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					Building a Brighter Future


    Investing in Schools for
        the 21st Century




  Building Schools for the Future
     Strategic Business Case
            June 2007
                                                 TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION AND BRIEF SUMMARY ...................................................................... 1
1. Resume of our Strategic Business Case ..................................................................... 1
LUTON - AN OVERVIEW ........................................................................................... 1
2. Summary of key aspects of the area. ........................................................................... 1
SCHOOLS CHART INDICATING BSF ADDITIONALITY ..................................................... 3

STRATEGIC OVERVIEW ........................................................................................... 4
3.1 Where are we now in terms of educational outcomes, diversity, fair access and
choice? ................................................................................................................................ 4
3.2 What additionality (value-added) will BSF investment provide to our educational
outcomes?........................................................................................................................... 4
3.3 How do we propose to champion the needs, choices and demands of parents and
pupils as we develop education provision? ..................................................................... 6
3.4 What approaches will we adopt to develop greater competition in the provision of
new schools? ...................................................................................................................... 7
3.5 How will we ensure an effective delivery of the 14-19 entitlements in partnership
with LLSCs? ........................................................................................................................ 7
3.6 How will we ensure robust challenge to the schools as they improve standards? . 7
3.7 Our projected targets.................................................................................................... 8
KEY PRIORITIES .................................................................................................... 9
4.1 Pupil place planning ..................................................................................................... 9
4.2 Priorities for the school estate .................................................................................. 10
4.3 Headline strategic vision for ICT ............................................................................... 11
4.4 Headline Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) ............................................................ 12
4.5 Consultation, stakeholder engagement and school visioning ................................ 13
PRIORITISATION OF BSF INVESTMENT .................................................................... 15
5.1 Context ........................................................................................................................ 15
5.2 Existing estate............................................................................................................. 15
5.3 Pupil number estimates.............................................................................................. 15
5.4 Estate proposals ......................................................................................................... 16
5.5 Assessment of existing asset base ........................................................................... 17
5.6 Current ICT and maintenance - infrastructure and service provision ..................... 17
5.7 Delivering our education vision ................................................................................. 20
5.8 Diversity of provision ................................................................................................. 20
5.9 The curriculum offer ................................................................................................... 20
5.10 Policy on mainstream school size ........................................................................... 21
5.11 A Borough-wide approach to SEN provision .......................................................... 21
5.12 A consortium approach to SEN provision............................................................... 22
5.13 Individual school visions.......................................................................................... 23
5.14 Our vision for ICT ...................................................................................................... 23
5.15 16-19 provision .......................................................................................................... 31
5.16 Our vision for extended schools ............................................................................. 31
5.17 Our vision for extended services ............................................................................. 32
5.18 Competition for new schools ................................................................................... 32
5.19 Options appraisal and methodology ....................................................................... 32
5.20 Definition of option assessment criteria ................................................................. 33
5.21 Costings .................................................................................................................... 34
5.22 Development of control option estates strategy .................................................... 34
5.23 Confirmation that prioritisation of schools under DfES criteria still applies ....... 35
5.24 Prioritisation/first phase ........................................................................................... 35
5.25 Potential disposals, site acquisitions, amalgamations, new schools etc ............ 37
5.26 Integration of ICT service delivery strategy ............................................................ 37
5.27 Geographical rankings ............................................................................................. 37
5.28 Impact of phasing ..................................................................................................... 38
5.29 Intentions for sustaining schools until BSF implemented .................................... 38
5.30 Investment to be delivered prior to BSF ................................................................. 38
5.31 School amalgamations, closures and expansions ................................................. 38
5.32 Land sale risks .......................................................................................................... 38
5.33 Converging ICT investment with phased buildings ............................................... 38
5.34 Affordability (Construction including ICT) .............................................................. 39
5.35 Comparison with FAM .............................................................................................. 43
5.36 New build procurement options .............................................................................. 44
5.37 Affordabilty (Lifecycle Maintenance and FM) .......................................................... 44
5.38 Affordabilty (LEP and LA internal costs) ................................................................. 44
5.39 Affordabilty (overall) ................................................................................................. 45
5.40 Alternative funding sources ..................................................................................... 46
5.41 Location of co-located non-school facilities and funding implications ................ 46
5.42 Presentation of Data ................................................................................................. 46
DELIVERY OF BSF ................................................................................................ 47
6.1 Procurement strategy ................................................................................................. 47
6.2 Managing the process ................................................................................................ 48
6.3 Budget and resource approvals................................................................................. 48
6.4 Client team .................................................................................................................. 48
6.5 Risk management ....................................................................................................... 48
6.6 External advisor strategy ........................................................................................... 49
6.7 Project governance ..................................................................................................... 49
6.8 Approvals and delegated authority............................................................................ 53
CONSULTATION................................................................................................... 54
7.1 Background ................................................................................................................. 54
7.2 Managing change ........................................................................................................ 54
7.3 Change management plan – issues and desired outcomes .................................... 56
APPENDIX A – LOCATION MAP OF MAINSTREAM SCHOOLS AND CONSORTIA AREAS ....... 67

APPENDIX B – HIGH LEVEL OPTION APPRAISALS ...................................................... 68

APPENDIX C – FUNDING ALLOCATION ..................................................................... 94

APPENDIX D – COST MODEL .................................................................................. 95

APPENDIX E – RESOURCE SUMMARY ...................................................................... 96

APPENDIX F – PHASING OF SCHOOLS WITHIN CONSORTIA ......................................... 97

APPENDIX G – PROJECT PROGRAMME FOR OBC AND PROCUREMENT ......................... 99

APPENDIX H – MEMBER APPROVAL OF SBC: .......................................................... 105

APPENDIX I – LETTER OF SUPPORT FROM LSC ....................................................... 107

APPENDIX J – LETTER OF APPROVAL FROM DFES FOR EDUCATIONAL VISION ............. 108

APPENDIX K – INCLUSION OF ACADEMIES IN BSF .................................................... 110

APPENDIX L – DESIGN INNOVATION IN BSF ............................................................ 111

APPENDIX M – TEACHING AND LEARNING: TRANSITION PLAN 2006-2007 ..................... 112

APPENDIX N - REGISTER OF CRITICAL RISKS .......................................................... 133
Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case


INTRODUCTION AND BRIEF SUMMARY

1. Resume of our Strategic Business Case

The following Strategic Business Case takes forward our DfES approved Education Vision and translates it
into an affordable BSF programme that is to be delivered over two waves (Wave 3 & Wave 6). This
provides a guarantee of funding continuity once our LEP is in place. Schools have been prioritised
according to performance and deprivation issues within a cluster arrangement of three consortia,
recognising the need for expansion to cope with our growing pupil population. Our sample offer in Wave 3
is based on the optimum of two schools with one being a 100% new build PFI and the other a D&B
refurbishment on which design solutions will be sought. In addition, two locally sponsored schools have
been approved to become academies and these 100% D&B new builds will be part-designed to RIBA
Stage D and then novated to our preferred bidder in order to complete the design in readiness for
construction following financial close. This option will minimise bidder costs (i.e. only two designs) but
maximise the benefit to bidders of becoming Luton's partner (i.e. four construction projects in Phase 1, of
which three will be 100% new builds). It is anticipated that all schools, bar the two academies, will source
managed services from the LEP to ensure that the entire secondary school estate, whether rebuilt under
PFI or refurbished under D&B, will benefit equally from the same anticipated high quality service provision
and robust maintenance regime. The Council has worked closely with schools to ensure a long term
commitment to the programme in order to deliver the required education transformation. The success of
BSF will determine the LEP's role in future projects such as the primary capital programme, 'reshaping the
Council's estate' and 'developing the office of the future' as well as specific project development, project
management and service requirements.

LUTON - AN OVERVIEW

2. Summary of key aspects of the area.

Luton is one of the largest towns in South East England, with a population of 184,900 residents, and about
71,000 households. The population is projected to rise to 189,000 by 2010.

The average age of residents is 34.9 years, compared to 38.6 in England and Wales, partly due to the
students at Luton University and also a high local birth rate. However, by 2010 there will also be a 9%
increase in the number of people aged 75 and over living in Luton.

Luton‟s people come from a wide range of ethnic backgrounds. Approximately 28% are of Black and
Minority Ethnic origin, with significant Pakistani/Kashmiri, Bangladeshi, Indian and African Caribbean
communities. In recent years the diversity of the population has been augmented by asylum seekers, and
there are now small communities of Albanian, Russian and Turkish speakers. 20% of the population were
born outside the UK. 44% of children in Luton schools speak a first language other than English.

Luton is about 30 miles north of London and has excellent transport links. London Luton International
Airport lies on the edge of the town, and more than 7 million travellers pass through there every year. The
Government has proposed permitting expansion of traffic on the single runway, as demand requires it, up
to the maximum capacity of 30 million passengers per year by 2030. Luton is also on the M1 motorway 10
minutes from the M25. The town also enjoys a frequent 30-minute rail service to London, and rail
connections north to Leicester, Nottingham, Derby and Sheffield, and south to London, Gatwick Airport and
Brighton.

Luton is a major sub-regional employment centre with approximately 90,000 jobs. Major employers include
the airport, airlines, and Luton-Dunstable hospital, Luton Borough Council, Luton University and the motor
industry. The service sector now provides as many jobs as manufacturing. There is a successful business
park at Capability Green, which has attracted new companies such as AstraZeneca UK and BAe Systems,
and another is under development at Butterfield Green. Unemployment is comparatively high for the
region, with higher unemployment in the inner wards of the borough, particularly among some minority
ethnic groups. There are also pockets of unemployment in some peripheral estates.

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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case


Improving education and training are key priorities for the town, as residents have a comparatively low level
of qualifications compared to other parts of the country (23% have the equivalent of NVQ3 or higher, and
31% have no qualifications). Luton has 12 mainstream secondary schools, one of which has a sixth form.
At the age of 16, young people can continue their education in the beacon-rated Luton Sixth Form College
and Barnfield FE College. The University of Luton in the town centre has an excellent reputation for
business, media studies, marketing and PR, and attracts many overseas students. The University has
twice finished top in national tables for the percentage of graduates gaining employment.

Luton is densely populated. There is little land left for development; all housing development has to take
place on land previously built on and there is a shortage of brownfield sites. However, the Government has
proposed that the area north of Luton, together with the neighbouring towns of Dunstable and Houghton
Regis should accommodate additional growth of over 30,000 dwellings together with associated
employment growth and infrastructure, by 2021. Most of this development will take place in Houghton
Regis and on greenfield sites to the North-West and North-East.

A shortage of affordable housing remains a problem for Luton residents, and rental prices have been
inflated by the demand amongst students at the university. The Council has a housing stock of
approximately 9,000 dwellings, and there are just over 7,000 applicants on the waiting list.

Luton has more than 1,500 acres of recreational space and seven attractive parks, but there is a shortage
of open space in some of the central wards. Sports facilities include a dedicated athletics arena, three
leisure centres and six swimming pools, and the town has a reputation for hosting prestigious sporting
events. Luton FC, “The Hatters”, has a devoted following. There are three museums, the Galaxy centre
with its restaurants and multiplex cinema, the Hat Factory arts and media centre, the Library theatre,
several nightclubs and a wide range of restaurants. Despite the lack of a large performance venue, there
is a wide range of arts and cultural events. Every year the Luton Carnival attracts about 140,000 visitors,
and many residents from all ethnic backgrounds participate throughout the year in carnival clubs to prepare
elaborate costumes and performances. Other events, such as the Irish Fleadh and St. Patrick‟s Day, a
major film festival and the Mela, all add to Luton‟s vibrant community spirit.




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case
    SCHOOLS CHART INDICATING BSF ADDITIONALITY

                        1       2                    3                                          4         5                                                                                              6     7
                     Single School School Special Specialism Specialism Successful, Current Proposed Changes to                        2005 + 5yr BSF Current + 5yr BSF Current + 5yr BSF             Comm. Future
       School        impact type 2006 type (post arrange- current proposed failing or size     size     SEN                            GCSE   GCSE CVA KS3 CVA KS3 CVA KS4 CVA KS4                    served regen.
                     of BSF              BSF)     ments                    coasting                   provision                        5 A*-C 5 A*-C
      Ashcroft         4       F, 16, Co   F, 16, Co   SSPA     none           ICT        S        1120        1050          -          44    2014: 59   100.7    2014: 103.0   975.8    2014: 1001      5        3
      Cardinal                  VA RC,      VA RC,                                                                           -
      Newman          11        19, Co      19, Co     Link5      Sc       Bus. Studies   S     1210 (223) 1210 (240)                   56    2015: 71   100.6    2015: 101.0 1006 2015: 1024      1
    Challney Boys 11           C, 16, Co   C, 16, Co    A1        Sc         Bus./Ent.    S        825       900 #           -          55    2015: 80   101.1    2015: 103.1 1011.6 2015: 1057.9  2             1, 2
    Challney Girls 4, 11, 12   C, 16, Co   C, 16, Co    A1        Sc             -        S        910       1050 #          -          55    2014: 70   100.5    2014: >101 1018.3 2014: >1020 2, 7
      Denbigh         11       C, 16, Co   C, 16, Co    A1        Sp             -        S       1120        1200           -          61    2016: 85   102.4    2016: 104.0 1048.1 2016: 1055 2, 7, 8
                                                                             Creative
                                                                                                                         -
       Halyard         4       C, 16, Co A, 19, Co      A1      none        Industries    S         915   1200 (250)                    44   2013: 69     98.5    2013: 101.0 987.4      2013: 1002      5
       Icknield       11       F, 16, Co F, 16, Co     Link5   Vis. Arts       Hum        S        1420     1500     Extend HI          71   2016: 85     98.8    2016: 102.0 1028.2     2016: 1040      2        3
      Lea Manor       11       F, 16, Co F, 16, Co     Link5    none        Perf. Arts    S        1200     1200     Extend PI          40   2013: 60     99.8    2013: 101.0 988.3      2013: 1002      5
                                                                                                                                             2014: 65-
       Lealands       11       C, 16, Co C, 16, Co     Link5     Sp         Perf. Arts    S         912       900            -          50      70       100.4    2014: 102.0   979.9    2014: 1002    1,3        3
      Putteridge      11       C, 16, Co C, 16, Co     SSPA     none        Maths/ICT     S        1215      900 ~      Extend PI/VI    50   2015: 65    98.8     2015: 102.0   962.8    2015: 1010 2, 5, 6, 8


     South Luton       4       C, 16, Co A, 19, Co     SSPA     none        Perf. Arts    F        888    1200 (250)         -          20    2013: 60    98.7    2013: 101.0   951.9    2013: 1002      5
                                                                                                                          Develop
       Stopsley       13       F, 16, Co F, 16, Co     SSPA       Sp          Music       S        990      1200 ~         SCD          54    2016: 70    99.7    2016: 106.0   990.3    2016: 1012   1, 5, 6

      Woodlands       10       C, 19, Sp C, 19, Sp     Link5    none       Cog./Learn.    S        145         175           -               Post BSF: good + according to Ofsted judgement              -        -
                                C, 16,    C, 16,
    Avenue Centre      4         PRU       PRU          A1         -            -         S         20         20            -               Post BSF: good + according to Ofsted judgement              -        -
                                C, 16,    C, 16,
    Orchard Centre     4         PRU       PRU         Link5       -            -         S         20         20            -               Post BSF: good + according to Ofsted judgement              -        -
                                          C, 16,
     New Centre       n/a         n/a      PRU         SSPA        -            -         n/a        -         20            -           -       -         -           -          -           -          -        -

    Key to numbers used in identified columns
    1 - 1.Policy area: 2.age range: 3 school type: 4 curriculum provision: 5 governance: 6 provider: 7 status: 8 choice: 9 diversity of provider: 10 diversity of provision: 11 improved performance: 12 14-19: 13 ECM: 14
    health and sport: 15 qualifications: 16 ICT (post BSF outputs relate to commencement of operational phase + 5 years)
    2 - School type: F: Foundation, T: Trust, A: Academy, C: Community, VA: Voluntary Aided, E: Extended, N: New, 19: 11-19, 16: 11-16, Co: Comprehensive, PRU: Pupil Referral Unit, Sp: Special,
    O: Other
    3 - Initials refer to one of three consortia that are at the core of Campus Luton
    4 - sixth form numbers identified in brackets, # capacities subject to planning approval to relocate Challney Girls‟ School, ~ proposals subject to updated pupil forecasts for Wave 4-6.
    5 - HI: Hearing Impaired, VI: Visually Impaired, PI: Physically Impaired, SCD: Social & Communication Difficulties (subject to confirmation with individual schools, A1 school yet to be identified)
    6 - 1 Predominantly White European; 2 Predominantly multi ethnic: 3 Predominantly Rented housing: 4 Predominantly Owner-occupied housing: 5 Predominantly mixed housing 6 SEN (school action and higher)
    >25%: 7 EAL >25%: 8 Pupil mobility >15%
    7 - 1.Training School 2. Leading Edge School 3. Extended Community Use




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case
STRATEGIC OVERVIEW

Our vision for Building Schools for the Future is ambitious, affordable, and deliverable and offers excellent
value for money. It is firmly rooted in our Children and Young People‟s Plan and complements both the
corporate agenda and local context. It places the learner at the centre and seeks to maximise the potential
of every individual. It is built upon a collaborative and forward thinking approach to teaching and learning.

3.1 Where are we now in terms of educational outcomes, diversity, fair access and choice?
Headline results, at both Key Stages 3 and 4, are improving. In 2005 GCSE results (on which the BSF
Wave 3 targets are based) six of the schools achieved above the level of Luton‟s Statistical Neighbours
and two others were very close, a marked improvement from the position two years earlier when four were
in this position. For the past three years three schools have been very close to or above national average
results KS4.

Contextual value added has also improved at both KS3 and KS4, but in only one school has the expected
progress been made consistently by both KS3 and KS4 students over the past three years. In 2005 seven
schools failed to reach the benchmark of 1000 for value added between KS2 and KS4, and so a significant
number of students across the town are failing to make adequate progress. The pattern of
underperformance by groups is complex and varies from school to school. Overall African-Caribbean
students, some of the groups from Asian heritage and, in some schools, boys are the main
underperforming groups. In some schools Asian students, once they have a mastery of English, make
significant progress - particularly from KS3 to KS4. A challenge to the schools is to ensure that all students
progress at the rate of the best performing.

Attendance is improving across all schools and is good in a number. All secondary schools are close to or
above the national average. Behaviour is also improving, but there are some challenging pockets of poor
behaviour, particularly in the poorer performing schools. Fixed term exclusions continue to fall and
consequently so have the number of days lost to exclusions. Permanent exclusions have risen, but again
action in individual schools can impact on the overall figure and a number of schools have had no
exclusions. Secondary schools within the Behaviour Improvement Programme (BIP) continue to remain
wedded to the principals of reducing exclusion and although the National BIP programme has ended the
Authority is continuing to set targets with these schools.

Inclusion is a major priority for Luton, ensuring all students are able to access a wide and relevant
curriculum wherever possible in a mainstream setting with support. There are resourced units in three high
schools and all schools are committed to supporting students with a range of special needs.

Of the 13 secondary schools (including 2 proposed Academies) one is 11-19 Voluntary Aided, one is 11-19
Special Needs and the remainder are 11-16, of which four are Foundation and the remainder Community
schools, two of which are single sex. Not all schools have specialist status, though some are well
established and have identified second specialisms for redesignation.

Provision for 14-19 education is a local, and nationally recognised, beacon. Two colleges in the town, and
a third in Dunstable that works in close partnership, provide a wide range of courses. The staying on rate,
particularly to 17, is rising and there is a strong determination to sustain and extend this trend. The
colleges are full members of Campus Luton (the area-wide learning collaboration initiative) and support the
provision of vocational and other courses in schools.

Five schools are over subscribed, one is likely to have greater pressure because of population shift, and
two are subject to local population decline. Currently most parents are able to access a school of their
choice, although some of the highest achieving are serving only their own designated catchment areas.
Expansion of some schools is limited by their restricted sites. Two of the lowest performing schools over a
period of years, are proposed to become Academies. The Sponsor, Barnfield College, is a full member of
Campus Luton and the Academies Expression of Interest indicates the intention to support and remain
within the collaborative framework.

3.2 What additionality (value-added) will BSF investment provide to our educational outcomes?
The Campus Luton strategy is at the heart of BSF. Organisationally this establishes three consortia of
schools and the proposed Academies that between them will provide a range of vocational and specialist
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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case
diploma courses. The potential for allowing access to students from other schools within the consortium
significantly widens choice and opportunity. The timescale for BSF is very appropriate to support the
development of specialist diplomas by providing the opportunity to develop the necessary specialist
accommodation. Design plans for the schools are intended to reflect the vocational and other specialisms
of each, whilst maintaining a core provision for Key Stage 3. The BSF Change Plan includes consideration
of the curriculum, staffing and financial implications of such shared facilities and joint courses. Work has
already started with pilot courses. The revenue plans for maintenance of buildings and ICT will retain these
facilities at a high standard.

The comprehensive BSF Change Plan, which includes improving standards, behaviour and action for
vulnerable groups, is co-ordinated through the BSF team, but is managed by the responsible service teams
within the Children and Learning Department with oversight of the Plan resting with the senior leadership
team, each member having named responsibility for specific elements of the Plan. Progress with the Plan
will be monitored through the regular meetings of the senior team. Each school will also be developing its
own change/improvement plan, in harmony with that of the LA, but identifying the particular priorities for
each institution. A small team of senior school staff, supported by funding from BSF and with leadership
from the core team, has been identified and resourced to act as change facilitators for each consortium.
They will work with staff, students and the wider community to bring about necessary change, and enable
these stakeholders to have a voice in the design and development of schools.

The vision for Campus Luton specifies significant changes in the expectations of teaching and learning. It
has four main elements as follows: learning to know, learning to do, learning to live together, and learning
to be.

The change plan for teaching and learning, with its associated CPD programme, includes enabling
teachers to work with groups of differing sizes, developing individualised and personalised learning,
promoting functional literacy, oracy and numeracy and emphasising the use of assessment to plan
learning. Specialist, special and training schools will all contribute to the development programme through
use of their expertise and guidance.

The design of schools will incorporate the physical resources and spaces necessary to enable this change
in learning and teaching. In addition to building flexible and adaptable spaces, BSF provides a managed
service for ICT that will be accessible „any where, any time‟ and opportunities for students to undertake
work in specialised facilities across the consortia. Schools have agreed to trial a Learning Platform,
permitting sharing of materials and allowing students to access materials in all schools and a number of
other sites, including home. It also allows students to lodge assignments from any location to have them
checked or assessed.

Ways in which schools are governed are also part of the Change Plan. This includes consideration of how
strategic leadership is to be provided for shared or joint courses, and how far federation and joint working
might be extended to benefit students and the wider community.

As individual school plans are completed targets have been set for the first cohorts in the changed
accommodation. This will require all students to progress at above average rates, for the contextual added
value of all schools to be above 1000, some significantly so, and for improvements in the headline
measures of attainment.

BSF has impacted corporately in the Council. It has promoted a greater element of joined-up action
particularly in community regeneration and community services provision. The extended schools
programme is pursuing co-ordination of the core BSF offer, with the provision of community facilities on
school sites. Discussions with Active Luton (a Leisure Trust established by the Council) centre on
partnership working with schools regarding leisure facilities for the benefit of all, linked to a sport/PE
strategy in consultation with Sport England. This includes extensive consultation with students and others
to ensure appropriate, well-located and sustainable facilities. There is also planned to be an integral BSF
link with the 2009/10 national rollout of the Primary Capital Programme to ensure opportunities are not
missed across the entire school and community estate.
A wider range of courses aimed to more closely suit the needs and aspirations of students and their
parents and to accommodate these in suitable buildings, has already begun to impact on the level of
engagement of some students. The greater level of funding available under BSF, with significant

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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case
improvements in buildings, sites and courses, will lead to improved attendance and to more appropriately
planned routeways encouraging improved stay-on rates, involvement with lifelong education/training, adult
education and teacher training. A focus of the Academies will be to target students typically not remaining
in education and training post 16, to contribute to a reduction of the proportion of these students across
Luton.

Schools and the Authority are committed to personalised learning and this will include the opportunity for
students to progress according to the stage of learning they have reached, and to not be held back by age
if they are capable and have the maturity to progress to the next stage.

All schools, including those being refurbished, will be fully DDA compliant including, for instance, having
colour schemes to assist students with visual impairment.

3.3 How do we propose to champion the needs, choices and demands of parents and pupils as we
develop education provision?
School place planning will continue to take account of demographic changes and developing patterns of
parental preference. On school admissions we will continue to challenge admission authorities in order to
protect the interests of young people and parents/carers; our community school admissions arrangements
will continue to reflect fully the Admissions Code of Practice. Consideration will be given to widening the
choice for single sex education by abolishing catchment areas for the two Challney schools, allowing them
to serve the whole Borough, as is the case with Luton‟s RC denominational Cardinal Newman Secondary
School. The Academies will, as they develop, offer post 16 provision within the framework of Campus
Luton.

Campus Luton will allow more effective partnership working and co-operation across schools and
Academies to support students with behavioural and learning needs, including those who are gifted and
talented. It will also contribute to more effective community access and provision for students and their
parents. Individual schools have effective mechanisms to allow students to participate in consultation and
development. Under BSF an authority-wide mechanism for consultation and engagement of students will
be extended, building on work already undertaken by Connexions to gain students‟ views.

Extended school and community provision will be used to enable parents and students to access a range
of services and so be more involved with the process of education and learning. Support for ethnic minority
and immigrant communities will continue to be developed and extended.

Underachievement and lack of engagement will not be an acceptable option in post-BSF Luton. Increasing
use of student tracking and target setting by schools, more focused support and guidance from in-school,
youth and Connexions services will be used to ensure that all students make progress and that links with
FE courses and other routes are available and attractive to students. This will reduce the number of
students not engaged in education and training. The use of student consultation and opportunities for them
to be directly involved in the development of courses will be an element which reduces underachievement
and lack of engagement.

The Change Plan includes elements that address issues of behaviour, attendance and engagement by
individuals and groups of students. Support for students and their parents are well-focused and will bring
about improvement in these important areas. The use of ICT to allow students to access their work, and for
schools to communicate and engage parents „any where, any time‟ will improve engagement and
participation and allow students to get support in choosing and following courses including the access to
teacher support and guidance.

A number of initiatives are already planned or in a pilot phase and will be enhanced by the programme of
BSF. These include:
       The establishment of a social care and education Intensive Support Team providing short-term
         support for vulnerable families and in particular those children on the brink of care
       Continued support for schools‟ curriculum through the work of the youth service with particular
         focus on the development of wider personal and social education programmes
       PRU Centres which provide short-term off-site provision and outreach to schools working in the
         consortia

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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case
            Further development of the Individual Placement Initiative, currently operating for KS1 & 2 in
             which a small number of students in receipt of multi-agency support are transferred to
             nominated schools selected for their stability and positive ethos
            Development of a community delivery model of mental health support for students focussed
             around local schools. This will be an extension of a programme developed for schools in the
             BIP.

Strengthening the local provision for children and young people with disabilities is being progressed as a
key focus for multi-agency working under the auspices of the Authority‟s Children & Young People‟s Plan
and Extended Schools Strategy and BSF is core to the delivery of these Plans.

Special schools have an integral part to play in achieving the policy of educating students with severe and
complex needs within Luton and have a key role in supporting inclusion in mainstream schools through
sharing expertise. The proposal under BSF to co-locate Woodlands Special School on the site of Icknield
High School is evidence of this aspiration for inclusion and sharing.

3.4 What approaches will we adopt to develop greater competition in the provision of new schools?
Two of Luton‟s High Schools are being developed as new Academy schools. Although Luton‟s
demography and land availability make it extremely unlikely that further new secondary schools will be
required within the existing Borough boundary, the LA will support the development of Trust schools where
this delivers a positive advantage to students and their parents/carers. In the event of a boundary change,
potentially resulting from additional development contained in the MKSM Sub-Regional Plan, then our first
focus would be on engaging with young people and their parents/carers to identify their aspirations for a
new school or schools.

3.5 How will we ensure an effective delivery of the 14-19 entitlements in partnership with LLSCs?
There is a well-developed partnership with the LSC through its representation on the area-wide 11-19
Achievement Strategy Group, which meets monthly with all schools and colleges as active members and is
the senior driving force for Campus Luton. The Providers Group, which meets in conjunction with ASG,
includes all providers of 14-19 courses and activity, including work-based providers and Higher Education.
The Authority‟s 14-19 Director post is jointly funded by LSC and there is a close day-to-day working
relationship between the organisations. The LSC is funding some vocational provision in schools.

Luton is entering an expression of interest in offering specialist Diploma courses from the earliest
opportunity, through the Gateway process. All schools and the two Colleges are co-operating to eventually
deliver the full range of specialist Diploma courses. Leadership of routes, training for staff and building
design are all included in the plans for change and development. Concerns remain over the lack of match
between the space generated by Building Bulletin 98 (BB98) and the requirements of Diploma and
vocational courses.

Students will attend core courses at their home school/Academy; with common timetabling, flexible and
extended days at other schools, Academies and colleges enabling KS4 students to access specialist
courses.

3.6 How will we ensure robust challenge to the schools as they improve standards?
The Council‟s school improvement service is actively engaged with each High School. Agendas and
records of the visits form the basis of the AsPIRE record, which is closely related to the school‟s Self
Evaluation Form. On a termly basis Headteachers and senior staff of each school (with School
Improvement Advisers and National Strategy Consultants) identify areas for focus based on the LA and
School Self Evaluation processes. Engagement then focuses on a specific aspect of the SEF to determine
action to raise standards and to review the impact of this action at key times, such as after mock
examinations. The plans and reviews include evaluation of individual and group performance to identify
those requiring additional support and guidance to make adequate progress. The evolving SIP programme
will play an increasing role with individual schools to provide challenge and support within the overall
Authority programme. Specific project groups are established for those schools where the LA identifies a
cause for concern. A crucial role of the support services is to ensure that the BSF building programme
does not impact negatively on the achievement of students. As work progresses advisers will be closely
involved in planning to minimise risk in this area.

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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case
Specialist schools already provide expertise and support to other schools to promote improvement;
Consortia increasingly provide support for their partners and Academies will add a further element to this
support. The training school provides a valuable source of well-trained students, most of who remain in the
town, reducing the difficulties in recruitment caused by location factors. Discussions have been held with
Government Agencies to ensure capital funding provision for the space required by the training arm of the
school. At this stage concerns remain as BB98 fails to identify and cater for this extended activity.

3.7 Our projected targets
With reference to the Schools Chart indicating BSF Additionality, the schools agreed to establish targets on
similar principles across Luton‟s BSF Wave 3 and Wave 6 programme. The overall timescale for the
combined Wave 3 and Wave 6 programme is likely to cover a greater period of time than that of currently
proposed targets. The principle was to take the start point as the admission of the first Y7 group following
the completion of the building programme and set targets for them at the end of KS3 (CVA) and KS4 (5A*-
C and CVA). A key element was the overall expectation that the CVA at KS4 would be over 1000. The
proposed figures are based on the extrapolation of current trends and the aspirations of senior school
leaders.




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case

KEY PRIORITIES

4.1 Pupil place planning
Luton‟s overall secondary school population is currently projected to rise by 2015/16 as follows:
        11-16 mainstream - from 12,071 (Summer 2006) to 12,769
        11-19 SEN - from 140 (Summer 2006) to 175
        500 extra sixth form places are to be developed in the two proposed Academies in addition to
           the existing RC denominational sixth form provision.

Combined with provision of 24 SCD places and 60 PRU, the current BSF pupil places for planning and
funding allocation purposes across the Luton programme (Waves 3 and 6) is based on a total of 13,714
places.

Given the limited availability of land for the construction of new schools and restrictions on some of our
existing sites, it was felt that whilst all existing sites should be retained, we should endeavour to better
match the supply of school places to local demand where possible.

The growing demand for school places, as a result of Brownfield redevelopment for housing, inward
migration and multi-occupancy of housing, emanates from the centre of the town and is spreading
southwards along the B4540, northwards along the A6 and westwards along the A505. It has already had a
significant impact on demand for primary education, where an additional 945 places has or will be
provided. This contrasts with a decline in pupil numbers in the Northeast area, resulting in the removal of
735 primary places.

In retaining 11 secondary schools and 2 Academies, including the two single sex schools for which there is
a strong and continuing parental preference, it will be necessary to better match the supply of school
places to demand and to build in growth. The implications in Wave 3 are as follows:
         Significant expansion at Halyard (Barnfield West Academy), South Luton (Barnfield South
            Academy)
         Moderate expansion at Challney Girls (where feasible)
         Consolidation of capacity at Lealands and Lea Manor
         Marginal reduction at Ashcroft.

Recent forecast updates on the basis of Luton‟s actual September 2006 NOR figures suggest that the rise
in the 11-16 school population is likely to be greater than previous estimates to 13,017 in 2015 and 13,218
in 2016. Thus, the approach in respect of schools within Wave 6 will be developed from and be based
upon revised pupil place projections agreed within the Wave 6 „Strategy for Change‟ process.

Catchment areas will be reviewed to accommodate demographic changes and revised capacities, ensuring
that a school place is available locally for those parents who seek it for their child. Consideration will also
be given to abolishing catchment areas for the two single-sex schools in order to widen choice for all
children in Luton. The proposed aggregated total future capacity of 13,510 (for the 11-16 age group only)
allows the 2015/16 mainstream estimate of 12,769 pupils to be accommodated as well as providing some
5.5% in headroom. The extent of this headroom will be subject to planning, updated pupil number
estimates and overall affordability issues.




