Docstoc

Home Page –

Document Sample
Home Page – Powered By Docstoc
					Home Page –

Additional Promo Area

Pain Management – (Link to pain management page)

Inland Imaging may be able to help with a painful or uncomfortable condition. We offer specialized procedures to
alleviate and subside specific pain. Learn more about Inland Imaging‟s Pain Management options.

Schedule a Screening Mammogram - (Link to mammography page)

The American Cancer Society recommends women over the age of 40 schedule an annual screening mammogram.
Early detection of breast cancer can greatly increase your chances of treatment of the disease and survival. Schedule
your mammogram today.

Cardiovascular Health - (Link to cardiovascular page)

Heart disease is the number one cause of death in United States. Inland Imaging offers several procedures that may
better evaluate your risk and help your doctor develop a treatment plan.

Latest News

CT Radiation Exposure Strictly Monitored to Minimize Risk to Patients

NFL Preventive Cardiologist Says Early Detection Key to Offsetting Heart Disease

Inland Imaging Expands Services to Deer Park, Washington.

Inland Imaging Achieves PET/CT Accreditation

Rotating Message

Cardiovascular Disease
How Do I know if I might be at Risk?

Women‟s Health
Women at High Risk of Breast Cancer Should Pair their Mammogram with a Breast MRI

Events
Race for the Cure and the Women‟s Show

Three Inland Imaging Doctor‟s Selected to the Area‟s Best Doctor List

Inland Vascular Institute Message (Link)

Venous Disease:
A half million people suffer from ulceration of the lower extremity as a result of longstanding venous disease. Learn
more.

For Physicians (Link)

iSite PACS Login

Username
Password
Go
Rotating Message 1 (Explain)

Cardiovascular Disease – Am I at risk?

Inland Imaging along with area medical professionals are taking a proactive approach to better aid in offsetting the
deadly effects of cardiovascular disease in the United States. Research has shown early detection can greatly
decrease the risk of heart attack or stroke. Through new imaging and screening procedures, your doctor can prescribe
life saving or life prolonging assistance before a heart attack or stroke occurs.

Traditionally, patients are unaware of possible vascular problems or other indicators associated with heart disease until
a major health problem happens. Inland Imaging has prepared a cardiovascular protocol to educate patients of their
cardiovascular health. Ask you doctor if you are interested in cardiovascular health screening.

Here are general steps that Inland Imaging and your doctor can take to measure your risk:

Step 1: Assess and evaluate your baseline data, family history, and current healthcare information. This includes
cholesterol screening, fasting lipid profile, age and gender. The information gathered will determine if you are at risk
and what potential treatment options are available.

Step 2: Based on initial history, blood analysis, cardiac scoring, and patient symptoms, a cardiac intama medial
thickness (IMT) ultrasound may be ordered to further evaluate your cardiac capacity and health. The arterial fibrous
cap can be analyzed for architecture and stability. The IMT test can potentially ascertain arterial occlusion and the
need for immediate or prophylactic surgical and pharmacologic intervention.

Step 3: An early stage or late stage Cardiac CTA may be ordered based on initial evaluation in order to determine the
presence of soft plaque and your heart stability. Considered by most clinicians as the gold standard for Cardiac
diagnosis, the Cardiac CT provides a 3-D orientation to identify architectural anomalies and soft-plaque presence,
progression, and stability.

Rotating Message 2 (Explain)

Women’s Health
Women at High Risk of Breast Cancer Should Pair their Mammogram with a Breast MRI

Based on new guidelines from the American Cancer Society, it is now suggested that women with a high risk of
developing breast cancer pair their mammograms with an MRI scan. These tests together provide a greater
opportunity for doctors to determine early signs of cancer. Catching these warning signs early can open the way for
more accurate and less invasive treatment options, increasing the chance of patient survival.

The guidelines recommend MRI screening in addition to mammograms for women who meet at least one of the
following conditions:
• they have a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation.
• they have a first-degree relative (parent, sibling, child) with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, even if they have yet to be
tested themselves.
• their lifetime risk of breast cancer has been scored at 20%-25% or greater, based on one of several accepted risk
assessment tools that look at family history and other factors.
• they had radiation to the chest between the ages of 10 and 30.
• they have Li-Fraumeni syndrome, Cowden syndrome, or Bannayan-Riley, Ruvalcaba syndrome, or may have one of
these syndromes based on a history in a first-degree relative.

