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					                                                                                   ECIS‐2010‐DRAMA‐Session 1 
 



                            ‘Drama, huh?.... but I am an English teacher!’

This whole day series of drama-related activities is a series of ‘taster’ workshops for teachers of English (or other
subjects) who would like to enhance their teaching skills through active engagement in drama. The workshops
are intended to provide starting points for further study and application but all participants will be able to take
away a range of practical and useful ideas for their classroom. As the nature of drama requires students to learn
through active participation, this series of workshops will also be active, engaging and, we hope, enjoyable. No
previous experience in teaching drama is required; however, loose, comfortable clothing is advised!




                                            Session 1: Warm ups

The purposes of warm ups are many fold. They introduce a different way of learning
and approach to the subject, they engender enthusiasm, they create energy and a
willingness to be actively engaged, they set the tone for the lesson, they make drama
different from the start to other lessons and they are fun. It is important that you are
ready to begin from the moment students enter the class.

If you have access to music, try and make sure this is playing as the students enter
and leave, although we realise this is not always possible. If you can play the piano,
and there is one in the drama studio, the possibilities are limitless!

 These activities should be physically engaging and be engineered by the teacher to
include everyone equally (avoid asking students to form their own groups, pick their
own partners etc as this can be divisive for the introverted student).

As the teacher, you must also takepart. As with all drama lessons, it is very important
for the students to see you are willing to take the risks you are asking them to take.
With the exception of the necessary admin required, never, ever, spend the drama
lesson sitting at the computer while they are working!

Because warm-ups are fun, do not repeat the same ones over and over. It will not be
long before the students hate doing them and this will be a very bad start to the
lesson!

Be inventive, draw on your own childhood experiences for ideas, be willing to laugh
with your students – they will sense your active engagement and enjoy them even
more.




                                                         1
                                                                          ECIS‐2010‐DRAMA‐Session 1 
 

Below is a list of the activities we will cover in this opening session, if time permits;
however they are just a few of the many possibilities open to you.

                                     Rhythmic listening

                                  Standing position ritual

                                    Boom Chikka Boom

                                         Knee fighting

                                      I Love you Honey

                                  Making statues together

                                    Groups of 3 tableaux

                                           Mirroring

                                    Mirror in a big group

                                       Moving the pen

                                         Mind games;

                                               1. Breaking glass

                                                2. Black magic

                                                 3. Walk into the wall

                                        Fingertip trust




                          Julia McKelvey, Chair, ECIS Drama, Theatre Arts Committee and Drama Coordinator,

                                                       International School of the Basel Region, Switzerland

                                   Erick Aufderheyde, Head of Drama, Lorentz Lyceum, Arnhem, Netherlands




                                                 2
                                                                                   ECIS‐2010‐DRAMA‐Session 2 
 

                            ‘Drama, huh?.... but I am an English teacher!’

This whole day series of drama-related activities is a series of ‘taster’ workshops for teachers of English (or other
subjects) who would like to enhance their teaching skills through active engagement in drama. The workshops
are intended to provide starting points for further study and application but all participants will be able to take
away a range of practical and useful ideas for their classroom. As the nature of drama requires students to learn
through active participation, this series of workshops will also be active, engaging and, we hope, enjoyable. No
previous experience in teaching drama is required; however, loose, comfortable clothing is advised!




                           Session 2: Story telling through stage combat

Students will love doing this work as it challenges them to take on roles they have
seen many times in films, on the TV and in the theatre. Active engagement, co-
operation and concentration are allnecessary whenlearning to perform stage combat
without inflicting injury.

Do not teach stage combat unless you are confident that your students can rise to the
challenge and stay focussed enough, however, even the most disinterested students
will probably find themselves fully motivated to learn!

Once mastered, students will be able to use these skills in many different ways and
they will add a sense of energy and excitement to storytelling and improvisation.

In this workshop, we will be covering a few basic moves and then asking you to put
them into practice. Please note that the key to stage combat is that the actors are
actually doing the opposite of what it appears on stage. At the first sign that any
student is doing it for real, remove them from the group!



Below is a brief summary of what we are covering in this session;

    1. Safety measures and basic rules

    2. Falling safely (cork screw)

    3. Helping the other to overcome the fear of falling

    4. Safe distance (eye contact)

    5. Slap in the face

    6. Arm lock

    7. Hair or ear pull

    8. Hair pulling and dragging across the floor

    9. Kick in the stomach/Breaking the neck

    10. Where is the audience?
                                                    ECIS‐2010‐DRAMA‐Session 2 
 



    Julia McKelvey, Chair, ECIS Drama, Theatre Arts Committee and Drama Coordinator,

                                 International School of the Basel Region, Switzerland

             Erick Aufderheyde, Head of Drama, Lorentz Lyceum, Arnhem, Netherlands
                                                                   ECIS-2010-DRAMA-Session 5



                       ‘Drama, huh?.... but I am an English teacher!’

