   with the concerns common to all 2-dimensional visual
application, properly formatted lists of slides, content etc.          works.
Students will propose and execute an artwork of their own              Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66
design, which will be worked on over an extended period of             Prerequisite: 510-101 or with written permission from
time (8 weeks). The written proposal for the extended                  instructor
studio project must include a rationale on how the artwork
includes themes, theories, and techniques that the student             510-905-LA
has identified as being present in their work. Class: 3                2D Computer Animation Workshop
hours/week Units: 1.66                                                 (Option course for students in Creative Arts -
Prerequisite: all 510s from previous semesters or with                 Film/Video/Communications and Photo/Design profiles
written permission from instructor (any prerequisite                   only)
failed may be taken concurrently with 510-403)                         Students will be introduced to some basic techniques of
                                                                       computer assisted animation using desktop-based
510-901-LA                                                             animation software; in particular, Macromedia’s Flash.
Drawing                                                                Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:
(Option course for students in Creative Arts -                         demonstrate competence with Vector and Paint-based 2D
Film/Video/Communications and Photo/Design only)                       graphics production; produce animation sequences using a
Learning how to draw requires learning to see and translate.           range of animation techniques; complete a short animated
This is considered a basic skill in any field of visual art.           work illustrating skills acquired during the course;
Students will learn how various qualities of line can be used          incorporate sound and other multimedia elements into a
to describe objects, figures, environments, movement and               presentation.
time. They will be introduced to perspective systems and               Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66
experiment with light, colour and distortion. This course is           Prerequisite: 510-101 or with written permission from
useful to students interested in still or moving images. Class:        instructor
3 hours/week Units: 1.66




                                                                Page 158
Creative Arts (continued)
510-907-LA                                                          511-202-LA
Beyond The Object                                                   Black & White Photo Workshop
(Option course for students in Creative Arts -                      (Concentration course for students in Creative Arts -
Film/Video/Communications and Photo/Design profiles                 Photo/Design profile only)
only)                                                               This course is a bridge between technique and creative
                                                                    photography. Techniques covered will include using
Students will work with objects, images, and                        different films and lenses, controlling contrast through film
architectural space in relating to sculpture. Using a               development, using filters, advanced printing methods, and
variety of media, they will experiment with ideas about             print spotting. The course will introduce a thematic
how to manipulate light, sound, space, and time through             approach to photography with individual attention paid to
sculpture objects, and spatial organization. Genres of              each student’s project. There will be opportunities to
contemporary sculpture that will be investigated are:               explore areas of personal interest while relating projects to
installation, video/performance, set and scenery for                historical context. Students will learn to use black and white
theatre and/or animation, assemblage, and works that                photography as a means of creative expression, as well as to
invite interaction or participation of an audience.                 analyse the structure of images and develop a critical
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66                                     vocabulary.
                                                                    Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
511-101-LA                                                          Prerequisite: 511-101 (or with written permission from
Intro to Photo/Design                                               instructor)
(Concentration course for Creative Arts students only)
This course introduces the principles and practices of              511-203-LA
design through the medium of photography. Students                  2D & 3D Design
will be able to produce black and white photographs by              (Concentration course for students in Creative Arts -
going through all the steps from loading film into the              Photo/Design profile only)
camera to making enlargements in the darkroom.                      In this course, students will explore visual language,
Students will develop good printing skills which will               experimenting with the formal elements of design and
enable them to control the interpretation of the final              studying how their use and their interpretation can shape
print. This course will also cover the basic concepts and           the meanings of images. Concepts which will be explored
design elements of colour. The main objective of this               include line, shape, plane and volume; positive and
course is to enable students to turn ideas into visual              negative shapes and spaces; colour, tone and contrast;
images.                                                             different forms of symmetry and pattern. The course will
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66                                     also examine the transformation of 2 and 3-dimensional
                                                                    images in space and time, and communication between
511-201-LA                                                          the designer and the audience. Students will analyze how
Color Photography                                                   design elements contribute to the composition of works of
(Concentration course for students in Creative Arts –               art in both historical and contemporary pieces in a variety
Photo/Design profile only)                                          of media.
This course explores the colour of light, colour                    Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
techniques, and the aesthetics of creative photography.             Prerequisite: 511-101 (or with written permission from
Some of the technical topics covered are colour theory,             instructor)
conversion filters and different films. Students will use
this technical foundation to express their ideas in colour
photography and to create coherent series of
photographs. Printed-page layout and colour design are
important components of the course. The use of colour
photography in photojournalism and stock images will
also be examined. Critiques of students’ work will be
supplemented with studying the work of well-known
photographers in order to develop self-critical and
analytical skills.
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
Prerequisite: 511-101 (or with written permission from
instructor)




                                                             Page 159
Creative Arts (continued)
511-301-LA                                                            511-401-LA
Studio Photography                                                    Advanced Photo Workshop
(Concentration course for students in Creative Arts –                 (Concentration course for students in Creative Arts –
Photo/Design profile only)                                            Photo/Design profile only)
The primary goal of this course is to develop sensitivity to          By the end of this course, students will be able to
the shaping power of light. Students will explore an                  produce a coherent body of work which utilizes and
extensive range of interior lighting techniques, matching             extends the techniques and the analytical and critical
those techniques to appropriate subjects. Students will               skills learned in previous semesters. Students will
develop the skills necessary to light almost any interior             produce a portfolio of photographs which are
photographic situation; however the emphasis will be on               thematically cohesive, printed to high standards, and
the creative use of light rather than commercial                      well-presented. Students will design a project, write a
techniques. A variety of other studio techniques such as              project proposal and explain it in class, analyze and solve
backgrounds, table-top photography, and the use of the                problems on an on-going basis, and be able to usefully
view camera will be covered.                                          criticize both their own work and that of other students.
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                       At the end of the semester, students in this course will
Prerequisite: (511-201 and 511-202) or with written                   present their work in a year-end exhibition which allows
permission from instructor                                            them to complete the production cycle from concept to
                                                                      public presentation.
511-302-LA                                                            Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
2D Computer Design                                                    Prerequisite: 511-201 and 511-202; 511-301 or with
(Concentration course for students in Creative Arts –                 written permission from instructor (if either 511-201 or
Photo/Design profile only)                                            202 are failed, they must be taken concurrently with
This course is an introduction to the computer as a design            511-401)
tool. It builds on the design principles introduced in 511-
203, using students’ photographs as a basis for image                 511-402-LA
generation. Students will use both negative and flatbed               Digital Photography Workshop
scanners to create digital files which can be manipulated             (Concentration course for students in Creative Arts –
using different software. They will then print the final              Photo/Design profile only)
images using different printers and media. An emphasis will           This course focuses on using the computer to digitally
be placed on students developing their own visual ideas and           manipulate photographs. This course will use Adobe
original imagery, with the computer used as a means rather            Photoshop on the Macintosh to edit, create and
than an end in itself. Projects will include the development          manipulate photographic images. Students will learn how
of single and multiple images as well as design and                   to scan images, use editing tools, work with layers,
presentation in book format.                                          understand resolution concepts, manage file formats and
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                       prepare files for output. Emphasis will be placed on using
Prerequisite: 511-203 or with written permission from                 digital techniques for the creation of expressive digital
instructor                                                            artwork.
                                                                      Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
                                                                      Prerequisite: 511-302 or with written permission from
                                                                      instructor




