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The 2010 Rogue's standard Xtronic continuously variable transmission

VIEWS: 17 PAGES: 1

									Nissan's compact SUV returns for 2010 with no changes to its standard four-cylinder
engine.

The Rogue's only engine is the 16-valve, 2.5-liter QR25DE, shared with the Sentra
and Altima sedans. This all-aluminum inline four is an open-deck engine, designed for
compactness and light weight. It has chain-driven dual overhead cams; continuously
variable timing for the intake valves; Nissan's Direct Ignition System; and twin
balance shafts to reduce vibration. In the Rogue, it is rated at 170 horsepower and 175
lb-ft of torque.

Despite the QR25DE's variable valve timing and long-stroke design, which are
supposed to enhance low-end torque, most reviewers find this engine annoyingly
weak at low speeds. Unlike some other four-cylinder SUVs, which provide good
off-the-line grunt, but run out of breath at high revs, the Rogue's 2.5-liter engine
provides anemic mid-range response, coming on strongly at higher speeds.

The 2.5-liter engine's 170 horsepower is at the low end for this class. The
four-cylinder Toyota RAV4 has 179 horsepower, the Honda CR-V 180 horsepower,
and the Chevrolet Equinox 182 horsepower; several rivals also offer V6 engines. The
Rogue's performance is not dramatically inferior to its four-cylinder competition, but
reviewers wish for more power for safer merging and passing.

The Rogue's standard Xtronic continuously variable transmission (CVT) does not
help much. While this transmission works well with Nissan's larger V6s, many critics
say it only emphasizes the 2.5-liter engine's lack of power and raucous demeanor. The
big four is reasonably quiet when cruising, but it becomes obnoxiously noisy in even
moderate acceleration.

The EPA estimates the 2.5-liter's fuel economy at 22/27 for FWD Rogues, 21/26 with
AWD. Both are average for this class, comparable to the Honda CR-V and
four-cylinder RAV4, but well behind the 22/32 rating of the FWD Chevrolet Equinox.
Like most rivals, the Rogue uses regular fuel.

Ronnie Tanner is a contributing writer at SWEngines.com. He writes about Nissan
Rogue Engine and other industry specific topics.

								
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