GrassRoots by qingyunliuliu

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									              GrassRoots http://grassroots.brunnet.net/


                                     What is GrassRoots?


The GrassRoots Program is a unique program designed for teachers to promote and facilitate the
    effective integration and use of information and communications technologies (ICT) in the
classroom. Students complete projects which are curriculum relevant, focus on learning activities
                carried out using the Internet and result in the creation of a website.

                              What type of project is involved?

                           There are 4 types of GrassRoots projects:
            Individual Projects

            There are 3 subcategories to Individual Projects:



    Category A                $300          entry-level project.
    Students must:            collaborate to seek information using the Internet (other sources may be used also)
                                            create a website containing a home page and three subsequent pages.
    The project must display…
        Collaboration in the class
        Curriculum based learning
        Interactive activities
        Research
        Use/seeking of online resources




    Category B                  $600
    Students must:              create a 5 page website.
                                             The website must:
         Show original content
         Be designed using several ICT (information & communication technology)-based skills
         Integrate cross curriculum information
         Demonstrate higher order thinking skills
         Reflect curriculum
         Demonstrate the effective use of multi-media technologies
         Present complex ideas

Category C $900
Category C has the same requirements as Category B but involves online networking with classes in other schools (minimum of 2
additional classes, 5 is the norm).
Block Projects

Block Projects are usually developed around a unifying theme, unit of work or subject area. Block Projects
involve many classes in one or more schools (you may go outside of your district and/or province). Each class
designs and implements their own project as a part of the Block Project.

There should be one teacher who acts as the Block Project coordinator. This person would be responsible for
submitting a report, after project completion, reporting statistical information on participation and other
information.

It is recommended that schools electing to organize a Block Project with schools outside of their district or
province seek the advice of the GrassRoots program coordinator.

A Block Project has a minimum of three Component Projects (3 classes—3 teachers).

Funding is determined by the combination of Component Projects and is distributed directly to schools
according to the categories of the project.

The Block Project must contain a home page which links the Component Projects. Each component must
meet the criteria outline in Individual Projects.

Block Projects may contain Individual Category A components but must also include components involving
higher-level ICT skills.
  Generations Can Connect Project
  Generations CanConnect (GCC) projects are resources that connect young and old to the Internet, foster inter-generational
  learning and create online historical and cultural shareable resources.

  GCC projects are curriculum-relevant and focus on learning activities that develop technical skills (discovering the Web, using
  ICTs), literacy skills (interviewing, writing) and social skills (teamwork, communication and leadership) in students.




  Students must…


•students plan and conduct interviews with older Canadians
•write stories about their life experiences
•create images or other media resulting from these interviews
•edit and publish these stories online.

Students are encouraged to include references and use the Internet to do research in support of their stories. Upon completion of the
project, students can invite their interviewees and other members of the community to gather and showcase the final results during a
celebration event.

Product:

GCC Level 1 -- $300:
The final product is a website that consists of an introductory home page, a minimum of 15 stories, the integration of images (photos,
graphics), and a final report. Each story is between 150 and 250 words in length and is based on an in-person interview with an older
Canadian.

GCC Level 2 -- $300:
The final product is a website that consists of an introductory home page, five stories of three to five pages each in length, the
integration of multi-media files (video, audio, graphic, photos) within each story and a final report. Each story is 300 words long and is
a narrative based on an interview with an older Canadian and built around a specific theme.
School Website              $300

  School websites are seen as unique Canadian resources, developed by students with the guidance of
  teachers (and sometimes parents) that reflect practical applications of knowledge-economy skills. Each
  approved school website is funded at $300 which is a one-time funding per school.
  Process:
  Students must…
  with the guidance of teachers (and sometimes parents), develop a comprehensive school website
  containing information on a range of school activities.