                                                               Page 160
Creative Arts (continued)
511-403-LA                                                              511-902-LA
Portfolio: Photo/Design                                                 Photo/Design: Light and Image
(Concentration course for students in Creative Arts –                   (Option course for students in Creative Arts - Digital
Photo/Design profile only)                                              Imaging/Studio Arts and Film/Video/Communications
The portfolio course is the culmination of four semesters in            profiles only)
the Photography/Design profile. Students will review,                   The essence of image making is light. This course will help
analyze, and integrate the skills and knowledge learned in              you to modify light, control it, and use it to create mood and
all their courses to produce a coherent portfolio of their              structure. The thematic focus of the course will be mise-en
strongest work. Writing a letter of intent and presenting the           scene, with all projects revolving around the theatrics of the
portfolio to the class as a rehearsed oral presentation are             constructed image. Work can be in traditional black and
the two most important components of the course. The                    white, analogue colour or digital photography and can vary
letter of intent and portfolio may be used by students when             according to the specific project. You will make large prints
applying to pertinent university programs or when looking               which can be exhibited in the Champlain gallery, thus
for employment in the field. The course will also emphasize             completing the cycle of concept, production, and exhibition.
interview and presentation skills, including the use of audio-          Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66
visual support, and will offer the opportunity to practice              Prerequisite: 511-101 or with written permission from
public speaking.                                                        instructor
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66
Prerequisite: 511 courses in previous semesters except                  511-903-LA
if taken concurrently because of failure or with written                Story-telling with Still Images
permission from instructor                                              (Option course for students in Creative Arts - Digital
                                                                        Imaging/Studio Arts and Film/Video/Communications
511-901-LA                                                              profiles)
Photo/Design: Black & White Photography Workshop                        Photojournalism will provide the initial focus of this
(Option course for students in Creative Arts - Digital                  course, which will cover the relationship of the still image
Imaging/Studio Arts and Film/Video/Communications                       with narrative. Content analysis will help students
only)                                                                   understand how meaning is created in the media.
This photography course gives students the skills to control            Through the use of layout and an understanding of the
exposure and contrast, which is of fundamental concern in               relationship between text and image in the telling of
black and white photography. It also concentrates on                    stories, the students will learn how to create effective
editing and sequencing, and on developing a sense of                    photo essays. Students will explore several techniques
coherence and thoroughness in a given project. The course               used in still photography to create a sense of the passage
will continue the work on composition and design begun in               of time, and will use these to produce photographs
the introduction course, and will introduce more advanced               which imply narrative. The last project, compressed
printing skills. Most of the projects will be initiated by              narrative, attempts to tell a story in a single constructed
students themselves. The term project will include a written            image, using actors and props.
project proposal.                                                       Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66                                         Prerequisite: 511-101 or with written permission from
Prerequisite: 511-101 or with written permission from                   instructor
instructor




                                                                 Page 161
Creative Arts (continued)
511-942-LA                                                           530-202-LA
Introduction to Digital Photography                                  Television Studio
(Photography for Graphic Communication students                      (Concentration course for students in Creative Arts –
only)                                                                Film/Video/Communications only)
While learning about the technology and functions of the             Building on skills acquired in the introductory Film/Video/
digital camera students also learn about photographic                Communications course, students will use the TV studio to
aesthetics and basic visual language concepts. These                 create a video production. Students will learn how to create
concerns will be explored through the study of the                   electronic graphics, artwork, set design, audio mixes, and
history of image making and by practical assignments                 sound effects, while gaining an understanding of TV studio
done by the students throughout the semester. The                    production and operations. Students will learn the
course explores how images are made, understood and                  importance of teamwork and planning.
used in both artistic and commercial environments. The               Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
importance of editing and sequencing of multiple images              Prerequisite: 530-101 or with written permission from
will be examined through the creation of a slideshow                 instructor
using the students’ own photographs using software that
includes sound as an important element.                              530-203-LA
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66                                      Screen Studies
                                                                     (Concentration course for students in Creative Arts –
520-301-LA                                                           Film/Video/Communications only)
The “Sense” of Works of Art                                          Screen Studies is an introduction to serious film viewing
(Creative Arts course for Liberal Arts students only)                treating film as a constructed formal system. It teaches
In this course, Liberal Arts students will be introduced to          methods of analysis and a precise vocabulary regarding a
several ways of speaking, writing and thinking analytically          variety of filmic elements - cinematography, narrative,
about works of visual art and architecture. These                    sound, editing, etc. Students will also gain an awareness
approaches will include:                                             and deeper understanding of context - the multitude of
art history, where students will analyze works of art in             outside factors that influence the ways films look and are
historical and cultural contexts; visual language, where             looked at. Ultimately, the goal of the course is to change
students will analyze the formal elements of works of art;           passive viewers into active ones with their own
and contemporary critical theory, where students will be             articulated critical stance.
                  th
introduced to 20 century theoretical models which have               Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
been applied to art and art history from all eras: pre-
history through the ancients, the renaissance, to the                530-211-LA
modern era.                                                          Digital Filmmaking II
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                      (Concentration course for students in Creative Arts –
                                                                     Film/Video/Communications only)
530-101-LA                                                           Building on skills acquired in the introductory
Intro to Film/Video/Communications                                   Film/Video/Communications course, this course will use
(Concentration course for Creative Arts students only)               small format video equipment to allow students to
This introductory course teaches students about the                  experiment with basic and advanced narrative
grammar of film and video (shot types, angles, etc.) and             filmmaking techniques. The course will cover the
the specialized vocabulary and roles associated with                 technical and theoretical aspects of telling a story using
video and film production. Students will be exposed to all           images, focusing on the specifics of narrative shooting
phases of production (i.e., writing, preparation, planning,          and editing, such as matching action, maintaining screen
shooting, editing, presentation, and self-review) and will           direction, exposition, point-of-view, cross-cutting and
create short productions in small teams using single- and            manipulating time.
multi-camera continuity techniques.                                  Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66                                      Prerequisite: 530-101 or with written permission from
                                                                     instructor




                                                              Page 162
Creative Arts (continued)
530-302-LA                                                               530-403-LA
Film History: Selected Topics                                            Creative Arts Portfolio: Film/Video/Communication
(Concentration course for students in Creative Arts –                    (Concentration course for students in Creative Arts –
Film/Video/Communications only)                                          Film/Video/Communications only)
This course is an introductory survey of developments in                 This course synthesizes the knowledge and skills learned
cinema from its invention to the present. Using works                    in the other courses in the profile. Students will
from the silent era through the present, including fiction,              inventory, review, evaluate and edit their own work,
documentary and propaganda films, this course explores                   producing a portfolio that best represents their mastery
how filmmakers have observed and commented upon                          of the program material. Students will also research
social issues, and how films reflect the times in which                  various university admission requirements and deadlines
they were made. The intent of this course is to introduce                and they will draft a letter of intent or artist’s statement
the student to the development of forms and techniques                   for the university programs of their choice.
of film-making while examining how the historical,                       Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66 Prerequisite: All 530
political and cultural contexts of films relate to style,                courses in previous semesters except if taken
content and aesthetics. Class: 3 hours/week Units:                       concurrently because of failure or with written
2.00                                                                     permission from instructor