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case
4.2 Priorities for the school estate

Location and size of mainstream schools
In addressing the above demographics, a consensus was reached by the 11-19 ASG that:
        All existing high schools would be retained
        Luton would make progression towards even forms of entry to support organisational
           arrangements within schools i.e. 6FE (900), 8FE (1200) and 10FE (1500)
        No individual schools would be larger than 1500 or smaller than 900
        Given an overall rising secondary school population and the need to retain all schools, the
           number of school places offered would need to reflect the changing pattern of demography,
           improve accessibility, support parental preference and provide adequate headroom for future
           flexibility, and
        A collaborative approach would be used to deliver elements of the curriculum at KS4.

SEN and other service provision
The following are our key drivers in developing a service delivery framework:
         A Borough wide approach to service delivery for specialist/low incidence requirements (e.g.
           SEN provision for PD, VI, HI and SLD/PMLD needs)
         A 3 geographical area approach to service delivery for high incidence requirements (e.g. SEN
           provision for SCD and BESD needs)
         A consortia approach to delivery of the KS4 curriculum
         The development of consortia/school/college links, and
         An individual school level approach to service delivery linked to Borough wide strategies and
           local opportunities/requirements for the provision of some or all of the following (extended
           schools core offer, base for education welfare service, youth, adult, leisure, community, PCT,
           NDC regeneration, police bases).

Prioritisation of schools
The indicative phasing of schools below is based on the requirement to include the two proposed
academies in Wave 3: Phase 1 and the objective application of seven criteria (AMP condition, suitability,
ICT and access/inclusion; performance at KS4 & KS2-KS4 CVA plus deprivation based on FSM).

In addition to the 7 key factors, the indicative phasing was subject to a further assessment based on local
criteria that were either:
          Asset related (such as sufficiency/compliance with BB98, impact on school operation, road
             access/site constraints, requirement for decanting pupils, length of the construction period,
             redevelopment opportunities offered by the site, planning and consultation issues, agreements
             on extended school facilities and market attractiveness)
          Non-asset related (such as exclusion data, KS3 performance, schools with additional resources,
             access to other funding streams, impact on admissions/parental preference, unmet demand for
             school places, other major local regeneration projects), or
          Linked to the benefits of a consortia approach (i.e. supporting change management and
             curriculum delivery and negating the potential impact of pupil migration within Luton).

The result of this further assessment was to reaffirm the identity of our Wave 3: Phases 1&2 schools within
the overall BSF programme. The confirmation of the phasing of Luton‟s BSF programme and the split
between BSF Waves 3 and 6 is outlined in the following table.

Luton BSF – Prioritisation and phasing of schools
BSF Wave     Luton Phase       Identity of Schools
       3                   1           Challney Girls, Halyard (Barnfield West Academy), Lea Manor, South Luton
                                       (Barnfield South Academy)
                           2           Ashcroft, Lealands
       6                   3           Cardinal Newman, Challney Boys, Putteridge
                           4           Denbigh, Icknield, Stopsley, Woodlands




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case
4.3 Headline strategic vision for ICT
Luton‟s approach to BSF ICT is based on the collaboration through „Campus Luton‟; a foundation of good
existing service, including high computer-teacher ratios; 10Mb connections to all secondary schools;
exciting pilot work with VLEs and increasingly e-confident staff.
Luton‟s vision is to use the BSF programme to build on these foundations and, in particular, to:
         Ensure that ICT meets the objectives of the Every Child Matters agenda and that facilities are
            planned not just for the school but for the extended school
         Build the collaborative approach between secondary schools, Academies and beyond to include
            the primary phase, FE, special educational needs establishments and the workplace.

A key aim for ICT is the enabling of personalised learning. This means adopting both technology and
approaches to teaching and learning which:
       Support independent learning and a range of learning styles
       Enable a choice of routes through the curriculum
       Offer a range of materials and tools to match differentiated need.

In order to achieve this diversity, Luton recognises the need for commonality to enable learners to:
         Access their space, and work at their pace, from any site
         Work on individual assignments and collaborative projects, within a managed approach with
             appropriate support and the ability to receive feedback and monitor their own progress
         Benefit from a wide pool of digital resources, shared across Luton and beyond
         Enjoy communicating, by email, video and other means, with peers and teachers.

The service incorporates the WAN and broadband access to the National Education Network, as well as
local networks and equipment. Key applications are the integrated learning platform and management
information system. This will enable teachers to:
        Concentrate on teaching and learning rather than technology
        Create, acquire, access and deploy a large and increasing range of digital resources
        Assign student work, communicate and monitor progress
        Analyse learning trends as never before and respond accordingly.

This implies a changing role for teachers and need to develop e-maturity. Preparation for change, training
and sharing good practice will be at the heart of Luton‟s ICT programme. Managers are expected to benefit
from better management information to inform decision-making.

Luton‟s approach to ICT is holistic requiring integration as a necessity:
         Within each school, to maximise the environmental and economic effect of a „smart building‟
         Between schools to ensure seamlessness, smooth data exchange and scale economies
         With Authority services (e.g. social care and libraries), curriculum and technology.

The approach will be underpinned by a high-performing infrastructure that centres on a business critical
integrated „deep and wide‟ ICT managed service. This managed service partnership will be sustained by
commitment to continued engagement of schools and to funding for future development.




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case

4.4 Headline Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)
Completion of BSF will result in the following impact on key national and local key performance indicators:

Performance Indicator           Impact of BSF                                                                 Date
                                                                                                              Anticipated
Curriculum related
KS3 (BV181a-d)                  Improved attainment – Level 5 in core subjects at 90%                         From 2013
KS3                             Improved value added – CVA of 1010                                            From 2013
KS4 (BV38 & 39)                 Improved attainment – 5+ A*-C grades at 65%                                   From 2014
KS4                             Improved attainment – 5+ A*-C grades at 70-75% (inc. English & maths)         From 2017
KS4                             Improved value added - CVA of 1010                                            From 2013
KS2-KS4                         Improved value added - CVA of 1025                                            From 2013
Development of school           All secondary schools to offer at least one and possibly two specialisms      From 2009
specialisms
14-19 curriculum                Increased diversity through the introduction of the (14) vocational           2008-2013
                                diplomas and improved continuity pathways – all diplomas to be
                                available in line with published timescale of DfES
SEN and Inclusion               \Increased local capacity to meet a wide range of needs in an                 2009-2013
                                inclusive a setting as possible. Out-Borough special school placements to
                                be reduced by 50%.
Participation in sport          Greater participation in school and out-of-school sport, leading to           2009-2013
                                increasing levels of physical fitness, thereby tackling obesity
Teaching/learning               Our change plan, with its associated CPD programme, will improve the          2009-2013
                                quality of teaching and learning by supporting teachers to work with groups
                                of differing sizes, developing individualised and personalised learning,
                                promoting functional literacy, oracy and numeracy and emphasising the
                                use of assessment to plan learning.
                                95% of teaching is satisfactory or better and 75% good or better in all       From 2011
                                establishments.
Post-16                         Improve the choice & diversity of post-16 provision and increase              From 2009
                                participation at age 16 from 86% (2005) to >90%
Higher education                Increase to 50% the number of young people proceeding to an                   From 2011
                                experience in higher education
Non-curriculum related
Attendance and behaviour    Improving school attendance, reducing exclusions and increasing                   2009-2013
(BV 44-46, 159a-d)          curriculum entitlement – attendance of >94% and permanent exclusion of
                            <10 pupils per year
Teaching Staff in schools   Improving the recruitment and retention of secondary school                       2009-2013
                            teachers as measured by vacancy level (from 1.7% to <1%) and
                            staff turnover (from 2.6% to <1%)
Equality & Diversity        Meeting our corporate targets on equality standards, race equality                2009-2013
(BV2a & b, 174 & 175)       promotion and racial incidents reporting
Supply of school places and Improving supply and better matching the demand for secondary school              2009-2013
parental preference         places as measured by the percentage of parents obtaining 1st/2nd/3rd
                            preferences in Year6-7 transfer phase to >95%
NEET Group                  Reduce the number of people not in education, employment or training to           2009-2013
                            <7%
Diet & health               Improve the diet and hence health of pupils through the provision of              2009-2013
                            nutritious school meals across all secondary establishments
                            All schools to achieve ‘healthy schools’ status                                   From 2009




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case

In addition to the above, BSF is also planned to:
         Redress all current Asset Management Plan issues (condition, suitability, sufficiency, DDA
            compliance, energy efficiency, lifecycle maintenance, external areas)
         Support many community initiatives (access to children‟s services, access to other services,
            increased community use of schools, supporting local regeneration and aiding community
            cohesion), and
         Support many Borough-wide initiatives (improving the image of Luton; delivering Vision 2011:
            BV161 & 198; delivering the Community Plan: BV1a & 99h; delivering the Corporate Plan;
            delivering the Corporate Capital Strategy; delivering the Children and Young Persons Plan and
            the Children & Learning Service Plan.

4.5 Consultation, stakeholder engagement and school visioning

What has happened so far
Our BSF Vision, building on that of Campus Luton, is driven by the 11-19 Achievement Strategy Group
(ASG) comprising all pre and post-16 providers and other key stakeholders including the LSC and
Connexions. On a monthly basis it is a conduit to develop and progress Borough-wide strategies and is the
core of BSF consultation across Campus Luton.

Consultation has also taken place with individual schools and area consortia in developing our option
appraisals for each site. This process has been supported by the BSF School Representatives‟ Group
which ensures a consistent school based approach to resolving issues and undertaking wider stakeholder
involvement both within and outside the school. The Curriculum Network Group develops and agrees
curriculum requirements/specialist accommodation to inform and meet the needs of Campus Luton and
BSF.

Each consortia area is represented on the BSF Project Board and all schools have been involved with the
Extended Schools‟ Family Network Clusters (nine clusters linked to the three areas). These clusters meet
termly to develop area approaches to extended and wider services. Wider consultation included a
questionnaire and telephone survey with 13-19 year olds and sessions with secondary school governors
(providing an information and discussion forum) and individual governing bodies on school-specific
matters.

In consultation with the ASG, the BSF Change Plan encompasses curriculum, staffing, governance,
administration, ICT, SEN and behaviour, leadership, finance, admissions, exclusions and design. The
Council is part funding the appointment of consortia BSF change champions to enhance capacity. These
individuals meet weekly with members of the core BSF Team to drive forward the published Change Plan
and the delivery of Campus Luton and BSF (e.g. supporting the development of collaborative working,
curriculum change, particularly 14-19 Diplomas, levels of Federation, physical demands with regard to
designing new and refurbished buildings, new forms of organisation, managing the build process,
restructuring of timetables and organisation of the movement of pupils around sites).

An integral and fundamental activity is that of revising School Visions. Consortium and school
representatives have been engaged to refine current visions with a particular focus on the six Wave 3
schools (Phases 1 and 2). Each School Vision will reflect and complement Campus Luton, emphasising the
4 key aspects and considering the role and needs of all stakeholders in the development of the school. It is
planned to revise all School Visions by April 2007. The visions follow PfS guidance and build from where
the school is now, where it wants to be in 5 years time and proposals to achieve the transition, identifying
key actions required within a change plan.

Future consultation
Following a major consultation across September/October 2006 involving delivery by the Extended Schools
and BSF teams of well-received workshops to engage the views of primary and secondary pupils
concerning future schools and designs, a further consultation has been undertaken with the wider
community on local service provision on school sites.

User workshop groups have been established in the six Wave 3 schools to progress individual school
designs to RIBA Stage B as part of preparations for the Outline Business Case. Consultation
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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case
arrangements have been augmented through the initiation of regular (currently monthly) BSF Governors
Forums for governing bodies that will increasingly consider the implications of BSF operations and funding.

A regular Luton BSF Newsletter is aimed at keeping schools and key stakeholders up to date with progress
and developing strategies. The LA is working closely with the Academies Project Manager (PKF) and
Sponsor, Barnfield College, to ensure effective engagement with the predecessor schools. A monthly
Luton Academies Newsletter is also produced. Communications and consultation are also facilitated by the
following local websites (www.luton.gov.uk/bsf) and (www.theacademies.barnfield.ac.uk).




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case
PRIORITISATION OF BSF INVESTMENT

5.1 Context
Luton, although formally part of Bedfordshire and adjacent to Hertfordshire, does not share many of the
social and economic characteristics of either county. The DfES statistical neighbour analysis places the
town alongside places such as Nottingham, Slough, Blackburn, Bradford and Southampton. A dependency
on a single employer, Vauxhall Motors, has ended and the economic base is slowly widening, mainly
around the airport and its associated activities.

The population is, unlike that in many other urban areas, expanding. There is a high level of immigration
from the Indian sub-continent and more recently from Eastern Europe, notably Poland. Pressure on
accommodation has led to a rise in the multi-occupancy of houses.

Geographically, further development in Luton is constrained by its relatively compact size and the amount
of land that is already occupied by buildings at a high density, particularly in the town centre where the
population growth is greatest. In spite of these constraints, there is still a high level of brownfield
redevelopment happening in the Borough. Most primary schools in the town centre have been expanded in
excess of their original planned size and opportunities to expand sites further are limited by surrounding
buildings.

The Council has an ambitious programme of regeneration and BSF has encouraged more joined-up
corporate activity, including the involvement of non-statutory partners. This thrust is recorded in a range of
Council Plans and targets.

5.2 Existing estate
There are 13 maintained secondary schools in Luton:-
     Ashcroft High School (11-16 Foundation)
     Cardinal Newman Catholic Secondary School (11-19 Voluntary Aided)
     Challney High School for Boys (11-16 Community)
     Challney High School for Girls (11-16 Community)
     Denbigh High School (11-16 Community)
     Halyard High School (11-16 Community)
     Icknield High School (11-16 Foundation)
     Lealands High School (11-16 Community)
     Lea Manor High School (11-16 Foundation)
     Putteridge High School (11-16 Community)
     South Luton High School (11-16 Community)
     Stopsley High School (11-16 Foundation)
     Woodlands Secondary School (11-19 Community Special)

Post-16 education is provided at Cardinal Newman Catholic Secondary School, Barnfield College, Luton
Sixth Form College and at nearby Dunstable College. SEN provision is provided by Woodland Secondary
School (for pupils with severe and profound learning difficulties), Putteridge High School caters for 25 FTE
pupils with physical, visual and hearing disabilities, Lea Manor caters for 8FTE pupils with physical, visual
and hearing disabilities whilst Icknield High School caters for 12 FTE pupils with hearing difficulties. There
are currently two PRUs (Avenue Centre and Orchard Centre), each catering for 20 FTE KS3/4 pupils.

To facilitate the delivery of children‟s services, Luton has been aligned into three soft areas and these have
formed the basis of a consortium approach to service provision and curriculum delivery.

5.3 Pupil number estimates
The projections show an increase in the secondary mainstream school population from 12,325 pupils in
2005/6 to 12,769 (11-16) plus 186 (16-19) pupils in 2015/16. Projections for each school in 2015/16 vary
from 889-1388 pupils; therefore, there is a clear rationale for retaining all secondary schools. However, the
projections show a need to rationalise high school capacity to take account of localised expansion or
retraction in pupil numbers.



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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case
The projections show the following changes to the pupil populations in each school‟s catchment area as
follows – schools are listed in order of decreasing pressure on school places:
      Challney Girls (33% increase), Halyard (29% increase), Challney Boys (26% increase)
      South Luton (14% increase), Denbigh (13% increase)
      Stopsley (0% change)
      Icknield (1% decrease), Ashcroft (3% decrease), Cardinal Newman (3% decrease)
      Lea Manor (5% decrease), Lealands (5% decrease)
      Putteridge High School (15% decrease).

5.4 Estate proposals
Our proposals to reshape the estate take into account the following criteria:
     changing demography of Luton
     better matching supply to demand
     accessibility of school places
     meeting parental preference
     removing the possibility of significant surplus places
     recognising individual site constraints
     developing consortia arrangements for extended services and KS4 curriculum delivery
     growing demand for SLD and PMLD places
     need for SCD places within mainstream schools through a consortia approach
     growing demand for HI, VI and PD places in mainstream schools, and
     continued demand for PRU places (through a consortium approach).

The result of this further assessment was to reaffirm the identity of our Wave 3: Phases 1&2 schools within
the overall BSF programme. The confirmation of the phasing of Luton‟s BSF programme and the split
between BSF Waves 3 and 6 is outlined in the following table.

Project Scope for mainstream provision – Wave 3: Phases 1 & 2 and Wave 6: Phases 1 & 2:
       School             January         January          PAN          Projected         Proposed         Pupil number/
                           2006             2006                          pupils          capacity            capacity
                          Capacity         N.O.R.                        2015/16                           variation 11-16
 Wave 3: Phase 1
 Challney Girls              910            901             182            1050             1050#                   0
 South Luton                 900            827             180            1200           1200 + 250                0
 (Barnfield South
 Academy)
 Halyard (Barnfield          915            728             183            1200           1200 + 250                0
 West Academy)
 Lea Manor                  1200            1099            240            1039              1200                  +161
 Sub-total                  3015            2684            603            4489           4650 + 500               +161
 Wave 3: Phase 2
 Ashcroft                   1120            1008            224             970              1050                  +80
 Lealands                   912              936            182             859              900                   +41
 Sub-total                  2942            2845            588            1829              1950                  +121
 Wave 3 Total               5957            5529           1191            6318           6600 + 500               +282
 Wave 6: Phase 1
 Putteridge                1215            1107             243             940             900~                   -40
 Challney Boys              825             803             165             938              900#                  -38
 Cardinal Newman         1210 + 200      1220 + 193         242          1133 + 186       1210+ 240                + 77
 Sub-total               3250 + 200      3130 + 193         650          3011 + 186       3010 + 240                -1
  Wave 6: Phase 2
 Stopsley                    990             965            198             912             1200~                  +248
 Denbigh                    1120            1116            224            1166              1200                   -6
 Icknield                   1420            1396            284            1362              1500                  +98
 Sub-total                  3530            3477            706            3440              3900                  +460
 Wave 6: Total           6780 + 200      6607 + 193        1356         6451 + 186        6910 + 240               +459

 OVERALL TOTAL          12737 + 200     12136 + 193        2547         12769 + 186       13510 +740         741 (+5.5%)

# proposed capacities subject to securing planning permission to relocate Challney Girls‟ School
~ proposed capacities subject to an update of projected pupil numbers for Wave 6 in Strategy for Change document


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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case
In addition to the above, it is anticipated that the development/redevelopment of the PRUs would take
place in Wave 3: Phase 2 and Wave 6: Phase 1 and the relocation and rebuilding of Woodlands would
take place alongside the rebuilding of Icknield in Wave 6: Phase 2.

5.5 Assessment of existing asset base
Using the Authority‟s DfES approved Asset Management Plan, a full assessment of all buildings in the
secondary estate was conducted by Mott MacDonald, our technical advisers, including a review of all
existing condition, access and suitability surveys.

A visual inspection of the thirteen secondary schools was carried out to assess the general condition of the
buildings and to assist with the strategic evaluation of refurbishment and extension options. The schools
were evaluated and rated on a scale from 1 to 10 with 10 being the worst and 1 the best. The scores were
as follows.

 School                                                                 Condition   Access       Suitability
 Ashcroft High School                                                       8          5              7
 Cardinal Newman Catholic Secondary School                                  3          4              4
 Challney High School for Boys                                              3          5              6
 Challney High School for Girls                                             6          8              9
 Denbigh High School                                                        3          5              6
 Halyard High School                                                        8          8              9
 Icknield High School                                                      10          3              3
 Lea Manor High School                                                      7          8              7
 Lealands High School                                                       5          5              6
 Putteridge High School                                                     5          4              6
 South Luton High School                                                    2          9             10
 Stopsley High School                                                       2          4              3
 Woodlands Secondary School                                               n/a         n/a           n/a

Woodlands Secondary School and the existing two pupil referral units are receiving investment on the
basis of inclusion and not asset management elemental ranking.

Most schools suffer from a range of condition, suitability and access deficiencies that, to a greater or lesser
degree, inhibit the raising of standards and the schools‟ ability to deliver services to the community. The
large scale transformational investment anticipated using the BSF programme is the only way that many of
the building issues facing schools can be overcome.

5.6 Current ICT and maintenance - infrastructure and service provision
ICT provision across schools in Luton is generally good reflecting the priority that the Local Authority has
placed on the use of ICT to support learning and teaching through successive EDPs and the ICT in
Schools Standards Fund that has been allocated and used effectively. All secondary schools have been
connected to Broadband (10mb) via the East of England Broadband Network and the Local Authority since
July 2002. All secondary schools have exceeded the target of 5:1 pupil to computer ratio with some
running at less than 2:1.

In keeping with many Local Authorities the development of networks within secondary schools (LANs) has
taken place over a long period of time. A number of schools have taken the opportunity to replace the old
infrastructure with more modern up-to-date servers, switches and cabling which has brought about
improvements in the delivery of ICT resources to the classroom. In many schools these developments
have been coupled with the provision of wireless networks and laptops in trolleys that provide access to
ICT in the classroom when it is needed.

All secondary schools are continuing to invest in Interactive Whiteboards and staff are developing expertise
in their use to transform learning. This expertise can be shared both within and across schools. In addition
some schools have installed Music Technology suites, cadcam facilities and there is a growing trend in the
use of Apple Mac hardware and software particularly in art and media studies.



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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case

The Local Authority has developed “The Luton Learning Grid – L2G” (www.learning.luton.gov.uk) a web
portal that provides a wide range of information and resources to Headteachers, Governors, Teachers,
Parents and learners of all ages within Luton and this is supported by a Web Development Officer who
works in the Children and Learning department. The facility has the capacity for all teachers and teaching
assistants and pupils within the Luton Schools to have their own personal folder and email address. There
is also the facility within L2G “LearningSchools@Luton” where schools are able to submit and share
effective resources with other schools in the town.

Appropriate and varied advice is made available to schools on the use of ICT within the curriculum by the
Local Authority ICT team lead by the School Improvement Adviser (ICT Strategy) and comprising two
Primary ICT Teaching and Learning Consultants, a Secondary ICT Teaching and Learning Consultant and
the Manager and staff of the City Learning Centre. This has an impact on the extent to which ICT is
effectively used across the curriculum.

Luton has one City Learning Centre (eLearning@Luton) that has developed a range of innovative activities
particularly in the areas of Music Technology and Digital Video/imaging aimed at promoting ICT as a tool to
support learning. Pupils from all secondary schools have attended sessions at the centre and there is
evidence that this is impacting on attainment. Schools have reported that examination boards have
commented very favourably on the quality of music technology assignments submitted for assessment that
have been produced at the centre. The centre is the venue for ICT Masterclasses and an Advanced
Learning Centre for ICT. Strong links are being developed with E2BN particularly in the use of E2BN
developed resources and Video Conferencing.
The CLC also acts as a training venue for both teachers and support staff, particularly in the use of new
technologies and how they can be planned into the teaching and learning experience. Specific CPD
events are organised through cpd@luton and many courses utilise the use of ICT and how it can be used
to both engage learners and help raise attainment in all subjects. These courses also take place at the
Local Authority Professional Development Centre (Luton Learning Resource Centre – LLRC) which is well
equipped with ICT resources including an ICT Suite, Wireless LAN and Mobile Laptop Trollies as well as
Interactive Whiteboards and provides in addition to the CLC a venue where staff from schools can try out
software and digital resources before purchasing them. . As well as many courses for teachers we have
included accredited courses for Teaching Assistants in the use of ICT in teaching and learning to support
the workforce remodelling agenda and reduce teacher workload. We are committed to continuing this
provision.
Currently ten secondary schools act as a spoke for the CLC. These schools are developing expertise in
the use of ICT for a particular area of the curriculum and are beginning to share both the expertise they
have acquired and also resources that have been developed. It is our intention that all secondary schools
including the Special School will become such spokes over time.

Several schools are beginning to develop managed virtual learning environments (MVLEs) that will provide
the electronic management of the learning process to support teaching and learning and administration
processes and help to support workforce reform initiatives. Both Barnfield College and Luton Sixth Form
College have developed expertise in the use of VLEs with their students as has the University of Luton. All
Luton secondary headteachers have recently made a decision to have a consistent approach to the
establishment of a common MVLE across the town. We are soon to be in a position where all high schools
will be able to collaborate through the Microsoft Learning Gateway, which will be developed over the
coming year and fully evaluated as to its effectiveness in meeting our needs both now and into the future
There is much good practice in ICT in Luton‟s schools across all phases to draw upon. ICT is being
steadily embedded across all areas of the curriculum, and schools are becoming increasingly e-confident.
More schools are using the recently launched Becta/NCSL ICT Self Review Framework to evaluate their
ICT provision and establish an action plan for their future development, which could lead to ICT Mark
accreditation. In fact two secondary schools Denbigh and Woodlands along with 4 primary phase schools
are amongst he first schools in the country to receive this accreditation.
The use of ICT to support inclusion is well underway in Luton. One of our special schools provides
outreach support to mainstream schools in how ICT can help the school meet the special needs of
individual children.

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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case

In-borough specialist provision for those with challenging behaviour has recently increased and caters for
students both with and without statements. Currently, it includes:
        Learning Support Units in all High Schools.
        The Avenue Centre, offering offsite short-term provision Key Stages 3 & 4 and developing
          outreach.
        The Orchard Centre, offering offsite longer-term provision at Key Stage 4.
        The Rathbone Centre offering offsite alternative vocational curriculum at Key Stage 4.

ICT is seen as a key way of delivering the curriculum and supporting learners who present challenging
behaviour in all these provisions and much good practice is being developed.
Headteachers are increasingly becoming more aware of the importance of their role with regard to
developing a holistic approach and vision for how ICT can impact on both teaching and learning and
leadership and management in their school. Six have participated in the NCSL Strategic Leadership in ICT
Programme and the Local Authority is working closely with NCSL to provide courses particularly for
secondary headteachers and subject leaders in Luton schools. All headteachers have engaged fully with
developing the BSF ICT Vision for their school in line with the overarching Campus Luton Vision and fully
understand the importance of ICT within the BSF scheme.
There is already good community provision for ICT within Luton, in Adult and Community Education
centres attached to schools, local community centres, libraries as well as outreach work from Local
Authority staff.
All schools in Luton have been provided with secure intranet and email links directly with the Local
Authority that enables data and information to pass efficiently between schools and the Local Authority.
Schools have been provided with at least one high specification desktop by the Local Authority to ensure
that this is possible, and these have been refreshed twice over time. We are currently working on the
provision of a common database across the Children and Learning Directorate to give a single point of
access to data about specific children.

Over 75% of Luton secondary teachers have been provided with a laptop through the Laptops for Teachers
Initiative managed by the Local Authority. Schools have purchased additional laptops through other
funding so that very few teachers do not have access to a laptop computer. Some of these have been
refreshed over time. This has had a positive impact on the use of ICT by teachers for learning and
teaching and administration functions.

All Luton Secondary schools have arranged their own technical support and have network manager‟s and
technical support staff to manage and keep the infrastructure and hardware running and have moved away
from this being part of the Head of ICT role. Most also have an arrangement with ICT companies ranging
from RM, Teksys and Ramesys to local companies (GV Technologies Ltd and GBIT Ltd and Russell House
Services) to provide advice and support as required. The success of these arrangements is variable
depending largely on the quality of staff employed in the schools. Schools have been encouraged to adopt
the Becta FITs framework to ensure that technical support staff are able to work at the required level. The
Local Authority has a Service Level Agreement with all schools in relation to the maintenance of
Broadband Connectivity within the school. Capita/Sims provide both hardware and software support for
MIS systems.

All secondary headteachers are fully signed up to the principle of an ICT Managed Service to ensure that
ICT functionality is always available.




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case

5.7 Delivering our education vision
The project scope proposed in this business case is subject to review and in particular:
    1 proposed capacities identified with a # are subject to planning approval to relocate Challney Girls
       on its existing site and create a new access or ~ are subject to further discussion with governing
       bodies on a re-calculation of projected pupil numbers for those schools included in Wave 4-6;
    2 that the level of overall headroom at 11-16 (currently 5.7%) provides the necessary future flexibility
       and can be afforded within the funding envelope;
    3 confirmation of the identity of a school within each consortium that will serve as a base for the area
       SCD provision (Stopsley is to be the base for the SSPA Consortium);
    4 confirmation of a site for the off-site PRU to serve the SSPA Consortium.

A detailed Change Plan that has secured External Partner, Council, Department, Service and Schools
support to deliver the transformational agenda underpins all aspects of the Education Vision. At the core of
the delivery of this vision are ICT and the personalised curriculum (ref. Section 6).

5.8 Diversity of provision
The balance of school type and split by existing and proposed capacities for 11-16 (calculations in brackets
includes sixth form provision) is as follows:

                      Co-educational         Single sex girls       Single sex                       Total
                                                                       boys
     Existing           10990 (200)                910                  825                       12,725 (200)
        %              86.4% (86.6%)           7.1% (7.0%)          6.5% (6.4%)                        -
    Proposed            11560 (740)               1050                  900                       13.510 (740)
        %              85.5% (86.3%)           7.8% (7.4%)          6.7% (6.3%)                        -

                     Community             VA               Foundation             Academies               Special
     Existing           6785            1210 (200)             4730                    0                  141 (24)
        %              52.7%           9.4% (10.8%)        36.8% (36.1%)              0%                1.1% (1.3%)
                      (51.8%)
    Proposed            4950            1210 (240)             4950                 2400 (500)            162 (33)
       %               36.2%           8.8% (10.0%)        36.2% (34.3%)          17.6% (20.1%)         1.2% (1.3%)
                      (34.3%)

At present it is unknown how many community or foundation schools will seek trust status and thus it has
been assumed for the above analysis that the status quo will prevail.

5.9 The curriculum offer
Each consortium will develop a range of courses that will be available to all learners within the consortium,
The courses, both academic and vocational, could already been in existence or be developed. Over time,
the capacity for learners to be offered even broader opportunities will be developed both within each
consortium and across Campus Luton. The Table below illustrates our current proposals to date for pupils
aged 11-16 in mainstream schools (this is subject to on-going development).

 Consortia        School specialisms          Vocational specialisms                                             Total
                                                                                                                 capacity

 A1               Business & Enterprise       Catering                                                           4350 + 20
 Challney         Science                     Construction
 Boys             Sport                       Creative Arts
 Challney                                     Creative & Cultural Industries (Visual & Performing Arts)
 Girls                                        Fashion
 Denbigh                                      Hairdressing
 Halyard                                      Health & Social Care
                                              Leisure & Tourism
                                              Manufacturing




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case


 Consortia        School specialisms          Vocational specialisms                                      Total
                                                                                                          capacity

 Link 5           Business Studies            Catering                                                    4810 + 20
 C. Newman        Cognition & Learning        Construction (inc. Plumbing & Electrical)
 Icknield         Humanities                  Creative & Cultural Industries (Visual & Performing Arts,
 Lealands         Performing Arts             Visual & Creative Arts)
 Lea Manor        Science                     Engineering
 (Woodlands)      Sport                       Hairdressing                                                (plus 142)
                  Visual Arts                 Health & Social care
                                              Leisure & Tourism

 SSPA             ICT                         Catering                                                    4350 + 20
 Ashcroft         Maths                       Construction
 Putteridge       Music                       Creative & Cultural Industries (Performing Arts/crafts)
 South Luton      Performing Arts             Hairdressing
 Stopsley         Sport                       Leisure & Tourism


Each consortium will serve as a focus for attracting sector skill funding and they will plan delivery by
developing programmes of study and providing CPD for staff. Sector skill collaboratives will be developed
to lead in the following areas: Construction, Creative & Cultural Industries, Health & Social Care and
Leisure & Tourism. It is envisaged that each consortium will be supported by post-16 providers to ensure
curriculum progression and provide additional quality assurance.

5.10 Policy on mainstream school size
At the 11-19 ASG Visioning Day held in June 2005, a consensus was reached on school organisation that:
         all thirteen secondary schools would be retained, with at least one moving to a new site
         that as far as possible we would move to „even‟ forms of entry to better support organisational
           arrangements within schools i.e. 6FE - 180 (900), 8FE - 240 (1200) and 12FE - 300 (1500)
         that no individual school would be larger than 1500 or smaller than 900
         that given a rising secondary school population and the need to retain all sites/schools, the
           number of school places offered would need to reflect the changing demography of Luton,
           improve accessibility of those places, support parental preference and provide at least a 5-7%
           headroom (subject to affordability), and
         that a collaborative approach would be used to deliver the curriculum at KS4.

5.11 A Borough-wide approach to SEN provision
In planning specialist services for children with less common SEN and the rising expenditure on residential
special schools we intend to:
         support school staff in developing greater confidence and expertise in communication and
           interaction difficulties through the ongoing provision of training, relevant teaching strategies and
           advisory support for individual pupils from the Social Communication Difficulty Team and
           Educational Psychological Service in Access and the outreach service at Woodlands School
         Develop three co-terminus area provisions on the site of identified secondary schools
           specifically for students with more severe social communication difficulties
         Explore the development of dedicated youth provision for young people with social
           communication difficulties
         Explore the possibility of developing primary phase dedicated provision for children with social
           communication difficulties
         Ensure all schools are compliant with the Disability Discrimination Act 2005
         Ensure that an appropriate and effective acoustic enhancement exists in all schools to support
           greater curriculum access for pupils with SEN
         Ensure all schools where VI pupils are placed have appropriate visual decoration to support
           their needs
         Develop Putteridge High School as an enhanced centre for PI/VI pupils centrally sited within the
           School
         Develop Icknield High School provision for HI pupils in terms of facilities and staffing.