  Product:

  The final product is a school website illustrating:
       evidence of the website being built by students;
       elements of good design;
       information on a range of school activities;
       two-way communication with the community; and
    effective use of multi-media.
                                      Project Planning Tips
                                          10 Golden Rules
A successful GrassRoots project should become part of your existing teaching plan, rather than
an additional drain on classroom time and resources.
Set clear, realistic goals for your project.
Set appropriate timelines for all parts of your project. Don't underestimate the time it takes to
adequately cover each area.
 Determine the activities and events that will take place at each stage of the project. This will help
you to stay on track and keep to your timeline.
 Include creative ways to include your students in all stages of the project. Remember that
students are often fluent with the technology and that learning can be increased by allowing them
to 'teach' others and by having 'hands-on' experiences.
Set out the expectations that you have for other participants in your project. Ask yourself the
questions: Who? What? When? Where? Why? How?
An Internet project provides a great opportunity for collaboration with other classes. By writing and
posting a Call to Participate 4 - 8 weeks before the start date of your project, you are advertising
your idea to other teachers who may become participants.
 Keep a notebook for jotting down notes on: the progress of the project, things that could be
modified for another time, problems that were encountered and the solutions you implemented, as
well as relevant information on ALL participants in the project. This information is useful for
completing the Project Report and it will of great help to other teachers running a similar project.
Always remember to "Expect the Unexpected!" You will encounter unexpected events and delays.
Look at each experience in a positive manner and record your solutions!
Enjoy the experience! It's all part of the fun and the learning process for you and your students!
GrassRoots Projects: New Brunswick Evaluation Criteria
The GrassRoots Program for 2002-2004 enters a new phase while the goals remain essentially the same, in
this phase of the GrassRoots Program nationally we want to:
•place increased emphasis on quality by providing online tools and detailed descriptions of the requirements
as well as exemplars for each type of project
•facilitate teacher planning and reporting of projects through comprehensive and easier-to-use proposal and
report forms
•facilitate teacher planning and evaluation committee processing of proposals through the use of rubrics for
each type of project
•support the development of more challenging projects by emphasizing the use of various media and higher
order-thinking skills
•increase the number of teachers leading a GrassRoots project for the first time
•Higher accountability to assure that only completed projects will receive funding
To assure we meet these goals New Brunswick GrassRoots supports and has adopted the national criteria.
The following provincial additions have been made:
GrassRoots Projects: New Brunswick Evaluation Criteria


•NB teachers should seek the approval of their school administration to
participate. Both the participating individual or lead teacher and school
administration will be required to sign the terms of agreement prior to receiving
any funds
•NB Teachers and Students place an increased emphasis on the issue of
copyright and assure the all sources of information are properly sited on all project
websites. Projects without a bibliography section will not be approved.
•Funding of the approved monetary amount will be transferred to the schools
account following approval of a proposal and receipt of the signed terms of
agreement.
•when the web resource is online, the final report has been submitted and both
have been evaluated by the NB Management Team schools will be informed the
final project is completed and approved.
•Schools that do not complete their project within the designated timeline may be
invoiced to return all funding they have received for the project
•The monetary amount awarded to a Block Project will be limited to a maximum of
$10,000 and a Block may involve a few as three teachers.
•On both a Block, no one teacher may be responsible for more than two
subprojects in any one block project.
NOTE: It is important that you also read the National Criteria which applies to all
NB Teachers.
GrassRoots Projects: New Brunswick Evaluation Criteria
The GrassRoots Program for 2002-2004 enters a new phase while the goals remain essentially the same, in this
phase of the GrassRoots Program nationally we want to:
•place increased emphasis on quality by providing online tools and detailed descriptions of the requirements as well as exemplars for each type of
project
•facilitate teacher planning and reporting of projects through comprehensive and easier-to-use proposal and report forms
•facilitate teacher planning and evaluation committee processing of proposals through the use of rubrics for each type of project
•support the development of more challenging projects by emphasizing the use of various media and higher order-thinking skills
•increase the number of teachers leading a GrassRoots project for the first time
•Higher accountability to assure that only completed projects will receive funding

To assure we meet these goals New Brunswick GrassRoots supports and has adopted the national criteria. The
following provincial additions have been made:
•one NB teachers should seek the approval of their school administration to participate. Both the participating individual or lead teacher and
school administration will be required to sign the terms of agreement prior to receiving any funds
•NB Teachers and Students place an increased emphasis on the issue of copyright and assure the all sources of information are properly sited on
all project websites. Projects without a bibliography section will not be approved.
•Funding of the approved monetary amount will be transferred to the schools account following approval of a proposal and receipt of the signed
terms of agreement.
•when the web resource is online, the final report has been submitted and both have been evaluated by the NB Management Team schools will be
informed the final project is completed and approved.
•Schools that do not complete their project within the designated timeline may be invoiced to return all funding they have received for the project
•The monetary amount awarded to a Block Project will be limited to a maximum of $10,000 and a Block may involve a few as three teachers.
•On both a Block, no one teacher may be responsible for more than two subprojects in any block project.