Screening MRI is now recommended for women with a 20-25% or greater lifetime risk of breast cancer. This includes
women with a strong family history of breast or ovarian cancer as well as women who were treated
for Hodgkin‟s disease. However, there is still conflicting evidence that would suggest MRI screening for women with
dense breasts, a history of LCIS (lobular carcinoma in situ), or personal history of breast cancer.
In addition, a study published by The New England Journal of Medicine reported that women with breast cancer in one
breast may benefit from a contralateral breast MRI. 10% of women diagnosed with breast cancer develop a tumor in
the opposite breast, even though no evidence of abnormalities was found in their initial exam. In the study, 969 women
underwent an MRI scan of the contralateral breast soon after being diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer. The MRI
detected abnormalities in 121 patients, 30 of which that were found to have invasive breast cancer.

As with all diagnostic imaging, breast MRI is not always the most accurate means of evaluating a patient. MRI
screenings can result in more false-positive results than mammography, thus leading to unnecessary biopsies,
increased patient anxiety, and greater risk of adverse health effects. They are about 10 times as expensive as a
standard mammogram and do not have strong data to support MRI as an alternative to mammography. These factors
confirm the need to carefully screen and educate patients and their referring physician before utilizing breast MRI
technology.

For those women that have been categorized as “average-risk” by their doctor and have symptoms, the American
Cancer Society recommends scheduling an annual screening mammogram and breast exam beginning at age 40.
Women with a “high-risk” of developing breast cancer should begin having alternating breast MRIs and mammograms
by age 30, unless otherwise determined by the women‟s doctor.

MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) is a powerful diagnostic tool that uses magnetic fields, not radiation, to create
images of the body. The best MRI technique involves the use of a special “breast coil” to enhance the magnetic field.
During a breast MRI, the patient lies still on her stomach and is administered a contrast agent via IV as the machine
creates images of the body.

Breast MRI is useful in:
• problem solving associated with those patients that present difficult diagnostic obstacles
• breast implant evaluation
• screening a woman who is at high risk for cancer because of a significant family history of breast cancer or an
abnormal breast cancer gene.

Breast MRI is used in women who are found to have breast cancer cells in an axillary lymph node, but have no known
breast mass that doctors are able to feel or see on a mammogram. In these cases, where mastectomy is typically
recommended, MRI can help find the precise site of the cancer‟s origin within the breast. Finding the cancer‟s primary
site can expand a woman‟s treatment options to include lumpectomy plus radiation and mastectomy.

Inland Imaging is one of few Northwest centers that offer MRI breast exams as well as breast MRI guided biopsies, as
they are not readily available everywhere. Inland Imaging is gaining valuable expertise to read these tests more
reliably. Dr. Florence Gin, a breast-imaging radiologist at Inland Imaging, says “The new guidelines released by the
American Cancer Society and the article published by The New England Journal of Medicine serve as crucial
resources for determining the use of breast MRI. We can now diagnose breast cancer earlier by utilizing both
mammography and breast MRI in high risk patients.”

The American Cancer Society‟s new guidelines are based on studies that were published after they last revised its
early detection guidelines from 2002 and 2003. The panel in 2003 concluded there was not sufficient evidence to
recommend MRI scans for high risk women. The result of these studies advised women to talk with their doctor‟s
based on their individual case. Now, in 2007, more concise data is available to support MRI as a successful imaging
tool for certain women.

For more information regarding possible risk factors, mammogram screenings, and MRI breast exams, please contact
Inland Imaging at 509.747.4455.

Rotating Message 3 (Explain)

Events
Race for the Cure and the Women’s Show
The 4th annual Spokane Women‟s Show partnered with the 3rd annual Race for the Cure on April 18-20 at the
Spokane Convention Center in downtown Spokane. The show attracted over 6,000 women throughout the region
seeking of information, entertainment and education. The net proceeds of the Show will help Sacred Heart replace the
Women‟s Health Center Coach and equip it with the latest in mammography technology. Inland Imaging radiologists
read the mammography images and are major supporters of the coach.

Hundreds of women stopped by the Inland Imaging booth to receive some great gifts and talk with area medical
professionals. Inland Imaging staff members and medical professionals were on hand to address the latest
advancements in women‟s health.