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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case

The Council currently maintains one special school at secondary phase, which addresses the needs of
pupils who cannot be accommodated in mainstream schools. The types of special needs met in this
school and the current and proposed numbers of places are as follows:

 School                      Designation                                     Current places    Proposed places
 Woodlands                   Severe/Profound/Multiple/Social                    121: 11-16        142: 11-16
 Secondary School            Communication Difficulties                         24: 16-19         33: 16-19
                             (SLD/PMLD/SCD)                                     145 in total      175 in total

The intention is to relocate Woodlands Secondary School from its present site to co-locate with Icknield
High School as part of the new build programme on the Icknield Site. The proposed expansion seeks to
maximise provision within Luton for SLD/PMLD/SCD children and to re-develop the existing Woodlands
Site or an alternative site to provide short-term respite and longer-term residential provision to complement
the enhanced mainstream linked education provision, thus significantly improving on what is currently
available.

In addition, the Council maintains specialist provision at the following resourced high schools to serve the
whole Borough and plans to expand each provision as follows:

 School                         Designation                             Current places         Proposed places
 Icknield High School           Hearing Impairment (HI)                      14                      18
 Lea Manor High School          Physical Impairment (PI)                      5                       8
 Putteridge High School         Physical Impairment/                         25                      30
                                Visual Impairment (PI/VI)

5.12 A consortium approach to SEN provision
Since 2004 Luton has aimed to support the development of co-ordinated and effective support for those
children and young people who have difficulty in learning and working alongside others, in partnership with
school staff and a range of child-focussed agencies through implementing its Behaviour Support Plan. This
Plan has focussed on four key areas:
         to work in partnership with schools and other agencies to develop and communicate a strategic
           and cohesive approach to support the management of behaviour
         to deliver more effective support for managing behaviour to promote inclusion
         to provide comprehensive training opportunities for school staff, governors, key personnel and
           parents on issues relating to behaviour management and exclusions
         to develop more inclusive educational opportunities within Luton for pupils with significant and
           complex behaviour

In order to meet the challenges for schools posed by children with severe behavioural, emotional and
social difficulties, we have agreed a number of key actions as follows:
          develop opportunities for managers of behaviour and inclusion in high schools and colleges to
             share good practice in behaviour and contribute to the development of collaborative working
             models within and across the three consortia areas
          further strengthen the quality of the behaviour Support and educational Psychology Services in
             terms of support and training offered to schools and maintained settings
          disseminate good practice from the Behaviour Improvement Programme (BIP) and explore
             possible development of the BIP community mental health model, pending ongoing evaluation
          include students with behaviour, social and emotional difficulties in the enriched curricular
             arrangements of Campus Luton wherever possible, enabling students to attend another area
             establishment outside of their home establishment for a particular course/activity
          enhance all existing Learning Support Units (LSUs) across the town to specialise in particular
             activities or behavioural approaches such that students with more pronounced BESD may
             benefit from short-term access to an enhanced LSU in another establishment
          develop a collaborative area model of offsite secondary behaviour centres in each of the three
             consortia areas into which is amalgamated existing PRU provision



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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case

            develop revised approaches to primary behaviour provision which includes a preventative
             model in high need schools and an individual pupil placement focussed initiative for KS1 and
             KS2 children with high level needs
            explore the development of a model of Youth Service support for permanently excluded
             students and those at risk of exclusion.

It is also proposed to develop a consortium approach SCD provision by identifying one school in each
consortium to meet this need. This will similarly support the move to inclusive localised provision where
possible. This can be summarised as follows:

School                           Designation                         Current places            Proposed places
One school in each of the        Social Communication                    None                24 in total (8 places per
three consortia                  Difficulties (SCD)                                                 consortium)
An offsite PRU in each of        PRU (BESD)                        40 (Borough-wide)        60 in total (20 places per
the three consortia                                                                                 consortium)

5.13 Individual school visions
These are being developed for all schools in accordance with our change plan and detailed work is
ongoing with our six Wave 3 establishments (two of which are proposed academies). The individual visions
are central to Luton‟s BSF programme to deliver the transformational agenda. These visions will form the
start point for the change management programme in schools and the design development discussions
and will be facilitated by both individual school and consortium representatives.

The environments to enable the transformational agenda to flourish are a key element in this project. The
Council will be supporting the extension of this visioning process into the design development through the
work of its officers, educational advisers, technical advisers and CABE. The schools, through the visioning
process, are becoming increasingly aware of the potential benefits and enhancements that flexible and
innovative learning environments can bring.

The schools have the vision of a curriculum delivered                 by the use of flexible buildings and learning
environments, to achieve learner centered objectives. ICT             is also a central part of achieving these visions
and will underpin everything schools want to achieve in                the future. These will be working documents,
constantly reviewed and updated to assist the schools and             the authority to achieve its education vision and
BSF objectives.

Modern, purpose built schools with flexible spaces integrating the use of ICT from first principles are
needed to deliver individual school visions with external areas being extremely important to both support
teaching and learning but also contribution to the overall vision. Extending specialist provision and
community facilities will also be a key focus in the design of facilities.

In partnership with our technical advisers, Mott MacDonald, design workshops have taken place with our
Wave 3 schools from October - December 2006. This involved a series of sequential workshops examining
the following:
    1 School vision and relationship to site/buildings,
    2 Site issues and options,
    3 Shortlisting of options,
    4 Selection of preferred option.

This provided an opportunity for governors, staff and pupils to work alongside MM, GSS and CABE and
contribute to the design process. Such stakeholders are seen to be pivotal to that process to ensure that
young people and their families are kept at the heart of the vision for the design of new and remodelled
school facilities.

5.14 Our vision for ICT
We aim to provide universal common access to high quality borough wide facilities and learning provision
to enable every child, young person and adult learner to access learning at any time, anywhere.



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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case

A robust, reliable and sustainable common digital system framework will be created which will blur the
divide between school and school, school and home and school and other children‟s services and help
bring about collaboration in teaching and learning and other aspects of “Every Child Matters” that are a key
part of the overall vision for Campus Luton and Building Schools for the Future.

There will also be an increase in parental and community digital access to school and we will ensure that
the access to ICT for the community is enhanced by these developments particularly in relation to the
Extended Schools strategy.

We will ensure that a greater focus on ICT will bring real benefits for all learners. Access to ICT will be
instant and available wherever the need is identified and ICT will be used wherever it is the best resource
for learning to maximise the impact of teaching and increase the variety and effectiveness of learning
styles. It will be used to, to motivate and engage pupils and provide the best opportunities for every child
and young person to reach their potential leading to higher levels of inclusion.

ICT will facilitate access to differentiated materials and worldwide expertise and provide a greater range of
learning pathways for individuals. It will enable learners to move seamlessly between one learning
environment and another, maximising the potential to provide personalised learning programmes.

Improved use of digital technologies within the Campus Luton environment will bring a number of
significant benefits to the learning communities that it supports. The aim is to improve attainment and
achievement by enabling and empowering learners of all abilities, ages, backgrounds and cultures through
the use of digital tools.

Communications and portability will lead to greater access to global resources and he opportunity for a
seamless continuation of learning between home, school and the wider community. Technology will
provide teachers and pupils with the tools of increasing power that allow them to act independently but the
extended nature of communication networks will lead to learning that is increasingly dependent on
collaboration and mutual support.

We will continue to provide for community access to ICT through the common digital platform and the
development of extended schools and community use and will work hard to break down the so called
“digital divide” within the borough through the continued provision and access to ICT in schools, community
centres and libraries some of which may in the future be collocated in schools.

We believe that this vision sits well with “Harnessing Technology” eLearning agenda and the four service
components identified by Becta that are needed to bring about an effective digital infrastructure for
schools:
        Learning services.
        Data services.
        Connectivity services, and
        school Infrastructure services.

This will also enable us to build upon the Council‟s priority to improve access to e-government through ICT.

If we are to achieve this vision it is essential that ICT be seen as an integral part of the design process for
the building from the outset.

ICT and a Luton secondary learner
All learners will be e-confident; they will know how and when to use ICT.

       A Luton learner will be able to access resources to support their learning during any lesson or any
        time, anywhere. The resources will be organised and available in such a way that makes it easy for
        the learner to access the materials whichever school they attend and will be tailored to meet their
        individual needs.

       A Luton learner will have online interaction with teachers and/or peers:


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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case
             -   as individuals,
             -   as part of whole class teaching.

       A Luton learner will be able to work at their own pace with online support from their teacher as well
        as support for SEN and Gifted and Talented where appropriate.

       A Luton learner will be able to access specialist lessons taking place in another school or location
        (such as the CLC) through video conferencing, streaming video, discussion groups, live and
        archived content and email. This will, for example, enable gifted and talented pupils from a number
        of schools to be brought together virtually for online “Masterclasses”. In addition it is expected that
        in keeping with the Campus Luton model of collaboration that some courses for gifted and talented
        pupils will be delivered using video conferencing. We will ensure that resources and digital
        pathways are tailored to meet the needs of all gifted and talented pupils.

       A Luton learner will have on the network his/her own personal space for work, a single login and
        password with an adaptive profile that will enable them to access the same resources wherever
        they happen to be. If they are working in another location such as a school or library, rather than
        their “home” institution in order to meet their aspirations and needs they will have the same access
        to the network and their personal files.

       A Luton learner will be able to check homework that has been assigned to them through the
        Learning Platform by accessing their teacher‟s virtual area online. They will also be able submit
        homework online.

       A Luton learner will be able to access assessment data and information and receive feedback
        through on-screen assessment.

All of the above factors will provide support for personalised learning and the four fundamental types of
learning that are central to the Campus Luton model for learning:

“Learning to know, Learning to do, Learning to live together and Learning to be.”

ICT implementation - improving Infrastructure and hardware
There will need to be large scale investment in the infrastructure and hardware within Building Schools for
the Future to underpin the transformation envisaged by Campus Luton and the use of ICT. All works will be
carried out to the highest level of specification available at the time.
         Learning Spaces – these will be created to provide total network coverage throughout a building
            via a combination of wireless access in all learning spaces and hard-wired areas with access to
            excellent multi-media content and software.
            Wide Area Network (WAN) – to facilitate collaborative working and sharing of resources and
             learning and the establishment of a Managed Virtual Learning Environment (MVLE), also
             referred to as a Learning Platform that covers all secondary schools (including the Special
             School) in Luton. The WAN will enable data transfer between schools and other agencies to be
             streamlined. We would also envisage other agencies that are part of the fully extended school
             to be included in the WAN wherever possible.
            Broadband Access – all establishments will be connected with a minimum 100mb connection to
             enable access to high quality learning resources as near to instant as possible. This will also be
             used to promote collaborative synchronous and asynchronous teaching and learning through
             video conferencing, discussion forum, email and video streaming etc. We will continue to work
             closely with E2BN to ensure a high quality service is provided. This will be linked to the National
             Education Network (NEN) that is currently being developed.
            Local Area Networks (LAN) – these will be within schools and will be important in providing
             instant access to ICT. It will be essential that there is interoperability between systems in each
             school to facilitate resource sharing, a single login and password and also technical support.
             The LAN will support both management/administration (MIS) and curriculum use. There will no
             longer be separate networks for these functions.


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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case
            Remote access and security – staff, pupils and parents will be able to access the network any
             time, any where with appropriate security restrictions to protect data. The security of each
             school will be designed to prevent theft of both information and ICT equipment.
            Management Information Systems – It will be essential that all office and staff work spaces are
             included in the infrastructure to enable instant access to management and financial applications
             and individual pupil level data to inform teaching and learning. All staff will have access to ICT
             – Teachers and Support staff will have their own laptop/tablet pc or similar device available at
             the time.
            We envisage that there will be a mixture of hard-wired high specification desktop computers
             (both PC and Apple Mac) for whole class work or where a high specification computer is
             required. Wireless mobile devices such as laptops, tablets and PDAs will be available to enable
             the embedding of ICT across the curriculum for individuals, groups of learners or whole classes
             as appropriate. Interactive Whiteboards will be available in every teaching space and this will
             also contribute to the further embedding of ICT in the schools.
            We envisage that the ICT infrastructure will be fully integrated with other key functions of the
             building such as security and access, CCTV, telephony, fire protection, notices/display and
             payment for food.
            We will seek to achieve economies of scale on the procurement of the infrastructure and
             hardware across all schools.
            Given the rapid rate of change and invention within this area we will need to ensure that we take
             account of any developments in technologies that would enhance the teaching and learning
             process.
            We will also ensure that specialist hardware and software to support the inclusion of pupils with
             special educational needs will be available.

ICT implementation - improving digital resources and software
We will make extensive use of high quality commercially available multi-media materials, software and
digital resources and we will make use of Curriculum Online and exhibitions such as the BETT show to
ensure that we provide the most appropriate software to meet both learners and teacher/support staff
needs.

We would also expect that the City Learning Centre will continue to have a key role in terms of providing
advice and support to both teacher/support staff and learners with regard to the use of new hardware and
software applications to support learning across the curriculum particularly with music technology and
digital imaging/video. Gifted and talented pupils will continue to be brought together at the City Learning
Centre for extension projects involving the use of the specialist ICT equipment available at the centre,
particularly in relation to music technology, digital imaging/video and the use of the television studio.

We will ensure that the needs of all learners are met, particularly those with special needs who require
specialist ICT equipment to enable them to access the curriculum and we will continue to provide outreach
support to schools to help identify individual pupils needs in this respect. ICT will have a particular role to
play in enabling the continued learning of students who are hard to reach (e.g. young mothers) or who
have been excluded and resources will be provided to meet these needs. We will continue to provide ICT
solutions to help meet the needs of these vulnerable children.

We will also continue to provide CPD both at the LA Professional Development Centre and the CLC to
further develop teachers‟ ability to produce and use digital learning materials. All resources will be shared
between all establishments including some in Primary schools to support transfer and transition. As with
hardware we will expect to achieve economies of scale in the procurement of multi-media resources,
software and the Managed Virtual Learning Environment.

We will ensure that we achieve the very best prices for office application software that at least match or
better Becta agreements. Similarly we will ensure that MIS applications are procured centrally in order to
achieve best value through the Managed Service Provider.


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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case

We will ensure that clear and simple systems are set up to enable the sharing of resources and best
practice through the Managed Virtual Learning Environment that will also enable both teachers and pupils
to track and record progress essential for personalised learning and assessment for learning. It will be
essential to establish requirements with regard to functionality and software when the pupil needs to
access ICT outside of their school. The functionality will consistent and interoperable with MIS systems
within schools.

We are in the process of implementing the Microsoft Learning Gateway in all secondary schools. We will
fully test the product and evaluate its appropriateness, the results of which will be discussed with the
Managed Service Provider.

It will be essential that the very best resources and digital applications are provided with easy access if the
learner is to be able to take on new responsibilities for their own learning through individual learning plans
and enable personalisation of learning to take place.

It will be necessary to integrate the use of the learning platform as the vehicle to deliver multi-media
content with the current Luton Learning Grid (L2G) and Learning Schools@Luton so that there is no
confusion as to where resources can be found.

ICT improving learning and teaching
The teacher will remain pivotal as the manager and leader of he learning environment, but ICT will
increasingly facilitate their ability to deliver efficiently and effectively to an increasingly ambitious education
agenda. ICT will provide teachers access to an information rich environment and support them with the
diagnostic capability enabling them to respond more pertinently to their pupil‟s individual needs.

The confidence and competence of both teachers and teaching assistants in the use of ICT and the
development of pupils‟ capability and skills is crucial to achieving this vision. We will ensure that a tailored
programme of training and support is in place for all teachers and support staff.

It will be necessary to sustain this high level of training and support over a long period of time to create a
workforce who are able to embed ICT into their subject in an innovative way to improve teaching and
learning and at the same time develop the ICT capability and skills of all pupils in order to improve
attainment and achievement. It will also be essential that identified staff working in community centres and
libraries are provided with the training to enable them to be able give appropriate advice and guidance to
learners using the ICT facilities in their establishments.

It is not reasonable to expect staff to simply move into and take advantage of the new facilities and
technologies; time will need to be spent in inducting them into their use so that they are able to deliver
“quality first” teaching at all times.

The learner must become central to the process of improving teaching and learning. Teachers and support
staff will need to be able to guide pupils through the content and learning pathways and interfaces that best
suit their individual needs and learning styles to enable pupils to manage their own learning.

It may well be necessary to enhance the number of Secondary Teaching and Learning Consultants
through Building Schools for the Future funding to ensure that staff are well trained and supported. This
function could be carried out by the Managed Service Provider as part of the LEP.

ICT improving management information
This will be part of the WAN and LAN (in individual schools) and will no longer be part of a separate
network. This will enable management information to be shared and made available between schools,
schools and the LA and also other agencies included within the infrastructure as part of the extended
schools strategy.

It will be essential to provide a highly effective management system to store both pupil and staff data. This
will become increasingly important as school self evaluation develops and we will ensure that the system
supports this process and provide training wherever necessary. It will be essential that the training
programme is also tailored to meet the needs of appropriate staff who work centrally within the Local

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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case
Authority in these areas for example in Human Resources and Knowledge and Information departments of
Children and Learning.

Management teams and teachers will need to be able to track pupil progress and analyse the performance
of pupils and the school. This will support assessment for learning.

Pupils will be provided with progress and targets that will be updated regularly. This pupil level data will be
fully integrated with the Managed Virtual Learning Environment and will reduce the amount of time
teachers/support staff spend entering data.

We will ensure that the system will be linked to wider developments that are taking place with regard to
extended schools and the sharing of information across multiple agencies. As this begins to take shape in
Luton it will essential that we look carefully at how ICT systems can be fully integrated to enable effective
collaboration between the LA, schools and other agencies. We will also need to ensure that all staff, not
just teaching staff are fully trained.

It will be essential that effective and timely support for MIS is an integral part of the service of the Managed
Service Provider.

ICT improving leadership and management
We will need to ensure that the MIS system provide leadership teams with essential tools to support
personalised learning strategies to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of their learning institutions.
This will directly support the drive to raise standards in our schools.

If these new tools and learning environments are to be used effectively there is a need for effective change
management within schools. School leaders will need to be supported in developing their strategic vision
for learning and teaching within their new technology rich environments.

We will ensure that School leaders understand the potential of ICT and that the vision is achieved and
continually developed. Support and training will be provided for school leaders that may include the NCSL
SLICT programme. As mentioned earlier we are currently talking with NCSL about how this might be
made available for Luton headteachers

Subject leaders or those responsible under the new TLR arrangements for attainment and achievement in
a subject will have a key part to play in ensuring that ICT and eLearning is fully integrated into learning in
their subjects and subject leaders.

We will continue to develop online communities for headteachers to communicate, share information and
collaborate and teacher networks to enable subject leaders amongst others to do the same.

We will continue to support schools in the use of ICT to reduce teacher workload and remodelling. Once
embedded many of the ICT practices referred to in this document will help to save teachers time and
enable the more effective use of support staff.

It will be important to ensure that Governors are fully informed and consulted upon with regard to how ICT
fits into the Building Schools for the Future agenda in Luton. It will be necessary to provide updates and
training through the Governor Support Programme of cpd@luton.

ICT technical support and sustainability of solutions
It is essential that the technology always works well and is never a barrier to learning. Anywhere, any time
learning is dependent on this. To achieve this we will need to partner with a Managed Service Provider
who will ensure that technical support is available across the whole interoperable network at all times. It
will be essential that the provider ensures that the technical support meets the standards laid down by
Becta in its “Framework for ICT Technical Support” (FITS).

In making infrastructure and hardware decisions it is critical that the sustainability of the ICT solutions are
taken account of. It will be necessary to consider the ongoing revenue and capital costs as part of the
decision making process on the exact solutions to be implemented. It will also be necessary to develop a
rolling programme of replacement to ensure that the ICT continues to function well as well as taking

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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case
account of new technological developments. Headteachers are committed to the principle of making
appropriate revenue payments to ensure that ICT solutions can be refreshed and built upon in the light of
new technologies. This will be essential as ICT functionality becomes business critical to not only teaching
and learning but administration and facilities management within our schools.

It will be essential that the ICT infrastructure envisaged has an impact on the design of the building from
the outset. In order to keep the maximum degree of flexibility in the building consideration will need to be
given to the:
          The size of rooms where hardware is to be fixed (classroom/learning spaces and
            administration/teacher space
          The design of rooms with the use of portable ICT solutions in mind using wireless technology –
            whole school wireless enabled
          Routing of cabling (not fixed to walls which may not be permanent) and telephony
          The position of digital display screens (walls) around the school and particularly adjacent to the
            main entrance
          The position of CCTV, security systems; door access controls
          Computerised payment systems in dining/cafeteria areas
          Other applications, etc.

ICT integration and service delivery strategy
It is regarded as paramount that ICT service delivery is tightly integrated into the BSF programme. The
overall aim is to ensure that ICT service is regarded as a „fifth utility‟ and not part of the core business of
schools. This has implications for both education, per se, and facilities generally.

On the education side, appropriate ICT should be available to support school administration and teaching
and learning. Indeed, the vision is that these are themselves tightly integrated in order to maximize the
usage of common core data within the school. The vision is also that sharing of data and functionality
provided by ICT should be shared across sites in support of a collaborative model and to provide
seamless, anytime, anywhere access to staff, students and parents.

On the facilities side, we expect optimal integration of ICT into the design and construction of school
buildings. This will enable utilization of ICT to ensure cost-effective building management. In addition, we
expect utilization of ICT to ensure cost-effective facilities management and the sharing of infrastructure
and data between facilities and education systems where mutually beneficial. Examples are a single IP
network for all systems and the sharing of student data between school MIS systems and cashless
catering systems.

This vision suggests a four-dimensional scope model for ICT service integration:
         Dimension 1: Integration across facilities and services within the school, including extended
            school services (in-site scope)
         Dimension 2: Integration across multiple school and other sites for both access to systems and
            data transfer between systems (cross-site scope)
         Dimension 3: Integration between ICT service to schools and ICT service elsewhere within the
            authority (authority scope)
         Dimension 4: Integration between ICT facilities provision, maintenance, support, usage and
            training (service depth)

This level of integration is designed to achieve key business benefits:
         Improved service quality through improved data quality, improved access to systems and
            improved functionality of systems
         Cost benefits through scale economies

Implications of the above are
        Management and delivery has to be provided in a manner which is consistent across sites and
           achieves the desired scale economies
        The service must be based on common technical standards – based, where available, on
           national guidance from DfES, Becta, etc.


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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case
In order to achieve this level of integration, our strategy is to understand the requirements, which are
expounded in this strategy paper generally, and their implications – and prepare accordingly

Engage schools in full consultation over a sufficiently lengthy period in order to achieve both understanding
of and buy-in to the strategy. This process has been under way over the year and will continue through
OBC and procurement.
        Procure a ICT managed service partner through the LEP procurement process, with the
          express intention that this is a partnership rather than the provision of a closely defined service
          – this will be an outcome defined service
        Expect that partner to deliver service across the entirety of the four dimensions of scope
          outlined above, including a depth of service which includes assisting the authority with the
          change management implied by the aim of achieving transformation enabled by an ICT-rich
          environment
        Involve schools in continuing engagement with that partner, through appropriate governance
          and management arrangements, such that momentum is maintained as the project progresses,
          technology advances and inevitable problems are overcome.

The scope of service described involves establishing appropriate interfaces to other elements of the BSF
programme or of service delivery more generally. Taking the four dimensions in turn:

Dimension 1 (in-site)
This requires the establishment of a sound relationship between ICT supplier and construction and FM
supplier, in order that ICT is not retro-engineered into the building designed and ICT investment is
maximized. This is based achieved through the earliest possible engagement of the ICT partner and their
involvement in the design process. In advance of such appointment, design will be informed by suitably
qualified ICT consultant.

It also requires consideration of extended school services to be provided on the school site and the nature
and extent of ICT support required for them. This is the subject of ongoing work in the Borough; the
identification of funding sources to cover additional costs will be further clarified at OBC stage.

Dimension 2 (cross-site)
This requires the integration or interoperation of school systems, especially MIS systems – but this system
scope is itself likely to increase as the Every Child Matters programme matures. The Borough maintains a
watching brief on developments of, for example, IS Index and e-CAF, and will incorporate their technical
requirements into the BSF ICT project as and when necessary.

Cross-site integration also implies a level of integration with other phases of education, particularly the
primary-secondary interface and the interface between school and college.

Cross-site integration can be achieved through interoperation between disparate systems, the selection of
common systems (i.e. the same in each school) and the provision of a single system (e.g. hosted remotely)
for all schools. The Borough expresses no preference in general terms and will test prospective
approaches through procurement. However, it has embarked on a Learning Platform strategy, in response
to encouragement and funding from DfES, which seeks to establish a common system across schools and
it is anticipated that this will be adopted by, and built on, by the BSF ICT partner.

Dimension 3 (authority scope)
This dimension covers those aspects of ICT service where the authority will or may have some role to play.
In particular:
         WAN/RBC: This is currently provided by the Borough‟s corporate IM service, enables school
            linkage to the RBC (E2BN) and NEN, is facilitated by a contract with NTL which terminates in
            2010 and is backed by as service level agreement and a level of technical support to schools.
            The WAN will be critical to an efficient integrated service delivery and will underpin one aspect
            of the ICT managed service provider‟s performance. No decision has been taken on retention or
            otherwise of this approach and it is intended that that this question be tested through the
            procurement process. In any event, an interfacing arrangement is likely to be necessary, albeit
            on a temporary basis and depending on timing/phasing of the BSF ICT implementation.

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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case

            Administrative and curriculum support services: Some support services (MIS, curriculum ICT)
             are currently provided by the authority to schools. Some of these may overlap with service
             provide by the ICT partner, especially in relation to delivering the desired improvements in
             attainment and attendance and subject to the performance regime applying to the ICT partner.
             The scope and approach to this interface is also to be tested through procurement.

The authority is fully cognisant of the impact of any variation of scope of service outside of BSF, per se,
including the option of transfer of staff to the ICT partner if appropriate and intends to clarify its position at
OBC stage.

Dimension 4 (service depth)
The above comment, regarding support services from the authority, applies here. The intention is to invite
supplier proposals, which cover a depth of service from the provision of hardware and technical support
through to curriculum support, training, change management and support for the Borough‟s continuing ICT
for schools strategy.

In summary, the foundation of our integrated ICT service delivery strategy is:
       The adoption of a broad scope for the ICT service, to be provided by the managed service
         partner
       The earliest, practicable appointment of the partner in order to enable the establishment of
         sound interfaces to other services
       The transfer of risk, where applicable, to the partner
       The application of performance measures to the outcomes of that service
       A continuing governance/management approach in which all relevant stakeholders are
         adequately represented.

5.15 16-19 provision
Post-16 provision is the responsibility of Barnfield College, Cardinal Newman Secondary School, Dunstable
College, Luton Sixth Form College and the work based learning providers. This pattern of provision and
providers is subject to further development as a result of proposals to establish two 11-19 academies to
replace Halyard and South Luton High Schools under the sponsorship of Barnfield College.

Barnfield College, Cardinal Newman and Luton Sixth Form College will continue to develop arrangements
that enable students who are on the roll of one institution to access suitable courses provided by another,
thus widening the choice available.

Over time, it is envisaged that some post-16 courses will be offered on the premises of high schools or in
other places, such as the eLearning Centre. Such courses will be offered under the aegis of one of the
existing post-16 providers which will have responsibility for ensuring that the courses are adequately
resourced (including staffing, accommodation and equipment) and that effective quality assurance
arrangements are in place. These courses will give young people who might typically not continue in
education or training the opportunity to gain confidence and maturity, as well as a further qualification, in
familiar surroundings. Following completion of such a course, it is probable that a proportion of these
young people, who would have otherwise left the system at 16, will continue in education or training beyond
the age of 17 with a post-16 provider whose courses best meet their needs. In collaboration with the
Bedfordshire and Luton Learning and Skills Council, we have developed a Luton Strategy for 11-19
Education and Training.

5.16 Our vision for extended schools
Luton is working in partnership with the Children‟s Centre Initiative, Family Support Worker Strategy,
Children‟s Workforce Strategy, Health (PCTs), other agencies, the private, voluntary & independent
sectors and parents/children/young people and the wider community to deliver the Extended Schools
Strategy. Nine family clusters have been established across the three consortia areas to take forward this
initiative with a view to appointing cluster managers to facilitate and manage progress.

Workshops have already taken place on planning provision within each family cluster and future workshops
have been programmed to cover implementation, finance and sustainability. A community consultation is
also scheduled for November 2006 and will take the form of both paper and on-line questionnaires. In
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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case
addition, publicity will be used to raise awareness and there will be some direct mailings to specific
community groups. As part of the consultation, we will also be running workshops for children and young
people to elicit their views on extended schools and BSF. Separate sessions are being planned for primary
and secondary aged children. Luton intends to meet all Government targets relating to accessibility to the
core offer by 2006 (10%), 2008 (50%) and 2010 (100%).

5.17 Our vision for extended services
In developing our strategy for delivering services to the community through schools, we have agreed a
number of principles that will guide such developments. These are as follows:

            BSF is a Government Programme that focuses on raising educational attainment in schools -
             extended use of schools has proven to enhance school performance; accordingly, in line with
             Luton‟s Education Vision, all schools want to work closely with and make provision for the wider
             community they serve
            Services that cater for individual members of the community (e.g. leisure and sports activities,
             youth service, libraries, adult education and community development) will support high schools
             in their role of preparing young people for independence and adulthood. Accordingly, these
             services fit best with high school sites.
            The aim will be to enable all high schools that receive BSF funding to make their facilities
             available for community use outside of normal school hours
            Where schools are identified as being geographically well located and have sufficient site
             capacity to meet community needs during the school day - the full opportunity offered by these
             sites needs to be assessed and fully utilised
            Schools will, as far as possible, be designed to accommodate community use of the facilities.
            The objective will be to improve the quality of service provision to the community
            Shared use of facilities is to be encouraged and exclusive use will need to be supported by a
             business case
            Facilities management arrangements will be designed to maximise community use of school
             facilities
            The most appropriate providers need to be identified for each service and formal partnerships
             developed between school and those services
            Extended services need to be financially sustainable. Extended services will be expected to
             meet the additional cost to both the capital development costs and the running costs; this will
             include a contribution towards maintenance and management
            Capital and revenue resources released from closure of existing facilities to enable reprovision
             on school sites will be ring–fenced as far as necessary to meet the additional cost of providing
             facilities on school sites
            Whole life costing is required to determine the business case for moving from current facilities
             to school sites
            Resolving the issues must be treated as a matter of urgency, with adequate resources being
             devoted to the exercise. A mandate is required from the Chief Executive, Corporate Directors
             and Key Executive Members.

5.18 Competition for new schools
Luton embraces the principles of the Education Act in connection with the establishment of schools, to
ensure choice, diversity, high standards and access for all. We have already submitted two expressions of
interest to establish academies to replace Halyard and South Luton High Schools and the respective
funding agreements were signed on 23rd May 2007. These academies will greatly increase the diversity of
Campus Luton and build on the rich diversity of choice of high school places in the Borough. We will also
support any schools‟ move to trust status where it can be shown that this will provide a benefit to both
students and their parents/carers.

5.19 Options appraisal and methodology
This summarises the high level option appraisal exercise which was carried out in order to order to identify
the preferred option for each school and describes how the options appraisal exercise has been
approached, as informed by the guidance „Finding the Right Solution‟.



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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case
The first step of the option assessment was to identify and clearly define a set of objectives to which all
aspire and which are to be met through BSF.

Once the BSF objectives were identified, a number of criteria were established to allow the quantification of
performance of each option. The option performance criteria formed an impartial benchmarking basis upon
which the selection for the „optimum‟ school option was made for each school.

The next step in the process was the development of various options for each school. Bearing in mind the
criteria and objectives identified in the earlier stages of the process and by focusing methodically on each
school separately, in conjunction with the current school condition and future needs knowledge, various
options were developed and documented as described later in greater detail.

Finally, when a number of options were collated (minimum three) for each school, each option was
considered against the criteria and objectives defined earlier.

At all stages, all provider institutions and wider stakeholder groups have been consulted.

Definition of the objectives
The following objectives have been defined in order to provide a benchmark for the high level option
appraisal exercise covering schools in the BSF programme:

       To establish school buildings as sites for lifelong learning, leisure activities and a wide range of
        services to the local community
       To ensure that all learning takes place in well-designed, fully accessible, well maintained buildings
        that provide an environment for learning that supports specialist provision and anytime/anywhere
        learning
       Compliance with BB98
       Compliance with BB95
       Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) compliance
       Deliverability
       town planning constraints
       site provision
       To improve the overall education and skills levels of the population of Luton
       To ensure that there is a wide range of available educational opportunities that enable all pupils to
        have their needs met; and
       Value for Money (VfM).

5.20 Definition of option assessment criteria
Whilst all proposed options present solutions that attempt to meet the above objectives, in order to quantify
the success level of each school a set of criteria have been defined. The criteria were defined within the
context of four main headings:

Conformity with the education vision
Inspirational Environment: Will the option provide an inspirational environment that motivates both staff and
pupils, for example, attractiveness, light, temperature overall aesthetics, image.
Community Use: Will the option suit and encourage the community use of the school?
Specialism enhancement: Will the option enhance the schools specialist curriculum area?

Improvement of school conditions
Security: Will site security be improved e.g. control of access to the site and buildings, reduction in
vandalism?
Key Facilities: Will the option provide sufficient and quality facilities such as dining areas, toilets, sports
halls, etc?
Quality of student support facilities: Will the option improve the availability and quality of curriculum support
facilities such as CSU, Careers, Family support, and school administration?




