Discus the Social Contract of John Locke (DOC)

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CODE:            PHIL 227-TV                       TITLE:      Introduction to Ethics

DIVISION:      Social Sciences/Humanities                           DEPARTMENT: PHIL/POLI

COURSE DESCRIPTION:         Students will become familiar with many approaches to deciding what
is “right” and “wrong” in human behavior. The course begins with a look at several ethical
theories, each intended to provide a framework for moral decision-making. The second part of
the course involves discussion of many controversial issues, such as the taking of human life,
sexual behavior, abortion, business, medical practice, etc. (Certain sections of the course will be
designated to focus on questions within one particular area, e.g., Business Ethics, Nursing Ethics,
Environmental Ethics. See Master Schedule for designated topics.)

PREREQUISITES: READ 092, READ 095 or passing score in reading on Basic Skills Test

COREQUISITES: N/A

CREDITS:         3                 LECTURE CREDITS:          3               LAB CREDITS:

LAB HOURS: N/A




Welcome to the telecourse "Ethics in America."

This course has been designed to provide you with equivalent instruction for PHIL 227:
INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS, which is a three credit course.

In its traditional mode PHIL 227 meets for three hours a week for 15 weeks. Because you have
chosen to do it as a telecourse, you will have only one formal orientation with the instructor. The
work of the course will be done via up-to-date technology and innovative methods of student-
teacher contact designed to help you master the content of the course and expand your
educational horizons.

The fact that you will be doing PHIL 227 as a telecourse will not make the course easier--or
harder. Nor will it take less time and effort than would be needed to complete the course in a
classroom setting. What it will provide you is greater flexibility to learn in unique ways and at
hours that suit your personal schedule.

"Ethics in America" includes ten one-hour television programs, two audio tapes, a book on ethical
theory, and a Study Guide. The Study Guide will help give focus to your viewing, listening and
reading. The book on ethical theory will help your understand the major traditions in Western
ethics. The TV programs and audio tapes will present you with discussions of major ethical issues
and the arguments on both sides of controversial questions.

While learning ethical theory and the argumentation underlying ethical issues is important, this
course has a further objective: to provide you with the tools necessary for resolving your own
personal moral dilemmas and for evaluating the ethical controversies in our society. As you
pursue your formal studies in this course, therefore, stop to reflect from time to time on the
practical applications for yourself.




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REQUIRED MATERIALS:

Attendance at the orientation session is mandatory. Course information and grade requirements
will be explained and individual questions and concerns will be addressed at this time.

Several resources are available to help you master the basic concepts of this course in ethics. In
addition to the components listed below, you will, of course, be able to count on the help and
encouragement of your instructor and the learning assistant in philosophy.

1. Television: Ten one-hour programs developed for television by Columbia University Seminars
on Media and Society. They will begin with a preview week and continue weekly. Cablevision:
(Channel 34) and Comcast Cable: (Channel 21)

2. Audiocassettes: Two audiocassettes, also developed by Columbia University Seminars,
engage you in debate about the nature of moral behavior. The cassettes can be borrowed from
Brookdale's Library with your validated Student ID card. They can also be obtained at the
Bayshore, Freehold, Long Branch, and Asbury Park Learning Centers. Call ahead to reserve.

3. Seven Ethical Theories: This reader will introduce you to the major Western ethical traditions. It
was written by your instructor and published by Kendall-Hunt to replace a more difficult text, the
Source Reader. It is now available at the bookstore.

4. Study Guide: This text/study guide, edited by Lisa H. Newton and published by Prentice Hall,
links detailed discussions of ethical concepts with an analysis of the television programs. It can
likewise be purchased at the bookstore.

There are many ways to organize your study. I would suggest you proceed as follows: 1) read the
chapter in the Study Guide; 2) listen to the audiocassette or watch the telecast; 3) study the
materials from Seven Ethical Theories; 4) review the Study Guide chapter; 5) think about the
"Questions for your Reflection" at the end of the chapter. Study the texts with paper and pencil.
Be prepared to spend some time with them, especially the theory textbook, since it contains
intricate argumentation. While reading, ask yourself how these selections pertain to the issues
raised in the audiocassette or telecast, and make note of your insights. Finally, I recommend that
you make a quick review of the entire lesson before writing your journal.