530-311-LA                                                               530-411-LA
Digital Filmmaking III                                                   Digital Filmmaking IV
(Concentration course for students in Creative Arts –                    (Concentration course for students in Creative Arts -
Film/Video/Communications only)                                          Film/Video/Communications only)
In this course, students will develop a portfolio of electronic          Students work to develop individual responsibility and
film work via three projects: an animated film, a cut-to-                creativity in two completely different settings. In one
sound video and short documentary video. Students will be                project, students work on one specific task, within a
exposed to the fundamental techniques of animated film                   team, in a simulated environment of a professional
and will use digital production and post-production                      film/video production company. In another, students
techniques. By the end of the course, students will be                   work alone to write/adapt, produce, direct, shoot and
expected to be able to assess creative work.                             edit their independent project. Students also take part in
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00 Prerequisite: 530-211                    several writing exercises. All film/video projects are
or with written permission from instructor                               supported with digital cameras and non-linear digital
                                                                         editing equipment.
530-402-LA                                                               Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00 Prerequisite: 530-311
Canadian Film and Television                                             or with written permission from instructor
(Concentration course for students in Creative Arts –
Film/Video/Communications only)                                          530-901-LA
This course is an introduction to the history of film and                Film/Video/Communication -Production: Techniques
television production in Canada. Content will be                         (Option course for students in Creative Arts - Digital
examined in the context of recurring themes, including                   Imaging/Studio Arts and Photo/Design only)
the role of the Canadian government in fostering and                     This course builds on the content of the introductory
supporting the film and television industries, the                       course in Film/Video/ Communications offered in the
similarities and differences between the development of                  first semester and takes into account the skills and
film and television in Canada and Québec, and the                        knowledge amassed by the student thus far in his/her
influence of foreign media on Canadian film and                          profile. Students are given the opportunity to add to
television. Alternative practices and forms, including the               their portfolios by exploring two distinctly different
animated film and the documentary, will be discussed.                    techniques: video animation and advanced live action
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                          story-telling.
                                                                         Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66
                                                                         Prerequisite: 530-101 or with written permission from
                                                                         instructor




                                                                  Page 163
Creative Arts (continued)
530-902-LA                                                       530-941-LA
Film/Video/Communication: Screen History                         Introduction to Television, Film and Sound Medias
(Option course for students in Creative Arts - Digital           (Creative Arts for Advertising Management students
Imaging/Studio Arts and Photo/Design only)                       only)
This course builds on the content of the introductory            In order to be able to build and implement a marketing
course in Film/Video/ Communications and takes into              plan, students will need to be able to understand the
account the skills and knowledge amassed by the student          various medias they may be buying or working with. In
in their profile. The student will explore the concepts          this course, students will learn about electronic media by
necessary for analyzing and discussing moving images             understanding the various steps in the production
from film/video, television and the new digital image            process of radio, film and television. Instruction in each
technologies.                                                    aspect of the production process will be executed
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66                                  through in-class sessions, guest speakers, group work
Prerequisite: 530-101 or with written permission from            and field trips including use of campus broadcast
instructor                                                       facilities.
                                                                 Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00
530-903-LA
Film/Video/Communication: Production: Genre and
Style
(Option course for students in Creative Arts - Digital
Imaging/Studio Arts and Photo/Design only)
This course builds on the content of the introductory
course in Film/Video/ Communications offered in the
first semester and takes into account the skills and
knowledge amassed by the student thus far in his/her
profile. Students are given the opportunity to add to
their portfolios by exploring two distinctly different
genres: documentary and experimental filmmaking.
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 1.66
Prerequisite: 530-101 or with written permission from
instructor


French (continued)
602-009-MQ                                                       602-101-MQ (French – Block A)
Mise à niveau en français                                        Langue française et communication
Ce cours permet aux élèves de réviser les notions                Ce cours s’adresse aux élèves anglophones ou allophones
fondamentales du français parle et écrit en vue d’accéder        qui ont une connaissance satisfaisante du français. Des
au niveau 100. Des exercices pratiques les amèneront à           textes portant sur l’actualité et des exercices divers les
interagir en français dans une variété de situation très         amèneront à communiquer en français avec de plus en
simples.                                                         plus d’aisance. Heures : 3 heures par semaine Unités :
                                                                 2.00
602-100-MQ (French – Block A)
Français de base I                                               602-102-MQ (French – Block A)
Ce cours s’adresse aux élèves anglophones et allophones          Langue française et culture
qui ont une connaissance restreinte du français. Des             Ce cours s’adresse aux élèves qui ont une bonne
exercices variés leur permettront de communiquer en              connaissance du français oral, mais qui éprouvent
français, oralement et par écrit, dans des situations            certaines difficultés à l’écrit. Des textes culturels et
simples de la vie courante.                                      d’autres portant sur l’actualité, de même que des
Heures : 3 heures par semaine Unités : 2.00                      exercices divers les amèneront à communiquer avec
                                                                 aisance en français et à structurer leur pensée de façon
                                                                 organisée.
                                                                 Heures : 3 heures par semaine Unités : 2.00