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case

Improvement of suitability
Operational efficiency: Will the option improve the distance and relationship between parts of the school
and how well will internal spaces promote good behaviour?
Flexibility of buildings: Will there be opportunity for the expansion and adaptability of the space to
accommodate curriculum changes etc. in the future?
Accessibility: Will the option meet the Disability Discriminations Act and Special Educational Needs and
Disability Act?
Environment: will the construction be environmentally friendly?
School Management: Will the option complement the school‟s management strategy?

Deliverability
Disruption: All options will generate a degree of disruption. However will it be possible to maintain school
operation at acceptable levels through provision of temporary accommodation, phasing etc.?
Risk: Are the risks generated from this option acceptable or manageable?

5.21 Costings

            Capital Costs: have been calculated and set out for each option as detailed item 5.34
            Life Cycle Costs: have been calculated and set out for each option as detailed item 5.37.

5.22 Development of control option estates strategy
The control options considered for each school were generated based on different proportions of work
types (classes). Works were classified as follows:

 No Works                        The „No Works‟ class is allocated to areas that have been recently built or
                                 refurbished and are anticipated to be incorporated in the new BSF scheme
                                 without any requirements for works or alterations.

 Minor (light)                   Minor refurbishment generally includes for the completion of all backlog
 Refurbishment                   maintenance, replacement of all windows, replacement or significant repair of
                                 roof coverings, replacement and improvement of internal finishes i.e. ceilings,
                                 walls and floors. This option includes for minimal external works.

 Major (heavy)                   In addition to the above, major refurbishment allows for re-cladding,
 Refurbishment /                 structural alteration and remodelling of spaces to create a reorganised
 Remodelling                     internal environment, together with more external works.

 New Build                       New Built allows for the construction of new build elements in addition to the
                                 above, which could range from a new build extension to the complete
                                 rebuilding of a school.

By utilising proportions of each works type as defined above and based on the current condition and
suitability of each school, three options were developed per school.

 Do Minimum                     This option typically allows for light refurbishment of the whole school,
                                resolution of main backlog maintenance issues and works associated with
                                DDA compliance.

 Part Heavy, part Light This option typically allows for a combination of Heavy and Light
 and part Rebuild       refurbishments in conjunction with some new built. This option also allows for
                        works associated with DDA compliance.

 Substantial new build          This option allows for demolitions and new builds of extensive school areas
                                and is typically complemented with heavy refurbishment and some limited
                                light refurbishments.

                    The summary data for each school control option is given in Appendix B.

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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case

In the case of the two proposed academies to be included in Wave 3: Phase 1, option appraisals have
commenced and will be presented as part of the Outline Business Case (refer to Letter from PfS attached
as Appendix L). The initial view is that they will be new build in order to deliver the necessary education
transformation required of our highest priority schools.

5.23 Confirmation that prioritisation of schools under DfES criteria still applies
Our proposals for Wave 3 (Phases 1 and 2) will include the two proposed academies in Phase 1 and target
other schools where performance, deprivation and the Asset Management Plan backlog are identified as
significant issues, thus retaining the rational for the inclusion of Luton in Wave 3.

5.24 Prioritisation/first phase
The phasing of the secondary school investment has been addressed by assessing seven criteria for each
school, which broadly encompasses the condition of the buildings, levels of deprivation in the locality and
educational need.

The criteria have been assessed for each school and weightings assigned to each criterion. The
weightings have been established by LBC and are indicated as follows:

                         Criteria                                                 Weighting (%)
 M&E and Structural condition                                                          10
 Suitability for curriculum                                                            10
 Suitability ICT                                                                       10
 Access and Inclusion                                                                  10
 Free school meals                                                                     20
 Attainment - KS4 (GCSE A*-C)                                                          20
 Attainment - CVA (KS2-KS4)                                                            20

The application of these weightings has resulted in a total score for the school, which is then ranked within
the school estate. In all case a low score is positive and a high score negative. Details of the seven key
criteria are as follows:

M&E and structural condition
A score of 1-10 has been attributed to each school based on the overall condition of the building stock.

Suitability for curriculum
The suitability for teaching the curriculum at each school has been assessed using a 1-10 scoring system.
A score of 10 indicates that existing facilities providing teaching and support accommodation have
extensive deficiencies in terms of operational efficiency, security and standards of key facilities. A score of
1 represents existing facilities being of a high quality fully supporting curriculum delivery.

Suitability for ICT
This criterion assesses the existing ICT infrastructure as a component to deliver the BSF vision. A score of
10 indicates that existing facilities provide little or no opportunity to install necessary ICT infrastructure, and
a score of 1 indicates the existing ICT infrastructure and flexibility for future addition is at or beyond
proposed levels in BSF.

Access and inclusion
This criterion examines how well the existing facilities meet the Disability and Discriminations Act and
Special Education Needs. Points have been awarded to a school for offering a diverse range of inclusive
services such as a community education base, a school base youth worker, behavioural improvement
programme, education action zone or Learning and support unit. The score for this has been combined
with a score for the ability of the school to meet the requirements of DDA.

Free School Meals (proxy measure for deprivation)
Luton has relatively high levels of deprivation within the inner wards which improves significantly towards
the north east of the city. The map below shows the index of Multiple Deprivation for Luton.


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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case




The number of pupils eligible for free school meals at any one school has been taken as a measure of
deprivation for the locality. This has been converted to a percentage of total pupils, then normalised to give
a score out of 10.

Attainment - KS4
Educational Standards were assessed using the percentage of students achieving 5 GCSE‟s grades A*-C.
The scoring system follows the rule that the lower the attainment the higher the score, which should
address those schools with the greatest need.

Attainment - Contextual Value Added
In addition to the attainment scores, Contextual Value Added (CVA) scores were analysed as these can
often be a better indication of the success of a school in an area where there is a higher proportion of less
academically able pupils, than the national average. CVA scores have been collated over the past three
years and an average taken. A lower score has been given to schools achieving higher CVA grades, on
the basis that they are functioning successfully despite other external factors such as building condition.

Geographical (Area Consortia) rankings
To counteract any potential for educational migration across the Borough and to support a balance
approach to BSF, schools were grouped geographically within their assigned consortia. These consortia
have already been established by Luton as follows:

Link 5
        Cardinal Newman Catholic Secondary School
        Icknield High School
        Lealands High School
        Lea Manor High School
        Woodlands School (specialist SEN provision).



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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case

SSPA
       Ashcroft High School
       Putteridge High School
       Stopsley High School
       South Luton High School (Barnfield South Academy).
A1
       Challney Boys High School
       Challney Girls High School
       Denbigh High School
       Halyard High School (Barnfield West Academy).

A map of Luton showing the location of secondary mainstream schools and the three consortia areas is
attached as Appendix A.

The schools were then assigned their ranking within their consortium and four phases established which
consists of one school from each cluster in descending priority order i.e. most needy in each cluster to be
developed first. The outcome is summarised in the table below:
 Phases                                           School
 Wave 3: Phase 1                                  South Luton High School (Academy)
                                                  Halyard High School (Academy)
                                                  Lea Manor High School
                                                  Challney High School for Girls
 Wave 3: Phase 2                                  Ashcroft High School
                                                  Lealands High School
 Wave 6: Phase 1                                  Putteridge High School
                                                  Challney Boys High School
                                                  Cardinal Newman High School
 Wave 6: Phase 2                                  Stopsley High School
                                                  Denbigh High School
                                                  Icknield High School
                                                  Woodlands (as relocated to Icknield)

The fuller analysis is included in Appendix F.

5.25 Potential disposals, site acquisitions, amalgamations, new schools etc
South Luton (Barnfield South Academy) is proposed to move to an alternative site and this site is already in
the joint ownership of the Council and the Academy Sponsor. In order for the LA to provide an
unencumbered site on which to build the new academy, there is a need for the LA to acquire the land that
is currently in the ownership of the College. Two options were explored involving either deferred and
phased purchase or a land swap. In the event the LA and College have agreed on a land purchase
arrangement formulated through a „Heads of Terms‟ agreement. The relevant funding agreement was
signed on 23rd May 2007.

 Woodlands is also to be moved and co-located alongside a rebuilt Icknield High School. All other schools
will remain on their existing sites. The vacated South Luton site will be used to support any necessary
decanting of pupils to facilitate the phasing of the remainder of the programme. The vacated Woodlands
site may be adapted to provide short and long-term residential care for children as part of the Council's
inclusion strategy.

5.26 Integration of ICT service delivery strategy
The ICT Managed Service will be procured through the LEP in order to ensure that ICT requirements are
fully integrated into designs and thus able to transform the learning environment, transform teaching
practice and exploit all of the potential available in „smart buildings‟. Inclusion within the LEP will also allow
close links between the ICT managed service, facilities management and lifecycle maintenance services.

5.27 Geographical rankings
Covered in 4.24 above.
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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case


5.28 Impact of phasing
By using a consortia approach linked to AMP, performance and deprivation indices, we have minimized the
impact of pupil migration both within and across consortia. Such an approach also allows progress to
develop at an equal pace within each consortium and therefore minimise the level of disruption and provide
increased flexibility should the need arise to decant pupils. The relocation of South Luton (Barnfield South
Academy) into new build in 2010/11 will provide an opportunity of using the redundant buildings for
decanting purposes where site constraints necessitate this approach. Such decanting would both minimise
operational impact and reduce the length of period on site by freeing up more of the site to contractors.

5.29 Intentions for sustaining schools until BSF implemented
The Council is working in partnership with schools to undertake essential maintenance only prior to BSF
investment. The delivery of the programme in two waves (Wave 3: Phases 1 & 2 and Wave 6: Phases 1 &
2) will reduce the risk to later phase schools. The Corporate „repair and maintenance‟ budget funding will
be used to fund reactive maintenance valued at over £10k to ensure schools remain safe, dry and warm.

5.30 Investment to be delivered prior to BSF
Any investment in buildings to deliver new curriculum requirements will complement our preferred options
for individual schools or be based on a modular build approach to support „buildability‟ and to allow such
accommodation to be used elsewhere in the Council following completion of BSF.

5.31 School amalgamations, closures and expansions
                                       th
Statutory notices were published on 9 November 2006 with a view to establishing two academies to
replace the existing Halyard and South Luton High Schools. The closing date for the receipt of objections
was 21st December 2006. The decision to close the two predecessor schools to allow the academies to
                                                                                                        th
open in the existing building in September 2007 was made by the School Organisation Committee on 17
January 2007. The respective funding agreements were signed on 23rd May 2007.

The Statutory Notice to expand the intake of Challney High School Girls from 192 to 210 will be published
following the Executive meeting on 18th June 2007

5.32 Land sale risks
The land purchase relating to the new build requirements for the Barnfield South Academy was completed
as part of the funding agreement reached on 23rd May 2007. No other sales are required.

5.33 Converging ICT investment with phased buildings
The inclusion of an ICT provider as part of the LEP will ensure that schools designs in all phases will be
informed by ICT requirements. In addition, our consortia approach to phasing will support the Campus
Luton strategy of collaborative working to ensure that similar progress is made in each of the three
consortia. The likely delivery of the programme in two waves (Wave 3: Phase 1 & 2 and Wave 6: Phases 1
& 2) will reduce the risk to later phase schools.

Central to our aim for ICT is to establish a highly integrated and collaborative approach across all Luton
secondary schools. Therefore, we aim, as far as is practicable, to engage an ICT partner to develop central
elements of the ICT service (e.g. common Learning Platform, common data centre) early in the process
and make these available to all participating schools. This implies ICT service available in advance of the
completion of (some phases of) building work. This approach is designed to enable the ICT partner to work
with the Borough in preparing school staff to make optimal use of the new facilities as they come into
operation. Moreover, we believe that some of the transformative activity that ICT enables can be put into
practice, regardless of the building.

Four phases are planned for school building, but the intention is that these are programmed relatively
closely together. This is helpful to the ICT approach in that it reduces the stagger in contract timescales
between first and last and helps the creation of a holistic approach. We hope to minimise any difficulties
which may arise should, for example, the option to extend the ICT contract beyond the first five years, for
whatever reason, not be taken up.




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case

Two other aspects of the impact of phasing on ICT provision are under consideration:
       Integration of the Academies programme: It is our aim to procure a single ICT managed service
          covering our two Academies and BSF. However, we anticipate an earlier start on the
          Academies than the BSF schools. Whilst we are engaged in the initial design work on the
          Academies, we will, subject to consultation with the Academies Sponsor, use external
          consultants to assist the integration of ICT into that design, prior to the appointment of the ICT
          partner. Thereafter, Academies and BSF schools will be subject to the holistic approach
          described above.
       Primary schools: Our aim is to extend the BSF approach to our primary schools and to include
          ICT in that approach. An option that we are considering is to invite ICT suppliers to enter variant
          bids to provide, from the inception of the secondary school BSF programme, a managed service
          to non-BSF schools on a call-off basis, i.e. at each school‟s discretion. Furthermore, we will wish
          to retain the option of extending the BSF contract to cover primary schools, so as to exploit
          appropriate funding opportunities as they arise.

5.34 Affordability (Construction including ICT)

Indicative costing and affordability assessment: assumptions made in costing the options
Costs for the design options on each of the schools have been prepared in accordance with the PFS
Funding Guidance and factors given in the Funding Allocation Model by PfS. A summary of the unit rates
and factors used are shown in the table on the next page:




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case


        Base Build Costs - 1Q03 - 1Q08
                                                                      Base                               Site
                                                                      Cost         F&E      Abnormals   Costs
                                                                      £/m2        £/pupil      %          %
        Mainstream Schools

        New Build, including extensions thereto                        1,080       1,000            5       12

        Refurbishment                                                    700         500            9       8

        Minor Works                                                      150                        9       8

        SEN Plasc A, B, C

        New Build, including extensions thereto                        1,228       3,500            5       12

        Refurbishment                                                    800       1,750            9       8

        Minor Works                                                      150                        9       8

        PRU

        New Build, including extensions thereto                        1,228       1,000            5       12

        Refurbishment                                                    800         500            9       8

        Minor Works                                                      150                        9       8

        Inflation Factor
        Base Rates are 1Q03 with a PUBSEC Index of                                   144
        Proposed Rates are forecast to 1Q08 with a PUBSEC
        Index of                                                                     188       30.56%

        Location Factor
        Cost Factors are a rate of:                                                  1.00
        Teachernet Rate for Luton is:                                                1.09

        Professional Fees etc.
        New Build                                                                    12.5 %
        Refurbishment                                                                15.0 %

        Below the Line Figures

        Furniture & Equipment etc.

                                                                                     £
        ICT Infrastructure Cost                                                    225      per pupil
        Furniture Costs                                                            See Table Above
        RPIX Factor                                                                    2.5 % pa from 1Q03
        ICT hardware                                                              £1,450    per pupil

Costing of Preferred Options
The preferred Option for each school (which was identified during the option appraisal process described
earlier) has been costed using the criteria set out above, together with proposed capacities and the
resultant school area.



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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case

Options have not been prepared for the Academies (South Luton and Halyard) due to their late inclusion in
the SBC and they have therefore not been included in this costing exercise. The assumption has been
made that these will be funded on the basis of 100% new build as included in the FAM. The option
appraisal process for the Academies, which is already well advanced, will be carried out during the
development of the OBC.

The summary of the costings for the preferred scheme (excluding Academies) is given on the next sheet.
This breaks down the cost information into Main cost, Ancillary Cost, Capital cost and Through Life cost.
The Main cost is derived from the percentage area of new build, refurbishment and minor works at each
school, multiplied by the rates in the table above. The Ancillary costs include ICT infrastructure, FF&E and
ICT equipment which are all directly related to the number of pupils proposed by Luton, for each school.
The Through Life cost is based on a 25 year life cycle and calculated in accordance with the PfS funding
guidance.

The overall capital construction cost (excluding ICT equipment) required for the preferred options is
£163,379,659 overall. This compares to funding of £56,228,296 available to schools in Wave 3 plus a
funding requirement of £107,274,861 for schools in Wave 6.

A breakdown of the costs for each individual school is included in Appendix D.

Costing of non-preferred Option
A similar exercise has been carried out for the non-preferred design options for each school.

The summary sheet for the non-preferred design options is included on the next page and a breakdown for
each individual school included in Appendix D.

Costing of the Do Minimum Option
The final option identified during the option appraisal exercise was the “do minimum”. The approach for
establishing this cost was to align the Outline Condition Appraisal Report provided by Mott MacDonald
during the SBC phase with LBC‟s Asset Management Plan.

Significant items identified in the Condition Appraisal report have been summarised for each school and
compared against the relative costs for the condition assessment provided by LBC. These were considered
to be relative and therefore feasible costs.

The condition costs were then added to the cost identified by LBC following an Access Audit at each
school and totalled. These figures were then brought into line with the other options to first quarter 08, by
applying the relevant inflation indices. A summary of the “Do Minimum” costs is included in Appendix D.

Comparison of Options
A comparison of each of the costed options was then carried out and the table overleaf produced to
identify the differences between them.

The preferred options have been developed with affordability in mind and the funding envelope required for
the preferred option totals £163,379,659 (excluding the two proposed academies). The non-preferred
options total £193,615,395 (excluding the two proposed academies and SCD/PRU provision) which would
not have been achievable in the overall funding envelope. Adopting the “do minimum” options for the
school estate would not achieve the objectives set by the BSF programme.




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case


  Luton BSF Option Comparison by cost
  CLUSTER                                                     Construction capex (excluding ICT)
                                                                         Non-preferred
                                                  Preferred Option           option            Do minimum
  LINK 5
  Cardinal Newman High School                              £14,672,043             £23,930,132    £2,478,490
  Icknield High School                                     £26,557,420             £21,476,610    £2,128,931
  Lealands High School                                     £10,644,302             £17,299,788    £1,357,816
  Lea Manor High School                                    £14,029,496             £22,053,505      £685,384
  Woodlands High School                                    £12,516,253              £8,279,204    Unavailable
  Link 5 SCD                                                  £313,705              Unavailable   Unavailable
  Link 5 PRU                                                  £744,259              Unavailable   Unavailable
  TOTAL                                                    £79,477,478             £93,039,239    £6,650,622
  CLUSTER

  SSPA
  Ashcroft High School                                     £10,019,355             £18,351,495     £1,445,301
  Putteridge High School                                   £12,367,415             £17,493,393       £811,923
  Stopsley High School                                     £14,562,599             £21,545,743     £8,095,923
  SSPA SCD                                                    £313,705              Unavailable    Unavailable
  SSPA PRU                                                    £744,259              Unavailable    Unavailable
  TOTAL                                                    £38,007,333             £57,390,631    £10,353,148
  CLUSTER

  A1
  Challney Boys High School                                £12,690,230             £13,221,808     £1,617,935
  Challney Girls‟ High School                              £20,813,343             £16,159,649       £932,796
  Denbigh High School                                      £11,333,311             £13,804,068     £2,515,906
  A1 SCD                                                      £313,705              Unavailable    Unavailable
  A1 PRU                                                      £744,259              Unavailable    Unavailable
  TOTAL                                                    £45,894,848             £43,185,525     £5,066,638
  GRAND TOTAL for options                                 £163,379,659            £193,615,395    £22,070,409
  (excluding Academies)

Affordability of ICT Service
The Affordability of ICT Service under BSF has also been considered. A capital investment of £1450 per
pupil (with £225 per pupil in the construction for ICT infrastructure) is assumed, as per standard PfS
guidance. This funding envelope has been discussed with schools as has the scope of service that it is
expected to purchase.

It is further assumed that:
           Devolved formula capital (Grant 201) will be abated for four years for BSF schools, including
             that for ICT
           Other funding for ICT (Grant 121 and 122) is to be retained.

Our initial analysis of the scale of capital funding for BSF ICT is that it will provide for an adequate core
level of provision and service for five years but that issues that remain to be addressed are:
         Enabling schools to enhance the level of provision above the core
         Establishing an approach to, and culture of, planned and managed service that extends beyond
            the initial five years.

Our intention is to address both of these through the addition of school revenue contributions to the overall
funding package, such contributions to made annually on a formula (per pupil) basis through the five years
of the initial contract and into the following five years, thus giving a ten year planned period.


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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case

Based on initial estimates and soundings taken elsewhere, we are assuming a contribution level of £120
per pupil per annum. This range is designed not only to sustain the ICT service for ten years but to provide
for a degree of flexibility and choice by schools. Such choice will necessitate the invitation of variant bids
within the ICT procurement.

Work is ongoing to develop a model of existing ICT costs agreed with schools so that the baseline of
current provision is understood by all.

Schools, in separate one-on-one meetings, have already indicated their commitment to the principle of
making contributions from revenue. For OBC, we intend that the baseline cost model work will be
completed and that such commitment will have been formalised.

The remaining area of ICT funding, still under discussion, relates to services, if required, which are outside
of BSF but may be procured from the ICT managed service partner. These, it is intended, will be clarified
for OBC.

5.35 Comparison with FAM
The table below shows a comparison of the Funding Allocation Model (FAM) issued by PfS for our Wave 3
schools against known costs estimates. This suggests a capex shortfall of £336,165 The preferred options
for the schools estate have been designed in conjunction with the cost modelling exercise and the capital
shortfall identified in the affordability assessment will need to be addressed, if necessary, by a reduction in
the capacity and build size of the existing proposals.

  WAVE 3          School           FAM      Indicative cost         Variance                 Comments
  Phase 1     Halyard            26,945,465      26,945,465                   Expenditure to match FAM
  Phase 1     South Luton        26,945,465      26,945,465                   Expenditure to match FAM
  Phase 1     Lea Manor          12,786,898      14,029,496                   D&B refurbishment
  Phase 2     Ashcroft           11,430,049      10,019,355                   D&B refurbishment
  Phase 2     Challney Girls     19,398,189      20,813,343                   100% new build through PFI
  Phase 2     Lealands           11,555,196      10,644,302                   D&B refurbishment
   SCD                              313,705          313,705                  Expenditure to match FAM
   PRU                              744,259          744,259                  Expenditure to match FAM
   Total                        110,119,225     110,455,390           -336,165 Relates to non-academies shortfall

  WAVE 6          School         FAM (est.)    Indicative cost      Variance                     Comments
  Phase 1     Challney Boys         n/a             12,690,230                    D&B refurbishment
  Phase 1     Putteridge            n/a             12,367,415                    D&B refurbishment
  Phase 1     C. Newman             n/a             14,672,043                    D&B refurbishment
  Phase 2     Denbigh               n/a             11,333,312                    D&B refurbishment
  Phase 2     Icknield              n/a             26,557,420                    100% new build through PFI
  Phase 2     Woodlands             n/a             12,516,253                    100% new build through PFI
  Phase 2     Stopsley              n/a             14,562,599                    D&B refurbishment
  SCD (*2)                          n/a                 627,410                   Expenditure to match FAM
  PRU (*2)                          n/a              1,488,518                    Expenditure to match FAM
   Total                            n/a            106,815,200

The overall construction capex in the FAM for all eleven schools, plus SCD and PRU provision (but
excluding the two proposed academies), is currently being projected as totalling £163,379,659 against a
current actual Wave 3 FAM of £56,228,296 and an estimated Wave 6 FAM of £106,815,200 (i.e. a total of
£163,043,496), resulting in an overall shortfall of £336,165. It is the intention of the Council to work to the
available CapEx figure of £56,228,296 and thus to identify savings equivalent to £336,165. The indicative
FAM for Wave 6 is based on the 2005 pupil projections included in the approved Education Vision. Recent
forecast updates on the basis of Luton‟s actual September 2006 number on roll (NOR) figures suggest that
the rise in the 11-16 school population is likely to be greater than that previously estimated for 2015 (from
12,769 to 13,017) and increasing in 2016 to 13,218. This will impact on both CapEx affordability and
required capacities in our Wave 6 schools.

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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case
Appendix C to this document sets out the current FAM for Wave 3 and all affordability assumptions have
been benchmarked against the allocations therein.

5.36 New build procurement options
Three schools have currently been identified as preferred new builds as follows:
   1 Challney Girls (Wave 3, Phase 1)
   2 Icknield High (Wave 6, Phase 2)
   3 Woodlands Secondary (Wave 6, Phase 2)

The assumption is that each of these will be rebuilt under PFI arrangements. This will be explored further in
the OBC. Initial calculations suggest only a minimal difference in revenue affordability from a D&B model
with the added benefit that PFI includes lifecycle maintenance and also part supports the running costs of
the LEP.

5.37 Affordabilty (Lifecycle Maintenance and FM)

Lifecycle Maintenance
At present, secondary schools, excluding the two proposed academies, are allocated (based on a 2007/08
baseline) approximately £1.348m annually to cover the cost of non-structural and structural repair and
maintenance up to a threshold of £10k (for each project) and this funding is treated as revenue within the
schools‟ delegated budgets. The Council‟s corporate repair and maintenance budget covers all other
demands where projects exceed £10k and this funding is treated as capital. In addition schools receive an
additional £1.316m per annum as devolved formula capital DFC) and the intention is that schools will
commit the AMP element of DFC (currently £1.085m but due to be uplifted to £1.430m) to support the
increase in lifecycle maintenance. In addition, the Council is to commit £380k per annum from its Corporate
Repair & Maintenance Budget to help bridge the affordability gap for lifecycle maintenance for both PFI
and D&B schools.

Given the level of capital investment, it is estimated that, excluding the two proposed academies, some
£2.78m will need to be invested on an annual basis to ensure that BSF schools are maintained to a
standard equivalent to that of PFI schools. Where schools are rebuilt under PFI, then this gap will form part
of the unitary charge relating to those schools.

Facilities Management
At present, schools make their own arrangements for the delivery of soft FM, mainly by employing their
own staff. School budgets are being interrogated to determine the aggregated annual spend on facilities
management through a detailed analysis of 2005/06 and 2006/07 school budgets. However, at this time
and based on current estimates, it is assumed that estimated FM costs will be covered in full by funds
currently already committed by schools based on an indicative all-inclusive soft FM figure of £46.10 per m2
as indicated by our technical advisers.

5.38 Affordabilty (LEP and LA internal costs)

LEP affordability
LEP costs are expected to include the following:
   1 Initial se-up costs
   2 Development costs
   3 Running costs
   4 Demand led marginal costs

Depending on the scope of the LEP, it has been estimated that the annual cost of the LEP, excluding PFI
SPVs, would equate to £230k per year. This cost will be included within the PFI unitary charge.

LA internal costs
In respect of Council internal costs, it is assumed that the current Project Team or its equivalent will remain
in post supported by a reduced requirement for external consultants (in ICT, design, technical, financial
and legal) although it is recognised that there is an additional requirement for a director on the LEP Board.



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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case

During the design and construction period of BSF, it has been estimated that internal costs of £550k
supported by external costs of £250k per year (£800k in total) will be required and that this will reduce once
all projects become operational (i.e. after August 2013). At this stage it is assumed that internal costs will
be reduced by half to £400k per annum.

5.39 Affordabilty (overall)
All information is a best estimate at this stage and concludes the following:-
          Capital funding received through the FAM for Waves 3 (an estimated for Wave 6) will fully cover
            estimated constructions costs. No affordability issue is envisaged.
          ICT capital funding received through supported borrowing will fully cover infrastructure and
            hardware costs
          Schools delegated budgets will fully cover estimated ICT Managed Service costs
          Schools delegated budgets will fully cover estimated facilities management (soft FM) costs,
            based on an all-inclusive figure of £46.10 per m2.
          Schools delegated budgets plus AMP relevant devolved formula capital will part cover estimated
            lifecycle costs, leaving a gap of £380k to be funded by the Council out of the Corporate Repair
            and Maintenance Budget. In addition, the Council will also make a contribution to the PFI unitary
            charges.
          Council will have to find an additional £800k per year from 2008/09 onwards to cover estimated
            internal costs of supporting the LEP
          Council will have to find an additional £230k per year to cover the running costs of the LEP (this
            will, however, be included within the PFI unitary charges).

This translates into an overall estimated affordability gap of £1.440m per year from 2014/15 made up of
lifecycle maintenance for D&B schools (£380k), LA internal costs (initially £800k but reducing to £400k
from 2014/15) and PFI unitary charges of £660k (includes LEP running costs of £230k).

This can be transcribed into a table format to give a more accurate indication of annual costs over a 10
year period. However, it is worth bearing in mind that LEP set-up costs will be recovered at financial close
and rolled into the LEP‟s overall working capital requirement, of which Luton will fund 10%. Project
development costs are incurred in the year prior to each phase reaching commercial close (with PFI, these
are recovered through the unitary charge - with design and build, these will be recovered in the D&B
contract price).

PFI credits support LEP set-up and bid costs, lifecycle costs and the financing of cash and tax flows in
additional to the initial capital value of the project.

The following table summaries BSF related expenditure (£,000) falling to the Council following the
establishment of the LEP:

             LEP                                                                               Lifecycle
                   LEP (project)         LEP             PFI Unitary                  LBC
             set-                                PFI                                           gap (D&B
 Year                                   working                                     internal                Total
                                                Equity Charge (inc. LEP
                   development
              up      costs                                                                     projects
                                        capital         running costs)               costs       only)
            costs
2008/09      500 1,000 (Wave 3)          70-230          -               -            400         -        470-630
2009/10        -  1,000 (Wave 3)            -            -               -            800         -          800
2010/11        -   750 (Wave 6)             -           20        200 (part-year)     800        380        1,400
2011/12        -   750 (Wave 6)             -            -            343             800        380        1,523
2012/13        -         -                  -            -            343             800        380        1,523
2013/14        -         -                  -           40        528 (part-year)     400        380        1,348
2014/15        -         -                  -            -            660             400        380        1,440
2015/16        -         -                  -            -            660             400        380        1,440
2016/17        -         -                  -            -            660             400        380        1,440
2017/18        -         -                  -            -            660             400        380        1,440
 10 yr       500      3,500              70-230         60           4,054           5,600      3,040      12,824 –
 cost                                                                                                       12,984


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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case

The table on the previous page suggests that the affordability gap rises to a maximum of £1.523m in
2011/12-2012/13 before stabilising at £1.440m in 2014/15 and remains at this level each year thereafter
(whilst the LEP remains in place). The Council‟s commitment to this estimated cost of BSF will be
concluded at the approval of the Outline Business Case. DfES funding for Wave 6 will need to be available
no later than 2010/11 to ensure that the two waves are delivered sequentially.

5.40 Alternative funding sources
Other funding opportunities that are currently being explored include the use of capital receipts from the
sale of non-education sites to facilitate the co-location of services to the local community, a formulaic
approach to Section 106 agreements arising from brownfield redevelopment, school budget contributions,
external grants and opportunities for Active Luton to bid for grants on the basis of match funding against
BSF investment. Much of this activity is linked to our vision for extended services referred to in Paragraph
5.17.

5.41 Location of co-located non-school facilities and funding implications
Please refer to Paragraph 5.17

5.42 Presentation of Data
A copy of the latest FAM summary is included in Appendix C.




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case
DELIVERY OF BSF

6.1 Procurement strategy
The Authority will implement an EU procurement to select a Private Sector Partner (PSP) and establish the
Local Education Partnership (LEP), reach „Financial Close‟ on the first phase of projects and agree the
strategic partnering framework in which future phases will be developed.

The programme is initially focused solely on secondary schools, although it is expected that the LEP's
remit will expand to incorporate other educational institutions, plus the possibility of other major projects
and services.

Since there are only limited and local partnering arrangements in place with Luton Borough Council, this
will enable a fast track formation of a LEP. Therefore a purpose-procured LEP is deemed to be the most
suitable option to deliver the BSF programme. The LEP procurement model and use of standardised
documentation is recognised by Luton as its delivery route for this project.

It is anticipated that the LEP will also be required to deliver the Key Performance Indicators as stipulated in
the areas of: Partnering Services (FM, Lifecycle and ICT); Quality; Timeliness; Cost; Customer
Satisfaction; Safety and Community Use of Schools.

Completion of negotiations will be achieved smoothly through the use of standardised documentation.

The two sample schemes include one 100% new build under PFI arrangements and one D&B school. The
two proposed academies based on Halyard and South Luton High Schools will be procured through the
LEP on the basis of D&B contracts with the two Academy Trusts. Designs will be developed to RIBA Stage
D and then novated across to the preferred bidder to finalise to RIBA Stage E/F and then construct.

The plan currently under consideration for the LEP is to procure a consortium partner which will include an
ICT managed service supplier either as equity shareholder or sub-contractor. The scope of the service is
anticipated to be as described in this SBC.

The approach to ICT will follow PfS guidance and use „standard‟ BSF documentation. The ICT contract will
be output based (currently being developed).

A Competitive Dialogue procurement procedure is assumed. In order to allow for flexibility and the
possibility of extended scope, (in particular a range of service levels commensurate with levels of school
revenue contribution and an option to offer services to non-BSF schools, including the two academies) we
expect to entertain a small number of variant bids.

We have begun informal, soft market testing and will extend this process. Luton‟s BSF project stimulated
much interest at the recent Preview Bidders‟ Day in London and several companies indicated that Luton
was likely to be a target for bids. We have also met with a number of potential bidders this Autumn. In
addition, we plan to run separate bidders‟ days for ICT and DBO/DBFO with the intention of attracting a
number of different offerings (e.g. thin and thick client solutions), and will use the opportunity to involve and
inform schools.

We plan a undertake a procurement process that fully involves stakeholders in engaging with suppliers and
contributing to the evaluation of bids

We have retained all of our external advisers to provide assistance with the procurement process.