This whole day series of drama-related activities is a series of ‘taster’ workshops for teachers of English
(or other subjects) who would like to enhance their teaching skills through active engagement in drama.
The workshops are intended to provide starting points for further study and application but all
participants will be able to take away a range of practical and useful ideas for their classroom. As the
nature of drama requires students to learn through active participation, this series of workshops will also
be active, engaging and, we hope, enjoyable. No previous experience in teaching drama is required;
however, loose, comfortable clothing is advised!

             Session 5: ACCENT: ACtive and Creative ENglish Training):

The drama activities in language acquisition and language development are
designed to build up second language learning skills by constructing situations that
require the student to concentrate on the meaning and emotional content of
language rather than on its structure. In an attempt to involve the whole personality
of the learner in the acquisition of language, this course stresses the importance of a
social setting or artistic environment. Accent (!) is placed on the role that the learner
is to assume, and consideration of the mood, attitude, feelings, and unspoken
assumptions that are part of real conversation.

Main emphasis lies on a playful implementation of conversation techniques, new
vocabulary and knowledge of English speaking countries. The course provides a
build-up of confidence towards the active use of English in addition to gaining insight
through listening and speaking.

Each of the outlined activities concentrates on developing natural language in one of
a variety of situations that include the following: interpreting listening and
pronunciation exercises; sensory experiences; identifying real objects; descriptions of
objects, clothing, or unusual objects; playing with letters, verbs, or split sentences;
picture sets; conversations in sound; mime sketches; persuasion; describing other
conversations and composing dialogue on given themes.

This ECIS-session first introduces the basic ideas around this innovative and creative
approach in teaching English as a second language, but focuses mostly on a few
exemplary exercises where the participant will assume to be a young student having
fun with the new sounds of an unknown language. Most of the exercises are building
blocks that can culminate into projects where dramatic skills are further utilised.

                                              Exercises:

                                           My voice and I

                                          Nonsense words

                                         Reading rhythms

                                           Jabber-English

                                          Creative cursing

                                       My first Shakespeare




                                                    1
                                                       ECIS-2010-DRAMA-Session 5




                       ACtive and Creative ENglish Training:


                         Objectives and assessment criteria:

Criterion A:
Imagination in presentation
               - applying original ideas
               - creating interest through posture and gesture
               - showing the ability to engage the audience

Criterion B:
Comprehensive application of the English language
             - making sense with words
             - using accurate sentence structure
             - using broad vocabulary

Criterion C:
Speech and diction
             - speaking with expression
             - articulating clearly
             - pronouncing accurately

Criterion D:
Involvement and reflection
              - expressing feelings and ideas with confidence
              - cooperating with and listening to others
              - giving and receiving constructive feedback




                    Erick Aufderheyde, Head of Drama, Lorentz Lyceum, Arnhem, Netherlands




                                           2
                                                                                 ECIS‐2010‐DRAMA‐Session 6 
 



                            ‘Drama, huh?.... but I am an English teacher!’

This whole day series of drama-related activities is a series of ‘taster’ workshops for teachers of English (or other
subjects) who would like to enhance their teaching skills through active engagement in drama. The workshops
are intended to provide starting points for further study and application but all participants will be able to take
away a range of practical and useful ideas for their classroom. As the nature of drama requires students to learn
through active participation, this series of workshops will also be active, engaging and, we hope, enjoyable. No
previous experience in teaching drama is required; however, loose, comfortable clothing is advised!




                                         Session 6: Cooling down

Every lesson should have a reward. In Drama this is the cooling down session. These
exercises bring the lesson to a close and can be used as a reward for hard work, so
try to build a 5-minute cooling down exercise into your lesson plan. The students will
soon let you know which exercise they want to do but avoid doing the same one more
than two times in a row or they will lose their ‘zing.’



                                                  Body dance

                                                Group massage

                                        Coming round the mountain

                                                   Fruit basket

                                                Funny greetings

                                           What’s the time Mr Wolf

                                               Running in space

                                                   Leaping out




                       Julia McKelvey, Chair, ECIS Drama, Theatre Arts Committee and Drama Coordinator,

                                                         International School of the Basel Region, Switzerland

                                  Erick Aufderheyde, Head of Drama, Lorentz Lyceum, Arnhem, Netherlands
                                                                                   ECIS‐2010‐DRAMA‐Session 1 
 



                            ‘Drama, huh?.... but I am an English teacher!’