                                                          Page 164
French (continued)
602-103-MQ (French – Block A)                                         602-112-LA
Français et littérature                                               Littérature, culture et société
Le cours s’articule autour de deux volets principaux. Le              (French for Modern Languages students only)
premièr volet porte sur l’étude de textes littéraires et              Dans ce cours, la langue française sert d'outil pour explorer
culturels choisis parmi différents domaines tels le                   des éléments de culture et de civilisation à travers l’étude
théâtre, la littérature, la chanson, etc. Le second volet             de différents textes littéraires. L’élève sera entre autres
vise à perfectionner le français écrit par la rédaction               amené à comparer divers extraits de romans par l’étude de
d’analyses littéraires.                                               leurs composantes, à faire une recherche culturelle et à
Heures : 3 heures par semaine Unités : 2.00                           développer sa créativité par le biais d’ateliers d’écriture.
                                                                      NOTE: Pour les élèves du niveau 103.
602-BJP Français de base II (Niveau 100)                              Heures : 3 heures par semaine Unités : 2.00
(French – Block B)
602-BJK Français et société (Niveau 101)                              602-113-LA
(French – Block B)                                                    Le français à travers les âges
602-BJQ Français et professions I (Niveau 101)                        (French for Modern Languages students only)
(French – Block B)                                                    Dans une perspective sociohistorique et culturelle, ce
602-BJH Français et sciences II (Niveau 102)                          cours présente les grandes périodes de l’historie du
(French – Block B)                                                    français en soulignant les événements marquants de ces
602-BJM Français et société II (Niveau 102)                           époques et leurs conséquences sur la langue. Il initie
(French – Block B)                                                    aussi les élèves aux divers aspects de la linguistique tels
602-BJR Français et profession II (Niveau 102)                        la phonétique, la phonologie, la morphologie, la
(French – Block B)                                                    lexicologie, la sémantique et l’étymologie. NOTE: Pour
602-BJJ Français et sciences III (Niveau 103)                         les élèves des niveaux 101, 102 et 103.
(French – Block B)                                                    Heures : 3 heures par semaine Unités : 2.00
602-BJN Français et société III (Niveau 103)
(French – Block B)                                                    602-114-LA
602-BJS Français et professions III (Niveau 103)                      Production et Créativité
(French – Block B)                                                    (French for Modern Languages students only)
                                                                      Axé sur la créativité, ce cours amène l’élève à rédiger des
Après avoir réussi le cours approprié de la série A, l’élève          textes orientés vers des thèmes de société variés. Il lui
devra suivre un cours de la série B. Les cours de cette               permet d’élaborer, de réaliser et de présenter des
série s’appuient sur les acquis développés dans le                    productions originales. L’examen critique du cheminement
premier cours en les enrichissant d’éléments de                       suivi par l’élève fait partie du cours. NOTE: Pour les élèves
compétence liés aux champs d’études des élèves. On                    des niveaux 101, 102 et 103.
cherche à développer la précision de l’expression en                  Heures : 3 heures par semaine Unités : 2.00
plaçant les élèves dans des situations de communication               Préalables : 602-101 et 602-BJK ou 602-102 et 602-BJM ou
caractéristiques de leur domaine d’études.                            602-103 et 602-BJN
Heures : 3 heures par semaine Unités : 2.00
                                                                      602-927 LAFO
602-111-LA                                                            Français écrit du travail I – Option forte
Les mots de la culture                                                (Graphic Communication students only)
(French for Modern Languages students only)                           Ce cours s’adresse aux élèves qui ont une très bonne
Dans ce cours, la langue française sert d'outil pour                  connaissance du français. Il vise à développer et à
explorer des éléments de culture et de civilisation à                 peaufiner leur habileté à communiquer en français avec
travers l’étude de différents textes littéraires et                   aisance et précision, tant à l’oral qu’à l’écrit. Il explore le
journalistiques. L'élève sera, entre autres, amené à faire            contexte de travail propre au monde des affaires,
une recherche culturelle et à développer sa créativité par            notamment la recherche d’emploi, les communications
le biais d’ateliers d’écriture.                                       professionnelles et les relations de travail.
NOTE: Pour les élèves des niveaux 101 et 102.                         Heures : 3 heures/semaine Unités : 2.00
Heures: 3 heures par semaine Unités: 2.00                             Préalable : 602-BJN




                                                               Page 165
French (continued)
602-927 LAMO                                                             602-928 LAMO
Français écrit du travail I – Option moyenne                             Français écrit du travail II – Option moyenne
(Graphic Communication students only)                                    (Graphic Comm., Sport Mark. & Advert., Tourism)
S’adressant à des élèves ayant une bonne connaissance                    S’adressant à des élèves ayant une bonne connaissance
du français, ce cours a pour objectif de les amener à                    du français, ce cours est la suite du Français écrit du
communiquer en français standard, tant à l’oral qu’à                     travail I. Il a pour but d’amener l’élève à approfondir ses
l’écrit, dans le contexte particulier du monde du travail.               compétences orales et écrites dans le contexte
L’élève se familiarisera avec les thèmes suivants : la                   particulier du monde du travail. Les thèmes suivants
recherche d’emploi, les communications professionnelles                  seront abordés : les communications de presse, la langue
et les relations de travail.                                             de la publicité et la prise de parole en public.
Heures : 3 heures/semaine Unités : 2.00                                  Heures : 3 heures/semaine Unités : 2.00
Préalables :        602-BJM                                              Préalables : 602-927 LAMO pour Graphic
                                                                         Communications ; 602-BJR pour Sport Marketing,
602-927-01                                                               Advertising et Tourism
Français écrit du travail I – Option faible                              602-928-01
(Graphic Communication students only)                                    Français écrit du travail II – Option faible
Ce cours s’adresse aux élèves qui ont une connaissance                   (Graphic Comm., Sport Mark. & Advert., Tourism)
de base du français écrit et oral. Il a pour objectif d’initier          Ce cours s’adresse aux élèves qui ont une connaissance
les élèves au domaine des affaires tout en                               de base du français écrit et oral. Il vise à faciliter
perfectionnant leurs connaissances du français courant.                  l’intégration des élèves au monde professionnel à
Les thèmes suivants seront abordés : la recherche                        travers des thèmes tels que les communications de
d’emploi, les communications professionnelles et les                     presse, la langue de la publicité et la prise de parole en
relations de travail à travers des activités diverses                    public, en plus de participer à diverses activités dans le
(travaux pratiques, dictées, jeux de rôles, etc.).                       but de perfectionner leurs connaissances du français
Heures : 3 heures/semaine Unités : 2.00                                  courant (recherches sur le web, travaux pratiques, jeux
Préalables : 602-BJK ou 602-BJP                                          de rôles, etc.).
                                                                         Heures : 3 heures/semaine Unités : 2.00
602-928 LAFO                                                             Préalables : 602-927-01 pour Graphic Communications ;
Français écrit du travail II – Option forte                              602-BJQ ou 602-BJP pour Sport Marketing, Advertising
(Graphic Comm., Sport Mark. & Advert., Tourism)                          et Tourism
Ce cours, faisant suite au cours Français écrit du travail I,
s’adresse aux élèves qui ont une très bonne                              602-991-LA et 602-992-LA
connaissance du français. Il vise à développer et à                      Écriture, thème et littérature Niveau A2 standard
peaufiner leur habileté à communiquer en français avec                   (French for IB students only)
aisance et précision, tant à l’oral qu’à l’écrit. Il explore le          Ces cours, donnés l’un à la suite de l’autre, s’adressent aux
contexte de travail propre au monde des affaires,                        élèves du B.I. qui ont déjà une très bonne connaissance de
notamment les communications de presse, la langue de                     la langue française. Le programme comprend un volet
la publicité et la prise de parole en public.                            culturel et un volet littéraire à travers lesquels les élèves
Heures : 3 heures/semaine Unités : 2.00                                  approfondiront l’étude de certains thèmes.
Préalables : 602-927 LAFO pour Graphic                                   Heures : 3 heures par semaine Unités : 2.00
Communications ; 602-BJS pour Sport Marketing &                          Niveau de classement : 602-103
Advertising et Tourism
                                                                         602-911-77-A et 602-BJY-03
                                                                         Communication écrite : Niveau Standard
                                                                         (French for IB students only)
                                                                         Ces cours s’adressent aux élèves de français langue seconde
                                                                         de niveau intermédiaire. L’objectif visé par l’Organisation
                                                                         du Baccalauréat International est l’acquisition de la langue
                                                                         et le développement des quatre compétences linguistiques
                                                                         fondamentales : compréhension orale, expression orale,
                                                                         compréhension écrite et expression écrite.
                                                                         Heures: 3 heures par semaine Unités : 2.00
                                                                         Niveau de classement : 602-101 ou 602-102