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case

6.2 Managing the process
The Project Initiation Document (PID) has been developed by the Authority in conjunction with our advisers
and the desired project programme from OBC to Phase 1 school openings can be summarised as follows:

Stage/Phase                                                                           Completion by Date
Submission of OBC                                                                     25th June 2007
Publication of OJEU/PQQ                                                               24th September 2007
Evaluate completed PQQs and select long-list                                          3rd December 2007
Issue invitation to participate in dialogue (ITPD) to shortlist                       5th December 2007
Evaluate ITPD and interview long-list                                                 16th January 2008
Select initial shortlist and issue invitation to competitive dialogue (ITCD Part 1)   30th January 2008
                                                                                          th
Initial bid dialogue period                                                           27 August 2008
                                                                                          th
Invitation to continue dialogue (ITCD Part 2)                                         14 October 2008
Finalise ITSFB and seek PfS/Board approval of recommended final shortlist             14th October 2008
                                                                                          th
Invitation to submit final tender (ITSFT Part 1)                                      14 October 2008
                                                                                          st
Invitation to submit final tender (ITSFT Part 2)                                      21 November 2008
Final evaluation report to Board                                                      15th January 2009
Appoint preferred partner                                                             26th January 2009
Undertake Gateway 3 Review                                                            12th February 2009
Submit FBC to DfES/PfS for sign off                                                   20th February 2009
                                                                                          th
Gain approval of FBC                                                                  28 April 2009
                                                                                          th
Promissory Note/Formal Approval                                                       29 April 2009
                                                                                       th
SWAP                                                                                  8 May 2009
Completion of new build academies/new build PFI                                       No earlier than September 2010
Completion of refurbished school                                                      No earlier than April 2011

Note: the current programme as attached in Appendix G is a working document and all parties are
currently working to correlate and achieve programme dates as set out

6.3 Budget and resource approvals
A budget of £2.95 million has been allocated to allow the Council to reach financial close with a preferred
bidder, with a further £100k available from PfS. Please refer to Appendix E.

6.4 Client team
Following approval of our Education Vision, we have added to our internal client team and appointed
external advisers from the PfS framework in technical, financial and legal areas. These are managed by
relevant full-time members of the Project Team. In addition, we intend to strengthen the Team as we move
from business case development to procurement, including the need to establish a separate Academies
Team. We have also extended the appointment of our ICT consultants through to Financial Close and
appointed an interim Project Director to steer the project through the development and delivery of the
business cases.

6.5 Risk management
The Project Team will develop and maintain a risk register and action plan as a dynamic and proactive way
of managing the risk to the project‟s timely and effective success. The Project Director will present the
priority risks at the monthly Project Board Meetings. Details of the current key risks are attached as
Appendix N.

The risk register is currently part of the draft PID and has been recently updated to conform to the
corporate template to identify key risks up to financial close. The register enables the Wider Team to
maintain focus on critical risks i.e. uncertainties that need to be managed in order to achieve a successful
outcome for the programme. The risk register will be dynamic i.e. it will change over time as risks are
mitigated or new risks are identified.




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case

6.6 External advisor strategy
        Design Advisers - Gotch, Saunders and Surridge (GSS) have been appointed up to OBC. Their
          continued involvement thereafter will be subject to review.
        Technical Advisers - Mott Macdonald have been appointed up to Financial Close.
        Educational Advisers - Capita have been appointed up to OBC. This arrangement will be
          subject to review.
        ICT Advisers - SOCitm have been appointed up to Financial Close.
        Financial Advisers - Ernst and Young have been appointed up to Financial Close.
        Legal Advisers - Addleshaw Goddard have been appointed up to Financial Close.

6.7 Project governance

Project organisation structure
The management and organisation structure for the Luton BSF Programme is represented in the diagram
on the following page:




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case

                                    BSF Project Governance/Delivery in Luton


                                                         Council



                                                       Executive



                                                      Commission



                                                     Project Board



                                               Project Owner and Project
                                                        Sponsor



                                                     Project Director




                                                  Programme Manager


          Internal Groups                                                                  External Groups

 BSF Strategy Group                                                               Campus Luton Partnership
 BSF Wider Team                                                                   (previously the 11-19 ASG)
 Academies Group                                                                  Luton Secondary Headteachers‟
 (Such groups may include                                                         Group (LSHG)
 external representatives)                                                        BSF School Representatives Group
                                                                                  BSF Consortium Representatives
                                                                                  Curriculum Network Group
                                                                                  BSF Governors Forum
                                                                                  Extended Schools‟ Strategy
                                                                                  Steering Group
                                                                                  Extended Schools‟ Cluster Families
                                                                                  (nine in total)
                                                                                  Academies‟ Project Steering Group
                                                                                  (PSG) and Transition Sub-Groups
                                                                                  (two in total)

                                                     Project Team


                                               External Consultants
                                          (Education, Design, ICT, Technical,
                                                 Financial and Legal)




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case

Project Owner
Kevin Crompton, Chief Executive of Luton Borough Council and Chair of the Project Board is the Project
Owner.

Project Sponsor
Tony Dessent, Corporate Director (Children and Learning) is the Project Sponsor. He Chairs the BSF
Strategic Group and ensures that the project is focussed on delivering the transformational agenda. He
supports the Project Owner in promoting the project with members, stakeholders and other external
bodies.

Project Director
Kevin Duffy has been appointed as Interim Project Director to oversee the development of the SBC and
OBC. He provides the interface between the Project Board and the supply side of the Project Team.
The headline responsibilities of the Project Director are as follows:
    To direct the activities of the BSF project team
    To ensure that key deadlines are met
    To ensure that all cross cutting corporate opportunities are considered in the final portfolio, and
    To ensure that the Project Board and the Council are kept informed of and advised on all risks
       attached to the project.

Following the submission of the OBC, we intend to appoint a Project Director with responsibility for
overseeing the procurement of a PSP.

Programme Manager
Roger Lucas has been appointed as Programme Manager and is responsible for the following:
    The day to day management and operation of the Project Team
    Ensuring that all protocols are properly carried out and monitored
    Delivery of the instructions of both the Project Board and Project Director
    Interfacing with schools to help secure buy-in and commitment to the Change Plan.

Project Manager (Design and Technical)
David Cham has been appointed as Project Manager (Design and Technical) and is responsible for the
following:
      For interfacing with design and technical advisers on all design and option appraisals for relevant
        establishments, including the two proposed academies
      Supporting and running stakeholder/user group school and consortium workshops linked to the
        above
      Executing the main bidder-facing role as appropriate at each stage.

Project Adviser (Education Transformation and ICT)
David Crick has been seconded from School Improvement to the post of Project Adviser (Education
Transformation and ICT) and will support the project team through the procurement stage, ensuring that
education transformation and innovation in ICT remain at the forefront of our dialogue with and evaluation
of potential bidders.

Project Manager (Commercial)
To be appointed as soon as possible.

BSF Commission
The Commission was established to ensure cross-party and key stakeholder involvement in the
development and progress of the programme. The members of the Commission are as follows:




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case

 Name                                            Role/Organisation
 Cllr Tahir Khan                                 Children‟s Services Portfolio Holder and Labour Member, LBC
 Cllr Mahmood Hussain                            Labour Group Member, LBC
 Cllr Hazel Simmons                              Leader of the Council and Labour Group Member, LBC
 Cllr David Franks                               Lib/Dem Group Leader & Member, LBC
 Cllr Lawrence Patterson                         Lib/Dem Member, LBC
 Jo Baty                                         Luton and Beds Learning & Skills Council
 Kathy Chapman                                   PfS Director
 Andrew Elvin                                    Chief Executive - Connexions
 Tahamina Khan                                   DfES Adviser
 Graham Ryan                                     Luton Education Employees Panel Representative
 Alan Wilkinson                                  4Ps Associate

BSF Project Board
The Project Board was established as a corporate group to set the objectives of the project and to carry
out the following functions (in collaboration with the Commission/Executive/Council as appropriate):
      Oversee the development of the Strategic and Outline Business Cases
      Select the short-list
      Approve all contractual documentation
      Select the Preferred Bidder, and
      Approve the Final Business Case.

The Project Board will also be responsible for managing critical risks. Members of the Project Board are as
follows:

 Name                                            Role/Organisation
 Pete Birkett                                    Principal - Barnfield College (Academies Sponsor‟s representative)
 Kathy Chapman                                   PfS Director
 Kevin Crompton                                  Chief Executive & Project Owner
 Christopher Dean                                Link5 Consortium Headteacher Representative
 Tony Dessent                                    Corporate Director (Children & Learning) & Project Sponsor
 Kevin Duffy                                     Interim Project Director
 Vic Galyer                                      A1 Consortium Headteacher Representative
 Dave Kempson                                    Corporate Finance Officer
 Tahamina Khan                                   DfES Adviser
 Roger Lucas                                     Programme Manager
 Tony Smith                                      SSPA Consortium Headteacher Representative
 Alan Wilkinson                                  4Ps Associate

BSF Strategy Group
This is essentially an internal Children & Learning Department Group that seeks to ensure that the BSF
focus remains on transforming secondary education and supporting the delivery of the ECM outcomes.
Meetings are chaired by the Corporate Director (Children & Learning). Membership is as follows:

 Name                                                 Role/Organisation
 Alison Batten                                        14-19 Director
 Margaret Birtles                                     Corporate Adviser (Technical)
 David Carter                                         Education Consultant
 David Cham                                           Project Manager
 William Clapp                                        Head of Resources and Performance Review
 David Crick                                          Project Adviser (Education Transformation and ICT)
 Tony Dessent                                         Corporate Director (Children & Learning) and Chair
 Kevin Duffy                                          Interim Project Director
 Anne Futcher                                         Head of Access
 Geoff Headley                                        Head of School Improvement
 John Hulme                                           Major Projects and Airport Business Manager – Corporate Finance
 Peter Jones                                          Head of Leisure and Community
 Roger Lucas                                          Programme Manager
 Anita Nancollas                                      Administrative Assistant (Communications)
 Adrian Piper                                         Acting Head of Capital and Asset Management

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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case


Wider Project Team
The Wider Project Team includes education, technical, financial and legal officers, school based „consortia‟
representatives, support staff and external advisers (4Ps and DfES). It meets on a weekly basis and
supports the Programme Manager in the development and delivery of business cases and the procurement
of a private sector partner through a variety of linked workstreams (e.g. education vision, education
property strategy, extended schools/services strategy, individual school visions, financial planning, legal
planning, human resource implications, communications, operations & services, academies and change
management etc.). External support is provided by education, ICT, technical, financial and legal
consultants to complement the skills and experience of the in-house staff. The members of the Wider
Project Team are as follows:

 Name                                                 Role/Organisation
 Alison Batten                                        14-19 Director
 Margaret Birtles                                     Corporate Adviser (Technical)
 David Carter                                         Education Consultant
 David Cham                                           Project Manager
 Tracy Cowan                                          Extended Schools Strategy Manager
 David Crick                                          Project Adviser (Education Transformation and ICT)
 Kevin Duffy                                          Interim Project Director
 Chris Goldson                                        SEN/Access Adviser
 John Greevy                                          SSPA Consortia Representative
 John Hulme                                           Major Projects and Airport Business Manager – Corporate Finance
 Roger Lucas                                          Programme Manager
 Vivienne Mercer                                      Borough Solicitor
 Anita Nancollas                                      Administrative Assistant (Communications)
 John Salusbury                                       Link5 Consortia Representative
 Lorraine Small                                       A1 Consortia Representative
 Alan Wilkinson                                       4Ps Associate

6.8 Approvals and delegated authority
The following table, taken from the PID, indicates the relationship between the Council, Executive,
Commission and Project Board in terms of decisions and delegated authority.

 Decision                                    Board                Commission      Executive         Council
 Submission of Education Vision                                                                  note
 Submission of Strategic Business                                                                note
 Case
 Submission of Outline Business                                                                  note
 Case
 Agreement on Procurement Vehicle                                                                note
 Selection of longlist                                                          note              note
 Selection of initial and final shortlists                                      note              note
 Selection of preferred bidder                                                                   
 Contractual and Financial Close                                                                 




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case
CONSULTATION

7.1 Background
Luton has used the outcome of a relatively poor 14-19 Area Wide Inspection in Spring 2004 as the impetus
to develop an 11-19 strategy with all local 11-16, 11-19 and 16-19 providers and key stakeholders through
the formation of the 11-19 Achievement Strategy Group (ASG). The strategy is based on a collaborative
approach to curriculum delivery to maximise choice and diversity and to provide curriculum pathways that
lead to a variety of options including higher education, training or employment. This strategy has been
further refined by the introduction of three soft areas to delineate consortium arrangements and service
delivery. This Borough-wide approach to collaboration is at the heart of „Campus Luton‟ and has become
synonymous with our BSF programme. The recent 14-19 Area Wide re-inspection complimented the
Authority on the significant progress that has been made since the original inspection.

The 11-19 Achievement Strategy Group has been retained as our key stakeholder group to oversee and
drive forward our education vision, which was approved by Ministers in March 2006. Recently this has been
renamed as the Campus Luton Partnership. The next steps are to implement a change management plan
and communications strategy in order to translate this vision into reality.

The success of the BSF programme will depend upon how well our partners are involved with and informed
of our plans to transform education. We want to make sure that they understand and enthusiastically own
the part they have to play in it. The transformation of education is expected to involve significant changes
in the way in which education is delivered in the future and this will impact on the roles, relationships and
culture of schools, the Council and other partners. We do not underestimate the relevance, importance and
impact of good communications and change management strategies in delivering the BSF Vision. The
strategy below shows how we expect to work with our partners to deliver effective and timely
communications and how we will lead a successful change management programme.

7.2 Managing change
The process of managing change needs the leaders in the Authority and in each Department and School
to:

    1  Establish a clear vision for the change management process across the Authority and within each
       school. Paint a picture of where the organization will end up and the anticipated outcomes. Make
       certain the picture is one of reality and not what people “wish” would occur;
    2 Appoint executive champions who “own” the change management process and make certain
       other senior managers, as well as other appropriate people in the organization, are involved;
    3 Pay attention to the changes occurring. Ask how things are going. Focus on progress and
       barriers for change management. One of the worst possible scenarios is to have the leaders ignore
       the process;
    4 Sponsor portions of the change or the change management process, as an involved participant,
       to increase active involvement and interaction with other organization members;
    5 If personal or managerial actions or behaviours require change for the changes to take hold in
       the organization, “model” the new behaviours and actions. (Walk the talk.);
    6 Establish a structure which will support the change. This may take the form of a Steering
       Committee, Leadership Group or Guiding Coalition;
    7 Change the measurement, reward, and recognition systems to measure and reward the
       accomplishment of new expectations;
    8 Solicit and act upon feedback from other members of the organization, particularly students,
       parents and other community members;
    9 Recognize the human element in the change. People have different needs and different ways of
       reacting to change. They need time to deal with and adjust to change;
    10 Senior leaders must participate in the training that other organization members attend, but, even
       more importantly, they must exhibit their “learning” from the sessions, readings, interactions, tapes,
       books or research;
    11 Be honest and worthy of trust. Treat people with the same respect you expect from them.

Senior Officers within the Authority have been charged with leadership of the Change Plan. The Plan
incorporates many initiatives developed in partnership with schools. Each school has a BSF representative
part of whose role is to act as a conduit and driver for change. BSF has funded the half-time or equivalent
                                                             54
Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case
of 3 Deputy Headteachers to serve as consortium link representatives as champions for change in their
areas. The intention is to provide a strong base for bringing about change in line with the Change Plan of
the Authority and schools. One current BSF benefit has been the agreement between Ramyses and the
Authority, as part of the Learning Gateway contract, to appoint a consultant to support change in schools.
The Authority is developing the use of consultants to increase capacity and lead on specific aspects of
work.

The elements which need to be developed are:

       Setting the overall vision and process into context
       Engagement by individual schools and staff
       Training for staff and students to use the new learning, teaching processes and technology to
        support these
       Curriculum, particularly 14-19 collaboration
       ICT for curriculum and management
       Inclusion SEN and behaviour
       Finance within the collaboratives
       Staffing within the collaboratives
       Admissions
       Governance and management of schools
       Community and Extended Schools
       The integration of Children‟s Services
       Management of the design, building and commissioning stages of the project in each school

It is probable that some of the aspects are already covered in sufficient detail in existing plans. In this case
a suitably annotated version of that plan, which meets the BSF timescale, will be integrated into the
programme.


The following tables indicate what is required to elicit change and how it will be delivered.




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case


7.3 Change management plan – issues and desired outcomes

Issue               Elements      (not       Desired Outcome                        DMT         Start      Milestones                                Review
                    exhaustive)                                                     Lead                                                             (with date)
Engagement           Steering                  All      schools    fully           GH      June 2007        Paper to Heads and Project Board
by individual          group in each             informed and engaged             DCt /DCr                     (July 2007)
schools and            school        to          in Campus Luton and              (DH,AB)                     Training for Consortium and school
staff and              implement                 BSF                                                           reps appointed (July 2007)
across schools         local change             Each school has a                                            School steering groups appointed
                       plan        and           change plan which                                             (Sept 2007)
                       training                  identifies      progress                                     Schools draw up plans which are
                     Support and                towards the school‟s                                          included in school improvement
                       training     for          and Campus Luton                                              review (December 2007)
                       steering group            Vision
                       through area             Support through SIP,
                       and      school           SIA and consultants is
                       reps                      linked to change plan
                     Individual                 through termly school
                       school change             review meeting
                       plans
                       developed
Curriculum,             KS3                    Greater      curriculum            GH        Campus       Schools and colleges identify possible
particularly 14-        KS4            –        choice                            DH,AB     Luton Plan    Diploma Course offers (June 2006)
19                       Diploma                Improved facilities                            (CLP)      Authority  submits      for    Gateway
                         routes                 Improved                                    March 2006    development (June 2006)
                        Post 16                 teaching/learning/coac                      Section 3,    Common      spaces     in    timetables
                        Effect        of        hing                                         6, 15, 16,   (September 2006)
                         individual             Improved monitoring                           17 & 18
                         school                 Improved inclusion
                         specialisms            Better provision for
                        Use           of        excluded pupils
                         collaborative          Individual pathways for
                        Common        or        young people
                         synchronised
                         timetables


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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case


Issue               Elements      (not Desired Outcome                             DMT        Plan    Milestones                                   Review
                    exhaustive)                                                    Lead   established                                            (with date)
Training     for     Independent       Programme         which                    GH      Campus     Introduce the new teacher standards
staff       and        learning           meets requirements of                   DH,AB    Luton Plan    and PM guidance. (Sept 2006)
students to use      Flexible            teaching and learning                              (CLP)     Work with LCN subject groups to
the        new         learning           vision   of   Campus                            March 2006     evolve models for learning in subject
learning,            Tutorial            Luton                                             Section 6    areas that will make best use of the
teaching               support          Staff confident to meet                                         resources and facilities provided by
processes and        Use of ICT in       new challenges                                                 BSF (from Sept 2006)
technology to          all subjects                                                                    Develop further the coaching
support these                                                                                            frameworks and programmes that
                                                                                                         are developing in schools and
                                                                                                         colleges (from Sept 2006)
                                                                                                       Develop      a    Luton-wide    action
                                                                                                         research programme for teachers
                                                                                                         (from April 2007)
                                                                                                       Develop a Luton-wide approach to
                                                                                                         promoting literacy, oracy and
                                                                                                         thinking skills. (Audit prepared Dec
                                                                                                         2006, used May 2007)
                                                                                                       Train at least two staff in all
                                                                                                         institutions as “Building Learning
                                                                                                         Power” trainers. (Training complete
                                                                                                         May 2007)
                                                                                                       Establish a Luton framework on
                                                                                                         “tutoring    for   learning”    (work
                                                                                                         commenced Dec 2006, Trial from
                                                                                                         Sept 2007)




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case


Issue               Elements             (not Desired Outcome                     DMT       Plan     Milestones                               Review
                    exhaustive)                                                   Lead   established                                          (with date)

ICT         for         The impact of a            A coherent managed           GH                    Establish senior group to prepare
curriculum and           managed service             service, which includes      DCr                    output specification (Sept 2006)
management               across         LA           all aspects of ICT use                             Trial Learning Platform (from
                         (including impact           on school sites. And                                September 2007)
                         on         Central          across the “ campus “                              Individual     schools     prepare
                         Council IM and             A system capable of                                 change plans (September 2007
                         knowledge                   expansion to include                                onwards)
                         management and              primary         schools,                           Academy proposals proved to
                         CLC)                        community and other                                 provide full interoperability with
                        Links         with          providers working on                                BSF             system      before
                         primary provision           school sites                                        implementation
                         for ICT as BSF             ICT accepted as the                                All schools able to operate
                         embraces                    fifth utility                                       seamlessly once systems in
                         primary phase              A       system    which                             place
                        Connectivity                provides             full
                         provision                   interoperability for all
                         (Broadband and              High schools in Luton
                         who provides it)            including     Academies
                        ICT links to other          across
                         community sites             curriculum/learning and
                         and to provide              management
                         support        for          information systems
                         extended school
                         functions
                         involving a range
                         of statutory and
                         voluntary
                         services




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case


Issue          Elements      (not            Desired Outcome                      DMT       Plan     Milestones                                 Review
               exhaustive)                                                        Lead   established                                            (with date)
Inclusion, SEN  Provision on                   Pupils with all stages of         AF    Access BSF  Complete an audit of options and
and behaviour     individual                     SEN well catered for                      Change       pathways available to young people
                  school site                    and supported. Making                    Plan April    with     SEN/     LDD     to    inform
                Across sites                    appropriate progress                     2006-2010     collaborative action planning and
                Within                         Mainstream teachers                                    target setting (Nov 2006)
                  curriculum                     increasingly confident                               Facilitate     the    consistency     of
                  areas                          in working with young                                  behaviour and learning expectations
                Area PRU or                     people with SEN                                        for individual students across
                  similar                       Increased attendance                                   establishments (2008)
                  provision                      and     reduction      in                            Extend opportunities for students to
                                                 permanent exclusions                                   participate at Woodlands School in
                                                                                                        Layer 2 collaborative curricular
                                                                                                        opportunities (Apr 2007)
                                                                                                      Offer some post-16 courses on the
                                                                                                        premises of high schools through
                                                                                                        Campus Luton to young people with
                                                                                                        SEN/LDD (Sept 2008)
                                                                                                      Enhance local post-16 provision for
                                                                                                        students with the most severe needs
                                                                                                        (Apr 2006)
                                                                                                      Ensure all schools are fully
                                                                                                        compliant with the SEN and
                                                                                                        Disability Act 2001 and Disability
                                                                                                        Discrimination Act 2005 (Dec 2006)
                                                                                                      Enhance all existing Learning
                                                                                                        Support Units across the town to
                                                                                                        specialise in particular activities or
                                                                                                        behavioural approaches (Mar 2007)
                                                                                                      Explore the development of a model
                                                                                                        of Youth Service support for
                                                                                                        permanently excluded students and
                                                                                                        those at risk of exclusion (Dec 2006)




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case


Issue               Elements      (not Desired Outcome                            DMT       Plan     Milestones                                  Review
                    exhaustive)                                                   Lead   established                                             (with date)
Exclusions           Managed            Exclusions low. No                       AF    Access BSF
                       moves across       student        missing                           Change
                       collaborative      education and making                            Plan April
                     Agreed              less than adequate                              2006-2010
                       readmission        progress because of
                       following          the way in which the
                       exclusion          schools respond to
                     Joint      PRU      poor behaviour
                       with revolving  Enhanced curriculum
                       door               and student motivation
                     Students       in
                       KS4 will be
                       working in a
                       number        of
                       sites,     from
                       what are they
                       being
                       excluded?

Integration     of      Services               Services      accessible         TD      Change        Engage         with    multi-agency
Children‟s               integrated              through schools                           Plan          partnership to assess preparedness
Services                 within plans           Parents surveys show                     Summer         for change and identify next steps
                        Plans      take         high       levels     of                  2006          priorities (June 2006)
                         account       of        satisfaction                                           Appoint and commission staff to
                         extended                                                                        drive forward multi-agency priorities
                         schools                                                                         (From Sept 2006)
                         agenda
                        Support      for
                         children and
                         families
                         integral with
                         education
                         provision



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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case

Issue          Elements            (not             Desired Outcome                      DMT       Plan     Milestones                      Review
               exhaustive)                                                               Lead   established                                 (with date)
Finance within  How do schools                        Transparent financial            WC       Change     Amend schools accounting
the               manage        shared                  systems           which                     Plan       structures to demonstrate
collaboratives    costs                of               contribute    to   cost-                  Summer       costs of collaboration. (Apr
                  collaborative activity                effective delivery of                      2006        2007)
                What use of can be                     services
                  made of charge                       Students able to attend
                  centres, or charging                  courses      at    most
                  how do schools                        suitable venue without
                  charge for courses                    being      aware      of
                  delivered at other                    financial arrangements
                  schools within the                    which enable this
                  collaborative       or               School and College
                  possibly        more                  funding and budget
                  widely                                planning known
                Transport
Staffing within         Opportunities      for        Easier recruitment and           HB                    Engage with area consortia
the                      shared posts across            retention of staff                                      leads to assist in tailoring
collaboratives           schools.                      Improved                                                implementation       to     local
                        Joint appointments             accountability                                          circumstances (July 2007)
                         and/or transfers.             Improved           career                              Work through consequent HR
                        Staff appointed to             progression                                             and other issues (e.g. selling
                         the      collaborative        Targetted      specialist                               vision to staff, consultation on
                         working       between          support                                                 staffing structure changes,
                         schools.                      A common timetable                                      financial implications)
                        Appointment
                         processes,
                         contracts conditions
                         of    service     and
                         salaries
                        Training
                        Joint      curriculum
                         planning, common
                         timetabling



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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case


Issue               Elements           (not       Desired Outcome                  DMT       Plan     Milestones                          Review
                    exhaustive)                                                    Lead   established                                     (with date)
Admissions           Separate schools               Greater     clarity  of      WC       Change     Review catchment areas. (July
                       working     as      a          process                                 Plan       2007)
                       collaborative                 Simplifying admission                 Summer
                     Possible         joint          arrangements                           2006      Refine pupil forecasting to
                       process           for         Improving     level  of                            incorporate parental preference.
                       admission across               parental preference                                (July 2007)
                       a collaborative               Individual pathways for
                     Possible common                 young people
                       admissions                    Students owned by
                     A collaborative is              collaborative
                       one school with 4
                       sites
                     Impact              of
                       Academies        and
                       their    admission
                       policies
                     Agreement of who
                       is accountable for
                       young people
Administration          Opportunities for           Greater efficiency/cost      WC                     Explore implications for schools
                         the provision of             savings                                              of    different     forms     of
                         common services             Better         strategic                             Governance and Collaboration
                         (finance; payroll;           planning                                             (June 2007)
                         data;           site        Better         financial                            Develop change plan in light of
                         management;                  planning                                             progress     in    implementing
                         meals…)                     Improved                                             Governance and management
                        Opportunities for            communication                                        of schools change plan (July
                         shared     services         Improved ICT                                         2007)
                         (joined   up     for
                         economies of, for
                         instance,     stock
                         ordering)



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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case


Issue              Elements      (not        Desired Outcome                      DMT       Plan     Milestones                             Review
                   exhaustive)                                                    Lead   established                                        (with date)
Leadership      of  Roles          of          Schools well led and              GH                 Engagement           in   leadership
schools               Headteachers               confident in bringing            AFo                   development programmes (April
                      and      senior            about changes                                          2007)
                      staff         in          Existing       structures                            Review of themes emerging from
                      bringing about             (ASG) well used to                                     Performance Management process
                      change                     facilitate collaboration                               (May 2007)
                    Providing                   and joint activities                                 Coaching,      training,  shadowing
                      leadership for            Performance                                            programmes in place in each
                      collaborative              management used as                                     consortium (September 2007)
                      activity                   a         route         for                          Steering       Group     of     SIA,
                    Raising                     development                                            Headteachers and leaders to
                      standards in              Succession planning of                                 establish, commission and monitor
                      schools                    staffing with associated                               provision (Oct 2007)
                                                 training opportunities
                                                 (from      NCSL        and
                                                 others) used effectively
                                                Senior             leaders
                                                 appointed who are
                                                 capable of providing
                                                 inspirational          and
                                                 transformational
                                                 leadership




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case




Issue               Elements      (not Desired Outcome                            DMT       Plan     Milestones                             Review
                    exhaustive)                                                   Lead   established                                        (with date)
Governance           Individual         Efficient Governance                     GH                 Review options created by Bill (Sept
and                    school             across     and    within                                      2006)
management             governance         collaboratives    which                                     Discuss options with Heads and
of schools             within         a   gives good strategic                                          Governors (July 2007)
                       collaborative      planning and holds                                          Consortia and Individual Governing
                     The possible        schools             and                                       Bodies identify options (December
                       creation of a      collaboratives        to                                      2007)
                       collaborative      account
                       „Board‟    with  Consistency            of
                       specific remit     approach         across
                       for        joint   schools/collaboratives
                       activity
                     The possible
                       creation of an
                       over-arching
                       collaborative
                       committee
                       (which takes
                       precedence,
                       collaborative
                       committee or
                       individual
                       GB?)
                     Single
                       governing
                       body across
                       all schools (a
                       Hard
                       Federation)
                     How           do
                       Academies fit
                       into any of the
                       above


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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case




Issue        Elements           (not            Desired Outcome                     DMT         Plan     Milestones                            Review
             exhaustive)                                                            Lead     established                                       (with date)
Community     Statutory         and                A range of provision of         GH                   Workshops with statutory and
and Extended    voluntary                            statutory and voluntary       RL,DCh,                  voluntary organisations
Schools         services involved                    services available to all                            Individual reviews with statutory
              Provision to meet                     children and adults                                    and voluntary organisations
                the needs of the                     within a community on                                Preliminary position paper (July
                locality on the                      the most convenient                                    2006)
                best site                            site     and         easily                          Workshops for all schools (Dec
              Capital funding                       accessible         through                             2006)
                streams aligned,                     schools                                              Preliminary indication of desirable
                or            space                 Joint service provision                                locations for extended and
                identified for later                Strategic development                                  community services (May 2007)
                sympathetic build                    of sports facilitiies                                Site by site development of
              Management of                                                                                proposals    commencing       with
                community                                                                                   Wave 3 phase 1 (May 2007)
                provision         on
                school sites
              Links              to
                regeneration
                initiatives
              Links to Health /
                PCT to explore
                joined up funding
              Discussions with
                Sport England,
                Football
                Foundation, Big
                Lottery          and
                others to ensure
                strategic
                development of
                sports facilities




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case


Issue                  Elements     (not Desired Outcome                          DMT     Plan          Milestones                      Review (with date)
                       exhaustive)                                                Lead    established
Management of           Involvement       Programme delivered                   WC                       First phase schools
the       design,         of senior staff   on time and to budget                 RL                        identified (July 2006)
building     and          and        site   and meets vision of                                            School             vision
commissioning             manager           Campus Luton                                                    workshops          (Sept
stages of the           Review plans  Change management                                                   2006)
project in each           with    design    programme enables                                              Preliminary       design
school       and          team as they      staff    to  influence                                          options         (October
across schools            are developed     designs for school of                                           2006)
                        Identify    and    the future                                                     Design development
                          address                                                                           (Jan 2007)
                          issues of site                                                                   Programme         meets
                          management                                                                        OBC programme
                          with    design
                          team




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case



APPENDIX A – LOCATION MAP OF MAINSTREAM SCHOOLS AND CONSORTIA AREAS




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case



APPENDIX B – HIGH LEVEL OPTION APPRAISALS

High Level Option Appraisal
SCHOOL #1: Ashcroft

Option A - Description
Option „A‟ proposes the demolition and rebuild
                                                                              Ashcroft Option A
of most of the school.

A new building block is proposed to be built on                          5%    0%
the existing tennis court and community pitches                    15%
area. A community car park well placed to
serve the school and community uses is                                                            New Build
                                                                                                  M ajor Refurb
proposed to be located adjacent to the new                                                        M inor Refurb
building.                                                                                         No Works



The existing school is then proposed to be                                            80%

demolished in stages, providing a transition
period. Two of the existing teaching blocks
would be retained and refurbished.

An additional new building block is proposed to be built for the provision of a second
teaching block and the creation of a main entrance to the school. The existing parking
areas are then proposed to be refurbished (resurfaced and lit).

The proposed new configuration of the school would also allow for the widening of the
playing field.

Option A – Conclusion
It is believed that there are areas that are (under this option) proposed to be demolish and
rebuilt that have the potential, with the appropriate refurbishment and remodelling works, to
be converted into spaces that can deliver a modern curriculum in accordance with the
Education Vision.

In addition to the above, whilst it is believed that disruption at the school would be
significant, it will be possible to provide a continued delivery of education. However, this
would require significant amounts of mobile accommodation and a very carefully phased
programme.

It is considered that the heavy capital cost associated with the proposed high-scale
redevelopment when compared to the other two options would not be value for money.

The complete replacement of elements of the school estates that have a good potential of
being utilised as elements of a future school development would not be in the interest of the
school stakeholders or Luton‟s Building Schools for the Future programme in its totality.

Option B – Description
This option mainly focuses on reorganising key departments, improving access routes to
and within the school.

It is proposed that the front access is reconfigured by demolishing the Technology block and
remodelling the car park and green landscaped areas.




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case




A new Technology block then proposed to be                                  Ashcroft Option B
built along the eastern boundary - closer to the
other technical spaces.
                                                                      10%

In addition to the above, it is proposed to build                                       28%
a new Assembly Theatre, Reception and
                                                                                                New Build
Administration block at the front of the school                                                 Major Refurb
to allow for additional educational space and                                                   Minor Refurb
an improved frontage visual presentation.                      40%                              No Works


This option proposes the demolition of the                          22%

Female Changing areas to in order to allow
movement within the school blocks. The
female change area is proposed to be rebuilt
next to the male, together with a way through created below the teaching areas and hall /
gym store spaces.