This whole day series of drama-related activities is a series of ‘taster’ workshops for teachers of English (or other
subjects) who would like to enhance their teaching skills through active engagement in drama. The workshops
are intended to provide starting points for further study and application but all participants will be able to take
away a range of practical and useful ideas for their classroom. As the nature of drama requires students to learn
through active participation, this series of workshops will also be active, engaging and, we hope, enjoyable. No
previous experience in teaching drama is required; however, loose, comfortable clothing is advised!




                                            Session 1: Warm ups

The purposes of warm ups are many fold. They introduce a different way of learning
and approach to the subject, they engender enthusiasm, they create energy and a
willingness to be actively engaged, they set the tone for the lesson, they make drama
different from the start to other lessons and they are fun. It is important that you are
ready to begin from the moment students enter the class.

If you have access to music, try and make sure this is playing as the students enter
and leave, although we realise this is not always possible. If you can play the piano,
and there is one in the drama studio, the possibilities are limitless!

 These activities should be physically engaging and be engineered by the teacher to
include everyone equally (avoid asking students to form their own groups, pick their
own partners etc as this can be divisive for the introverted student).

As the teacher, you must also takepart. As with all drama lessons, it is very important
for the students to see you are willing to take the risks you are asking them to take.
With the exception of the necessary admin required, never, ever, spend the drama
lesson sitting at the computer while they are working!

Because warm-ups are fun, do not repeat the same ones over and over. It will not be
long before the students hate doing them and this will be a very bad start to the
lesson!

Be inventive, draw on your own childhood experiences for ideas, be willing to laugh
with your students – they will sense your active engagement and enjoy them even
more.




                                                         1
                                                                          ECIS‐2010‐DRAMA‐Session 1 
 

Below is a list of the activities we will cover in this opening session, if time permits;
however they are just a few of the many possibilities open to you.

                                     Rhythmic listening

                                  Standing position ritual

                                    Boom Chikka Boom

                                         Knee fighting

                                      I Love you Honey

                                  Making statues together

                                    Groups of 3 tableaux

                                           Mirroring

                                    Mirror in a big group

                                       Moving the pen

                                         Mind games;

                                               1. Breaking glass

                                                2. Black magic

                                                 3. Walk into the wall

                                        Fingertip trust




                          Julia McKelvey, Chair, ECIS Drama, Theatre Arts Committee and Drama Coordinator,

                                                       International School of the Basel Region, Switzerland

                                   Erick Aufderheyde, Head of Drama, Lorentz Lyceum, Arnhem, Netherlands




                                                 2
                                                                                   ECIS‐2010‐DRAMA‐Session 2 
 

                            ‘Drama, huh?.... but I am an English teacher!’

This whole day series of drama-related activities is a series of ‘taster’ workshops for teachers of English (or other
subjects) who would like to enhance their teaching skills through active engagement in drama. The workshops
are intended to provide starting points for further study and application but all participants will be able to take
away a range of practical and useful ideas for their classroom. As the nature of drama requires students to learn
through active participation, this series of workshops will also be active, engaging and, we hope, enjoyable. No
previous experience in teaching drama is required; however, loose, comfortable clothing is advised!




                           Session 2: Story telling through stage combat

Students will love doing this work as it challenges them to take on roles they have
seen many times in films, on the TV and in the theatre. Active engagement, co-
operation and concentration are allnecessary whenlearning to perform stage combat
without inflicting injury.

Do not teach stage combat unless you are confident that your students can rise to the
challenge and stay focussed enough, however, even the most disinterested students
will probably find themselves fully motivated to learn!

Once mastered, students will be able to use these skills in many different ways and
they will add a sense of energy and excitement to storytelling and improvisation.

In this workshop, we will be covering a few basic moves and then asking you to put
them into practice. Please note that the key to stage combat is that the actors are
actually doing the opposite of what it appears on stage. At the first sign that any
student is doing it for real, remove them from the group!



Below is a brief summary of what we are covering in this session;

    1. Safety measures and basic rules

    2. Falling safely (cork screw)

    3. Helping the other to overcome the fear of falling

    4. Safe distance (eye contact)

    5. Slap in the face

    6. Arm lock

    7. Hair or ear pull

    8. Hair pulling and dragging across the floor

    9. Kick in the stomach/Breaking the neck

    10. Where is the audience?
                                                    ECIS‐2010‐DRAMA‐Session 2 
 



    Julia McKelvey, Chair, ECIS Drama, Theatre Arts Committee and Drama Coordinator,

                                 International School of the Basel Region, Switzerland

             Erick Aufderheyde, Head of Drama, Lorentz Lyceum, Arnhem, Netherlands
                                                                   ECIS-2010-DRAMA-Session 5



                       ‘Drama, huh?.... but I am an English teacher!’