Rotating Message 4 (Explain)

Three Inland Imaging Doctor’s Selected to the Area’s Best Doctor List
Dr. Cubberley, Dr. Raabe, and Dr. Luna chosen

Inland Imaging is proud to announce that three of our own distinguished doctors have been selected as one of the
“Best Doctors” for 2008 as determined by a Boston-based Best Doctors Association. The issue is released yearly and
features area doctors that are honored for their achievements and participation with the medical community.

The March issue of Spokane/Coeur d‟Alene Living Magazine lists each highlighted individual as a “best doctor.” Look
for the March addition of the magazine when visiting our Inland Imaging centers. Each doctor is listed with experience
and years of service.

Other Inland Imaging Business Page

Inland Imaging, recognized as an international business and healthcare leader, has expanded services in the Western
United States and offers business services, physician staffing, investments, imaging centers, and software
development. The vision of these companies directly contributes to the success of Inland Imaging‟s diverse growth.

Inland Imaging Investments Incorporated
Inland Imaging Business Associates
Inland Imaging Physician Services
Inland Imaging Arizona
RadWorkFlow

Inland Imaging Investment Incorporated

Inland Imaging Investment Inc., formed in 1984, owns and operates medical imaging and medical imaging-related
businesses that are consistent with the objectives of long-term growth and provide a return on investment to its
constituents and Inland Imaging Investment Shareholders.

The company consists of one CEO, Steve Duvoisin, and owns percentages of Inland Imaging LLC, and Inland Imaging
Arizona. Inland Imaging Investments Inc., fully owns Inland Imaging Business Associates, 2 imaging center buildings,
and the Inland Imaging Business Center.

Inland Imaging Business Associates

Inland Imaging Business Associates is a team of skilled business professionals dedicated to the success of physicians
and other health care providers through the delivery of integrated intellectual and technological business services.

Formed in 1996 as an expanded entity of the Inland Imaging administrative team into its own company, Inland Imaging
Business Associates started with 50 employees. The company has grown to staff over 200 and serves nearly 20
clients.

The company provides business solutions for a medical practice including practice management, accounting, billing,
strategic planning, finance, marketing, operations management and our fastest growing area - information technology.
We are expanding our presence in the West during 2007.

Services
Team
Clients
Careers
Contact Us

Services

Inland Imaging Business Associates offers a variety of medical and business related services to medical practices.
Through real time experience, we are able to assess your business problems better than traditional consulting
companies that are in the business of dispensing advice. Integration of new technology to our clients' operations is
nationally recognized. We offer a full range of services from full practice management to fast answers to very specific
questions.

We can help you with your basic business services such as billing, accounting, operations management, information
systems, human resources and marketing.

We can also assist you with:

- Mergers between radiologists or vascular surgeons or primary care groups
- Financial analysis of imaging centers and individual imaging projects
- Design and implementation of complex radiology information systems
- Facilitation of partnership between hospitals and radiology groups around outpatient imaging

Information Systems
Accounting
Billing
Operations Management
Marketing
Strategic Planning
Finance
Human Resources

Practice Management

Our practice management team has over 20 years of experience managing and growing radiology practices employing
over 70 radiologists around the Northwest. Our experience includes:

  * Managing growth of practices
  * Facilitating group mergers
  * Managing group dynamics
  * Managing hospital relationships
  * Automating radiologist scheduling process

Information Systems

Our information technology team has grown dramatically in the last 10 years as the need for IT professionals in
radiology has exploded. Our radiology IT experience includes:

  * GE/IDX Radiology Information System setup & maintenance
  * GE/IDX Flowcast System set-up and maintenance
  * PHILIPS/STENTOR PACS distributor and development partner
  * Responsibility for over 700,000 electronic exams each year
  * Multi-state data and voice network setup and maintenance
  * 24/7 help desk
  * Custom Applications Development
  * PC setup and support systems
  * Data warehousing
  * Over 40 IT professionals on staff

Accounting

Our accounting team has over 20 years of radiology accounting experience. Our radiology accounting experience
includes:

  * Setup and maintenance of Great Plain Dynamics accounting
  * Modality and location - specific cost accounting
  * Compensation analysis for radiologists
  * Basic accounting services including payroll, general ledger and financial statement preparation
  * Banking management

Billing

Our billing staff has been providing radiology billing for over 25 years. Our average days in receivables has been less
than 50 days. Our billing experience includes:

  * Efficient billing of all radiology, surgery and primary care codes
  * Aggressive management of private pay patients
  * Knowledge of IDX billing systems including interfaces with hospital information systems
  * Certified coding experts for radiology and primary care
  * Fee schedule calculation and analysis
  * Medicare compliance oversight

