Design Technology Coursework - DOC by egg17171

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									Marks scheme for GCSE Design Technology Coursework
                                                                             (From WJEC 2004)

4.3 Coursework (60%)
Coursework for the full GCSE and short course will consist of a project which is
allocated a weighting of 60%. Candidates are required to submit a single project for
assessment which addresses all three assessment objectives in an integrated way. The
evidence required to be submitted for the project must include a three dimensional
product with a concise portfolio and/or the equivalent ICT evidence. It should
represent about 40 hours of supervised time for full GCSE candidates and about 20
hours of supervised time for those following the short course.

The work must demonstrate the candidate's ability to:
1. design and make quality products which can be tested and evaluated;
2. apply relevant knowledge and understanding including key skills to a range
of technological activities;
3. relate their work to relevant industrial and commercial practices where
appropriate;
4. communicate to relevant audiences their ideas, understanding and decision-making
processes.

The project represents a unique opportunity for the candidate to fulfill highly
individual needs. It also provides candidates with opportunities for generating
evidence for all six key skills identified in section 6.

Candidates should consider the industrial and commercial aspects of designing and
making, be aware of the needs of the end user of the product or system and show a
sensitivity to the wider effects of their work on society and the environment. It is
expected that candidates will, in their project, work with a range of materials from
within the focus area of their choice, but where appropriate they may also draw on
materials and processes from other areas.

ICT should be used to enhance the quality of the candidate’s designing and making
rather than for its own sake. Where Design and Technology is used to contribute
evidence towards the key skill of IT, that evidence should be naturally occurring, not
contrived. The exact application of ICT will depend on resources available, the focus
area concerned and the experience of the individual candidate. In all cases there
should be a balance between ICT/CAD/CAM generated work and hand skills which
remain an important feature of Design and Technology.

Summary of Assessment Criteria for the Project
Marks Assessment
Objectives
(a) Investigating 10 AO3
(b) Designing 20 AO2
(c) Communicating and modeling 10 AO1
(d) Knowledge of materials 5 AO1
(e) Making 40 AO2
(f) Planning 5 AO1
(g) Evaluating 10 AO3
(h) Written communication 3 all
GCSE DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY 17
Details of Assessment Criteria for the Project
The assessment criteria provided should be applied to all projects, whether they are based on
work in Food Technology, Graphic Products, Resistant Materials Technology, Systems and
Control Technology, Textiles Technology or Industrial Technology. It is important to note
that the assessment criteria must be applied consistently regardless of the point in the course
when a project was completed, or the assessment undertaken. The following mark descriptors
are provided as a general indication of the performance of candidates achieving the range of
marks available to the identified assessment objectives. The mark awarded will depend in
practice on the overall achievement with respect to each objective and while the descriptors
attempt to define typical performance in specific mark ranges, it is important to remember
that shortcomings in performance in some aspects of the descriptors may be balanced by
better performance in others.

Mark Description of Attainment
(a) Investigating (10%) AO3
1 – 2 A basic design brief is presented but there is little analysis of the problem. There may
be a basic design specification and some evidence of rudimentary research, but little
or no evaluation of existing products. Presentation poor, with little or no use of ICT.
3 – 4 A clear design brief has been recorded based upon an analysis of the problem. Some
research has been carried out, including a simple analysis of existing products,
leading to a basic design specification. Investigation work is generally well presented.
Some attempt to present work clearly, possibly using elementary ICT.
5 – 6 A clear design brief has been arrived at after an exploration of the problem.
Appropriate research has been carried out which contributes to a sound design
specification. Some of the implications of the candidate’s chosen course have been
explained. Existing products have been analysed and useful information sought from
several sources. The research has been drawn upon in design ideas and development.
Appropriate use of ICT evident, to gather, order and present investigation work.
7 – 8 A well-founded brief has been arrived at following a careful analysis of the design
problem. The needs of users, design implications and a survey of existing products
have been used to establish a detailed and appropriate design specification. Relevant
research from a variety of sources is also evident. The candidate has made appropriate
use of ICT to gather information and to record, collate and present research findings.
9 – 10 A well-founded brief has been arrived at after a thorough analysis of the problem. A
detailed analysis of the brief incorporating the needs of users, design implications and
an evaluation of existing products has been synthesised into a comprehensive and
thoughtful design specification. Relevant research (including, where appropriate,
specialist expert advice) from a variety of sources, which supports both functional and
aesthetic aspects of the initial ideas and design development, is also evident. The
candidate has made relevant use of ICT to source information and to record, analyse
and present research findings.


(b) Designing (20%) AO2
1 – 4 A small range of initial ideas has been presented in a recognisable form with a very
limited development of one idea into a final solution. A basic outline of the final
solution is given, but with many details omitted. Little or no evidence of the
appropriate use of CAD.
5 – 8 A range of realistic design ideas presented, with some annotation, along with
evidence of a clear development of one into a final solution. The appropriate
conventions have been used to convey details, such as materials, dimensions and
construction/manufacturing methods. Some evidence of the appropriate use of CAD.
9 – 12 A range of realistic, clearly presented and well-annotated initial ideas, with evidence
of a clear and logical development of one idea into a final solution. The appropriate
conventions have been used to convey details, including materials, dimensions and
construction/manufacturing methods. There is evidence of the appropriate use of
CAD to communicate/model ideas.
13–16 A broad range of clearly presented and well-annotated initial ideas, one of which has
been clearly and logically developed and refined into an achievable final solution.
Most details of the final proposal are presented, including materials, dimensions and
construction/manufacturing methods, using appropriate techniques and conventions.
A manufacturing specification is given. Effective use of CAD to communicate, model
and develop design proposals is evident.
17–20 A broad and imaginative range of clearly presented initial ideas, one of which has
been thoroughly developed and refined into a realistic, achievable final solution with
evidence of reasoned judgement throughout. Full details of the final proposal are
presented, including materials, dimensions and construction/manufacturing methods,
using appropriate techniques and conventions. A manufacturing specification such
that a third party could make the product is given. Imaginative and effective use of
CAD to communicate, model, develop and refine design proposals is evident.