This whole day series of drama-related activities is a series of ‘taster’ workshops for teachers of English
(or other subjects) who would like to enhance their teaching skills through active engagement in drama.
The workshops are intended to provide starting points for further study and application but all
participants will be able to take away a range of practical and useful ideas for their classroom. As the
nature of drama requires students to learn through active participation, this series of workshops will also
be active, engaging and, we hope, enjoyable. No previous experience in teaching drama is required;
however, loose, comfortable clothing is advised!

             Session 5: ACCENT: ACtive and Creative ENglish Training):

The drama activities in language acquisition and language development are
designed to build up second language learning skills by constructing situations that
require the student to concentrate on the meaning and emotional content of
language rather than on its structure. In an attempt to involve the whole personality
of the learner in the acquisition of language, this course stresses the importance of a
social setting or artistic environment. Accent (!) is placed on the role that the learner
is to assume, and consideration of the mood, attitude, feelings, and unspoken
assumptions that are part of real conversation.

Main emphasis lies on a playful implementation of conversation techniques, new
vocabulary and knowledge of English speaking countries. The course provides a
build-up of confidence towards the active use of English in addition to gaining insight
through listening and speaking.

Each of the outlined activities concentrates on developing natural language in one of
a variety of situations that include the following: interpreting listening and
pronunciation exercises; sensory experiences; identifying real objects; descriptions of
objects, clothing, or unusual objects; playing with letters, verbs, or split sentences;
picture sets; conversations in sound; mime sketches; persuasion; describing other
conversations and composing dialogue on given themes.

This ECIS-session first introduces the basic ideas around this innovative and creative
approach in teaching English as a second language, but focuses mostly on a few
exemplary exercises where the participant will assume to be a young student having
fun with the new sounds of an unknown language. Most of the exercises are building
blocks that can culminate into projects where dramatic skills are further utilised.

                                              Exercises:

                                           My voice and I

                                          Nonsense words

                                         Reading rhythms

                                           Jabber-English

                                          Creative cursing

                                       My first Shakespeare




                                                    1
                                                       ECIS-2010-DRAMA-Session 5




                       ACtive and Creative ENglish Training:


                         Objectives and assessment criteria:

Criterion A:
Imagination in presentation
               - applying original ideas
               - creating interest through posture and gesture
               - showing the ability to engage the audience

Criterion B:
Comprehensive application of the English language
             - making sense with words
             - using accurate sentence structure
             - using broad vocabulary

Criterion C:
Speech and diction
             - speaking with expression
             - articulating clearly
             - pronouncing accurately

Criterion D:
Involvement and reflection
              - expressing feelings and ideas with confidence
              - cooperating with and listening to others
              - giving and receiving constructive feedback




                    Erick Aufderheyde, Head of Drama, Lorentz Lyceum, Arnhem, Netherlands




                                           2
                                                                                 ECIS‐2010‐DRAMA‐Session 6 
 



                            ‘Drama, huh?.... but I am an English teacher!’

This whole day series of drama-related activities is a series of ‘taster’ workshops for teachers of English (or other
subjects) who would like to enhance their teaching skills through active engagement in drama. The workshops
are intended to provide starting points for further study and application but all participants will be able to take
away a range of practical and useful ideas for their classroom. As the nature of drama requires students to learn
through active participation, this series of workshops will also be active, engaging and, we hope, enjoyable. No
previous experience in teaching drama is required; however, loose, comfortable clothing is advised!




                                         Session 6: Cooling down

Every lesson should have a reward. In Drama this is the cooling down session. These
exercises bring the lesson to a close and can be used as a reward for hard work, so
try to build a 5-minute cooling down exercise into your lesson plan. The students will
soon let you know which exercise they want to do but avoid doing the same one more
than two times in a row or they will lose their ‘zing.’



                                                  Body dance

                                                Group massage

                                        Coming round the mountain

                                                   Fruit basket

                                                Funny greetings

                                           What’s the time Mr Wolf

                                               Running in space

                                                   Leaping out




                       Julia McKelvey, Chair, ECIS Drama, Theatre Arts Committee and Drama Coordinator,

                                                         International School of the Basel Region, Switzerland

                                  Erick Aufderheyde, Head of Drama, Lorentz Lyceum, Arnhem, Netherlands

				
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