Operations Management
Our team began managing imaging centers in 1984 and has achieved a national reputation for efficient and productive
operations. Our experience includes:

  * Set up of new Imaging Centers
  * Achieving 25%-30% return on equity
  * Using detailed operational metrics
  * Developing technologies to streamline center workflow
  * Building construction and facilities management
  * Turnaround of failing imaging centers

Marketing

Our group has grown client volumes through use of practical marketing techniques as well as using standard public
relations tools. Our team is experienced with:

  * Radiology marketing directed to referring physicians
  * Graphic design, writing and web development
  * Use of metrics to determine marketing effectiveness
  * Focus group management
  * Marketing plan development
  * Referring physician survey tools
  * Market Analyses
      o Demographic
      o Product / Service
      o Competitive
     o Market Segmentation
     o Focus Groups
     o Physician Survey Tools
  * Marketing Programs
     o Defining marketing & advertising objectives
       (awareness, volume growth, new positioning, etc)
     o Positioning of organization / product / service
     o Referring physician marketing & education (CME) programs
     o Consumer marketing & advertising channel evaluation
       (reach / cost / market demographics)
     o Consumer advertising
     o Brochure & ad content development
     o Marketing & collateral advertising material development
     o Pre & post marketing / advertising metrics (volumes / $$)

Strategic Planning

Our team has assisted groups ranging in size from 6 physicians up to 45 physicians through careful strategic planning
and execution of expansion plans. Our ability to look into the future and position our clients successfully is well
established. Our abilities include:

  * Organizing radiology groups to deal with a challenging future
  * Helping radiologists understand the business side of radiology and involving them in operations.
  * Assisting groups to internally come to common ground
  * Helping physicians understand the importance of planning
  * Working with groups through the merger process

Finance

Our finance team works closely with our accounting team to use practice data to develop projections for future projects.
Our finance group has experience including:

  * Managing banking relationship
  * Negotiating financing for major equipment with vendors
  * Providing detailed data for imaging center construction projects
  * Analyzing future projects for practice
  * Analyzing current practice operations
  * Assisting physicians with compensation models
  * Negotiating health plan contracts

Human Resources

Our HR group has experience including:

  * Establishing pay and employment policies
  * Employee recruiting
  * Employee safety and health
  * Benefits structures
  * Practice Management

Team

We have assembled a team of medical business professionals with strong backgrounds in practice management
medical facility operations. Their knowledge is gained through years of experience in all aspects of starting and
operating successful medical practices. Unlike most consultants, our team is responsible for practice success on a
daily basis. This unique perspective is invaluable when solving your healthcare business problem or managing a
project.

CEO (Inland Imaging Investments Inc.) – Steve Duvoisin
CEO (Inland Imaging Business Associates) – John Copeland
COO (Inland Imaging, LLC) – Kathleen Wilson
COO (Inland Imaging Physicians Services) – Sarah Russell
CFO (Inland Imaging Business Associates) – Tavi Lohman
CAO (Inland Imaging Physician Services) – Toni Cooley
CIO (Inland Imaging Business Associates) – Cole Hanford
CRO (Inland Imaging Business Associates) – Dan Heibert
CMO (Inland Imaging Business Associates) – Dennis Hake

Corporate Compliance Officer/Contract Manager - Lindley Armiger
Director of Business Development – Kevin Kirk
Human Resources Director – Shari Yamane
Coordinator, Patient Accounting – Sandy Nadeau
Coordinator, Patient Accounting – Kristin Ankerbrand
Coordinator, Patient Accounting – Colleen McCafferey
Director of IT Services – Jeff Kelly
PACS Manager – Mike Lent
RadWorkFlow Director – April McKenna
Compensation & Benefits Manager – Jennifer Johnson
Design and Brand Manager – Fran Zabawa
Marketing Specialist – Jason Miller
RWF Director – Jeff Sund
Quality Assurance Manager – Sarah Panzeri
Director of RIS – Jason Koller
Accounting Director – Justin Ladd

CEO (Inland Imaging Investments Inc.) – Steve Duvoisin

Steve started with Inland Imaging in late 1984 when Inland opened its first imaging center with six radiologists and 25
employees. His background as a CPA with an MBA has helped guide Inland through many changes in the regional
health care environment. Steve has worked with the radiologists to expand Inland Imaging to 60 radiologists, five
vascular surgeons and 325 employees working in four imaging centers. Steve's specialties are strategic planning,
hospital relationship management, marketing and financial analysis.
Contact: steve@inlandimaging.com