                                                                  Page 166
French (continued)
602-C1A-LA                                                             Heures : 3 heures par semaine Unités : 2.00
Les mots de la culture                                                 602-C2B-LA
(Complementary course - not open to Modern                             Le français à travers les âges
Languages students)                                                    (Complementary course - not open to Modern
Dans ce cours, la langue française sert d'outil pour                   Languages students)
explorer des éléments de culture et de civilisation à                  Dans une perspective sociohistorique et culturelle, ce
travers l’étude de différents textes littéraires et                    cours présente les grandes périodes de l’historie du
journalistiques. L'élève sera, entre autres, amené à faire             français en soulignant les événements marquants de ces
une recherche culturelle et à développer sa créativité par             époques et leurs conséquences sur la langue. Il initie
le biais d’ateliers d’écriture.                                        aussi les élèves aux divers aspects de la linguistique tels
NOTE: Ce cours est réservé aux élèves des niveaux 602-                 la phonétique, la phonologie, la morphologie, la
101 et 602-102. Heures: 3 heures par semaine Unités:                   lexicologie, la sémantique et l’étymologie.
2.00                                                                   NOTE: Ce cours est réservé aux élèves des niveaux 602-
                                                                       102 et 602-103. Heures : 3 heures par semaine Unités :
602-C1B-LA                                                             2.00
Littérature, culture et société
(Complementary course - not open to Modern                             602-C3B-LA
Languages students)                                                    Production et Créativité
Dans ce cours, la langue française sert d'outil pour explorer          (Complementary course - not open to Modern
des éléments de culture et de civilisation à travers l’étude           Languages students)
de différents textes littéraires. L’élève sera entre autres            Axé sur la créativité, ce cours amène l’élève à rédiger des
amené à comparer divers extraits de romans par l’étude de              textes orientés sur des thèmes de société variés. Il lui
leurs composantes, à faire une recherche culturelle et à               permet d’élaborer, de réaliser et de présenter des
développer sa créativité par le biais d’ateliers d’écriture.           productions originales. L’examen critique du cheminement
.                                                                      suivi par l’élève fait partie du cours. NOTE: Ce cours est
NOTE: Ce cours est réservé aux élèves du niveau 602-                   réservé aux élèves des niveaux 602-102 et 602-103.
103.                                                                   Heures : 3 heures par semaine Unités : 2.00


English
603-LA1-01                                                             603-1A1-01 - Introduction to Literature Level I
Literature in Translation: Ancient and Classical                       603-1B1-01 or 603-101-01- Introduction to Literature
Literature                                                             and Composition Level II
(English for Liberal Arts students only)                               This course introduces students to thinking, talking and
This course presents the literature of the ancient world               writing about literature at the college level. Students will
(myth) and of classical Greece and Rome. Course content is             learn to use the terms and forms they will need in future
selected from Babylonian poetry and creation myth, Greek               literature courses, and they will learn to write a literary
tragedy and comedy, and epic poetry (e.g. Virgil, Ovid).               analysis essay. By the end of term, successful students in
Students will read plays of Sophocles, Euripides, and                  both levels will be able to analyze a short story and write
Aristophanes. Academic essay structure is central to the               a 750-word theme analysis. Results of the placement test
curriculum.                                                            will determine whether students take the level I or level
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.66                                        II course. While the learning objectives are the same for
                                                                       both, the level II classes will have smaller class sizes to
                                                                       allow for more writing practice.
                                                                       Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.66




                                                                Page 167
English (continued)
603-IB1-01I                                                           603-102-MQ
Introduction to Literature Course I - Fall Semester                   The Novel
(English for International Baccalaureate students only)               (Literary Genre)
This course introduces students to all the literary genres:           Students will be introduced to the detailed analysis of
fiction, poetry and drama. A variety of writers will be               the novel as a literary form. They will learn that, while
compared and contrasted (some will be read in                         the novel shares many features of the short story, it also
translation) with a view to understanding genre and                   includes more developed characterization and plot, as
becoming competent at textual analysis. Evaluation will               well as a distinct historical setting.
take the form of both written work and oral                           Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
presentations. Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.66
                                                                      603-102-MQ
603-102-MQ                                                            Knightly Adventures
Elizabethan Drama: Shakespeare                                        (Literary Genre)
(Literary Genre)                                                      The legends of King Arthur and the Knight of the Round
This course examines major works by Shakespeare,                      Table have enthralled readers for centuries. This course will
focusing on the historical, social and cultural contexts.             explore the nature of quests, chivalry and marvellous and
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                       perilous magic through an examination of various tellings
                                                                      and/or retellings of knightly tales.
603-102-MQ                                                            Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
Modern Drama
(Literary Genre)                                                      603-102-MQ
This course introduces students to a variety of modern                Image & Imagination: Introduction to Poetry
plays and playwrights with a view to appreciating the                 (Literary Genre)
distinctive nature of this genre of literature. In order to           This course seeks to give students a grasp of the nature
appreciate the play as a potential script for theatre                 and variety of poetry. It may offer a historical survey of
artists, students may attend a live theatre performance               poetry or concentrate on contemporary poems.
as a course requirement.                                              Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
                                                                      603-102-MQ
603-102-MQ                                                            Drama Survey
Science Fiction                                                       (Literary Genre)
(Literary Genre)                                                      This course is designed to introduce students to some of
Isaac Asimov defines science fiction as "that branch of               the most important works of theatre through a study of
literature which deals with the response of human beings              critical theory and representative works. Studied plays
to changes in science and technology." In this course,                may include selections ranging from Greek tragedy to
students will develop an understanding of the                         contemporary drama.
conventions and/or functions of science fiction through a             Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
study of various literary forms.
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                       603-102- MQ
                                                                      The Western
603-102- MQ                                                           (Literary Genre)
Short Fiction                                                         This course studies the conventions of the formulaic
(Literary Genre)                                                      Western novel through representative authors.
In this course, students will become acquainted with the              Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
distinctive characteristics of short fiction by studying a
selection of notable examples of the genre. These may
include short stories, novellas, and/or fables. Texts may be
taken from various periods and cultures and may be
examined from different critical approaches.
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33




