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					        How to Write an
         Introduction to an
         Argumentative
         Essay


is




     Presenter Name and Title
 Yourintroduction should begin with a
 “hook” or an attention grabber to pull-in
 the reader. A hook could include an
 anecdote or short story that has a point,
 an epigraph, or quotation, a statistic, or a
 rhetorical question.
 “When   a cell phone goes off in the
 classroom or a concert, we are irritated,
 but at least our lives are not in danger.
 When we are on the road, however,
 irresponsible cell phone users are more
 than irritating: They are putting our lives
 at risk.”
 Statistics:
 “According   to Nellie Mae statistics, in 2004
 undergraduates had an average credit limit of
 $3,683. Nearly 10% of the students in the Nellie
 Mae study carried balances that exceed these
 credit limit (Blair, 96). Do we want a nation of
 people under twenty with credit card debt after
 they graduate college?”
Do you believe in fate or do you
 believe people cause their own
 fate?
 Abbie Hoffman suggests “freedom is
 yelling theater in a crowded fire.”
 Hoffman is being ironic and making the
 case that any utterance, no matter how
 absurd or inflammatory, is guaranteed by
 the Constitution. To believe this is to be
 un-American.
 The thesis is your overriding statement
 that announces the main topic of your
 essay. In an argumentative essay, once
 you have read and understood the
 prompt you are ready to generate a thesis
 either supporting, refuting, or qualifying
 the argument that is provided.
 Brainstorm: Support     Hershel’s position
  that “in a free society where terrible
  wrongs exist, some are guilty and all are
  responsible.”
 Thesis Statement: Rabbi Abraham
  Herschel is correct that in a society
  where “where terrible wrongs exist”
  everyone is responsible.
 Your subtopics are topics that support
 your thesis. In an argumentative essay,
 your subtopics should be arranged using
 a 2-3-1 format. Place your second best
 reason first, then your weakest argument
 in the middle, and your strongest
 argument as your last body paragraph.
 Brainstorm: Support   Herschel’s
  argument
 Subtopic:
-Subtopic 1(2): Hale’s guilt in “The
  Crucible”
-Subtopic 2(3): Middle School Matchmaker
  Drama
-Subtopic 3(1): Kazan during the McCarthy
  era
In 1998 President Bill Clinton told reporters when asked about
   a relationship with intern Monica Lewinsky, if they had any
   type of relationship together, Clinton responded: “I did not
   have sexual relations with that woman!” Later, it was
   revealed Clinton did have an affair with Lewinsky and was
   impeached, not because of his affair, but because he lied. A
   similar situation occurs in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet
   Letter. The dominant theme throughout the novel is sin vs.
   guilt. This is played out in three scaffold scenes. The first
   shows Hester Prynne on the scaffold for committing
   adultery, the second has Reverend Arthur Dimmesdale on
   the scaffold, suffering from his guilt at night time, and the
   final scaffold scene has Dimmesdale’s final confession to the
   Puritan people of Boston.
Hook: In 1998 President Bill Clinton told reporters when asked
  about a relationship with intern Monica Lewinsky, if they had
  any type of relationship together. Clinton responded: “I did
  not have sexual relations with that woman!” Later, it was
  revealed Clinton did have an affair with Lewinsky and was
  impeached, not because of his affair, but because he lied. A
  similar situation occurs in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet
  Letter.
Thesis: The dominant theme throughout the novel is sin vs.
  guilt.
Subtopics: This is played out in three scaffold scene. The first
  shows Hester Prynne on the scaffold for committing
  adultery, the second has Reverend Arthur Dimmesdale on
  the scaffold, suffering from his guilt at night time, and the
  final scaffold scene has Dimmesdale’s final confession to the
  Puritan people of Boston.
 1. Hook:
  Quote/Statistic/Definition/Story/Question/R
  eact to Prompt
 2. Thesis: State your position responding to
  the prompt – Support/Refute/Qualify
 3. Subtopics: Use the 2-3-1 format to arrange
  your evidence supporting your thesis. Make
  sure to include evidence from “The
  Crucible,” a modern day crucible, and
  another text and/or your life experience.
Get in the habit of using MLA format.
-Header with last name
-1 inch margins
-in-text citations with author and page #s.
-Double-Spaced
-Times New Roman Font
-Typed

				
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posted:1/15/2011
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