CEO (Inland Imaging Business Associates) – John Copeland

Jon led the IIBA Information Technology Services team for more than ten years. Jon's training and experience across
many IT industries makes him a unique resource in any medical group's attempt to implement and operate new
healthcare information technology services. The IT staff consists of approximately 32 professionals and provides
application service provider (ASP) services for Stentor PACS, IDX Flowcast practice management and billing systems,
IDX Imagecast Radiology Information Systems, and Allscripts Electronic Medical Record Systems. The team also
provides systems integration and development, general information technology implementation, networking, pc and
overall helpdesk support. Jon previously worked for a large radiology group in Sacramento, California. Prior to
healthcare, he worked in IT in the biotechnology, manufacturing and distribution industries.

Contact: jcopeland@inlandimaging.com

COO (Inland Imaging, LLC) – Kathleen Wilson

Kathleen has been an integral part of the management team of Inland Imaging since 1987 and has helped develop and
implement its marketing plan. Since Kathleen joined them, she has helped Inland Imaging revenues increase by 155%.
She has a degree in international business and marketing from Gonzaga University and is well versed in the special
marketing needs of medical practices.

Contact: kwilson@inlandimaging.com

COO (Inland Imaging Physicians Services) – Sarah Russell

Sarah began working with Inland Imaging in 1997 after graduating from the University of Washington. She has seen
the group grow from 14 radiologists to 47 radiologists, 5 vascular surgeons and 3 physician assistants and has been
an integral part of managing all of the professional aspects relating to this growth. Sarah has also been very involved in
the expansion of IIPS into the Seattle market where Inland now has 7 radiologists and 2 professional service contracts.
She has a very clear understanding of the professional issues relating to radiology, including work flow management,
staff planning and physician scheduling, client contract management and quality assurance.

Contact: srussell@inlandimaging.com

CFO (Inland Imaging Business Associates) – Tavi Lohman

Tavi is a graduate of Washington State University where she majored in accounting. She has eight years of public
accounting experience including working as an audit manager for international public accounting firms in San
Francisco, Seattle and Spokane. She is responsible for the IIBA financial division which includes accounting and
patient medical billing services. Accounting service includes financial statement preparation and analysis, cost
accounting, accounts receivable and payable, cash and fixed asset management, payroll processing, and materials
purchasing. Patient medical billing services are provided using the IDX Flowcast system and include all aspects of
medical billing including CPT and diagnosis coding, charge entry, claim submission, statement processing, insurance
company follow up, private pay collections, and insurance company contract review/negotiation.

Contact: tlohman@inlandimaging.com

CAO (Inland Imaging Physician Services) – Toni Cooley

Toni brings 28 years of health care experience to the IIBA team. She holds a degree in health care administration and
has most recently worked as administrative director for Providence Cancer Center in Spokane. Toni is responsible for
overseeing all daily operations of the organization. She is accountable for work flow management, staff planning, client
contract management, quality assurance, human resource services, and marketing.

Contact: tcooley@inlandimaging.com

CIO (Inland Imaging Business Associates) – Cole Hanford

Chief Technology Officer. Cole has been with IIBA for over nine years. He has contributed immensely to building a five-
state computer network connecting over 200 servers and 8000 users, granting instant access to over 25 terabytes of
online data. His breadth of knowledge in extremely technical areas of radiology systems and networking are a great
asset to Duvoisin and Associates. Additional work experience includes Ticketswest.com and adjunct professor at
Gonzaga University.

Contact: chanford@inlandimaging.com

CRO (Inland Imaging Business Associates) – Dan Heibert

Dan Hiebert is our Chief Revenue Officer responsible for payor contracting, reimbursement and data
management/informatics. Dan was previously the associate administrator of the Rockwood Clinic. He joined our team
in 2006, bringing with him nearly 20 years of experience in financial/data analysis. Dan has a bachelor‟s degree in
business administration from Eastern Washington University and is currently finishing his master‟s degree in business
administration from Gonzaga University.
Contact: dhiebert@inlandimagingbusiness.com