NOTE: It is important that you also read the National Criteria which applies to all NB Teachers.
Project Guidelines for New Brunswick Schools
1.   Obtain approval from your School Administration to submit a GrassRoots project proposal.
2.   If submitting a Block Project, find a team of teachers who are willing to participate in the project. No one teacher
     may participate in more the two components on each block project. This year there will only be Block 1 type
     projects.
3.   Arrange for technical support where needed. This information is required to complete the project proposal form.
4.   Plan your project proposal with input from all participants. Teachers should refer to provincial curriculum
     documents, and both national and provincial grassroots criteria. You can print a blank copy of the proposal for
     planning purposes from the first page of each proposal website.

5.   Electronically submit your Project Proposal using the on-line form.

6.   The NB GrassRoots Management Team will meet to evaluate the proposals. Applicants and District Technology
     Supervisors will be informed of the status of their proposal at the end of each month.
7.   Project funding will be released upon acceptance of project and receipt of the signed Terms of Agreement.
     Schools who do not complete their project and report will be invoiced to return all funds.
8.   All projects must include the development of a web site to showcase the project. Free web space is made
     available to schools by Brunnet and is obtained by completing the online application found on the GrassRoots NB
     site.

9.   Projects are expected to meet the deadlines established in their proposal.
     You will be required to complete the online final Project Report no later than March 15 2003 for project approved
     between October 15 2002 and February 15 2003 and no later than June 30 2003 for projects approved between
     March 31 and May 30
What is the SchoolNet GrassRoots Program?

The SchoolNet GrassRoots Program, together with its provincial, territorial and corporate partners, promotes and facilitates the
effective integration and use of information and communications technologies (ICT) in Canadian classrooms. Students from
Kindergarten to Grade 12 gain essential ICT skills through the development of innovative collaborative learning projects on the
Internet. Funding is offered to schools that complete a project following the Program's rubrics. These projects, which are initiated,
designed and implemented by the teacher and students, are curriculum relevant, focus on learning activities carried out using the
Internet and culminate in the creation of a website.
The program's objectives and guiding principles encourage Canadian K-12 students to develop innovative and entrepreneurial skills as well
as attitudes and behaviours that will help them perform well in an innovative multi-cultural society.

Who is eligible to participate in the SchoolNet GrassRoots Program?
All Canadian K-12 (OAC in Ontario) teachers are eligible to submit projects.

How is the GrassRoots Program delivered?
The SchoolNet GrassRoots Program is delivered through its partners in every Canadian province and territory including First Nations. These
partners assume the management, administration and promotion of the Program in their own jurisdiction.

Where is the funding for the GrassRoots Program coming from?
The SchoolNet GrassRoots Program is a three-way collaborative partnership involving the federal government, provinces/territories, including
First Nations, as well as the private sector. The funding for the SchoolNet GrassRoots Program comes from the federal government, GrassRoots
partners in the provinces, territories and First Nations, as well as corporate sponsors .

What are GrassRoots projects?
GrassRoots projects are initiated, designed and implemented by teachers and their students. Projects are curriculum-relevant and focus on
learning activities carried out using the Internet. All GrassRoots projects involve in-class online learning activities. GrassRoots projects are
based on the premise that students will collaborate, work in teams, interact, conduct research, seek out online resources and carry out activities
that result in their creating a product that will be published on the Internet. It is expected that teachers will collaborate with other teachers in
their school and in other schools in the design and implementation of projects.