ADDITIONAL TIME REQUIREMENTS:

Attendance at the orientation session is mandatory.

Tests must be taken on campus with either the Learning Assistant or in the testing center.


INTENDED COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES/COURSE GOALS (CORE COMPETENCIES):

How should people live? How should they act? This is what an ethics course is all about. These
are broad questions, and not every aspect of them can be studied by ethicists. What they are
chiefly concerned with is the ways in which people make decisions, why they act as they do, and
what norms or guidelines ought to influence their choices. The study of ethics deals with human
decision-making. To do this effectively, we cannot work in a vacuum. So we must first become
aware of a variety of personal and social problems which call for reasoned, human decisions.
Only in this context can we suggest what choices ought to be made.



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During our term we will look at a number of personal and social issues and see the controversies
that surround them. What is right or wrong? What is good or evil? What is acceptable or
unacceptable behavior? In some cases we may each reach satisfying answers. In many cases
we will simply learn to evaluate the reasons on both sides of the controversy. In all cases we will
attempt to clarify our thinking and make up our own minds. In short, we are setting out to become
ethicists. It’s not a hard job. We’ve all made moral choices in the past, and to that extent we have
already been ethicists in a way. Now we may learn to make those decisions in a more consistent
and systematic manner.

Through the writing of essay test questions and journal entries, students who pass this course will
have demonstrated competency of the following: 1) understanding relevant concepts related to
these issues, 2) thinking critically about these issues, and 3) forming their own opinions on these
issues (Communication, Critical Thinking, Creative Expression, Historical/Societal Analysis,
Community and Workplace, and Personal Development Core Competencies).



INTENDED UNIT OUTCOME [UNIT OBJECTIVES]:

UNIT I

Week 1: Introduction and Ethical Reasoning

The student will be able to

1. Distinguish metaethics, descriptive ethics, normative ethics.

2. Discuss the relationship between ethics and law.

3. List and give examples of the three statements possible in assertive discourse.

4. List and discuss the three basic assumptions that define ethics.

5. List and discuss the three basic, observable facts about human beings that determine the
structure of moral obligation.

6. Describe the two kinds of conflict fundamental to ethical discourse.

7. List and describe the three general concepts that are the source and criteria for evaluation of
every moral system.

8. List and describe the three basic imperatives for human conduct.

9. Distinguish between consequentialist and non-consequentialist (deontological) reasoning.

10. Give an example of the structure of a moral argument.

11. List the four conditions for consequentialist ethics.

12. Discuss the different meanings of ethics proposed by the participants in Audiocassette 1.

Week 2: Community: Do Unto Others



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The student will be able to

1. Discuss the traditional dichotomy between the individual and community.

2. Describe the sense in which community is value-neutral and the sense in which it is a value.

3. Distinguish between mass society and community.

4. Discuss whether community is a fact of nature or a conscious project.

5. Discuss how the three problematic dimensions of community impact ethical situations.

6. List the reasons why Robert's act of using his College Examination scores was judged wrong
by the participants in Videocassette 1.

7. Identify the underlying traditions in the above reasons.

8. Discuss how the right to know and the obligation not to do harm come into conflict when Robert
cheats on his wife.

9. Discuss the different approaches to intervening in the case of the battered child.

10. Discuss the moral arguments for and against giving money to the beggar.

11. Show the relation between the "good" and the "moral" in Ancient Greek ethics.

12. Describe what virtue is and how it is acquired.

13. Discuss the role of habit in Greek ethical theory.

14. Define the ultimate human end, according to Aristotle.

15. List and describe the three major forms of justice.

16. Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of Greek ethical theory.

Week 3: Retributive Justice: To Defend a Killer

The student will be able to

1. Define Social Contract, lex talonis, mens rea.

2. Describe the basis for the Social Contract as described by Thomas Hobbes.

3. Describe how the Biblical tradition deals with revenge.

4. Discuss the Greek notion of justice with respect to the maintenance of order in society.

5. Discuss the three utilitarian justifications for punishment.

6. Discuss the weaknesses of the above justifications.



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7. Discuss the circumstances in which justice precedes forgiveness in Videocassette 2.