CMO (Inland Imaging Business Associates) – Dennis Hake

Dennis is responsible for developing, implementing, and overseeing the strategic marketing efforts for Inland‟s
operations and imaging center services in Washington, Oregon, Montana, and Arizona. He has over twenty years of
sales and marketing experience in the healthcare, technology services, and manufacturing sectors. Dennis has a
bachelor of business administration degree from Pacific Lutheran University. Prior to joining Inland Imaging he was the
Director of Business Development, Advanced Input Systems, Coeur d‟ Alene, ID

Contact: dhake@inlandimaging.com

Corporate Compliance Officer/Contract Manager - Lindley Armiger

Lindley joined IIBA in 2000 bringing over 28 years of healthcare and healthcare systems experience. In her current
role, Lindley is responsible for ongoing activities related to the organization and development of high-quality document
management processes to maximize customer satisfaction. She actively assists in design, monitoring and process
improvement of appropriate practices. Lindley is the HIPAA privacy official for IIBA, Inland Imaging, LLC, and Inland
Imaging Associates, PS and is responsible for ongoing activities related to compliance and is part of the project
implementation group for HIPAA security compliance.

Contact: larmiger@inlandimaging.com

Director of Business Development – Kevin Kirk

Kevin is responsible for identifying, analyzing, and developing new and existing market opportunities for IIBA and its
clients. Key emphasis is placed on company, service, and product market positioning and leveraging their strengths.
Kevin has a bachelor's w/distinction in business administration from The George Washington University, and a
master's in business administration from Dartmouth's Tuck School of Business. Prior to joining Inland Imaging he was
the general manager for Pointshare and prior to that was a senior contracting representative for a major Washington
state healthcare insurance carrier.

Contact: k.kirk@inlandimaging.com

Human Resources Director – Shari Yamane

Shari Yamane is the Human Resources Director responsible for employees with Inland Imaging Business Associates
and for its clients. Shari joined our team in 2006, bringing with her over 20 years of experience in the human resources
field.

Contact: syamane@inlandimaging.com

Coordinator, Patient Accounting – Sandy Nadeau

Sandy has 23 years experience in the healthcare field and is experienced in all aspects of medical billing, including
capitation contracts. She attended college for three years taking health science classes including anatomy and
physiology, biology and computer science. Sandy is a certified professional coder and is a member of the AAPC and
INMGMA. Sandy currently leads the procedural coding and compliance department for Inland Imaging Business
Associates which consists of a staff of 17. She also is involved in RVU and fee analysis for Inland Imaging Business
Associates.

Contact: snadeau@inlandimaging.com

Coordinator, Patient Accounting – Kristin Ankerbrand
Kristin has worked in healthcare administration and billing capacities for various health care entities since 1987. She
leads the insurance specialist team and is responsible for monitoring payer reimbursement and payer aging for over
$150 million in billed claims annually. Kristin works directly with the payers to address claim-processing issues, which
affect the timeliness and appropriateness of reimbursements.

Contact: kankerbrand@inlandimaging.com

Coordinator, Patient Accounting – Colleen McCafferey

Colleen has over 22 years of experience with medical self pay collections and customer service. Colleen joined Inland
Imaging Business Associates in 1993 as a collection specialist and currently leads a team of nine collectors
specializing in medical collections, and five payment posters. Our emphasis is on providing outstanding customer
service combined with timely reimbursement in an ever changing economic environment.

Contact: cmccaffery@inlandimaging.com

Director of IT Services – Jeff Kelly

Jeff joined Inland Imaging Business Associates in 1998 after graduating from Eastern Washington University with a
degree in management information systems. Jeff leads the team responsible for the ImageCast RIS Application, which
currently has over 5,000 users throughout the Northwest.

Contact: jkelly@inlandimaging.com

PACS Manager – Mike Lent

Mike leads the Inland Imaging Business Associates PACS (Picture Archiving and Communication System) team which
provides medical imaging and distribution services to the medical communities of the Inland Northwest as well as to
the Seattle, Vancouver and Portland areas. He has over 25 years experience in the areas of customer service, service
management, project management and medical imaging.

Contact: mlent@inlandimaging.com

RadWorkFlow Director – April McKenna

April has a bachelor's degree in business management and began working at Inland Imaging Business Associates in
2000. She is responsible for the daily operations of organization as they relate to the radiology workflow software
application, RadWorkFlow. April plays a key role in the successful implementation of projects, policies and procedures.

Contact: amckenna@inlandimaging.com

Compensation & Benefits Manager – Jennifer Johnson

Jennifer is a graduate of Eastern Washington University with degrees in human resource management, general
management and accounting. She has worked with Inland Imaging Business Associates for almost eight years
beginning in payroll and accounting. She is currently an HR coordinator responsible for benefits and pay services
including the administration of all retirement plans and all health & welfare plans.