                                                               Page 168
English (continued)
603-102-MQ or 603-103-MQ                                              603-102-MQ
English for Tutors                                                    Shakespeare & Other Genres - IB
This course is both an English course and a tutoring                  Fall Semester
course. Students will study literature and work as writing            (English for International Baccalaureate students only)
tutors in the Writing Center. By the end of the term                  In this course, students will study one play by Shakespeare
students will have written a 1000 word literary analysis              as well as a work of non-fiction. Students will also study
essay. This course requires a serious commitment from                 works selected from one or two of the following: a second
the student as it requires good leadership abilities in               Shakespeare play, poetry, and fiction (either a novel or a
addiction to a strong background in English. Students will            collection of short stories). Evaluation will be based mainly
be recommended to the course by their English teacher.                on essays and taped oral presentations, in accordance with
Those eligible will receive a letter inviting them to apply           IB guidelines.
for the course.                                                       Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
NOTE: This course will fulfill either the student's 603-102
or 603-103 diploma requirement.                                       603-102-MQ
Class and tutoring: 2-4 hours/week Units: 2.33                        Satire
                                                                      (Literary Genre)
603-102-MQ                                                            This course concentrates on satire and social comedy as
The Genres of Literature                                              a literary genre in traditional and modern forms.
(Literary Genre)                                                      Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
Through the study of various genres of literature--the short
story, the play, the novel, the poem, and/or the essay--this          603-102-MQ
course will help students understand how meaning is                   Gothic Fiction
influenced by different forms.                                        (Literary Genre)
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                       This course focuses on establishing the components of
                                                                      the Gothic genre, from the haunted setting, to the
603-102-MQ                                                            villainous hero, to the related romantic yet deadly
The Essay: Ideas on Trial                                             entanglements. A series of historical and critical
(Literary Genre)                                                      approaches may be introduced to unravel the mystery of
This course emphasizes the diversity and liveliness of the            the Gothic text.
essay genre by examining its various structural patterns.             Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
Though studying essays will help students improve their
ability to plan and write essays that present convincing              603-102- MQ
arguments and that are logically organized and clear in               The Critic
expression, students should be aware that this is not a               (Literary Genre)
remedial essay writing course.                                        Students will be introduced to the basic principles of
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                       criticism, which can be applied to all forms of art. The
                                                                      course will be based on literary criticism but may include
603-102-MQ                                                            an outing to a museum, theatre, or concert.
Literature and Music                                                  Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
(Literary Genre)
This course examines various literary genres and the                  603-102-MQ
musical forms to which they have been adapted.                        Medieval & Renaissance World Literature
Students may study the differences between a musical                  (English for Liberal Arts students only)
play or a musical comedy and its literary model, and may              This course surveys literature from the end of antiquity
be listening to opera. No previous knowledge of classical             through the period of social upheaval and transition
music is required.                                                    leading up to the Renaissance. Works studied include
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                       genres typical of the era: medieval tales (fabliaux, lais),
                                                                      chivalric poems, and substantial portions of Chaucer and
                                                                      Dante’s works. At least one of Shakespeare’s plays will be
                                                                      studied. Students will continue to practice textual
                                                                      analysis and improve their writing skills.
                                                                      Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33




                                                               Page 169
English (continued)
603-102-MQ                                                           603-102-MQ
Fiction into Film                                                    The Epic
(Literary Genre)                                                     (Literary Genre)
This course will take a close look at the process of                 This course is an introduction to the epic, a form of
adaptation from fiction into film. Short stories and novels          literature that has had a major influence on the history of
will be studied for their literary merit, then the                   ideas. Students will be introduced to specific examples of
corresponding films will be viewed and analyzed for                  the genre.
cinematic qualities. The relationship between the text and           Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
the film will be the focus of the course.
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                      603-102-MQ
                                                                     Studies in Genre
603-102-MQ                                                           (Literary Genre)
Introduction to Graphic Novels                                       This course will introduce students to literary expression in
In this course students will develop an understanding of             various genres. Students will learn to recognize the
the conventions and themes of the graphic novel through              conventions of literary genres and their contribution to the
                                                    th
a study of its historical development during the 20                  meaning of the texts.
century. Among other things, we will explore the                     Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
combination of words and images in superhero comics,
underground commix, as well as the more recent trends                603-102-MQ
of realistic and autobiographical graphic novels.                    Fantasy Literature
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                      (Literary Genre)
                                                                     Though fantasy is often dismissed for being escapist, the
603-102-MQ                                                           genre presents serious comment on reality. This course will
The Best of Popular Literature                                       explore contemporary high fantasy and its roots through
(Literary Genre)                                                     the analysis of fairy tales, medieval romance, short fiction,
This course will examine, analyze, and evaluate the                  poetry, essays, and/or novels.
formal characteristics and concerns of commercial, best-             Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
selling fiction.
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                      603-102-MQ
                                                                     Crime Fiction
603-102-MQ                                                           (Literary Genre)
Magic Realism                                                        In this course, students will explore crime fiction through
(Literary Genre)                                                     various historical and/or literary periods.
This literary genre fuses the fantastic with the ordinary.           Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
Initially associated with Latin American authors, magical
realism has more recently been developed by a wide                   603-102-MQ
range of international writers. Students will examine the            Comedy
paradoxes of the genre through an analysis of poetry,                (Literary Genre)
short stories, and/or novels.                                        In this course, students will learn to recognize the features
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                      of comedy.
                                                                     Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
603-102-MQ
Greek Tragedy                                                        603-102-MQ
(Literary Genre)                                                     Children’s Literature
This course will examine the characteristics of Greek                (Literary Genre)
tragedy.                                                             This course explores literary aspects of texts written for
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                      children. Readings may include fairy tales, nursery
                                                                     rhymes, picture books, short fiction, poetry and/or
                                                                     novels.
                                                                     Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33




                                                              Page 170
English (continued)
603-102-MQ                                                           603-103-MQ
Life Writing                                                         Mythological and Religious Themes
(Literary Genre)                                                     (Literary Theme)
When authors write about themselves, they reveal a part              This course will examine the influence of mythology on
of their story; what they conceal is also telling. Authors           the development of literature. Through close analysis,
use a variety of formats to present their life stories and           students will learn to recognize the underlying
to convey their understanding of life journeys. By reading           mythological and religious ideas present in literary texts.
these literary examples, whether they be journal or diary            Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
entries, letters, autobiographies, essays, or fictionalized
accounts of real events, the reader gains an insight into            603-103-MQ
the author's psyche and, often, into his or her own life.            Is or Ain’t Your Blues Like Mine?
Students may also apply what they learn from these texts             In this course students will gain an appreciation of some
by writing about themselves.                                         of the issues that Black Canadian and American writers,
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                      musicians and film makers have had to grapple with in
                                                                     attempting to live and work in North America. Works
603-103-MQ                                                           chosen from the cultural and historical perspective of
Discord in Contemporary Drama                                        Black literature, music and film will enable students to
(Literary Theme)                                                     gain an appreciation of the complexities, difficulties and
In this course, students will study varying and recurring            dilemmas often encountered in the struggle to make
disputes in contemporary drama. Different styles, such as            one’s life.
comic or tragic, and parallel treatments may be examined.            Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
Students may attend a live theatre performance to better
appreciate the transformation from text to live production.          603-103-MQ
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                      Medieval and Renaissance Literature
                                                                     (Literary Theme)
603-103-MQ                                                           The course in Medieval and Renaissance studies will be
Literature and the Environment                                       historically and thematically oriented. The student will
(Literary Theme)                                                     write textual analyses with a view to comprehending and
Through the study of literature that deals with or draws             identifying figurative language and literary themes in
from environmental themes, readers can increase their                major works.
awareness of and appreciation for the environment. This              Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
course will examine the diverse interests involved in
environmental issues and the myriad ways in which                    603-103-MQ
aspects of the environment serve as sources of inspiration           World Literature - IB
for writers. Short stories, poems, novels, and/or essays             (English for International Baccalaureate students only)
from various social contexts will be studied to provide an           In this course, students will study three literary works in
overview of the relationship between literature and the              translation. These works may be chosen from different
environment. Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                         genres, countries and periods, ranging from Ancient Greece
                                                                     to the present. Students will be required to do textual
603-103-MQ                                                           analyses as well as comparative essays. The final
Coming of Age                                                        assignments will be independent studies of all three works
(Literary Theme)                                                     and will be submitted to the IB for external examination.
Growing up should be beautiful but can often be                      Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
traumatic, so much so that it can forever colour the way
we perceive the world and our place in it. This course will
study the passage from childhood to the adult world, and
in doing so chart the individual's journey from innocence
to experience, through short stories, poetry, drama,
and/or the novel.
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33