8. Discuss the circumstances in which informing the authorities may take precedence over
confidentiality.

9. Discuss the lawyer's responsibilities to the public versus his/her responsibilities to the client.

10. Recount the argument that justice is obtained in the functioning of the system and not in the
acts of individual attorneys.

11. Recount the exchange between Litman and Gaylin on what constitutes justice in sentencing.

12. Define the nature of lawyer-client confidentiality.

13. Discuss the relationship of truth and justice to the value of the individual.

14. Define "natural law" as an ethical theory.

15. Describe how all law is ideally a derivation of natural law.

16. Discuss the unique features of the natural law to persons.

17. Discuss the three consequences of the natural law theory of morality.

18. Apply natural law thinking to issues such as lying, adultery, and human sexuality.

19. Discuss the weaknesses and strengths of natural law morality.




Unit II

Week 4: Accountability: Public Trust, Private Interests

The student will be able to

1. Discuss the ethical dilemmas that arise in democracy with respect to the duties of the
representative vis-a-vis his/her constituency.

2. List and explain the four "sins" a representative must seek to avoid.

3. List some qualities we require of holders of public office.

4. List the reasons for and against requiring a drug test of a public official as presented in
Videocassette 3.

5. Discuss the potential conflict of interest that might arise when a former public official goes to
work for an interested private company.

6. Discuss the potential conflict inherent in accepting campaign contributions from interested
private parties.



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7. Describe the differences between the view that government is a minimal agreement of
autonomous agents and that government is an entity of its own.

8. Describe the reasons that necessitate a social contract.

9. Distinguish the presuppositions of Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, and Jean Jacques Rousseau.

10. Discuss John Rawls' idea of the nature of justice.

11. Define "original position," "veil of ignorance," the "maximin rule."

12. Discuss the two principles implied by Rawls' thought experiment.

13. Discuss the relationship between justice and equality in Rawls' thinking.

14. Discuss the two controversial aspects of Rawls' thinking.

15. Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of contractarian ethics.

Week 5: Autonomy: Does Doctor Know Best?

The student will be able to

1. Describe the difficulties inherent in defining the principle of autonomy.

2. Contrast the libertarian and rationalist interpretations of autonomy.

3. Describe how the respect for autonomy can have two different objects.

4. List and discuss the three questions about autonomy that frequently arise in a medical setting.

5. Discuss the possible limitations to strict doctor-patient confidentiality as argued in
Videocassette 4.

6. Discuss the issue of whether the doctor serves the patient's desires or ministers to his/her
health needs (client choice vs. professional prerogative).

7. Discuss both sides of the controversy that arises between Betty's autonomy and whether
Betty's fetus has a right to be born.

8. Define "abortion logic" and list its moral implications.

9. Discuss how a priori knowledge can be the basis for duty and morality in the deontological
theory.

10. Distinguish hypothetical imperatives from the categorical imperative.

11. State and explain the two major formulations of Immanuel Kant's categorical imperative and
show how they are related.

12. Discuss how the categorical imperative is the basis for "good will" and for determining one's
duty.



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13. Discuss why deontologists reject personal ends as determinants of morality.

14. Describe the relationship between ends and means in deontological ethics.

15. Apply deontology and the categorical imperative to making a moral determination.

16. Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of deontological ethics.