(c) Communicating and modelling (10%) AO1
1 – 2 One or two media used to present ideas, for example talk, sketches or pictures.
Simple modelling techniques will have been used, where appropriate.
3 – 4 A limited range of media and simplistic sketches used to present ideas, systematically
recording how ideas developed. Some evidence of modelling, where appropriate.
Little or no evidence of appropriate use of ICT to model or communicate ideas.
5 – 6 A range of media and techniques, of a good standard, used to develop and present
ideas with some evidence of attention to detail. Some modelling used where
appropriate. A clear description of how the design proposal was developed and
selected. Some evidence of appropriate use of ICT to model or communicate
ideas/information.
7 – 8 A range of media and techniques, of a very good standard, showing attention to detail,
used to develop, refine and present ideas. Appropriate modelling is evident and a
clear description is provided of how the design proposal was developed and selected.
Appropriate use of ICT will be evident, to model or communicate ideas/information.
9 – 10 A wide range of media and techniques, displaying a high level of competence and
attention to detail, used to develop, refine, record and propose design ideas. A
detailed account of the full range of ideas and strategies explored is provided. The
appropriate use of a range of ICT facilities will be evident throughout the project, to
model and communicate ideas/information.

(d) Knowledge of materials (5%) AO1
1 Minimal proposals for the use of materials, mainly evident in a simplistic outcome.
2 A limited understanding of materials displayed, yet the product shows the successful
use of appropriate materials.
3 More appropriate suggestions for suitable materials for the task, evident in both the
folio and product, taking account of some material properties and cost. The candidate
should have combined knowledge of the properties of a number of materials and/or
manufacturing processes in their selection.
4 A clear indication of understanding the properties, cost and availability of suitable
materials for the task, evident in both the folio and product. An informed choice of
materials will have been made, supported by clear justification for selection/rejection.
5 Evidence within the folio of the exploration of options in terms of materials choice
with a clear indication of the reasons for selecting the final materials used, and why
other materials have been rejected. A range of techniques, processes and materials
have been considered in the search for a high quality outcome.
(e) Making (40%) AO2
1 – 8 The product displays limited manufacturing capability. Little evidence of acquiring
appropriate techniques. Simple hand or machine tools have been used with a limited
degree of success, but there may be some evidence of accuracy and quality at the
upper end of this mark range.
9 – 16 Some attempt to develop suitable techniques and standards. Suitable equipment and
processes have been utilised demonstrating an understanding of the main properties
and/or working characteristics of materials. Equipment used safely.
17–24 The product displays adequate manufacturing skills which result from appropriate
planning and the safe execution of the techniques and skills required.
25–32 Good level of skills demonstrating the acquisition of appropriate techniques and
procedures. The candidate may have used and monitored procedures for quality
assurance.
33–40 High levels of accuracy and finish combined with careful planning and manufacturing
procedures evident in a very successful outcome. A range of demanding making
skills and processes used with confidence to achieve a high quality product.

(f) Planning (5%) AO1
1 A simplistic or incomplete outcome to the project. Very limited evidence of setting
time or manufacturing objectives. No plan for making is present.
2 A reasonable quality product has been successfully completed. Limited evidence of
setting time or manufacturing objectives, with only a simple plan for making.
3 A suitable plan for making developed, to fit with time, materials and facilities
available. Some objectives have been set for time and manufacturing procedures in
order to ensure the completion of the final product.
4 Objectives have been set, and most of them implemented, to improve quality during
the making process. Some major resources and constraints have been identified and
accounted for, including time, materials and facilities available.
5 A comprehensive, clear and realistic set of objectives for time, resource and constraint
management have been devised and implemented. A clearly recorded planning
programme will have been managed in a highly successful manner leading to an
outcome of high quality.

(g) Evaluating (10%) AO3
1 – 2 Simplistic evaluation of the success or failure of the product, with no modifications
proposed.
3 – 4 Limited evaluation, with some reference to the original design brief or specification.
Evidence of minor modification with some evidence of reasons being offered.
5 – 6 An objective evaluation, including a review of the design specification and evaluation
of the use of materials and/or manufacturing processes. Some evidence of justification
for modifications.
7 – 8 A thorough, objective evaluation, clearly linked with the design specification.
Suitable justifications have been given for modifications as a result of testing or
seeking the views of potential users. Reference made to economic, social or
environmental issues, where appropriate. Some consideration of manufacturing on a
greater scale.
9 – 10 A detailed, objective, articulate evaluation, cross-referenced to all aspects of the
design specification. Full justification provided for modifications incorporated as a
consequence of comprehensive testing or seeking the views of potential users.
Detailed consideration of economic, social or environmental issues, where
appropriate, with consideration of manufacturing on a greater scale.

								
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