                                                              Page 171
English (continued)
603-103-MQ                                                              603-103-MQ-L
Dreams of Freedom                                                       Seventeenth to Nineteenth Century Literature
(Literary Theme)                                                        (English for Liberal Arts students only)
Described as liberty, autonomy, or sovereignty, freedom                 This course will focus on the novel as a genre and
is possibly the most basic right of humans. The taking                  examine the historical development and social
away of personal freedom is one of the worst                            significance of the English novel. The student will be
experiences someone might ever face. However,                           introduced to the concept of Romanticism and will
freedom has meant something different to the authors                    examine the influence of this movement on the
who will be studied in this course. Although each writer                development of the genre. In order to develop an
touches upon his or her personal passions regarding the                 historical perspective, students will examine a number of
struggle for freedom, the definition of freedom is shaped               poems, prose works, and excerpts from early novels.
by factors such as era, country of birth, gender or race.               Students will analyze a number of representative works
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                         by British novelists who may include Austen, Bronte and
                                                                        Dickens.
603-103-MQ                                                              Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
War Literature
(Literary Theme)                                                        603-103-MQ
This course is a study of selected war literature--prose,               Utopia/Dystopia
poetry, and/or personal memoir--that examines such                      (Literary Theme)
issues as mateship, sexuality, depictions of the soldier                A utopia--a word that means “no place” in Greek--is an
and of the enemy, representations of violence and pain,                 imaginative picture of an ideal society. At certain times
and the ideological function of works about war.                        throughout history, philosophers, writers of fiction,
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                         painters, sociologists, and anthropologists have created
                                                                        utopias to suggest their own ideas for a better world, and
603-103-MQ                                                              to critique the societies in which they lived. Utopias often
International Literature                                                suggest hope for the betterment of humankind. Instead
(Literary Theme)                                                        of ideal worlds to be hoped for, dystopias are frightening
This course takes a global and multicultural approach to                worlds to be feared and avoided. Creators of dystopias
the study of literature. Students will examine literary                 often see in their own societies signs of the horror that
traditions and cultural values in a variety of stories, plays,          they describe in their imagined worlds.
poems, and/or novels from different countries around                    Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
the world. Post-colonial perspectives may also be
examined.                                                               603-103-MQ
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                         Linguistics & Literature
603-103-MQ                                                              (Literary Theme)
Images of Women (Literary Theme)                                        This course studies the nature of language and its role in
Through fiction, poems, and/or essays, this course                      human society, focusing on styles of language usage and
examines literature by and/or about women to explore                    discourse. Topics include levels of language usage,
female identity, desire, relationships, and position in                 historical dimension to language, national varieties of
society.                                                                language, and literary and conversational styles.
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                         Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33

                                                                        603-103-MQ
                                                                        Thinking about Learning
                                                                        (Literary Theme)
                                                                        This course will take as its focus the topic of education.
                                                                        Students will engage in a variety of class activities
                                                                        designed to develop the analysis of, and reflection upon,
                                                                        the process of teaching and learning. Readings will
                                                                        include essays, short stories, and articles to do with
                                                                        education. Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33




                                                                 Page 172
English (continued)
603-103-MQ                                                             603-103-MQ
The Immigrant Experience                                               Quebec Literature
(Literary Theme)                                                       (Literary Theme)
In this course, students will study literature that focuses            This course studies a variety of literary works by Quebec
on the interaction between generations as the new                      authors. Students will consider the essential qualities of
generation goes through the necessary process of                       Quebec literature and the way in which Quebec culture
defining itself. Issues such as language, religion,                    influences that literature.
education, and tradition may be explored.                              Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
                                                                       603-103-MQ
603-103-MQ                                                             Irish Literature
The American West                                                      (Literary Theme)
(Literary Theme)                                                       In this course, students will be introduced to literature
This course looks at the American West through a study of              written by major Irish writers. They will study narratives,
stories and/or novels. Themes to be examined may include               poetry, and/or drama to become familiar with the
the captivity narrative, the conflict between whitemen and             cultural and historical context out of which the literature
redmen, the pioneer experience, law and order, justice,                grows.
and the role of the cowboy.                                            Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
                                                                       603-103-MQ
603-103-MQ                                                             Contemporary Literature
Canadian Literature                                                    (Literary Theme)
(Literary Theme)                                                       This course presents contemporary literature from a
This course will explore the evolution of a Canadian                   historical and literary perspective. A variety of works that
literary voice in selected poems, stories, novels, and/or              explore ideas and art will be included.
plays, focusing on topics such as landscape, social                    Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
problems, artistic concerns, and historical events.
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                        603-103-MQ
                                                                       British Literature
603-103-MQ                                                             (Literary Theme)
American Literature                                                    In this course, students will be introduced to literature
(Literary Theme)                                                       that has a direct connection to Britain. Each work will be
This course will study the evolution of American                       examined to see how it reflects the cultural, geographic,
literature, focusing on issues that characterize the                   and historical situation of its author.
American experience, such as exploration, the Promised                 Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
Land and the American Dream, the nature of good and
evil, the nature of government, and the social contract.               603-103-MQ
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                        Multicultural Literature
                                                                       (Literary Theme)
603-103-MQ                                                             In this course, literature written by authors from Africa
Ah, Love!                                                              and the African diasporas or from Latin America will be
(Literary Theme)                                                       examined. Multicultural literature often deals with issues
This course will examine love and desire in various aspects            such as race, gender, class, ethnicity, religion, sexuality,
as expressed in a variety of literary forms. The cultural and          and nationality.
historical context of the literature will be considered, as            Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
will be the ways in which writers have thought about and
given voice to love.                                                   603-103-MQ
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                        Politics and Literature
                                                                       (Literary Theme)
                                                                       This course will examine the ideas, sometimes
                                                                       revolutionary, present in political writings.
                                                                       Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33