Week 6: Distributive Justice: Anatomy of a Corporate Takeover

The student will be able to

1. Define distributive justice and compare it to retributive justice.

2. Describe the different viewpoints of private property found in the ancient Greek philosophers
and in the Bible.

3. Contrast the modern views of justice found in John Rawls and Robert Nozick.

4. List the arguments for and against corporate takeovers, as presented in Videocassette 5.

5. Explain the idea of fiduciary responsibility as it applies to the board of directors of a large
corporation.

6. List and describe the three images of the businessman in American society.

7. Define the following terms in the context of modern business: capitalist, free investor, bound
investor, manager.

8. Distinguish the liberal and conservative theories of fiduciary responsibility as they apply to the
manager.

9. Define insider trading and give three reasons why it is considered unjust.

10. Criticize the above three reasons.

11. Discuss the moral considerations regarding the concentration of wealth and talent on Wall
Street.

12. Show the relation between the "good" and the "moral" in Ancient Greek ethics.

13. Describe what virtue is and how it is acquired.

14. Discuss the role of habit in Greek ethical theory.

15. Define the ultimate human end, according to Aristotle.

16. List and describe the three major forms of justice.

17. Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of Greek ethical theory.




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UNIT III

Week 7: Loyalty: Under Orders, Under Fire (I)

The student will be able to

1. Discuss the foundations of loyalty and its relation to commitment according the Josiah Royce.

2. Distinguish the two senses of duty.

3. List and discuss the three reasons that could make it desirable to have persons act without
thinking.

4. Suggest answers to the two questions about whether the practices of war can be justified.

5. Give the moral justification for military discipline.

6. Discuss the role of the journalist in covering war as illustrated in Videocassette 6.

7. Distinguish between combatants and noncombatants and discuss the soldier's moral
responsibilities toward each.

8. Discuss the morality of shooting a disobedient soldier, an enemy who is trying to surrender, a
guerrilla trying to escape.

9. List the moral qualities (virtues) to be found in the ideal soldier.

10. Distinguish between loyalty in a soldier and loyalty in general.

11. Distinguish between essence and existence as the basis for moral theory.

12. Discuss how consciousness, responsibility, and freedom form the basis for existentialist
ethical theory.

13. Distinguish two existential approaches in dealing with the problem of meaninglessness.

14. Discuss how the struggle against non-being involves loneliness and anguish.

14. Describe the fundamental dilemma regarding self and society in existentialist theory and show
how it is resolved.

15. Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of existentialism as a moral theory.

Week 8: Confidentiality: Under Orders, Under Fire (II)

The student will be able to

1. Discuss how confidentiality can be considered to be antisocial.




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2. List and describe the three values that confidentiality upholds.

3. Discuss the idea that human society is an enormous social contract.

4. Discuss the relation of confidentiality to the utilitarian and moral law traditions.

5. Explain why torture is morally wrong.

6. Recount Fr. Hehir's argument for absolute confidentiality between soldier and chaplain in
Videocassette 7.

7. Discuss the conflict of obligations faced by a journalist covering a war from behind the enemy
lines.

8. Discuss the issue of whether there is a moral distinction between nuclear and non-nuclear
weapons.

9. Discuss the role of pleasure and pain in the ethical theory of utilitarianism.

10. Discuss the issue of whether what one does seek is what one should seek.

11. Distinguish between act (intuitive) and rule (scientific) utilitarianism.

12. Give a critique of act and rule utilitarianism.

13. List and explain the elements in Bentham's utilitarian calculus.

14. Describe Mill's qualitative approach to utilitarianism.

15. Define the common good according to the utilitarian tradition and explain why it is compatible
with the democratic tradition.

16. Distinguish toe positions of total utility and average utility as they pertain to population
expansion.

17. Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of utilitarian ethics.

Week 9: Truthtelling: Truth on Trial

The student will be able to

1. Discuss the value of truthfulness to us as moral agents and as members of a society.

2. Describe how truthfulness is derived from justice.

3. Describe why a purely utilitarian rule is unacceptable for making exceptions to truthtelling.

4. Discuss the two possible rules for justifying the telling of a lie.

5. Discuss the issue of whether destroying evidence is a form of lying, as presented in
Videocassette 8.




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6. Discuss what constitutes "telling the whole truth" in a court of law.

7. Discuss the conflict that a lawyer might experience between loyalty to his client and loyalty to
the whole truth.

8. Discuss the conflict that a lawyer might experience between loyalty to his client and his
obligation to the public interest.