Additionally, Option „B‟ proposes the extension of the dining space by extending into the
existing hall.

Finally, a new Vocational Studies block is proposed to be built near the existing canteen
area.

Option B – Conclusion
In contrast with option A, it is considered that this option would optimise the use of elements
of the existing estate in order to provide a modern and fit for purpose development without
compromising the requirements of the education vision.

It is considered that this option will be less disruptive than the extensive new build option
(Option A). It is considered that existing facilities could be utilised while works are being
undertaken on the new build and refurbishment, supplemented by some additional
temporary accommodation in conjunction with a phased programme.

The above benefits of this option coupled with the favourable capital cost, suggests that this
option should be progressed as the preferred                     Ashcroft Option C
option for Ashcroft.
                                                                             0%
Option C – Description                                                10%    0%
Option C proposes the upgrade of older school
buildings to a serviceable state. Minimal or no
                                                                                                New Build
work is proposed for the newer buildings and                                                    Major Refurb
sports hall.                                                                                    Minor Refurb
                                                                                                No Works
It is proposed that all remaining crittall windows
in the old buildings (comprising about 75% of
                                                                                  90%
all), are replaced along with roof coverings and
rainwater goods on these buildings.

It is proposed that approximately 80% of old buildings are redecorated, including replacing
floor coverings and some ceiling tiles.




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case



Additionally, it is proposed that all mechanical services are modernised with a new boiler
system, control system, and new heating installations throughout. Furthermore, it is
proposed that all main electrical switchgear is replaced, and the fire alarm system upgraded.

Finally, it is proposed that roof and wall cladding to the sports centre are repaired, or
replaced as deemed necessary.

Option C – Conclusion
It is considered that this option would be less disruptive compared with the other two
options. With a phased program, it is believed that the disruption to the education delivery
would be minimal.

However, it is believed that the programme of minor refurbishment through the biggest part
of the school along with limited refurbishments to the building services would not address
the major issues that the school faces. More importantly, the development would not be fully
compliant with the requirements of the education vision for the continued delivery of the
curriculum.

Whilst the capital cost of this option would be significantly lower compared with earlier
options, this benefit does not outweigh the detriment of „hampered‟ education delivery.

                          Ashcroft Option Appraisal Summary


        Option C




        Option B




        Option A




        Existing


                   Very Poor      Poor            Good        Very Good       Excelent
                                                      Acceptability
                                                      Threshhold
                                           Criterion Pefrom ance

                                         Vision    Conditions   Suitability   Deliverability   VFM




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case



SCHOOL #2: Cardinal Newman

Option A – Description
Option A proposes the demolition and the                                  Cardinal New man Option A
rebuild of the biggest part of the school.

It is proposed that the existing Sixth Form and                           5%
                                                                    10%
Science buildings are retained, with light
                                                                0%
refurbishment.
                                                                                                      New Build
                                                                                                      Major Refurb
A new building is to be situated in front of the                                                      Minor Refurb
existing 3-storey building. This block would                                                          No Works
provide an opportunity for a more attractive
impression upon entering the school grounds.
                                                                                     85%

An additional second building block is
proposed to be constructed after the
demolition of the science/art/technology blocks.

Finally a third new building block can be constructed after the rest of the existing blocks are
demolished. This building would form a new reception and entrance to the school.

The access is proposed to be improved with a one-way road system, feeding into larger
parking areas with better accommodation of pedestrians.

Option A – Conclusion
Whilst this option presents an attractive opportunity to redevelop a great proportion of the
school estate, it is considered that even with a phased program, this option would render the
continuing and effective delivery of the vision for secondary education in Luton during the
construction period very difficult to achieve.

In addition to the above it is considered that the heavy capital cost and its associated benefit
weighed against the cost and benefit quotient offered by alternative Option B, indicates that
option would not present best value for money.

Option B – Description
The proposed works of this option aim to
                                                                          Cardinal New man Option B
create a more functional spaces and attractive
entrance that would improve movement in the
school with a central pupil space, and                                         0%
reorganise clashing facilities.
                                                                                            38%
The existing dilapidated 3-storey block is                    40%                                     New Build
                                                                                                      Major Refurb
proposed to be demolished in order to create
                                                                                                      Minor Refurb
a central supervised pupil space. It is also
                                                                                                      No Works
suggested that sports hall is demolished, to
allow for a new sports hall, two teaching
blocks and a sixth form building to be built on                                22%
the western side of the site.

The shift of teaching facilities would allow a dedicated dining room in the existing building.
With drama and music moved to the new blocks, vocational engineering and construction
facilities moved next to the dining area.




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case



Vehicular access and parking improvement are also suggested with a re-aligned one-way
road, complemented by a new staff/community car park on part of the existing playing field
area. New reception, staff and administration buildings to the school front would be
constructed to provide a clearer and more welcoming entrance.

Option B – Conclusion
The proposed programme of heavy and light refurbishment of existing facilities in
conjunction with new built where deemed to be essential is believed to address the all
issues that the school currently faces and at the same time, comply with all requirements of
the education vision.

It is considered that this option will be less disruptive than with the extensive new build (as
proposed in option A) as existing facilities could be utilised while works are being
undertaken on the new build and refurbishment, supplemented by some additional
temporary accommodation.

This option is considered to be the most beneficial and it is proposed to progress this as the
preferred option for Cardinal Newman.

Option C – Description
This option involves the minimum refurbishment                             Cardinal New man Option C
works to bring the school up to a serviceable
state.
                                                                              0%
                                                                         5%
Under this option, approximately 80% of the
windows that are metal crittall are proposed to                                                        New Build
be replaced. The flat roof covering and                                                                Major Refurb
rainwater goods that are in a leaky state also                                                         Minor Refurb
require replacement, as do the timber joists in                                                        No Works
the entrance canopy of the design and
technology blocks.
                                                                                  95%

Possible foundation movement beneath the Art
block would be investigated. General redecoration is proposed throughout including
replacing floor coverings.

Minimal works are anticipated on mechanical building services in the school as they are
believed to be in good condition.

Electrical switchgear and the LV panel are proposed to be replaced. Fire systems must be
checked against current standards and upgraded if necessary and a new zoned security
system would be installed.

Accessibility upgrades are another significant key works area to meet DDA standards.

Option C – Conclusion
Whilst refurbishment would improve much of the non-satisfactory accommodation to a state
that is acceptable for a school of the future, there are areas that need complete replacement
in order to achieve an improved estate wide environment and operational efficiency.

The refurbishment programme would provide good facilities in some areas within the school,
but only in selected areas.




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case



Whilst the extensive refurbishment may present a low capital cost option, it is not believed to
go „far enough‟ to achieving good facilities across the whole of the school estate.

                     Cardinal Newman Option Appraisal Summary


        Option C




        Option B




        Option A




        Existing


                   Very Poor      Poor            Good        Very Good         Excelent
                                                      Acceptability
                                                      Threshhold
                                           Criterion Pefrom ance

                                         Vision    Conditions   Suitability    Deliverability          VFM

SCHOOL #3: Challney Boys

Option A – Description
This option proposes the complete rebuild of the
                                                                              Challney Boys Option A
boys school. The key benefit of this option is
                                                                                  0%
that it would provide good separation between
                                                                                  0%
the boys and girls schools, and would also
provide new buildings.                                                            0%



After the girls school is constructed at the north                                                           New Build
                                                                                                             Major Refurb
of the site, the boys is proposed to temporarily
                                                                                                             Minor Refurb
move into the old girls school. This would allow
                                                                                                             No Works
the old boys school to be demolished, and a
new building built in its place to address the
current and future needs of the school.                                       100%



After the pupils move into the new school, the
remaining old school buildings can be demolished to make way for a new car park and all
weather pitch. This separate and well-defined car park would provide much clearer access
and movement in the site, reducing congestion.

Option A – Conclusion
This option would certainly provide a strong opportunity to rebuild the school in such a way
as to meet the current and future educational needs of the school. However disruption
during the redevelopment would be high. Use of the vacated girls school would reduce the
need for temporary accommodation, however the constant reorganising would interrupt
pupils often.



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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case



It is considered that the heavy capital cost associated with the proposed high-scale
redevelopment when compared to the other two options would not be value for money, as
replacement of elements of the school that have a good potential of being utilised is
considered unnecessary.

Option B – Description
The proposed works focus primarily on                                       Challney Boys Option B
reorganising the complex and addressing
access and movement arrangements at the
                                                                             0%
front of the school.
                                                                   23%

Demolition of the eastern 1970s teaching block                                                        New Build
to the east would allow access and parking to be                                                      Major Refurb
diverted to this side of the school. These                                                            Minor Refurb
alterations would allow for the separation of                   16%                          61%      No Works
vehicle and pedestrian on site movements.

A new teaching block and admin area is
proposed to be constructed in front of the
existing block in order to create a more clearly defined entrance. The construction of this
block would be achieved by the demolition of the front hall and kitchen. This would also
create a central open courtyard that is to be shared with the Girls school.

The existing sports hall, pool and gym are proposed to be demolished, and replaced with a
new sports hall, pool, kitchen and assembly/dining area.

A new vocational studies building is proposed in the north-east corner. New tennis courts
are proposed at the rear of the school buildings. The well-maintained core blocks are not
expected to require significant work.

Option B – Conclusion
The proposed program of refurbishment and rebuilding is expected to provide significant
improvements to the existing school, helping it better meet the educational vision. It does
not, however, address the major problem of not having enough space and not enough
separation from the girls school, which will restrict the magnitude of these improvements.

Disruption during construction is a factor, with some temporary accommodation necessary.
Overall the cost of this option falls in the middle of the other options, with some benefits
provided but not enough to produce significant value for money.

Option C – Description
The following option outlines the minimum                                  Challney Boys Option C
refurbishment works proposed to make the                                      0%
school serviceable.                                                           0%

                                                                              0%
Whilst the roofs in the older parts of the school
are in good condition, it is believed that newer
                                                                                                     New Build
building roofs would require replacement.                                                            Major Refurb
                                                                                                     Minor Refurb
It is expected that isolated areas of brick walls                                                    No Works
would require repairs such as wall repointing
and movement joint resealing. All crittall
                                                                          100%
windows are proposed to be replaced for
improved heat insulation and safety. Minor



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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case



internal redecoration is proposed.

The outdated oil-fired boilers and ancillary equipment are proposed to be replaced, with
modern and more efficient boilers along with a new control system that would allow separate
management of the schools. Additionally, it is proposed that cold water storage tanks are
replaced with smaller tanks to reduce the risk of legionella. The electrical systems are
generally in good working order and do not require significant update or alterations.

Option C – Conclusion
The minor refurbishment option would bring the worst areas of the school up to a „liveable‟
standard. This would improve some unsatisfactory areas and bring some facilities up to a
reasonable standard, but ignore the need for major refurbishment or replacement in many
areas. Disruption during the works would be minimal.

It is believed that this low-spend option does not do enough to make significant
improvements to the school.

Option D – Description
This option involves moving the girls school to                              Challney Boys Option D
the northern end of the site, with the boys school                              0%

then taking over the refurbished existing                                       0%

buildings. The key benefit of this option is that it                                 10%

provides good separation and independence
between the boys and girls schools.                                                                   New Build
Once the girls school is vacated, the 1970s                                                           Major Refurb
block to the west will be demolished to make                                                          Minor Refurb

way for a new all-weather pitch. The existing                                                         No Works

buildings will then undergo major refurbishment,
allowing the boys school to expand out into the                        90%
extra teaching space.
A new reception building will provide a clearer
and more inviting entrance to the school.

Option D – Conclusion
The major refurbishment of the existing blocks will provide strong opportunities to improve
the school‟s facilities, whilst reducing capital cost by taking advantage of existing structures.
The separation of the two schools is a key benefit not addressed by options B and C. Some
temporary accommodation would be required, however the extra space made available
would alleviate this problem somewhat.

It is considered that this option provides the best value for money, as it addresses all the key
improvements required for an effective future school, with lower capital costs than a
complete rebuild.




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case




                     Challney Boys Option Appraisal Summary


        Option D



        Option C



        Option B



        Option A



        Existing

                   Very Poor      Poor            Good        Very Good         Excelent
                                                      Acceptability
                                                      Threshhold
                                           Criterion Pef romance

                                         Vision    Conditions   Suitability    Deliverability       VFM



SCHOOL #4: Challney Girls

Option A – Description
This option proposes the complete rebuild of
                                                                          Challney Girls Option A
the boys and girls school. The key benefit of
                                                                              0%
this option would be the provision of good
                                                                              0%
separation between the boys and girls
schools, and the provision of two new school                                  0%

buildings.
                                                                                                     New Build

The new girl‟s school is proposed to be built                                                        Major Refurb
                                                                                                     Minor Refurb
at the north of the site. A new access would
                                                                                                     No Works
then be required to be formed from at the
eastern boundary, giving the boys and girls
schools greater independence by allowing for                 100%

separate access routes. The completely new
build option would provide an opportunity to
reshape schools to meet the current and future educational needs.

Option A – Conclusion
This option addresses all the key requirements for improvement of the school. Separation
from the boys school, and greater available space, is a key benefit. The new building allows
the requirements and goals of the educational vision to be well met.

Disruption would be minimal with no temporary accommodation required, as the new
building is on a vacant part of the site.

The capital costs of this option are higher, but are considered worthwhile given the extent of
improvements required and state of existing buildings.



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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case



Option B – Description
The proposed works would focus primarily on
reorganising the complex and restrictive access                             Challney Girls Option B
and movement arrangements at the front of the
school.
                                                                             0%
                                                                      20%
Demolition of the eastern 1970s teaching block
to the west would allow access and parking to                                                           New Build
be diverted to this side of the school. These                                                           Major Refurb
alterations would separate vehicles and                                                                 Minor Refurb
                                                                20%                          60%
pedestrians.                                                                                            No Works



A new teaching block and admin area is then
proposed to be constructed in front of the
existing block to create a more clearly defined
entrance. The construction of this block would be achieved by the demolition of the front hall
and kitchen.

The existing sports hall, pool and gym are also proposed to be demolished, and replaced
with a new sports hall, pool, kitchen and assembly/dining area. These facilities are proposed
to be shared with but separated from the Boys school and the community.

A new vocational studies building is also                                     Challney Girls Option C
proposed to be developed within the western                                       0%
edge of the block.                                                                0%

                                                                                  0%
Option B – Conclusion
Similar to Option B for the boys school, this                                                            New Build
option provides some significant improvements,                                                           Major Refurb
without addressing the key issues of space and                                                           Minor Refurb
separation between the schools. Disruption                                                               No Works
during the works is highest for this option.
                                                                             100%
Generally this option provides some good
benefits and is less expensive than options A and
D, but is considered to not do enough to provide value for money equal to that of some
other options.

Option C – Description
The following option outlines the minimum refurbishment works proposed to make the
school serviceable.

Whilst the roofs in the older parts of the school are in good condition, it is believed that
newer building roofs would require replacement.

It is expected that isolated areas of brick walls would require repairs such as wall repointing
and movement joint resealing.

All crittall windows are proposed to be replaced for improved heat insulation and safety.
Minor internal redecoration is proposed. The corridor damp problem would be investigated
and repaired. Minor internal redecoration is proposed.




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case



The outdated oil-fired boilers and ancillary equipment are proposed to be replaced, with
modern and more efficient boilers along with a new control system that would allow separate
management of the schools.

Additionally, it is proposed that cold water storage tanks are replaced with smaller tanks to
reduce the risk of legionella.

The electrical main switch panel proposed to be replaced.

Option C – Conclusion
The minor refurbishments would bring some unsatisfactory elements of the school up to a
reasonable standard, without making major improvements. Disruption during construction
would be minimal.

It is considered that this low-spend option does not do enough for a school in need of more
major improvements.

Option D – Description
                                                                                Challney Girls Option D
This option is the same as Option A in that it                                     0%
involves the complete rebuild of the girls school.                                 0%
The difference with Option D is the treatment of                                   0%
the boys school.
                                                                                                            New Build
Option D – Conclusion                                                                                       Major Refurb
The benefits and implications for the girls school                                                          Minor Refurb

are the same as outlined for Option A. Option D is                                                          No Works

therefore recommended as the preferred option,
as it provides the best improvements and value for                              100%
money for both the girls and boys school, in a
coordinated approach.
                     Challney Girls Option Appraisal Summary


        Option D



        Option C



        Option B



        Option A



        Existing

                   Very Poor      Poor            Good          Very Good      Excelent
                                                      Acceptability
                                                      Threshhold
                                           Criterion Pef romance

                                         Vision    Conditions    Suitability   Deliverability         VFM




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case



SCHOOL #5: Denbigh

Option A – Description
This option proposes the improvement of the                                       Denbigh Option A
access to the site, replacement of buildings in
poor condition, and the light or heavy
refurbishment of other building to bring up to                           14%

serviceable standard.
                                                                  11%                                    New Build
It is proposed that the kitchen and dining,                                                              Major Refurb
                                                                                                  50%
technology, drama, and swimming pool buildings                                                           Minor Refurb
to the north of the site are demolished due to the                                                       No Works

fact that they are in poor condition. This would
                                                                       25%
open up land to build a new consolidated block to
accommodate the need for teaching space.

An additional building is proposed to be built in the exiting netball/tennis court area, along
with a new all weather pitch. An additional access is proposed to be opened up from
Marlborough Rd, in order to alleviate the existing congestion problems at the restricted front
access.

The remaining existing blocks are proposed to be refurbished and remodelled as required,
to improve their condition and flexibility of use.

Option A – Conclusion
This option would greatly improve the environment within the school buildings and improve
operational efficiency whilst still supporting Luton‟s Education Vision. The improved school
layout would increase land utilisation efficiency.

However, it is believed that due to the current site constraints, the continued delivery of
Luton‟s education vision during the construction period would be problematic as the land
availability for the location mobile accommodation is very limited.

The capital cost of undertaking for this option is higher than Option B. It is believed that the
increased capital cost is not justified as the advantages obtained from a more extensive
rebuild would not be seen to deliver a significantly improved school.

Option B – Description
The proposed works focus on improving access,                                  Denbigh Option B
security, and organisation.

The reorganisation is proposed to be achieved                           14%
                                                                                         24%
in several ways. Community facilities are
proposed to be grouped together by the                                                                  New Build
construction of a new dining/community and                                                              Major Refurb
kitchen space and new gym beside the existing                                                           Minor Refurb
sports hall. This grouping would help control                                                           No Works
                                                                 37%
security. Teaching facilities can then be
                                                                                           25%
consolidated on the west of the site.

The proposed demolition of the old technology
and dining blocks would allow for the construction of a new art/technology block and new
hard paved area, while music and drama are proposed to be moved into the remodelled
gym with a new vocational studies attachment.



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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case




Finally, library and ICT extensions are proposed to be added at the rear of the main block in
existing parking areas.

Access is proposed to be reconfigured primarily by creating a new access of Marlborough
Rd with new community and staff parking, clear of pupil/pedestrian areas. The front access
space is proposed to be remodelled to create a more welcome access for visitors parking
only. Congestion and safety at the main pupil access on Argyle Ave would be improved by
demolishing the site supervisor‟s house and widening the access. The Blenheim Crescent
entrance would be used for technology deliveries.

Option B – Conclusion
As with option A, this option would similarly improve the environment within the school
buildings and improve operational efficiency whilst still supporting Luton‟s Education Vision.

Unlike Option A, it is believed that additional retained areas that will be heavily refurbished
will allow for temporary accommodation to be used between phases thus enabling the
continued delivery of Luton‟s education vision during the construction period.

The capital cost of undertaking for this option is lower than Option A because of the smaller
extent of demolitions and rebuilds. However, as mentioned above, this option is believed to
present the best value for money option as it is expected to deliver closely comparable
school improvements. It is therefore recommended that this option is progressed as the
preferred option for further consideration in the next BSF process stage.

Option C – Description
The following option outlines the minimum refurbishment works proposed to bring the school
to a serviceable standard.
                                                                              Denbigh Option C

Structurally the school is believed to be in a
                                                                                  0%
generally in good condition. Repairs to roof
                                                                      14%         0%
leaks are proposed to be carried out before
replacement in about 5 years time.
                                                                                                 New Build
Windows are proposed to be replaced in the                                                       Major Refurb

gym, science, drama and technology blocks.                                                       Minor Refurb
                                                                                                 No Works

Minor redecoration is expected to be required in
some areas including the drama and technology                                          86%

block.

The swimming pool boilers, heat exchanger and ancillary equipment is outdated and would
be replaced.

The original 1930s building has asbestos-lined ducts which would be replaced, requiring
replacement of the whole heating system in this building.

The LV main switch panel and fire alarm system are both believed to be obsolete and would
be replaced. Access upgrades are a key element also, to meet DDA standards.

Option C – Conclusion
It is considered that the proposed programme of minor refurbishment across the largest
portion of the school in conjunction with the minimum essential for DDA compliance and




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case



works to the building services would not provide a school that adequately meets the
objectives of BSF.

In particular, the development would not be fully compliant with the requirements of the
education vision and the continued delivery of the curriculum would be significantly difficult
even with a phased program.

This option therefore does not lend itself to support the vision or a substantial improvement
in the school‟s environment. Therefore it is suggested that extensive light refurbishment is
not progressed as the preferred option in this case.

                           Denbigh Option Appraisal Summary



          Option C



          Option B



          Option A



          Existing

                      Very Poor       Poor         Good          Very Good            Excelent
                                                           Acceptability
                                                           Threshhold

                                              Criterion Pefromance
                                          Vision   Conditions    Suitability     Deliverability      VFM



SCHOOL #6: Icknield

Option A – Description
                                                                                 Icknield Option B
The key feature of this option is the demolition
                                                                                 0%
of all of the existing buildings due to their poor
                                                                                 0%
architectural and structural condition. In doing
                                                                                 0%
so, the use of mobile accommodation is also
eliminated.
                                                                                                       New Build
                                                                                                       Major Refurb
Essentially a whole new school would be built
                                                                                                       Minor Refurb
behind the existing buildings, mostly on what is
                                                                                                       No Works
a now part of the playing field. This would
include teaching blocks, a reception/admin
area,     a     community        building,   an                                100%

assembly/dining block, a sports hall, and new
tennis courts and all-weather pitch.




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case



Following this, the existing buildings are to be demolished and mobile accommodation
removed, with this area used for a new entrance, parking, paved courtyards and green
spaces.

Finally the Woodlands special needs school is proposed to be relocated into a new building
in the area made available in the south-east corner of the site.

Option A – Conclusion
This option would allow the development of an exemplar design at the current site, which
would provide state of the art facilities and would also fully comply with and support Luton‟s
education vision. The operational efficiency of the school would be greatly improved and the
delivery of a modern curriculum would be fully supported by the new accommodation.

Whilst the significant impact of the wholesale rebuilt capital cost on the overall BSF program
budget has been identified, it is believed that due to the current poor state of the school
estate, no alternative options are considered viable.

The benefits of this option outweigh the increased capital costs and it is therefore proposed
to progress this option as the preferred solution.

Option B – Description
This option proposes the retention of the existing                                Icknield Option A
buildings with major refurbishment, whilst
                                                                                  0%
removing      mobile    accommodation         and
                                                                                  0%
accommodating the addition of the Woodlands
school.                                                                                     25%


                                                                                                      New Build
A new building is proposed to be built north of the                                                   Major Refurb
existing blocks, in order to accommodate the                                                          Minor Refurb
teaching areas of the mobile accommodation that                                                       No Works
is to be removed. The all weather pitch is
                                                                    75%
proposed to be relocated to this area also.

The main blocks are proposed to be extensively
refurbished to improve their current poor condition.

The eastern edge of the site is proposed to be remodelled in order to allow for improved
parking facilities, a new landscaped play area, and the new construction accommodate the
relocated Woodlands special needs school.

Option B – Conclusion
With this option proposal, it is considered that is unlikely that all inherent problems that are
currently faced by Icknield will be eliminated with an extensive major refurbishment
programme along with a limited extent rebuild.

To undertake a full programme of heavy refurbishment in order that this option could provide
a school of the future, significant works would need to be undertaken to the external building
fabric, internally and across the whole building services infrastructure.




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case



The capital cost of undertaking these works is considered to be significant and would not
provide a school with the highest quality teaching and learning spaces.

Option C – Description
This proposal encompasses all the minimum                                       Icknield Option C

refurbishment works required to raise the                                       0%

existing school buildings into a serviceable                                    0%
state.                                                                          0%


The existing school is in generally poor                                                                  New Build
structural condition, and replacement of the                                                              Major Refurb
crittall windows and remaining flat roofs is                                                              Minor Refurb
proposed.                                                                                                 No Works


The masonry walls would require surface
repairs and repointing, with investigation into                               100%

the structural movement likely to lead to
remedial works and possibly underpinning.

Internal decoration is in poor condition and would require replacement throughout, including
floor coverings and ceilings.

It is proposed to replace the boilers and all the heating distribution system. The current
electrical supply would be upgraded, including replacement of the main LV switch panel.
The existing CCTV system would be extended to cover blind spots.

Option C – Conclusion
As with option B, it is considered that is unlikely that all inherent problems that are currently
faced by Icknield will be eliminated with an extensive light refurbishment programme.
                            Ickneild Option Appraisal Summary



          Option C



          Option B



          Option A



          Existing

                      Very Poor       Poor         Good          Very Good           Excelent
                                                           Acceptability
                                                           Threshhold

                                              Criterion Pefromance
                                          Vision   Conditions   Suitability     Deliverability      VFM




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case



SCHOOL #7: Lea Manor

Option A - Description
This option proposes the demolition and                                       Lea Manor Option A
rebuilding of the biggest part of the school.
                                                                              0%
Elements of the building complex to be retained                         15%
are the community sports hall, swimming pool,                      0%
and the children‟s centre. Retained buildings are                                                  New Build
proposed to receive minor refurbishment.                                                           Major Refurb
                                                                                                   Minor Refurb
The rest of the school buildings are proposed to                                                   No Works

be demolished, providing the opportunity to
replace the tired 1970s blocks with a vibrant                                        85%
new school, accommodating the flexibility to
deal with current and future needs.

A new entrance with parking space is proposed in order to replace the existing confused
road layout, and remove the need for traffic driving through the school grounds to reach
parking areas.

Option A – Conclusion
This option proposes the redevelopment through new build construction of the biggest part
of the school estate in conjunction with light refurbishment of some limited areas that have
been recently refurbished or constructed.

Whilst this option is believed to be a suitable option in terms its proposed outcome, it is
considered that this option would pose significant difficulties associated with the continuing
delivery of the vision for secondary education during the construction period. The ability to
deliver this project option would be determined by the management of a phased programme
of remodelling. Major disruption would occur as there is limited opportunity to decant within
the existing structure.

In addition to the above, it is considered that there are further areas of the school‟s estate
that can be retained as they can deliver a modern curriculum whilst retaining the current
main structural elements. It is considered that the heavy capital cost of an extensive-scale
redevelopment when compared to the other two options would not be value for money.

Option B - Description
The key features of the proposed development                                  Lea Manor Option B
are improving access and entrance, and a better
defined boundary between school and
                                                                              0%
community facilities. These key improvements
                                                                                         25%
are to be achieved in one coordinated approach.
                                                                 34%
                                                                                                   New Build
School parking is proposed to be relocated into                                                    Major Refurb
the south-east corner, away from the community                                                     Minor Refurb

parking, with remodelled access arrangements.                                                      No Works

This would create a clearer boundary to
community facilities.                                                              41%


The school entrance is proposed to be further
improved by demolishing and rebuilding the entrance building, which would house




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case



assembly, reception/admin, staff and dining facilities. This reconfiguration would also
accommodate improved pupil routes.

New library, music/drama, and hairdressing/vocational studies blocks are proposed to be
constructed. It is believed that the relocation of these facilities would release space for
remodelled and more flexible teaching spaces in the main building.

Option B – Conclusion

This option is believed to accomplish improvements in operational efficiency and school
environment whilst supporting Luton‟s Education Vision. This is achieved by utilising the full
potential of the existing school estate elements and only replacing building blocks that have
been deemed to be in a non viable state.

Unlike Option A, it is believed that additional retained areas that will be heavily refurbished
will allow for temporary accommodation to be used between phases thus enabling the
continued delivery of the education vision during the construction period.

Furthermore, it is believed that this option will offer good value for money as the capital cost
of undertaking for this option is significantly lower than Option A because of the smaller
extent of demolitions and rebuilds.

It is therefore considered that this option should be progressed as the preferred option for
further consideration in the next BSF process stage.

Option C - Description
                                                                             Lea Manor Option C
The minimum case refurbishment                    works
                                                                                  0%
proposed are as follows.
                                                                                  0%

                                                                                  0%
About 75% of the roof is proposed to be
replaced as it is leaking and rotten, along with
new down pipes.                                                                                   New Build
                                                                                                  Major Refurb
                                                                                                  Minor Refurb
Areas of brickwork would benefit from repairs to
                                                                                                  No Works
cracks and repointing, with some timber panels
replaced. Metal windows would be replaced.
Significant internal refurbishment work is                                  100%

generally not required, except for ceiling
replacements.

The heating system is proposed to be overhauled, with new and more efficient boilers for
the school use only with dedicated controls, new distribution pipework, and new heating
emitters. The old and overstretched LV distribution system would also be replaced.

Option C – Conclusion
While light refurbishment would improve some areas of the existing unsatisfactory
accommodation to a state that could marginally be acceptable for a school of the future, It is
considered that there are areas that need complete replacement or at least heavy
refurbishment or remodelling.

With regards to capital costing, this option is believed to be the „lowest cost‟ option. However
expenditure for this option would not be considered as good value for money as the final
outcome of this option in the long term would not be fit for purpose.



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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case




                          Lea Manor Option Appraisal Summary



          Option C



          Option B



          Option A



          Existing

                      Very Poor       Poor         Good           Very Good          Excelent
                                                           Acceptability
                                                           Threshhold

                                              Criterion Pefromance
                                          Vision   Conditions   Suitability     Deliverability     VFM



SCHOOL #8: Lealands
                                                                               Lealands Option A

Option A – Description                                                          0%

                                                                                0%
These proposed works aim to deal with the
outdated existing building by demolishing and                                   0%

rebuilding the school.
                                                                                                     New Build
                                                                                                     Major Refurb
New school buildings are proposed to be built
                                                                                                     Minor Refurb
towards the south- west of the site, providing
                                                                                                     No Works
adaptable, pleasant teaching accommodation
and other facilities.
                                                                              100%

Once the population has been moved into the
new buildings, the old buildings are to be
demolished to make way for a new hard play area which would account for the current lack
of such an area.

A new access is proposed to be taken south of the existing e-learning centre, avoiding the
current problems of restricted entries. This area would lead to new parking facilities in front
of the new school buildings.

Option A – Conclusion
This option will provide excellent school facilities to meet the educational vision and address
the issues of the existing school. Disruption during construction and the need for temporary
accommodation would be low, because of the relocation of the building site to new land.

This option is not considered to provide value for money however, with large capital costs
outlaid, and the opportunity missed to repair and recover much of the existing infrastructure
which is in a reusable state.


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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case




Option B – Description
The proposed redevelopment option focuses on
                                                                                  Lealands Option B
improving access and entrance, and rejuvenating
the existing school buildings.
                                                                           6%       7%
All school, staff and community access is                           15%
proposed to be through the existing southern
                                                                                                      New Build
entrance. The road is proposed to be widened
                                                                                                      Major Refurb
into the netball court area. This would lead to a                                                     Minor Refurb
shared, tree-lined car park south of the teaching                                                     No Works
buildings.
                                                                                         72%
The entrance is proposed to be improved with a
central courtyard leading to a new reception
building attached to the existing hall, and links to
new hard paved areas and teaching blocks.

The northern access is proposed to be retained as a service entry, and upgraded for
pedestrian use by demolishing the site supervisor‟s house. This would allow for a new hard
paved area in the existing staff car park.

The existing three-storey teaching block is proposed to be fully refurbished and remodelled.
The refurbishment is expected to improve the building presentation, open up the ground
floor including a new library, and provide more flexible teaching spaces through the building.
The existing single-storey block for science, technology and art would be similarly
remodelled.

The dining area is proposed to be relocated into a shared use with the extended hall. This
would release more teaching space in the former dining area.

Option B – Conclusion
This option provides the school with significant improvements without the need for a more
expensive new build approach. Utilising the existing structure but providing major works
provides an option capturing many of the advantages of options A and C, although
disruption and the need for temporary accommodation would be highest.
This option is recommended as the best value for money, as it results in nearly as much
improvement as Option A, but with much lower capital costs and better utilisation of existing
buildings.




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case



Option C – Description
                                                                                Lealands Option C
The minimum case refurbishment                     works
proposed are as follows.
                                                                                0%
                                                                           6%
Some roof flashing would be replaced to stop
leaks, and the roof ponding is to be investigated
                                                                                                          New Build
with remedial action possible.
                                                                                                          Major Refurb
                                                                                                          Minor Refurb
The timber cladding at the rear of the sports hall                                                        No Works
would be replaced, and panel to masonry joints
elsewhere resealed. A small portion of the
windows are proposed to be replaced. As                                              94%

internal areas are generally in acceptable and
therefore no significant refurbishment is
proposed. However, floors in circulation areas are to be recovered.

The pool would benefit from redecoration, mould treatment and new ventilation. The plant
rooms are at the end of their serviceable life and hence the primary heating plant and LPHW
distribution system are proposed to be replaced.