All Canadian K-12 teachers and students can create and share a SchoolNet GrassRoots project ... whether beginners or experts in the use
of ICT, whether from rural or urban communities, regardless of the level of sophistication of the technology to which they have access.
What are the different categories of GrassRoots projects?
There are different categories of GrassRoots projects designed to provide a range of opportunities from Individual Projects to Block Projects
that comprise a number of Component Projects and involve several teachers and classes in one or more schools in one or more school boards.
There are four different categories of GrassRoots projects:
Individual projects
Block projects
School Website Projects
Generations CanConnect Projects
How long does it take to complete a GrassRoots project?
While all GrassRoots projects require a significant period of time for completion -- a minimum of four weeks of class activities, collaboration
and research -- many GrassRoots projects are more complex in design and scope, requiring higher cognitive and ICT skills to implement.
These projects should be carried out over a substantial period of time.
All GrassRoots projects are to be undertaken and completed within the school year.
Can a GrassRoots project be funded more than once?
The GrassRoots Program does not fund repeat projects; it is understood that teachers may wish to submit proposals for projects that build on
previous projects but that are substantially different in scope, design, etc.
Have tools been developed to help teachers with their GrassRoots Projects?
Useful tools called Rubrics have been developed for project proposals and final reports/websites for the various categories of GrassRoots
projects setting out distinct criteria for each. These tools are for teachers, students and evaluation teams to use at various stages of planning,
developing, implementing, evaluating and reporting on projects.
Is there a limit on the number of GrassRoots projects that can be submitted?
There is no limit to the number of projects that a teacher or school can submit. Where projects are administered by
provincial/territorial partners, restrictions may apply. Consult the list of provincial/territorial partners for local program guidelines.

How does the SchoolNet GrassRoots Program work?
1. Teachers must submit a proposal using an on-line form;
Note: Project proposals from partner provinces/territories are administered by the local GrassRoots Program.
Check the list of provincial/territorial partners to determine if special program guidelines will apply to your project proposal.
2. Projects are evaluated using established evaluation criteria and rubrics;
3. Upon approval, project proposals are posted in the GrassRoots Project Gallery;
4. Upon completion of the project, teachers submit a project report;
5. Funding is issued to the school principal.
Find out more about the process for GrassRoots project application and reporting.
Copyright Issues
As in any research project, students must provide an online bibliography of the resources they used in
      creating homepages. It is too easy to copy material from the web and forget to respect the
      intellectual property of others whether it is an article, a graphic or an audio file. Credit must be given
      to the authors; permission must be requested to use material and links must be provided to other
      people's sites as a courtesy for materials used.




Five Rules to remember:
1.    If you use an image/audio file from a collection on the Internet, always link back to that site as a
      courtesy, proof of source and acknowledgement of credit.
2.    If you find a graphic you really like, read the fine print for copyright information and request
      permission to use it on your site.
3.    Make your own original pictures and avoid any copyright infringements.
4.    Give credit where credit is due by providing a bibliography on your homepages.
5.    Use established formats for citing Internet resources such as:
      Citing Internet Addresses
      Classroom Connect 's comprehensive how-to guide for citing online information in student
      bibliographies
      MLA Citation Examples
      for both hard copy and online resources
                             WEB SITE -- Professional or Personal
                                                  Format:




                 Creator's name (if given). Web Page Title. Institution or organization.
                  of access <URL network        Date
                address>.




              Basic Hula Words. 8 Nov. 2000 <http://www.geocities.com/~olelo/o-h-general.html>.

        Li, Rong-Chang. English as a Second Language. 6 Nov. 2000 <http://www.rong-chang.com/>.


                        Harden, Mark. Picasso the Legend. The Artchive. 6 Nov. 2000
                         <http://www.artchive.com/artchive/P/picasso_postww2.html>.

Dinosaurs in Hawaii! Honolulu Community College. 6 Nov. 2000              <http://www.hcc.hawaii.edu/dinos/dinos.1.html>.
                              Florenceville Middle School
                             181 Main St. Florenceville NB Canada E7L 3G2
                             Phone ~506..392.5115       Faxx ~ 506.392.5118


Dear Parents/Guardians,

The students in Grade ______ at _________________________ School are
participating in an exciting SchoolNet GrassRoots Internet Project.
Creation of sites will require hands-on learning of skills in information technology, writing
and the graphic arts.
Your child is invited to participate in this web-based learning experience. He/she will
work as a member of a team and may create artwork, photos or writing which may be
suitable for publication on the World Wide Web. Under guided supervision, your child will
have access to a class e-mail account and online resources of the Internet. Along with
these privileges, your child is expected to use the technology appropriately or he/she will
forfeit this opportunity.
If you have any concerns or questions, please feel free to contact me. Please sign the
permission form and return it to school as soon as possible.

Sincerely,

________________

								
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