9. Discuss the statement of Mr. Neal that the adversary system supports justice, not truthtelling.

10. List and discuss the four decisions in the videocassette that seem to compromise truthtelling.

11. Discuss the moral reasons for and against changing our adversarial system of justice.

12. Discuss how a priori knowledge can be the basis for duty and morality in the deontological
theory.

13. Distinguish hypothetical imperatives from the categorical imperative.

14. State and explain the two major formulations of Immanuel Kant's categorical imperative and
show how they are related.

15. Discuss how the categorical imperative is the basis for "good will" and for determining one's
duty.

16. Discuss why deontologists reject personal ends as determinants of morality.

17. Describe the relationship between ends and means in deontological ethics.

18. Apply deontology and the categorical imperative to making a moral determination.

19. Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of deontological ethics.




UNIT IV

Week 10: Help and Harm: The Human Experiment

The student will be able to

1. Distinguish utilitarianism and deontological theories with respect to prescriptions and
proscriptions.

2. Distinguish "research," "practice," and "experimentation."

3. Distinguish between the doctor-patient relationship from the investigator-subject relationship.

4. List the ethical principles governing the use of human beings in scientific research.

5. Discuss why the risk/benefit ratio is the most important aspect of research protocol for the
utilitarian.


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6. List examples of unethical scientific research.

7. Discuss the morality of using placebos for terminal patients, as discussed in Videocassette 9.

8. List the kinds of pressures that may limit a patient's ability to give informed consent.

9. Discuss the moral differences between privately and publicly funded research.

10. List potential beneficiaries from successful AIDS research.

11. Discuss whether the profit motive and humanitarian concerns are incompatible in the
development of new pharmaceutical products.

12. Discuss the role of pleasure and pain in the ethical theory of utilitarianism.

13. Discuss the issue of whether what one does seek is what one should seek.

14. Distinguish between act (intuitive) and rule (scientific) utilitarianism.

15. Give a critique of act and rule utilitarianism.

16. List and explain the elements in Bentham's utilitarian calculus.

17. Describe Mill's qualitative approach to utilitarianism.

18. Define the common good according to the utilitarian tradition and explain why it is compatible
with the democratic tradition.

19. Distinguish toe positions of total utility and average utility as they pertain to population
expansion.

20. Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of utilitarian ethics.

Week 11: Privacy: Politics, Privacy and the Press

The student will be able to

1. Discuss the importance of protecting privacy.

2. Distinguish three kinds of invasion of privacy: material injuries, public revelations, and
penetration of personal space.

3. Discuss the ethics of spying, as suggested by the different viewpoints of Sen. Simpson and Mr.
Denniston on Videocassette 10.

4. Discuss and evaluate the purposes newspapers have for publishing stories about the
immorality of public persons.

5. Discuss the tension between being a professional journalist and a decent human being.

6. Discuss the tension between the public's right to know about public figures and the public
figure's right to privacy.



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7. Discuss the ethical need to regulate invasions of privacy to protect public figures.

8. Discuss the solutions proposed by Sen. Simpson, Ms. Garment, and Mr. Greenfield.

9. Discuss the meaning and origins of pragmatism.

10. Describe the analogy between the scientific method and the pragmatic method.

11. List and describe the three steps in making a moral decision according Dewey's "reflective"
method.

12. Discuss the role of goals, or ends, in the pragmatic method.

13. Describe how pragmatism reconciles the ethical tension between self and society.

14. Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of pragmatic ethics.

Week 12: The Last Word

The student will be able to

1. Summarize the three permanent assumptions about ethics: it is intelligible, serious, and about
human beings.

2. Discuss the relation among fanaticism, cynicism and moral belief.

3. List and discuss three basic values in ethics: beneficence, justice and respect for persons.

4. List and discuss the qualities needed to lead a moral life: sensitivity, self-discipline, a sense of
humor, and a moral compass.

5. Contrast one's own ethical thinking with that of the students on Audiocassette 2.

6. Discuss the problem that arises in a society without a common ethical standard.

7. Distinguish between formalism and consequentialism.

8. Classify the seven theories as formalist or consequentialist, and explain why each is classified
as it is.

9. Describe how formalism and consequentialism might possibly be reconciled.

10. Distinguish between goal-oriented and process-oriented ethical theories.

11. Classify the seven theories as goal-oriented or process-oriented, and explain why each is
classified as it is.

12. Describe how goal-oriented and process-oriented theories might possibly be reconciled.

13. Distinguish between subject-originated and object-originated ethical theories.

14. Classify the seven theories as subject-originated or object originated.


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15. Describe how subject-originated and object-originated theories might possibly be reconciled.