Option C – Conclusion
This low-spend option will go some way to improving the unsatisfactory areas of the school
and providing some benefits. It is considered however to not do enough to provide the
improvements necessary to meet the educational vision laid out.

                           Lealands Option Appraisal Summary



          Option C



          Option B



          Option A



          Existing

                      Very Poor       Poor         Good           Very Good          Excelent
                                                           Acceptability
                                                           Threshhold

                                              Criterion Pefromance
                                          Vision   Conditions   Suitability     Deliverability      VFM




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case



SCHOOL #9: Putteridge

Option A – Description
This proposal involves largely rebuilding the                                 Putteridge Option A

school.
                                                                              0%
The small dining hall and cramped southern                              15%

teaching building are proposed to be                               0%
demolished to make way for the construction of                                                      New Build
new school buildings along the southern border                                                      Major Refurb

of the site.                                                                                        Minor Refurb
                                                                                                    No Works

Following this the bulk of the remaining school
building is proposed to be demolished, with a                                         85%
new staff car park and hard play area built in it‟s
place.

The existing community sports hall and pool, its associated car park, and the all-weather
pitches and tennis courts would remain as is.

A key advantage of the new layout would be the proposed improved access and safety, with
vehicular traffic constrained to the northern border of the site, and the existing central
western access converted to pedestrian only.

Option A – Conclusion
Option A proposes extensive new build construction coupled with light refurbishment of
some areas that have been deemed to be in relatively good condition.

It has been determined that due to the limited opportunity to decant within the existing
structures the school would be unable to deliver the education vision during a construction
period with such major disruptions.

It is also considered that there this option proposes the demolition of areas that are believed
to be in a state that does not justify complete demolition. It is therefore evident that such
option would not offer best value for money.

Option B – Description
The     primary    focus   of    the      proposed                            Putteridge Option B
redevelopment is improving access, and
refurbishing and reorganising facilities.
                                                                              0%
                                                                   24%                  22%
The access is proposed to be improved with a
new vehicle turning circle to reduce congestion.                                                    New Build
A dedicated tree-lined pedestrian route would                                                       Major Refurb
then be created to ensure pupil safety and                                                          Minor Refurb
improve appearance. Car parks would be                                                              No Works

adjusted in the existing locations.
                                                                              54%

A new school frontage is proposed, with the new
building housing reception/admin, a theatre assembly hall, and community library facilities.

With additional space now vacated, the existing teaching space is proposed to be
refurbished and remodelled to provide better circulation and more flexible spaces.



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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case



New changing rooms are to be constructed nearer the pitches and playing field.

Option B – Conclusion
This option is considered to offer the appropriate balance between new build, major and
minor refurbishment as it addresses each area with the appropriate extent of works - thus,
eliminating the implementation of unnecessary works that are not essential for the
development of a school that meets all Luton BSF project objectives.

In addition to the above, the retention of a bigger proportion of the school (compared with
option A) is considered to offer increased flexibility for phased decanting and implementation
of works that in conjunction with the use of mobile accommodation will allow for minimum
disruption to the delivery of education.

It is recommended that this option is progressed for further consideration to the next BSF
stage.

Option C – Description
The minimum refurbishments required for                                     Putteridge Option C
serviceable use are outlined for this option.                                0%

                                                                             0%

The aluminium-framed windows are proposed                                    0%
to be replaced, along with the majority of the
flat roof coverings, which are currently leaking.                                                 New Build
                                                                                                  Major Refurb

Cracking in the raft foundation and floor in the                                                  Minor Refurb
                                                                                                  No Works
lower dining room would be investigated and
remedial action taken as necessary, along with
repairs to other floor slabs. Wall cladding joints                        100%
would be re-flashed where necessary.

The old boiler would be replaced, as would the LPHW heating system throughout the
school. The existing cold water tanks would be investigated for health risks such as
legionella, and replaced or insulated if necessary.

Option C – Conclusion
It is has been deemed that out of other option considered this option would be least
disruptive to the normal school operations.

However, it is considered that the proposed programme light refurbishment across the
whole school would not be able bring the school up to the required minimum standards or
meet the Luton BSF project objectives.

The reduced capital cost that this option presents does not outweigh the benefits obtained
by alternative option B.




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Luton Borough Council – Building Schools for the Future Strategic Business Case




                          Putteridge Option Appraisal Summary



          Option C



          Option B



          Option A



          Existing

                      Very Poor       Poor         Good           Very Good          Excelent
                                                           Acceptability
                                                           Threshhold

                                              Criterion Pefromance
                                          Vision   Conditions   Suitability     Deliverability    VFM



SCHOOL #10: Stopsley

Option A - Description
                                                                              Stopsley Option A
This proposal involves the complete rebuilding
of all the buildings in the school, except the
                                                                      5%
community change rooms.                                                        0%
                                                                    0%

The new school buildings are proposed to be
constructed in the north-east corner of the                                                         New Build
                                                                                                    Major Refurb
school, thereby capitalising on the site layout
                                                                                                    Minor Refurb
to release more space, and only requiring                                                           No Works
partial phased demolition to allow an easier
transition.
                                                                               95%
After the population has been moved into the
new building, the rest of the existing school is
proposed to be demolished to accommodate a central hard play area for pupils and a new,
larger car park for community and staff which would be away from the pupil movement and
play areas.

This option believed to provide a more efficient use of the land than the current layout, and
would create more free land to be used as a playing field.

Option A – Conclusion
This option proposes redevelopment with demolition and rebuilding of nearly all school
estate coupled with light refurbishment of a very small proportion of the estate.

Whilst this option is believed to be a viable option in terms its proposed outcome, the capital
cost of undertaking these works would be significant and when compared with option B, it
would not provide a school with a significantly higher level of objectives achievement.


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Option B – Description
This option aims to reduce access                                        Stopsley Option B
congestion, consolidate the scattered car
parks, and reorganise school facilities while
removing rundown buildings.                                             0%

                                                             28%                      29%
The science building and gym, which are in
                                                                                                   New Build
poor condition, along with the structurally                                                        Major Refurb
unsound library/reception/admin building,                                                          Minor Refurb
are proposed to be demolished.                                                                     No Works


New science and new reception buildings at
the front of the school would provide                   43%

character to the entrance. A new building in
place of the old science block would house
the gym, changing facilities and the relocated dining and kitchen area, to group the
community facilities.

The refurbished library and ICT facilities are proposed to be located in the vacated dining
area.

A new staff access and car park in the northern corner of the site is proposed to be
constructed. This would allow for a dedicated pedestrian entrance and revamped drop-off
point to reduce congestion.

New green areas and an entrance courtyard would supplement this layout to provide a more
attractive and functional entrance. Roads in and around the school buildings would be
removed to improve safety.

Option B – Conclusion
Unlike option A, this option allows the School to retain accommodation that is suitable and
requires only refurbishment to provide excellent accommodation for teaching and learning,
while replacing those areas of the building stock that are dilapidated and unsuitable for
continued delivery of a modern education.

As discussed earlier, it is believed that the benefits obtained and the BSF objectives by this
option are considered lie closely with the results obtained from option A. Through the
optimum utilisation of the existing estate it is believed that this option offers the best value
for money and it is therefore considered that it would best serve the interests of the school
stakeholders and Luton‟s Building Schools for the Future programme in its totality.

Option C – Description
The following essential refurbishments are
                                                                               Stopsley Option C
proposed under this option to bring the school                                  0%
up to a serviceable state.
                                                                                0%

                                                                                0%
Minor internal refurbishment is proposed,
including floors in circulation areas and
                                                                                                       New Build
replacing the timber open tread staircase. The
                                                                                                       Major Refurb
majority of the windows that are metal crittall                                                        Minor Refurb
are proposed to be replaced.                                                                           No Works


Trees over the technology department would
                                                                             100%
be cut back to stop drain blockages. Minor



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repairs to the brickwork are planned, while the ongoing structural movement of the entrance
block would require further investigation and possibly some remedial works.

The heating distribution system and emitters would benefit from replacement. A new main
electrical LV panel is also proposed.

Option C – Conclusion
It is considered that the proposed option of light refurbishment across the whole school
would not provide a school that adequately meets the objectives of Luton BSF.

In particular, it is considered that the development would not be fully compliant with the
requirements of the education vision and the delivery of a modern curriculum.

It is therefore proposed that this option is not progressed as preferred option as it does not
lend itself to support the vision or a substantial upgrade in school environment.
                           Stopsley Option Appraisal Summary


          Option C



          Option B



          Option A



          Existing

                      Very Poor       Poor         Good           Very Good       Excelent
                                                           Acceptability
                                                           Threshhold

                                              Criterion Pefromance
                                          Vision   Conditions   Suitability   Deliverability   VFM




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 APPENDIX C – FUNDING ALLOCATION


                                                        Area
LEA:                            Luton                   name: Luton                     Wave:          3     Phases:       1&2                        Date:       Jan -07
School              Number      Proc. Proc. Start on Service Current Proposed Proposed New Construction Construction         Total      Capital   Other      ICT
                                              site    start   Pupils  Pupils    GFA    build    Capex          Capex      Construction Receipts funding   Hardware
                                                                                        %                                 Capex to BSF          for Supp. exc Supp.
                                                                                                                             at FS                Areas     Area
                                                                                             Reconciliation
                                Route Phase                                                                 Funding Start                                Funding Start
                                                                                                 Date


Challney High for                                                                                      100
      Girls         School 2      0      1     Sept-08 Sept-10             -   1,050      8,885         %     19,398,189    20,087,397   21,360,272           -      -      1,522,500

   South Luton                                                                                         100
   (Academy)        School 5      0      1     Sept-08 Sept-10             -   1,450      12,348        %     26,945,465    27,902,824   27,902,824           -      -      2,102,500
                                                                                                       100
Halyard (Academy) School 6        0      1     Sept-08 Sept-10             -   1,450      12,348        %     26,945,465    27,902,824   27,902,824           -      -      2,102,500



  Ashcroft High     School 8      0      2     Sept-09 Sept-11             -    970       8,349        8%     11,430,049    12,616,635   12,616,635           -      -      1,406,500

 Lea Manor High     School 11     0      1     Sept-08 Sept-10             -   1,039      8,814        15%    12,786,898    13,241,412   13,241,412           -      -      1,506,550

  Lealands High     School 12     0      2     Sept-09 Sept-11             -    859       7,606        12%    11,555,196    12,728,899   12,728,899           -      -      1,245,550



  SCD provision     School 7      0      2     Sept-09 Sept-11             -      8         168        50%       313,705      345,511      345,511            -      -       11,600



  PRU provision     School 15     0      2     Sept-09 Sept-11             -     20         419        50%       744,259      821.974      821.974            -      -       29,000

TOTAL          8                                                           -    6,846      58,936            110,119,225   115,647,477 115,647,477            -      -       9,926,700
                    Construction Capex includes F&E and ICT infrastructure and excludes ICT hardware




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 APPENDIX D – COST MODEL

LUTON BUILDING SCHOOLS FOR THE FUTURE
LUTON BOROUGH COUNCIL

SUMMARY OF INDICATIVE COST ESTIMATES
PREFERRED OPTIONS


CLUSTER                                                                          MAIN COST                                                                          ANCILLARY COST                                    CAPITAL COST
                                         New Build          Remodelling        Minor Works             Total         Construction          ICT                             ICT
LINK 5                                  (m2)     %          (m2)    %          (m2)    %          (m2)      £/m2        Cost          Infrastructure       FF & E       Equipment         Total        £/m2         Total          £/m2

Cardinal Newman High School              3,900     33.86    3,277     28.45    4,341     37.69   11,518   1,167.22   13,444,040.28         324,000.00     904,003.00    2,088,000.00    3,316,003.00   287.90   16,760,043.28    1,455.12

Icknield High School                   12,190    100.00           -        -         -       -   12,190   1,990.29   24,261,580.25         337,500.00    1,958,340.00   2,175,000.00    4,470,840.00   366.76   28,732,420.25    2,357.05

Lealands High School                       594      7.34    6,365     78.67    1,132     13.99    8,091   1,222.76    9,893,369.64         202,500.00     548,433.00    1,305,000.00    2,055,933.00   254.10   11,949,302.64    1,476.86

Lea Manor High School                    2,698     21.61    4,736     37.94    5,050     40.45   12,484   1,051.25   13,123,748.88         270,000.00     635,748.00    1,740,000.00    2,645,748.00   211.93   15,769,496.88    1,263.18

Woodlands High School                    5,160   100.00           -        -         -       -    5,160   2,263.03   11,677,226.09          39,375.00     799,652.00     253,750.00     1,092,777.00   211.78    12,770,003.09     2,474.81

Link 5 PRU                                 206     50.00       144    35.00         62   15.00      412   1,720.99      709,047.24            4,500.00     17,619.00      29,000.00       51,119.00    124.08       760,166.24     1,845.06

TOTAL                                                                                            49,855              73,109,012.38        1,177,875.00   4,863,795.00   7,590,750.00   13,632,420.00             86,741,432.38
CLUSTER                                                                          MAIN COST                                                                          ANCILLARY COST                                    CAPITAL COST
                                         New Build          Remodelling        Minor Works             Total         Construction          ICT                                 ICT
SSPA                                    (m2)     %          (m2)    %          (m2)    %          (m2)      £/m2        Cost          Infrastructure          FF & E     Equipment             Total     £/m2       Total Cost        £/m2

Ashcroft High School                   1,800       20.34   3,481      39.33    3,570     40.33   8,851    1,043.36   9,234,753.00     236,250.00          548,352.00    1,522,500.00    2,307,102.00   260.66    11,541,855.00     1,304.02

Putteridge High School                 2,127       21.34   4,936      49.53    2,902     29.12   9,965    1,166.39   11,623,106.88    202,500.00          541,809.00    1,305,000.00    2,049,309.00   205.65    13,672,415.88     1,372.04

Stopsley High School                   3,048       27.45   4,901      44.14    3,155     28.41   11,104   1,217.29   13,516,811.88    270,000.00          775,788.00    1,740,000.00    2,785,788.00   250.88    16,302,599.88     1,468.17

SSPA Cluster PRU                       206         50.00   144        35.00    62        15.00    412     1,720.99   709,047.24       4,500.00             17,619.00      29,000.00       51,119.00    124.08       760,166.24     1,845.06

TOTAL                                                                                            30,332              35,083,719.00    713,250.00         1,883,568.00   4,596,500.00    7,193,318.00             42,277,037.00
CLUSTER                                                                          MAIN COST                                                                          ANCILLARY COST                                    CAPITAL COST
                                         New Build          Remodelling        Minor Works             Total         Construction          ICT                             ICT
A1                                      (m2)     %          (m2)    %          (m2)    %          (m2)      £/m2        Cost          Infrastructure       FF & E       Equipment         Total        £/m2       Total Cost       £/m2

Challney Boys High School                 854         90   7688           10        0        0   8,542    1,386.27   11,841,494.28         202,500.00     646,236.00    1,305,000.00    2,153,736.00   252.13    13,995,230.28     1,638.40

Challney Girls‟ High School            9,650        1.00   -          -        -         -       9,650    1,990.29   19,206,255.08         236,250.00    1,370,838.00   1,522,500.00    3,129,588.00   324.31    22,335,843.08     2,314.60

Denbigh High School                    2,550       25.57   3,057      30.66    4,364     43.77   9,971    1,045.28   10,422,487.68         270,000.00     640,824.00    1,740,000.00    2,650,824.00   265.85    13,073,311.68     1,311.13

A1 Cluster PRU                         206         50.00   144        35.00    62        15.00    412     1,720.99      709,047.24            4,500.00     17,619.00      29,000.00       51,119.00    124.08       760,166.24     1,845.06

TOTAL                                                                                            28,575              42,179,284.28         713,250.00    2,675,517.00   4,596,500.00    7,985,267.00             50,164,551.28




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APPENDIX E – RESOURCE SUMMARY

LUTON BOROUGH COUNCIL RESOURCES SUMMARY TO FINANCIAL CLOSE
Indicative cost profile      2005/06 Actual    2006/07 Forecast                                          2007/08 Forecast          Total
Project Director                            -             75,000.00                                               100,000.00           175,000.00
Programme Manager                                              52,314.00                   65,861.00               69,478.00           187,653.00
Project Manager (Design & Tech)                                18,392.00                   56,795.00               59,432.00           134,619.00
Project Manager (Commercial)                                             -                           -             59,432.00            59,432.00
Project Adviser (Education & ICT)                                        -                           -             42,432.00            42,432.00
Project Manager (Academies)                                              -                           -             59,432.00            59,432.00
Project Planner/Analyst                                        22,611.00                   26,929.00               28,822.00            78,362.00
Administrative Assistants (*2)                                           -                 32,983.00               39,361.00            72,344.00
Technical (Client Role)                                                  -                 16,308.00               48,393.00            64,701.00
Finance (Client Role)                                                    -                 15,842.00               40,650.00            56,492.00
Legal (Client Role)                                             1,032.00                   19,247.00               51,000.00            71,279.00
ICT (software and equipment)                                             -                  2,758.00                2,000.00               4,758.00
Accommodation                                                            -                  4,968.00               17,000.00            21,968.00
Subsistence/Travel                                              1,850.00                             -              1,000.00               2,850.00
Conferences (external)                                            965.00                    1,508.00                3,000.00               5,473.00
Conferences (internal)                                            918.00                    1,353.00                3,000.00               5,271.00
Training                                                                 -                      825.00              1,000.00               1,825.00
Marketing                                                         17,853                             -                      -           17,853.00
Consumables                                                     2,396.00                    1,910.00                1,500.00               5,806.00
Miscellaneous                                                       2,520                       592.00                      -              3,112.00
Other Internal Support                                     -                           -                     3,000.00            3,000.00
External Advisor Support **                           51,046.00                    569,224.00               744,340.00          1,364,610.00
3 area support (school based)                              -                       90,000.00                90,000.00            180,000.00
Total                                               £171,897.00                   £982,103.00             £1,464,271.00         2,618,271.00



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 APPENDIX F – PHASING OF SCHOOLS WITHIN CONSORTIA


                                                            M&E and Suitability                       Access
                                                            Structural    for                           and      School    KS4 CVA grades      Total
Consortia                     School                        Condition curriculum             ICT     inclusion   meals    Grades 3 year aver   Score

 SSPA       South Luton High School                               2                9          7         9          8        8        9         7.502
            Ashcroft High School                                  8                6          5         5          4        6        9         6.161
            Putteridge High School                                5                7          7         4          3        5        10        5.901
            Stopsley High School                                  2                3          7         4          2        5        6         4.052


   A1       Halyard High School                                   8                4          7         8           7       6         8        6.752
            Challney Girls High School                            6                7          10        8           9       5         3        6.243
            Challney Boys High School                             3                6          5         5           8       5         4        5.269
            Denbigh High School                                   3                6          3         5          10       4         1        4.669


 Link 5     Lea Manor High School                                7               7             5         8          5        6        8        6.153
            Lealands High School                                 5               6             7         5          4        5        8        5.507
            Cardinal Newman Secondary School                     3               4             7         4          2        4        4        4.480
            Icknield High School                                10               3             3         3          3        3        2        4.188
                                                              10.00%          10.00%        10.00%    10.00%     20.00%   20.00%   20.00%
            Woodlands Secondary                                  3                             2                    -        -        -




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SUMMARY OF PHASES (EXCLUDING SCD AND PRU PROVISION)

Phase                                                     School
Wave 3 – Phase One                                        South Luton High
                                                          Halyard High
                                                          Lea Manor High
                                                          Challney High School for Girls


Wave 3 – Phase Two                                        Ashcroft High
                                                          Lealands High


Wave 6 – Phase One                                        Putteridge High
                                                          Challney High School for Boys
                                                          Cardinal Newman RC Secondary School


Wave 6 – Phase Two                                        Stopsley High
                                                          Denbigh High
                                                          Icknield High
                                                          Woodland Secondary


        The above phasing supports the following:-
        1. Allows each consortium to progress through BSF on a similar timeline
        2. Realises the full benefit of the consortia representatives
        3. Supports meaningful collaboration between each consortium in dealing with live projects
        4. Supports a developmental approach to design within each consortium
        5. Minimises the geographical migration of pupils across consortia
        6. Minimises the geographical migration of pupils within each consortium




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APPENDIX G – PROJECT PROGRAMME FOR OBC AND PROCUREMENT




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    APPENDIX H – MEMBER APPROVAL OF SBC:
                                                                       TH
                                                      EXECUTIVE – 29        AUGUST 2006 AT 6.00 P.M.

                          THEME: CHILDREN’S SERVICES; EQUALITIES AND SOCIAL INCLUSION; YOUTH AND CULTURE

                                                  PRESENT:   Councillor Franks (Chair); Councillors J. Davies, R. Davies, Howes, Q. Hussain,
                                                             Patterson, Pedersen, Strange and Yasin.

                                              APOLOGIES:     Councillor Rutstein

                                        IN ATTENDANCE:       Councillor Timoney

                                                             DECISIONS SHEET (EXTRACT)


  AGENDA ITEM/                         SUBJECT                  DEC.              DECISION AND REASONS FOR                 OTHER OPTIONS CONSIDERED
WARD(S) AFFECTED                                                NO.                        DECISION


        9.                Building Schools for the Future    EX/242/06         (i) That Luton's Strategic Business Case   (i) Not to submit an SBC.
        All                                                                    for Building Schools for the Future as     (ii) Not to reach agreement on the
                                                                               attached at Appendix A to the report of    required LEP procurement method
                                                                               the Director of Children and Learning      for BSF.
                                                                               and its submission to DfES and             (iii) To negotiate with the DfES to
                                                                               Partnership for Schools (PfS) be           establish    an    alternative BSF
                                                                               approved.                                  procurement vehicle.

                                                                               (ii) That the Portfolio Holder for
                                                                               Children's Services and the Director of
                                                                               Children and Learning be authorised to
                                                                               finalise agreement of the Strategic
                                                                               Business Case with DfES/PfS within the
                                                                               scope of the Executive's approval.


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  AGENDA ITEM/                         SUBJECT        DEC.         DECISION AND REASONS FOR                  OTHER OPTIONS CONSIDERED
WARD(S) AFFECTED                                      NO.                   DECISION


                                                               (iii) That the submission of an
                                                               'expression of interest' to the DfES to be
                                                               considered for inclusion in Waves 4-6 of
                                                               the Building Schools for the Future
                                                               Programme be approved and authorise
                                                               the Director of Children and Learning,
                                                               following consultation with the Executive
                                                               Member with Portfolio responsibility for
                                                               Children's       Services       (Councillor
                                                               Patterson) to submit the expression of
                                                               interest to the DfES.

                                                               (iv) That the appointment of ICT, design,
                                                               technical, financial and legal consultants
                                                               be noted.

                                                               (v) That a final decision on whether to
                                                               proceed be taken on the basis of the
                                                               outline business case which will clarify
                                                               the financial and other implications be
                                                               accepted.

                                                               Reason: To utilise the opportunity to
                                                               improve all Secondary Schools in Luton
                                                               using BSF funding.

    The meeting ended at 6.43 p.m.

    DATE OF PUBLICATION: Thursday 31st August 2006                       CALL IN DEADLINE: Thursday 7th September 2006



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APPENDIX I – LETTER OF SUPPORT FROM LSC




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APPENDIX J – LETTER OF APPROVAL FROM DFES FOR EDUCATIONAL VISION

Tony Dessent
Corporate Director – Lifelong Learning
Luton Borough Council
Unity House
111 Stuart Street
Luton
LU1 5NP
                                                                              22 March 2006

                    Building Schools for the Future: Luton's Education Vision

Dear Tony,

Thank you for coming to the Department on 17 February 2006 to present your Education Vision for
Building Schools for the Future (BSF).

As you know, Ministers need to ensure that local authorities‟ Education Visions for BSF investment are
delivering the appropriate level of transformation and improvement in standards, to maximise the
potential impact of this unprecedented level of investment in our schools.

It is in this context that Ministers have been considering Luton's proposals for BSF, as they will be
considering all proposals from local authorities benefiting from BSF investment.

I am delighted to tell you that Ministers have now approved Luton's plans as set out in your Education
Vision. I would like to take this opportunity to thank you for working with us and Partnerships for
Schools (PfS) in developing your vision.

Your Education Vision was reviewed by DfES officials concerned with a number of policy areas who
considered that the issues of Academies, behaviour and attendance, extended schools, ICT, 14-19,
inclusion, school workforce remodelling, SEN and specialist schools were all well developed.

Although we are happy to approve your vision, we need to point out that there are some aspects that
require continued development. In order to build upon the progress you have made to date and ensure
that your project realises the ambitions that we all share for improved pupil achievement, you will need
to focus on the following:

       Ensure that your Strategic Business Case addresses delivery/resource issues in a
        comprehensive way.
       Examine further your provision for students with more severe challenging behaviour.
       Evaluate your 14 – 19 governance arrangements.
       Issues surrounding PE and school sport need to be developed further.

We do not consider these issues warrant delaying the implementation of your proposals. However, we
do need you to confirm in your Strategic Business Case what actions you plan to take to address
them.

In addition we hope that you will be willing to share with other BSF authorities some of the good
practices that were identified. These included the Luton education commission involvement which has
been instrumental in gaining initial consensus across the borough. The emphasis on Campus Luton
with fully integrated ICT is particularly innovative, as is the desire to offer more personalised learning
complemented by tutorial support.

Please note that this letter only endorses your Education Vision as it relates to Building Schools for the
Future, and not for any other purposes.




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I wish you every success in the development and implementation of your project.

Yours sincerely,




Dana Woodmansey
BSF Programme Manager
Schools Capital Division, DfES




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APPENDIX K – INCLUSION OF ACADEMIES IN BSF




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APPENDIX L – DESIGN INNOVATION IN BSF

Design concepts
Inspiration: deliver flexible curriculum, high quality learning environments
Innovation: modern construction methods, alternative flexible spaces
A school for us: school community
In the community: inclusive & for the wider community
Schools for today: demands of current teaching styles and organisation
Ideas for tomorrow: adapted to new educational ideas
Flexibility: rearrange teaching environment to suit different activities
Adaptability: over life of building to changing curriculum, move partitions etc
Learning clusters: clusters of classes in various forms to enhance belonging
Comfort: suitable serviced
Sustainability: energy efficiency, waste minimisation, security, community use

Design Quality Indicators (DQIs)
This tool provides a framework for assessment of school design at:
Brief stage: consensus about priorities & ambitions
Design phase: how well plans meet objectives
Completion: how well functions in relation to priorities & ambitions

Key design aims:
Siting: building sited well in relation to context
Detailing: form and materials to be well detailed
External areas: grounds for all formal & informal curriculum needs pupils & community
Entrance: clearly defined, good first impression, reception inviting
Access: good access and adequate width circulation
Layout: clearly visible plus ease of navigation
Circulation: well lit and easily supervised
Signage: placed in logical prominent positions
Illumination: high quality, well lit, good daylight for practical tasks
Acoustics: finishes to reduce sound levels during noisy activities
Workforce reform: Staff & administrative areas suitable for needs of workforce
Teaching spaces: adequate/appropriate for curriculum & organisation school
Dining/social: areas sufficient to allow healthy eating/relaxation/recreation
Adaptable: for constant changing needs, use of internal non structural walls
Build quality: performance & co-ordination of construction
High ceilings: views, good day-lighting
Roofing: over courtyards between blocks to create dining/social/circulation space
Durability: finishes resistant to heavy wear
Energy efficiency: minimise mechanical ventilation/cooling/heating/solar heat gain
Integration: engineering services
Sustainable/renewable: systems & materials, winter sunlight is collected in circulation
spaces to provide heating, features as learning tools for students
Uplifting: building & grounds should lift spirits & raise aspirations, circulation and common
spaces enjoyable, good design creates good impressions

Key Terms:
Functionality: use, arrangement, quality & inter-relationship of spaces
Access: how get to & move around
Space: size & inter-relationship of rooms & spaces




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APPENDIX M – TEACHING AND LEARNING: TRANSITION PLAN 2006-2007

The Objective
Young people should leave schools, colleges and other provision in Luton confident and well-equipped to manage their lives successfully as
adults in a complex, interdependent and ever-changing world.

Extract from The Luton BSF vision for teaching and learning
Learning in Campus Luton will be based on the four fundamental types of learning proposed by the International Commission on Education for
the Twenty First Century (Delores et al, 1996):

       Learning to know – acquiring a broad general knowledge, intellectual curiosity, the instruments of understanding, independence of
        judgement, and the impetus and foundation or being able to continue learning throughout life.
       Learning to do – the competence to put what one has learned into practice, even when it is unclear how future work will evolve to deal
        with many situations and to act creatively on one‟s environment. This involves higher skills at all levels, being able to process
        information and communicate with others.
       Learning to live together – developing understanding of and respect for other people, their cultures and spiritual values, empathy for
        others‟ points of view, understanding diversity and similarities between people, appreciating interdependence, and being able to
        [engage in] dialogue and debate, in order to participate and cooperate with others, enhance relationships, and combat violence and
        conflict.
       Learning to be – developing the „all-round‟ person who possesses greater autonomy, judgement and personal responsibility, through
        attending to all aspects of a person‟s potential – mind and body, intelligence, sensitivity, aesthetic sense and spiritual values – such that
        they can understand themselves and their world, and solve their own problems.

In order to make a reality of the vision, all teachers and other adults working with young people will need to be equipped with:
     a high level of subject expertise (appropriate to their role);
     high level skills in pedagogy;
     very strong interpersonal and motivational skills, based on a good understanding of Maslow‟s hierarchy of needs and of what is often
       described as “emotional intelligence”; and
     an understanding of the barriers to learning individual students and groups of students may face and how these barriers can be
       overcome.
Much of the teaching in Luton will thus need to be consistently very good or outstanding. To be able to operate consistently with this level of
professional expertise, the teachers and other adults will need to exhibit the same learning behaviours as those articulated for the students in
the BSF vision.




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The present situation
Evidence of external evaluation and internal review shows a wide range in the quality of teaching. In the institutions where teaching is
strongest, unsatisfactory teaching has been virtually eradicated and there is little teaching that is less than good. The students in these
lessons are making good progress in all four areas of learning described above.
Evidence shows that, in general, the quality of teaching and learning improves as students move from key stage 3, to key stage 4 and into post
16. Learning tends to improve as students are able follow courses in areas, which particularly interest them.
Taking Luton as a whole, however, there are still too many lessons, which have a range of shortcomings. The most important of these are:
insufficient subject expertise on the part of the teacher, leading to errors in teaching and a lack of rigour;
poor use of assessment information by teachers to inform the level of the lesson, leading to challenge that is too high or too low for students;
and
teachers not using sufficiently engaging approaches to teaching and learning, which leads either to a passive climate or to disaffection and
misbehaviour on the part of students.

In addition to weaknesses in teaching, there are a number of other barriers preventing learners from making good progress. Significant among
these are weaknesses in speaking, listening, reading and writing in English, in thinking skills and in general learning skills.