                                                                Page 173
English (continued)
603-103-MQ                                                             603-103-MQ
American Writers of the South                                          Sport in Fiction
(Literary Theme)                                                       (Literary Theme)
The history of the South reflects a particular past, haunted           This course examines sport themes and motifs, and the
by ghosts of the slave trade, plantations, incest, and                 role of sports in society as expressed in literature. Issues
murder. The literature of the South, like its history and              examined might include, but are not limited to,
location, reveals themes that question the social and racial           heroes/heroines in sport; youth and aging in sport;
system that permeated the old South. Many writers                      nationalism, racism, and sexism in sport; the individual
attempt to expose their paradoxical attraction for this                versus the community; and the triumph of the individual
particular region and its history. This course will study the          in terms of body and mind.
literature of the South to familiarize the student with the            Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
history of the South and the movement from old to new
South.                                                                 603-103-MQ-AO
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                        The Rebel
                                                                       (Literary Theme)
603-103-MQ                                                             This course will examine the rebel from different points
Travels and Journeys                                                   of view. The causes and forms of rebellion will also be
(Literary Theme)                                                       explored.
This course explores the use of the journey in literature              Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
through short stories, plays, novels, and/or travel writing.
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                        603-103-MQ
                                                                       Marginality: Gay and Lesbian Literature
603-103-MQ                                                             (Literary Theme)
The Creative Self                                                      The study of same-sex desire has been avoided for
(Literary Theme)                                                       centuries. Due to the history of legal and social scandal,
This course explores the nature and expression of                      queer theory has attempted to highlight clandestine or
creativity. Through an analysis of fiction and/or non-                 ignored desire between people of the same sex. Gay and
fiction, students will discover ways in which ideas are                lesbian literature reflects the paradox of liberation: the
transformed into literature. Students may also apply                   combination of a desire to articulate personal yearnings
what they learn from these texts to their own creative                 and the realities of culturalized homophobia. This course
lives.                                                                 will sample literature that represents same-sex desire
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                        either overtly or covertly to acquaint the student with
                                                                       themes that examine the transition from concealed to
603-103-MQ                                                             open same-sex desires.
Paths to Self-Realization                                              Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
(Literary Theme)
Students in this course will study texts that explore an               603-103-MQ-AQ
individual's need for self-discovery.                                  Single Author Study
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                        (Literary Theme)
                                                                       In this course, students will study the work of a single
603-103-MQ                                                             author in detail. The choice of author may vary from
Extreme Fiction                                                        semester to semester depending on instructor
(Literary Theme)                                                       preference.
Through this survey of thought-provoking and                           Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33
noteworthy non-realistic and/or non-traditional fiction,
students will think about literature and fiction in a new              603-103-MQ
light while being exposed to a wide gender, ethnic, and                Studies in Theme
stylistic diversity. Short stories, novels, plays and/or               (Literary Theme)
poems may be used to present startling ideas, characters               This course will introduce students to the themes or
and situations.                                                        ideas of literature. Students will learn to recognize and
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                        analyze the themes and value systems of the texts.
                                                                       Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33




                                                                Page 174
English (continued)
603-103-LA                                                             603-BME-LA
A Touch of Class: The 19th Century Novel of Manners                    English for Arts Programs
(Literary Theme)                                                       (English for Creative Arts and Graphic Communications
This course will focus on novels dealing with the social               Students only)
                       th
conventions of the 19 century. Conventions of courtship,               The objective of this course is to enable students to
marriage, social relations, death and money are among the              communicate in forms appropriate to specific programs.
topics covered.                                                        To this end, students will learn to recognize appropriate
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                        forms, conventions of communications and organization
                                                                       of facts and arguments. Students will learn to develop
603-103-LA                                                             their own ideas into arguments, to organize them and to
Literature of Scotland                                                 edit their work. At the end of the course, successful
(Literary Theme)                                                       students will produce a 1000 word analysis. This analysis
This course will study literature by writers of Scottish               will be developed clearly and correctly.
background. It will examine the ways in which Scots                    Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.00
writers have used song, poetry, drama, the short story,
the novel and/or non-fiction to explore different facets               603-BMC-LA
of their culture.                                                      English for Professional Programs
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.33                                        (English for Advertising Management, Computer
                                                                       Science, Sport Marketing & Management and Tourism
603-110-LA                                                             students only)
International Literature                                               The objective of this course is to enable students to
(English for Modern Languages students only)                           communicate in forms appropriate to specific programs.
This course takes a global and multicultural approach to               To this end, students will learn to recognize appropriate
the study of literature. Students will examine literary                forms, conventions of communications and organization
traditions and cultural values in a variety of stories, short          of facts and arguments. Students will learn to develop
plays and poems from around the world. Class: 4                        their own ideas into arguments, to organize them and to
hours/week Units: 2.00                                                 edit their work. At the end of the course, successful
                                                                       students will produce a 1000-word analysis. This analysis
603-BMA-LA                                                             will be developed clearly and correctly.
English for Science Programs                                           Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.00
(English for Science students only)
The objective of this course is to enable students to                  603-BMD-LA
communicate in forms appropriate to specific programs.                 Literature of the Twentieth Century
To this end, students will learn to recognize appropriate              (English for Liberal Arts students only)
forms, conventions of communications and organization                  This course studies a variety of works that reflect important
of facts and arguments. Students will learn to develop                 aspects of twentieth-century literature. The reading list is
their own ideas into arguments, to organize them and to                international and involves the study of works in translation
edit their work. At the end of the course, successful                  as well as works written originally in English. Students will
students will produce a 1000-word analysis. This analysis              consider the connection between history and literature by
will be developed clearly and correctly.                               reading fiction, drama, and poetry that deal with important
Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.00                                        twentieth-century subjects such as social revolution, World
                                                                       War I, communism, and feminism. The course also
                                                                       considers aesthetic aspects of modern literature through
                                                                       the examination of developments in literary technique.
                                                                       Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.00




                                                                Page 175
English (continued)
603-BME-IB                                                            603-BMH-LA
Literature in Context Course IV - Winter Semester                     Effective Communication for College Studies
(English for International Baccalaureate students only)               (English for Social Science (all options), Creative Arts,
This course introduces the student to the narrative                   Modern Languages and Publication Design &
techniques of various novelists or dramatists from the                Management students only)
nineteenth or twentieth centuries. Through the study of               The objective of this course is to enable students to
these techniques, the student will be prepared to write               communicate in forms appropriate to specific programs.
about the novel or play form in general as well as about              To this end, students will learn to recognize appropriate
specific works and authors.                                           forms, conventions of communications and organization
Class: 4 hrs/week Units: 2.00                                         of facts and arguments. Students will learn to develop
                                                                      their own ideas into arguments, to organize them and to
                                                                      edit their work. At the end of the course, successful
                                                                      students will produce a 1000-word analysis. This analysis
                                                                      will be developed clearly and correctly.
                                                                      Class: 4 hours/week Units: 2.00


Modern Languages
607-101-01                                                            607-401-LA
Spanish I                                                             Spanish IV
(Spanish for Modern Languages and Tourism                             (Spanish for Modern Languages and Tourism
Management students only)                                             Management students only)
Designed for students who have no knowledge of                        This course will complete the close study of Spanish
Spanish, this course will present the basic structures of             grammar and syntax. Students will communicate orally
the Spanish language with emphasis on listening,                      and in writing with ease through intensive conversation
reading, comprehension and oral expression. Students                  and written assignments based on socio-cultural topics.
will be able to communicate in common situations of                   Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00 Comprehensive
their everyday life.                                                  Assessment: 1 hour/week
Class: 3 hours/week Units: 2.00                                       Prerequisite: 607-201

607-201-01                                                            607-901-LA
Spanish II                                                            Introduction to Spanish Literature
(Spanish for Modern Languages and Tourism                             (Spanish for Modern Languages and Tourism
Management students only)                                             Management students only)
This course is a continuation of Beginners I. It consists of