16. Discuss the analogy between art and morality.

17. Discuss the meaning and important to ethics of the "seven moral senses": place, time,
identity, the social, the ideal, the concrete, seriousness.

18. List and explain the eight steps for making a moral decision.




Calendar

Unit I

                                                 Seven Ethical
Week             Topic          Study Guide                             Media
                                                   Theories
   1       Intro & Reasoning      Chap. 1           Preface             TC 7371
   2        Do Unto Others        Chap. 3           Greeks              VT 3123
   3       To Defend a Killer     Chap. 4         Natural. Law          VT 3123


Unit II

                                                 Seven Ethical
Week             Topic          Study Guide                             Media
                                                    Theories
   4          Public Trust        Chap. 5           Contract            VT 3124
   5       Does Dr. Know Best     Chap. 6          Deontology           VT 3124
   6       Corporate Takeover     Chap. 7       (review Greeks)         VT 3125


Unit III

                                                 Seven Ethical
Week             Topic          Study Guide                             Media
                                                    Theories
   7        Under Orders (1)     Chap. 8         Existentialism         VT 3125
   8        Under Orders (2)     Chap. 9          Utilitarianism        VT 3126
   9         Truth on Trial      Chap. 10     (review deontology)       VT 3126


Unit IV

                                                 Seven Ethical
Week             Topic          Study Guide                             Media
                                                    Theories
   10      Human Experiment      Chap. 11     (review utilitarianism)   VT 3063
   11       Politics, Privacy    Chap. 12          Pragmatism           VT 3063
                                                   Synthesis &
   12        The Last Word         none                                 TC 7373
                                                   Conclusions




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CORE COMPETENCIES:

   Communication--The student will communicate information and ideas clearly and effectively
    in the written and spoken form, and will demonstrate effective listening and reading skills.
   Critical Thinking--The student will think clearly, critically and creatively to analyze information,
    identify solutions, make logical decisions and solve problems.
   Creative Expression--The student will use visual, verbal or written methods of communication
    to articulate a response to the arts and/or humanities.
   Historical/Societal Analysis--The student will identify and analyze historical and/or societal
    issues as they impact current and future trends.
   Community and Workplace--The student will demonstrate cultural sensitivity within the
    context of the contemporary, diverse, global community. The student will demonstrate ethical
    conduct and effective teamwork.
   Personal Development--The student will use the biological, psychological, and social
    dimensions of health and wellness to improve and maintain physical and emotional well-
    being. The student will demonstrate personal, time and stress management skills.



GRADING STANDARD:

For the grade of "C", the student will be able to discus the major ethical theories in
contemporary philosophy and relate these theories to selected ethical issues:

1) The student must pass four unit examinations with an average grade of 70%. No retests are
given in this course.

2) The student must keep a journal in which he/she expresses his/her opinions about each of the
twelve topics. A journal consists of one or two pages of reflections for each topic in the unit and is
to be submitted at the time that the student takes a unit test. The student may choose one or
more of the "Questions for Further Reflection" at the end of most chapters of the Study Guide as
the basis for the journal, or he/she may present a reasoned opinion related to one of the issues
discussed in the chapter. Please label journal entries clearly as to which topic you are submitting.
When appropriate, copy the "Question for Further Reflection" at the top of the assignment.

For the grade of "B", the student will be able to identify, comprehend and analyze different
ethical arguments of ethicists regarding selected issues:

1) Students must complete the requirements for the grade of "C" with an average grade of 80% or
better on the four tests.