A recent survey of young people in Luton indicated a disparity between young people‟s wishes for what should happen at school to enable
them to learn and what does actually take place:
                                                                                                          How frequently do you have
Area                                                       How important is this to you?
                                                                                                            the chance to do this?
Subjects that interest you                                                87%                                       52%
Regular feedback on progress                                              81%                                       32%
Individual help with difficulties                                         79%                                       39%
Chance to learn in different ways                                         78%                                       33%
Chance to do subjects related to job opportunities                        78%                                       33%

Our current priorities
On the basis of this analysis, our local key priorities to improve the quality of teaching and learning are:
Ensuring that all teachers have the knowledge and skills to teach lessons that are at least satisfactory and meet the needs of Luton‟s diverse
community
Enabling teachers whose work is consistently satisfactory or better to improve further
Developing literacy, oracy and thinking skills in the classroom
Developing assessment for learning
Developing students‟ skills as learners
Equipping staff to teach new courses
Recruiting, retaining and developing high quality staff (including promoting high quality performance management)



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Additional priorities
Additional priorities arising from the Luton BSF vision are:
Making best use of ICT to support learning
Enabling staff to undertake high quality tutoring and guidance




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THE TRANSITION PLAN

Overarching            Quality of teaching in Luton is 100% satisfactory or better
success criteria       Quality of teaching and learning is good or better in at least 75% of lessons/sessions
(to be achieved        ICT is integrated into teaching and learning and supports raised achievement
by July 2009)          Student feedback shows that lessons meet their needs in terms of variety and interest, and regularity and quality of
                       feedback at least 90% of the time

                                       Priority                     Other                                                 Monitored     Progress/
Action                                          Responsibility                    Timescale            Resources
                                         /ies                     partners                                                   by           Notes
Continue to develop the skills          127     HTs               SIAs/SIPs   Capacity confirmed       School time       Chairs of
of senior and middle leaders in                 SIA Sec Strat                   at termly aspire                         Govs
using performance                                                               meetings (from                           HTs
management to identify                                                           Easter 2007).                           SIAs/SIPs
strengths, weaknesses and                                                        Programmes/
areas for development of staff.                                                      support
                                                                              implemented termly
Introduce the new teacher                  7      HTs                HR         From Sept 2006       Training/briefing   Chairs of
standards and PM guidance.                                                                                 time          Govs
                                                                                                                         SIAs/SIPs
Put in place individual, time            17       HTs                As           As required          As required       Chairs of
limited support plans for staff                                   required                                               Govs
whose teaching is consistently                                                                                           SIAs/SIPs
weak
Provide training packages to             13       DHTs            Sec Strat      Put in place         School training    HTs
address commonly identified              47       SIA Sec Strat    Team       annually as needs           time           11-19 ASG
weaknesses across groups of                                                       identified
schools and Luton
Work with LCN subject groups            123       DHTs            Heads of     From Sept 2006       LCN meeting and      HTs
to evolve models for learning in        79        BSF Coord        Dept                             development time     11-19 ASG
subject areas that will make                      Chief Adv Sec                                                          BSF
best use of the resources and                                                                                            commission
facilities provided by BSF




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                                                  Priority                        Other          Time-                      Monitored    Progress/
Action                                                     Responsibility                                   Re-sources
                                                    /ies                         partners        scale                      by             Notes
Work with LCN subject groups to evolve             123     DHTs                  Heads of      From Sept    LCN meeting     HTs
models for learning in subject areas that            79    BSF Coord               Dept           2006      and develop-    11-19 ASG
will make best use of the resources and                    Chief Adv Sec                                    ment time       BSF
facilities provided by BSF                                                                                                  commission
Develop further the coaching                       123     DHTs                  Sec Strat     From Sept    School          HTs
frameworks and programmes that are                 457     CPD Coords              Tm             2006      training time   11-19 ASG
developing in schools and colleges                         SIA Sec Strat
Develop a Luton-wide action research              1234     DHTs              14-19 T&L        Programme     14-19 action    HTs
programme for teachers, derived from               578     Chief Adv Sec       action         devised by    group time      11-19 ASG
the Beds School Improvement                                CPD Coords          group          Easter 2007
Partnership model. A significant
component of this will be the                                                                  Programme
development of the “student voice” in                                                          commences
influencing professional development of                                                       Summer 2007
staff
Use Campus Luton consortia as the                  234     DHTs                  Identified    From Sept    School/         HTs
basis for learning partnerships to enable          578     Chief Adv Sec         teachers         2007      Consortium      11-19 ASG
staff peer learning to take place; focus                   CPD Coords                                       dev time
on NQTs, OTTs and Y2 teachers




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                                           Priority                   Other                Time-                             Monitored   Progress
Action                                              Responsibility                                           Resources
                                             /ies                    partners              scale                             by           / Notes
With HTs, DHTs and other key                234     HTs               All staff    Audit created by Dec      School          HTs
staff develop a Luton-wide                    57    DHTs                          06. Audits completed by    training time   11-19 ASG
approach to promoting literacy,                     Chief Adv Sec                       Easter 2007.         Team
oracy and thinking skills. Develop                  SIA Sec Strat                  Programmes planned        meeting
audit and teaching materials.                                                         and commenced          time
Disseminate these through                                                              Summer 2007
consortium. LCN and action
research groups.
Identify good practice in Luton in          234     DHTs              LSFC        Good practice identified   School          HTs
assessment for learning. Use                57      CPD Coords                         by Dec 2006.          training time   11-19 ASG
leading teachers and others to                      SIA Sec Strat     Leading      Dissemination activity    Team
model AfL practice via digital                                       teachers       ongoing (from Sept       meeting
resources and in “live” events                                                            2006)              time




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                                          Priority                                                                        Monitored    Progress
Action                                             Responsibility    Other partners       Timescale       Resources
                                            /ies                                                                          by            /Notes
Continue to develop the e-                 234     SIA ICT           Teacher training     From Sept          Centre       HTs
Learning centre as a venue for             578     SIA Sec Strat      organisations         2006.         development     11-19 ASG
teacher training (including as a                                        Secondary                             time
“virtual classroom”). Provide                      Centre             Strategy Team
subject specific sessions in all                   Manager
areas in the use of the IWB and
other hardware and software.

Train at least two staff in all             234    Chief Adv Sec      Identified staff      Training        2 days‟       HTs
institutions as “Building Learning          57     DHTs                                  completed by       training      11-19 ASG
Power” trainers. Integrate this                                          All staff        Easter 2007     Net-working
work into the development of                                                             (two thirds of        time
coaching in schools and colleges                                                            schools)       (0.5 day/
(see f above).                                                                              Network           term)
                                                                                         running from
                                                                                           Jan 2007
Continue to develop links with HE             7    CTG manager         HE partners         Ongoing        Core time for   HTs
and other SCITT providers to                       LA recruitment                                           key staff     11-19 ASG
increase recruitment to Luton.                     officer
Work with LBC corporate                       7    Director of C&L       LBC              From June        Core time      HTs
communications department to                                         Communications          2006                         11-19 ASG
improve profile of Luton and “sell”                                      Dept                                             LB Council
the opportunities that will be
available to teachers working in
transformed schools.




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                                             Priority                Other           Time                                  Monitored   Progress/
Action                                                Responsibility                                        Resources
                                               /ies                  partners        scale                                 by          Notes
Through the relevant LCN groups                  6    14-19 Director College         In line with 14-19     LCN meeting    HTs
and Campus Luton collaboratives                       DHTs           staff           Implementation              time      11-19 ASG
identify training needs for staff                                    HE staff        plan timescales         Addit-ional
delivering new courses (including                                    Employers                                 time as
diplomas). Put in place training in                                  QCA             Training for first       required
partnership with Colleges, HE, and                                                   lines of learning in
employers as required.                                                               place from Jan
                                                                                     2007
Establish a group to establish a                  9   HTs             14-19 T&L      Group established        Group        HTs
Luton framework on “tutoring for                      Chief Adv Sec   group          by Dec 2006            meeting time   11-19 ASG
learning” and promote its                                                                                    Material
dissemination so that all tutors are                                  CPD group      Proposals ready by        costs
equipped to enable students to                                                       July 2007
make the most of campus Luton                                         Identified
                                                                      school staff   Trial from Sept
learning opportunities.
                                                                                     2007




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Objective 1: Develop relevant curricular pathways and recognised qualifications for young people with Special Educational Needs/
Learning difficulties and disabilities
Action (A) Clarify options and pathways available to young people with SEN/ LDD to inform collaborative action planning and target
setting
Expected Outcomes: Action planning & improvement targets of options and pathways available to young people with SEN/LDD is based on
reliable & relevant audit information
ACTIVITIES             MILESTONES            TIMESCALE RESPONSIBILITY RESOURCES PROGRESS SUCCESS CRITERIA
                                                                                                  *
1A i. Complete an - Map and describe          May 2006   - Head of         No additional          4       Available current options and
audit of options       current options and               Psychology,       resourcing                     pathways mapped and
and pathways           pathways available                Assessment and                                   described with High Schools,
available to young     to young people                   Intervention                                     Local Colleges, LSC and
people with SEN/       with LDD                                                                           Connexions
LDD to inform          - Collate data on      June 2006  - Head of         No additional          4
collaborative action numbers of young                    Psychology,       resourcing
planning and target people progressing                   Assessment and
setting                to particular options             Intervention
                       - Estimate numbers      July 2006 - Head of         No additional          3
                       of places required                Psychology,       resourcing
                       in future based on                Assessment and
                       above                             Intervention
                       - Investigate         August 2006 - Head of         No additional          3
                       possible gaps and                 Psychology,       resourcing
                       shortfalls in                     Assessment and
                       provision                         Intervention
                       - Complete audit       September - Head of          No additional          1
                       including the above       2006    Psychology,       resourcing
                       information                       Assessment and
                                                         Intervention
                       - Complete action      November   - Head of         No additional          1
                       plan and set              2006    Psychology,       resourcing
                       improvement                       Assessment and
                       targets                           Intervention




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Objective 1: Develop relevant curricular pathways and recognised qualifications for young people with Special Educational Needs/
Learning difficulties and disabilities
Action (B) Ensure that as many students with special needs as possible access the enhanced curricular offer inherent in Campus
Luton arrangements
Expected Outcomes: Students with SEN access enhanced curricular offers as they are made available across Campus Luton
ACTIVITIES             MILESTONES           TIMESCALE RESPONSIBILITY RESOURCES PROGRESS SUCCESS CRITERIA
                                                                                                   *
1B i Facilitate the    - Develop agreed       January   - SEN Adviser       2 days staff          1        Students with special needs
consistency of         format of               2007                         time                           included in enriched
behaviour and          individualised                                                                      curricular arrangements
learning               learning plans with
expectations for       providers
individual students    - Individualised      September - SEN Adviser,       3 days staff          1
across                 learning plans in       2008     Head of             time
establishments         place for all                    Behaviour and
                       SEN/LDD students                 Tuition (BATS)
                       - Plans shared        September - SEN Adviser,       1 day staff           1
                       across providers        2008     Head of BATS        time
                       - Protocols to         October   - SEN Adviser,      2 days staff          1
                       support plans           2008     Head of             time
                       agreed by all                    Behaviour and
                       Campus Luton                     Tuition
                       providers
1B ii Use multi-       - Ensure all          April 2006 Access Managers 1 days staff              2        Existing multi-agency
agency forums and      colleagues           and ongoing                     time                           forums and subsequent
subsequent support     attending High                                                                      support arrangements used
arrangements to        School SLMs are                                                                     to ensure curricular access
ensure curricular      fully aware of                                                                      as appropriate
access as              Campus Luton
appropriate            curricular
                       developments
1B iii Ensure that     - Offer training for  April 2006 Head of             2 days staff          3        All transport arrangements
all transport          drivers and escorts  and ongoing Psychology,         time                           made enable students to
arrangements made on key needs as                       Assessment and                                     arrive at their destination
enable students to     required                         Intervention                                       safely and ready to learn
arrive at their        - Ensure routes are
destination safely     planned efficiently
and ready to learn


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Objective 1: Develop relevant curricular pathways and recognised qualifications for young people with Special Educational Needs/
Learning difficulties and disabilities
Action (B) Ensure that as many students with special needs as possible access the enhanced curricular offer inherent in Campus
Luton arrangements
Expected Outcomes: Students with SEN access enhanced curricular offers as they are made available across Campus Luton
ACTIVITIES               MILESTONES               TIMESCALE RESPONSIBILITY          RESOURCES          PROGRESS* SUCCESS
                                                                                                                     CRITERIA
1Biv Extend              - Establish local         April 2007 Headteacher of        Transport costs         1        Students
opportunities for        employment               and ongoing Woodlands                                              participate in a
students to participate availability                                                                                 variety of
at Woodlands School      - Ensure information                                                                        curricular
in Layer 2               available on full                                                                           opportunities
collaborative curricular range of
opportunities (i.e.      opportunities
Construction, Creative - Support students
and Cultural             participation as
industries, health and   needed
social care and leisure - Ensure transport is
and Tourism) as          available as needed
appropriate
1Bv Offer some post-     - Ensure information      September High School            tbc                     1        Post-16
16 courses on the        is available on full        2008     Headteachers                                           opportunities
premises of high         range of                                                                                    established
schools through          opportunities
Campus Luton to          - Elicit students‟ views
young people with        on participation
SEN/LDD                  - Support students
                         participation as
                         needed
                         - Ensure transport
                         available as needed
1Bvi Enhance local       - Strategic links with     April 06  - Head of Psychology, No additional           3        Local post-16
post-16 provision for    LSC Mayflower              onwards   Assessment and        resourcing                       provision for
students with the most project established                    Intervention                                           students with
severe needs             - Work with LSC re         April 06  - Head of Psychology, LSC and BSF                      the most severe
                         future developments        onwards   Assessment and        Funding (post                    needs
                                                              Intervention          2010 re.                         enhanced
                                                                                    Woodlands)


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Objective 2 Planning specialist services for children with less common SEN
Action (A) establish identified provision for students with communication and interaction needs
Expected Outcomes: Pupils with communication and interaction needs well catered for and making appropriate progress
Mainstream teachers increasingly confident in working with young people with communication and interaction needs
ACTIVITIES            MILESTONES             TIMESCALE RESPONSIBILITY RESOURCES                 PROGRESS SUCCESS CRITERIA
                                                                                                      *
2A i To develop 3     - Draft proposal       April 06       - Head of Access    No additional         4        3 fully integrated provisions
coterminous fully     developed for initial                 BSF Project         resourcing                     for students with SCD
integrated area       borough-wide pilot                    Manager                                            developed on High School
educational           provision and                                                                            sites
provisions on High    specification for
School sites for      subsequent
students with social  provisions outlined
and communication     - Expressions of       May 06         - Head of Access    No additional         4
difficulties          interest sought from                  BSF Project         resourcing
                      Head Teachers to                      Manager
                      develop initial
                      borough-wide pilot
                      provision on
                      delegated model
                      - Building             March 08       - Head Teacher of 10 days staff           1
                      programme,                            identified school,  time
                      refitting and staffing                Education Support
                      of Borough wide                       Services
                      provision developed                   Manager,
                                                            BSF Project
                                                            Manager
                      - Additional           March 10       - Head Teacher of 15 days staff           1
                      provisions                            identified schools, time
                      developed in light of                 Education Support BSF Funding
                      pilot experience                      Services
                                                            Manager,
                                                            BSF Project
                                                            Manager




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ACTIVITIES                            MILESTONES                  TIMESCALE       RESPONSIBILITY RESOURCES        PROGRESS*   SUCCESS
                                                                                                                              CRITERIA
2A ii Explore the development         - Consultation with         October 06      Youth Service   No additional       1       Development
of dedicated youth provision          Access Service                              Manager         resourcing                  of dedicated
for young people with social          colleagues completed                                                                    youth
communication difficulties            - Expressions of            November                        No additional       1       provision for
                                      interest sought from        06                              resourcing                  young people
                                      Heads                                                                                   with SCD
                                      - Proposal developed        November                        No additional       1       explored
                                      for initial borough wide    06                              resourcing
                                      pilot provision
                                      - Building programme,       January                         tbc                 1
                                      refitting and staffing of   2007
                                      dedicated youth
                                      provision
                                      - Dedicated provision       April 2007                      15 days staff       1
                                      developed                                                   time




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Objective 2 Plan specialist services for children with less common SEN
Action (B) Enhance the quality of existing borough wide integrated provision for students with significant visual, physical and
hearing impairments
Expected Outcomes: Pupils with significant visual, physical and hearing impairments are well catered for and making appropriate progress
Mainstream teachers increasingly confident in working with young people with communication and interaction needs
ACTIVITIES               MILESTONES           TIMESCALE RESPONSIBILITY             RESOURCES           PROGRESS SUCCESS CRITERIA
                                                                                                             *
2B i. Ensure all schools - Accessibility      July 06         Head Teachers,       Education                 2       All schools fully
are fully compliant with plans completed                      Education Support    Support                           compliant with the
the SEN and Disability                                        Services Manager     Services                          SEN and Disability Act
Act 2001 and Disability  - Disability         December 06                          Manager                   1       2001 and Disability
Discrimination Act 2005 Equality                                                                                     Discrimination Act
                         Schemes are in                                                                              2005
                         place
2Bii Develop an          - Clarify draft      April 06        Head of Access       No additional             4       Enhanced centre for
enhanced centre for      specification for                                         resourcing                        PI/VI pupils centrally
PI/VI pupils centrally   BSF                                                                                         sited within Putteridge
sited within Putteridge  developments                                                                                High School
High School              - Consult with       May 06 and      Education Support                              1       developed
                         Head Teacher         ongoing         Services Manager
                         and key school
                         staff
                         - Capital work       tbc             BSF Project          BSF Funding               1
                         developed                            Manager
2Biii Develop Icknield   - Clarify draft      April 06        Head of Access       No additional             4       Facilities and staffing
High School provision    specification for                    Education Support    resourcing                        of Icknield High
for hearing impaired     BSF                                  Services Manager                                       provision for HI pupils
pupils in terms of its   developments                                                                                developed
facilities and staffing  - Consult with       May 06          Education Support                              1
                         Head Teacher                         Services Manager
                         and key school
                         staff
                         - Capital work       tbc             BSF Project          BSF Funding               1
                         developed                            Manager




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Objective 3: Meet the challenges for schools posed by children and young people with severe behavioural, emotional and social
difficulties
Action (A) Establish identified provision for students with behaviour, emotional and social difficulties
Expected Outcomes:
ACTIVITIES             MILESTONES                 TIMESCALE    RESPONSIBILITY       RESOURCES PROGRESS SUCCESS
                                                                                                         *     CRITERIA
3A i. Develop a        - Provide opportunities    April 06 and - BIP Co-ordinator   3 days staff         3     Collaborative
collaborative working for managers of             onwards      Behaviour and        time                       working model for
model for behaviour    behaviour and inclusion                 Attendance           DfES funding               behaviour
improvement across in high schools to plan                     Consultant                                      improvement across
Campus Luton           multi-tiered collaborative                                                              Campus Luton
providers              working                                                                                 providers developed
                       - Develop action plan for June 06       - BIP Co-ordinator   1 day staff          4
                       SSPA consortium in                      Behaviour and        time
                       association with all                    Attendance
                       SSPA High Schools                       Consultant
                       - Support                  September 06 - BIP Co-ordinator   3 days staff         3
                       implementation of          and onwards  Behaviour and        time
                       collaborative working in                Attendance
                       SPAA consortium in line                 Consultant
                       with agreed action plan
                       - Action plan for          September 06 - BIP Co-ordinator   2 days staff         2
                       remaining 2 consortia                   Behaviour and        time
                       developed                               Attendance
                                                               Consultant
                       - Support                  September 07 - BIP Co-ordinator   3 days staff         1
                       implementation of          and onwards  Behaviour and        time
                       collaborative working                   Attendance
                       across all consortia                    Consultant




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Objective 3: Meet the challenges for schools posed by children and young people with severe behavioural, emotional and social
difficulties
Action (A) Establish identified provision for students with behaviour, emotional and social difficulties
Expected Outcomes:
ACTIVITIES                  MILESTONES               TIMESCALE RESPONSIBILITY          RESOURCES PROGRESS SUCCESS
                                                                                                         *      CRITERIA
3Aii Include students                                           See 1Bi,1Bii and 1Biii                          Students with BESD
with behaviour, social                                                                                          included in the
and emotional                                                                                                   enriched curricular
difficulties in the                                                                                             arrangements of
enriched curricular                                                                                             Campus Luton
arrangements of                                                                                                 wherever possible
Campus Luton
wherever possible
3Aiii Enhance all           - Identify current       September     BIP Co-ordinator    1 day staff       3      All existing LSUs
existing Learning           strengths and            06            LSU Managers        time                     developed to
Support Units across        weaknesses of LSUs                                                                  specialise in
the town to specialise      - Support individual     January 07    BIP Co-ordinator    6 days staff      2      particular activities
in particular activities or LSUs across Luton to                   LSU Managers        time                     or behavioural
behavioural                 develop specific                                                                    approaches
approaches                  expertise in line with
                            identifies strengths     March 07      BIP Co-ordinator    6 days staff      2
                            - Support individual                   LSU Managers        time
                            LSUs in collaborating
                            and sharing of good
                            practice that can be
                            accessed by students
                            within the consortium
3Aiv Develop a              - Proposals outlined via April 06      - Head of Access    0.5 day staff     4      Collaborative area
collaborative area          EBD strategy group                                         time                     model of offsite
model of offsite            - Consult with Heads of                - Head of Access,                            secondary behaviour
secondary behaviour         Centres                  June 06 and Head of BATS,         1 day staff       3      centres developed in
centres in each of the 3                             ongoing       Heads of Centres    time                     each of the 3 areas
areas into which is         - Agree new ways of      September     - Head of Access,   1 day staff       2      into which is
amalgamated existing        working alongside BSF 06               Head of BATS,       time                     amalgamated
PRU provision               developments with                      Heads of Centres,                            existing PRU
                            Management Steering                    Management                                   provision
                            Committee                              Steering Group


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Objective 3: Meet the challenges for schools posed by children and young people with severe behavioural, emotional and social
difficulties
Action (A) Establish identified provision for students with behaviour, emotional and social difficulties
Expected Outcomes:
ACTIVITIES            MILESTONES            TIMESCALE RESPONSIBILITY RESOURCES                PROGRESS SUCCESS CRITERIA
                                                                                                     *
3Aiv Cont.            - Agree specification circa 2007    Head of Access,    No additional           2
                      and site of new                     BSF Project        resources
                      provision                           Manager,
                      - Capital work        circa 2010    Management         BSF Funding             1
                      developed                           Steering group

3A v Explore the          - Briefing paper to     October 06   - Manager of        1 day staff time   2   Model of Youth Service
development of a          DMT                                  Youth Service,                             support for permanently
model of Youth                                                 Head of Behaviour                          excluded students and
Service support for                                            and Tuition                                those at risk of exclusion
permanently               - Proposal              December     - Manager of        2 days staff       1   developed
excluded students         developed for initial   06           Youth Service,      time
and those at risk of      borough wide model                   Head of Behaviour
exclusion                                                      and Tuition




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Objective 4: Ensure there is clarity about the future role of special schools within an inclusive system
Action (A) Enhance the quality of existing borough-wide facilities for students with significant and complex learning difficulties
Expected Outcomes: Borough-wide facilities for students with significant and complex learning difficulties meet local need
ACTIVITIES                 MILESTONES                 TIMESCALE RESPONSIBILITY RESOURCES                       PROGRESS SUCCESS
                                                                                                                      *    CRITERIA
Consider the               - Consultation with Head April 06         - Head of Access,    tbc                        4     Development of
development of a long-     Teacher re. proposed                      BSF team, Capital                                     a long-term
term residential resource plans                                      & Asses                                               residential
linked to Woodlands                                                  Management                                            resource linked
                           - Plans developed once     Circa 2008     - BSF Project        tbc                        1     to Woodlands
                           funding decisions made                    Manager                                               considered
Consider the               - Consultation with Head April 06         BSF team             1 day staff time           4     Development of
development of onsite      Teacher and social care                                                                         onsite provision
provision for short breaks colleagues re. proposed                                                                         for short breaks
attached to the school, in plans                                                                                           attached to the
association with social    - Plans developed once     June 06        BSF team, Capital tbc                           1     school
care colleagues.           funding and capital                       and Asset                                             considered, in
                           decisions made                            Management                                            association
                                                                                                                           with social care
                                                                                                                           colleagues
Consider whether           - Consultation with Head June 06          BSF Project          1 day staff time           4     Co-location of
Woodlands school should Teachers of High                             Manager                                               Woodlands
be co-located with a       Schools re. proposed                                                                            School with
mainstream High School     plans                                                                                           mainstream
                           - Consultation with Head June 06          Consultation with    BSF                        4     High School
                           Teacher                                   Head Teacher                                          considered

Key to progress rating
Rating                             Description                            Rating                    Description
1                                  Not started                            3                         On target
2                                  Slow start but making progress         4                         Completed




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BSF CHANGE PLAN ~ ADMINISTRATION VERSION 1.0

Activity                                          Led by       Involving    Timescale        Progress / comments
Develop change plan in light of progress          W Clapp      Area         September
in implementing Governance and                                 consortia    2006
management of schools change plan                              leads


BSF CHANGE PLAN ~ ADMISSIONS VERSION 1.0

Activity                                          Led by       Involving    Timescale        Progress / comments
Review catchment areas.                           D Craig      Admissions   Annual           Check ability of school to admit preferences
                                                               Forum                         within catchment area.

Refine pupil forecasting to incorporate           G Sandmann   D Craig      Summer 2007
parental preference.
Participate in discussions regarding              R Lucas      D Craig      June 2006
phasing of BSF programme.

Brief academy sponsors representative             W Clapp/ P   Barnfield    Autumn 2006      D Craig to check dates for new school agreement
on Luton admission arrangements                   Joseph       College                       of admissions arrangements.

Assist in design of academies admission           W Clapp/ P   Barnfield    March 2007       D Craig to check date.
arrangements.                                     Joseph       College      (for Sept 08
                                                                            academy start)




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BSF CHANGE PLAN ~ FINANCE WITHIN THE COLLABORATIVES VERSION 1.0

Activity                                           Led by       Involving         Timescale Progress / comments
Engage with area consortia leads to agree            LBC      Area consortia       Autumn
scope.                                             Finance        leads             2006

Develop simple costing model to allocate             LBC      School Finance/      Autumn        To be fully developed by April 2007.
costs of collaborative arrangements.               Finance      Curriculum          2006
                                                                Managers

Review to inform 07/08 budget-setting                LBC      School Finance/     December
                                                   Finance      Curriculum          2006
                                                                Managers
Amend schools accounting structures to               LBC      School Finance      April 2007
demonstrate costs of collaboration.                Finance      Managers


BSF CHANGE PLAN ~ STAFFING WITHIN THE COLLABORATIVES VERSION 1.0

Activity                                           Led by      Involving        Timescale      Progress / comments
Engage with area consortia leads to assist        H Burgess        Area         September      Need to liaise with D Carter over the nominated area
in tailoring implementation to local                            consortia          06          leads
circumstances                                                     leads
Work through consequent HR and other                Head-      H Burgess        Autumn 06
issues (e.g. selling vision to staff,             teachers                         and
consultation on staffing structure changes,                                      ongoing
financial implications)
Ensure senior leaders in schools are              H Burgess   Headteachers September           Policy on school federation, collaboration and
aware of existing tools for supporting                                      06 and             partnership working – Personnel Handbook for
collaboration                                                               ongoing            Schools Ch.2, section 6, appx 6
                                                                                               Check local agreement being followed-through in
                                                                                               school staffing contracts issued directly by schools

Schools to share existing experiences /             Head-      H Burgess        September
good practice in relation to collaboration        teachers                       06 and
                                                                                 ongoing



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BSF CHANGE PLAN ~ INTEGRATION OF CHILDREN’S SERVICES VERSION 1.0

Activity                                          Led by      Involving     Timescale   Progress / comments
Engage with multi-agency partnership to           T Dessent   CYPSB,        June 06
assess preparedness for change and                            PMG
identify next steps priorities

Assess need and bid for transformational          W Clapp     C&LDMT        June 06
resources to develop integrated children‟s
services

Negotiate with partners over contributions        T Dessent   CYPSB         Summer 06
to multi-agency capacity

Appoint and commission staff to drive             T Dessent   CYPSB         September
forward multi-agency priorities                                             06 and
                                                                            ongoing




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APPENDIX N - REGISTER OF CRITICAL RISKS
    Stage       ID           Risk           Sev   Prob   Impor               Existing controls                              Mitigating action                  Resp      Status   Target
                                                           t                                                                                                  Officer              date

                                                                 LBC Executive, Project Board, BSF             Action Plan finalised within 4ps Gate 1         Lead:     Amber    Resolve
                       Insufficient LBC                          Strategy Group. Design, ICT, Finance,         Action Plan for approval Project Board            PD               prior to
  Stage 2:             staff/ consultant                         Technical & Legal Consultants                 26.04.07                                       Officers              OBC
  Strategic     2.8     capacity & skill     3     2       6     4ps,   PfS    advice   &    competency                                                         : PS               finish.
  Planning               set to deliver                          frameworks                                    Review & confirm in OBC resource plan &                            Jun 07
                          programme                              4ps Gateway 1 Review.                         project management arrangements for
                                                                                                               procurement stage
                                                                 Agreements of 26th September meeting          Clarify   &     confirm  revised   delivery     Lead:      Red     Project
                                                                 DfES/Sponsor/LBC - confirmed 17th             responsibilities & governance framework          PD                Board
                       Formal inclusion                          October                                       with Sponsor. Complete                         Officers             24th
                       of Academies in                           Project Board                                 Review OBC outputs & programme.                 : PM                May
                2.9    BSF programme         3     3       9     Academies Project Steering Group              Complete
                        & procurement                            Current position: OBC delayed from            Sign-off      of    Academies     Funding
                         delays OBC                              January 07                                    Agreement (achieved on 23rd May 2007)
                                                                                                               Confirm proposed inclusion of Academies in
                                                                                                               OBC sample schemes
                                                                 Addressed via LBC/Sponsor/PfS/DfES            See existing controls                           Lead:     Amber    Project
                                                                 10th November 2006.                           Target date to confirm “Heads of                 PS                Board
                       Failure to secure                         Preferred & fallback options established      Agreement” in line with Academies Funding      Officers             24th
                        land purchase/                           Land purchase & transfer agreed               Agreement revised to May 2007                  : CFO                May
                2.10     availability for    3     1       3     Date for transfer of freehold outstanding –   DfES and Sponsor addressing for
                        Barnfield South                          resolution required for approval of OBC       completion of Funding Agreement
                           Academy                               and for procurement to proceed                (achieved on 23rd May 2007)
                                                                                                               Monitored by Project Board
                                                                 SBC revenue affordability estimate            Address via OBC affordability analysis          Lead:     Amber    Project
                                                                 updated for OBC                               Engagement with schools via Campus               PS                Board
                                                                 National    funding    formulas,   BSF        Luton Partnership Mtg                          Officers              28th
                        BSF operational                          benchmarks & standard BSF contracts           Presentations to LSHGp/CLP Nov ‟06, Dec            :                June
                       revenues in OBC                                    Schools Forum                       ‟06, Jan ‟07, Mar „07                           CFO,
   Stage 3:                   prove                                       Campus Luton Partnership Mtg        Addressed at 21st Feb & 7th Mar ‟07 School     PD, PM
Business Case   3.1       unaffordable       3     2       6              BSF Governors Forum                 Governors‟ Forum meetings. Agenda item
  Develop‟t              (FM, lifecycle,                                  BSF Strategy Group                  for 2nd May meeting
                            ICT, LEP                                      ICT Sub-Group                       Meetings held with Wave 3 Governing
                           operations)                                    BSF schools representatives         Bodies
                                                                           meeting                             LBC Executive approval 18th June
                                                                                                               Draft OBC demonstrates improved Schools
                                                                                                               and LBC revenue affordability
                                                                 DfES/PfS BSF guidance                         Address       via     project   governance      Lead:     Amber    Project
                                                                 OBC template requirements                     arrangements & Council meetings                  PO                Board
                                                                         Joint Board (25th January)           Address within OBC analysis, making            Officers              28th
                        OBC outcomes:
                       (LEP/affordability                                BSF      Commission        (14th     explicit commercial proposals, cost, phasing    : PS,               June
                                                                                       th                      & BSF benefits                                  CFO,
                         / PFI analysis/                                  February, 13 June)
                3.2
                        service transfer/
                                             3     2       6             Council Executive (18th June)        PfS LEP presentation to CLMT and Joint         PD, PM
                                                                                                               Board 25th January
                          TUPE) prove
                                                                                                               Presentation to BSF Commission 14th
                          unacceptable
                                                                                                               February
                                                                                                               Draft OBC to include new build PFI in Phase
                                                                                                               1




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    Stage       ID         Risk         Sev   Prob    Import              Existing controls                             Mitigating action                    Resp       Status   Target
                                                                                                                                                             Officer              date

                                                               Intelligence from Pre-Bidders Day (22nd    Advice established on market interest for           Lead:     Amber    Project
                                                               September 2006) & Luton ICT soft           D&B only, D&B + managed service                      PD                Board
                                                               market-test (16th January 2007)            provision & PFI                                    Officers             24th
                       OBC/Phase
                                                               PfS market intelligence/advice obtained    Feedback obtained from Luton ICT soft               : PM                May
                         1/Sample
                                                               DfES/PfS guidance - Academies within       market-test
                3.3      schemes         3        2     6
                                                               Luton BSF programme                        Academies separate ICT provision approved
                      market offering
                                                               Project Board monitoring                   Academies separate FM provision approved
                      is unattractive
                                                               OBC analysis & approval                    Luton BSF Phase 1 sample schemes to be
                                                                                                          confirmed within OBC
                                                                                                          Revised sample agreed with DfES/PfS
                                                               Purchase/transfer of Rotheram Ave site     Sponsor/DfES addressing:                            Lead:      Red     Review
                                                               for Barnfield South Academy agreed                   LEP provision of Academies FM              PS               Project
                        Signing of                             SOC (17th January) agreed closure of                 Timing       of    Rotheram       Ave   Officers            Board
                       Academies                               predecessor schools                                   availability/freehold transfer           : HSI,              24th
                3.4      Funding         3        2     6      Academies Project Steering Group                     Satisfactory completion of schools         PM                May
                      Agreement not                            Project Board                                         transfer due diligence
                         secured                                                                          Sign-off      of      Academies        Funding
                                                                                                          Agreement (achieved on 23rd May 2007)
                                                                                                          Monitored by Project Board
                                                               Role specification & advice from 4ps,      Approve & implement recruitment approach            Lead:     Amber    Project
                        Inability to                           PfS.                                       & plan. Complete                                     PO                Board
                          secure                               Established & growing PFI/LIFT/BSF         Funding availability approved. Complete            Officers             24th
   Stage 4:
                       substantive                             market                                     Recruitment       implemented;        interviews    : PD                May
 Procurement    4.1                      3        2     6
                          Project                              Job Description/person specification set   16th/17th May
   Planning
                       Procurement                             Recruitment consultants engaged            Review & confirm in OBC resource plan &
                         Director                                                                         project management arrangements for
                                                                                                          procurement stage
                                                                        Project Board                    PfS advice engaged in development of the            Lead:     Amber    Review
                                                                        BSF Strategy Group               Plan                                                  PS               Project
                      Transformation                                    Campus Luton Partnership Mtg     Change       Plan     established    &     being   Officers            Board
                                                               Change Plan consistent with Campus         implemented. Complete                               : HSI,              24th
                         plan not
                                                               Luton/BSF EV                               Plan incorporated in SBC & production of              SIA               May
                         delivered
                4.2                      3        2     6      Providers representation on Project        OBC. Complete
                          across
                                                               Board                                      Ongoing monitoring at Campus Luton
                      Campus Luton
                                                               BSF Consortia Reps facilitating Change     Partnership Mtg, BSF Strategy Group,
                       collaborative
                                                               Plan with schools                          Project Board
                                                                                                          Schools engaging in individual change plans
                                                                                                          based on school visions




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