2) Students must read, summarize and comment upon two sets of articles. A list of articles can be
obtained from the instructor or the learning assistant. With the consent of the instructor, students
may instead choose equivalent reading from philosophical journals on subjects that relate to the
issues covered in this course. Reports shall consist of a summary of each article, identification of
the ethical theories implied by the author, and an evaluation of the article along with comments by
the student. Each report should be about three or four pages in length. Any student desiring help
in finding suitable articles can meet with the instructor or with the learning assistant for
suggestions.




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 For the grade of "A", the student will be able to research an ethical issue, present the
relevant arguments in terms of the underlying theories, and formulate his/her own position
on both evidential and theoretical grounds:

1) Students must complete the requirements for "B" and "C" with an average of 80% or better on
the four examinations.

2) Students must submit a term report of approximately 12 to 15 pages on one ethical issue. In
the report students must research the evidence, analyze the ethical theories used to defend each
side of the issue, and come to their own conclusions. A sample outline follows:

A. What are the major arguments on one side of this issue?

    1. What factual evidence supports this position?

   2. What theoretical assumptions are implied?

B. What are the major arguments on the other side?

   1. What factual evidence supports this position?

   2. What theoretical assumptions are implied?

C. What other significant positions have been advocated and how are they supported by fact and
theory?

D. What, in detail, is your own position on this issue, and how do you support it with fact and
theory?

   1. How might opponents challenge your position?

   2. How might you defend against these challenges?

The term report is to be submitted in three stages: first, an annotated bibliography; second, a
detailed outline; third, the finished paper.

For the grade of "D":

This grade will be awarded at the option of the instructor.

 Nota Bene: Students are urged to complete their work according to the following
schedule:

Unit I by the fourth week of the semester

Unit II by the seventh week of the semester

Unit III by the tenth week of the semester

Unit IV by the thirteenth week of the semester




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Term projects must be completed by the end of the fourteenth week.



DEPARTMENT POLICIES:

COLLEGE POLICIES:
For information regarding:
          Brookdale’s Academic Integrity Code
          Student Conduct Code
          Student Grade Appeal Process

Please refer to the STUDENT HANDBOOK AND BCC CATALOG.

NOTIFICATION FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES:
Brookdale Community College offers reasonable accommodations and/or services to persons
with disabilities. Students with disabilities who wish to self-identify, must contact the Disabilities
Services Office at 732-224-2730 or 732-842-4211 (TTY), provide appropriate documentation of
the disability, and request specific accommodations or services. If a student qualifies, reasonable
accommodations and/or services, which are appropriate for the college level and are
recommended in the documentation, can be approved.

ADDITIONAL SUPPORT/LABS:

 Brookdale Community College is special in that it offers more student assistance programs than
most colleges. Among these are access to learning assistants who tutor students, a library that
supports research assignments, a writing team that helps with written assignments, and a testing
center to allow optimal flexibility for individual study schedules. These and other support services
will be discussed at the orientation session.

Students--especially new students--are encouraged to read the college catalogue and the
schedule published by the registration office. These contain college policies about fees, dates,
reimbursements and credits. They constitute the contract between the student and the institution.




Your instructor for this course will be Dr. Robert B. Mellert, professor of philosophy at Brookdale.
He can be reached in the following ways:

1. Mail. Address materials to Dr. Robert B. Mellert, Philosophy Department, Brookdale Comm.
College, Lincroft, NJ 07738.

2. Mailbox. Materials may be left in the mailbox in the SS Central Office.

3. Appointment. Regular office hours will be announced at the orientation session. Other times
can be arranged if needed.

4. Telephone. During the business day, you may speak with the learning assistant by calling 224-
2533. Or, call my personal number, 224-2918, at any time to leave a message, and I will get back
to you as soon as I can.

5. E-mail. rmellert@brookdale.cc.nj.us




7/2007
              THIS IS THE TELEVISION COURSE SECTION ADDENDUM

A Learning Assistant is available 5 days each week (with varying hours each day) for individual
and group tutoring and for testing. If you have any questions about the course material or
concerns about the course, please call the Learning Assistant (224-2533) for an appointment.
Drop-ins are also welcome. Brookdale provides this added resource free of charge to all
students. Don't hesitate to take advantage of this help




7/2007

				
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Description: Discus the Social Contract of John Locke document sample