Contact: jmjohnson@inlandimaging.com

Design and Brand Manager – Fran Zabawa

Fran is responsible for the creative direction and design of business identity packages, collateral marketing materials,
targeted advertising campaigns, continuing education programs and website content. She has more than 20 years of
experience in award winning design encompassing advertising agencies, design studios, software companies and
corporate departments. She earned her bachelor's in fine arts with an emphasis in graphic design from Washington
State University. Prior to joining Duvoisin, Fran was the art director for Inland Northwest Health Services in Spokane.
Previous companies Fran has worked for include Aldus Inc. and Asymetrix Software in Seattle.

Contact: fzabawa@inlandimaging.com

Marketing Specialist – Jason Miller

Jason coordinates and handles all press relations as well as copy writing responsibilities for Inland Imaging. He also
has an interactive media creation background as both a television producer and as managing partner of a Spokane
based marketing group. He is a graduate of the University of Idaho with a degree in Communication.

Contact: jmiller@inlandimaging.com

RWF Director – Jeff Sund

Jeff was hired in early 2008 as the Product Director for Inland Imaging‟s RadWorkFlow system. Mr. Sund had been
the Director of International Services at Itron, Inc. prior joining Inland Imaging. He graduated from the University of
Minnesota with a degree in Chemical Engineering and has over 25 years experience in technical project management,
implementation, and business development.

Quality Assurance Manager – Sarah Panzeri

Information to come

Director of RIS – Jason Koller

Information to come

Accounting Director – Justin Ladd

Information to come

*Careers (Cyber Recruiter)

Inland Imaging Physician Services

As clinical imaging specialists, the Inland Imaging Physicians Services goal is to provide quality diagnostic imaging
professional support to our referring physicians and their patients throughout the Western United States.

Our partnerships with healthcare organizations in the area are vital to our growth. Our experience and reputation have
allowed us to share our vision in other regions.

As a group, we are committed to the ongoing professional and personal development of our physicians and staff. We
value not only the professional contribution of each of our members, but also their personal participation in our local
community.

RadWorkFlow LLC

RadWorkFlow is an advanced software system created by Inland Imaging developers to enhance the electronic
distribution of radiology and hospital information across multiple platforms.

More information can be found at www.rwfllc.com

Locations
Each Inland Imaging center was built with the patient in mind. Our goal is to ensure that a visit to one of our centers is
as comfortable, clean, and as safe as possible. Every facility offers an inviting and friendly environment to better
accommodate visitors.

Inland Imaging invests in groundbreaking technology and reviews the standards of each piece of equipment on a
regular basis. Upgrades and remodels are in constant cycle in order to keep pace with the ever-changing medical
community.

Spokane North
Spokane South
Spokane Valley
Sacred Heart Medical Center
Deer Park
Arizona

Spokane North (Holy Family Hospital)

5715 North Lidgerwood
Spokane, WA 99207
509.747.4455

Hours: 6:30am – 9:00pm

MRI
CT
General Radiology
Ultrasound/Vascular
Bone Densitometry
Digital Mammography

Spokane South (South Center)

525 S. Cowley St.
Spokane, WA 99202
509.747.4455

Hours: 6:00am – 8:00pm

MRI
CT
General Radiology
Ultrasound/Vascular
Nuclear Medicine

Spokane Valley Center

12420 East Mission St.
Spokane Valley, WA 99216
509.747.4455

Hours: 6:30am – 8:00pm

MRI
CT
General Radiology
Ultrasound/Vascular
Bone Densitometry
Digital Mammography

Sacred Heart Center (Sacred Heart Doctors Building)

105 West 8th Avenue
Suite 100C, 125C
Spokane, WA 99204
509.747.4455

Hours: 6:30am – 8:00pm

MRI
PET/CT
General Radiology
Ultrasound/Vascular
Bone Densitometry
Digital Mammography

Deer Park Center

702 South Park Rd.
Deer Park, WA 99006
509.747.4455

Hours: 10:30am – 7:00pm

MRI
CT
General Radiology

Inland Imaging Business Center

801 S. Stevens St.
Spokane, WA 99204
Phone: 509.747.4455
Fax: 509.459.0182

Hours: 8:00am – 5:00pm

Gilbert, Arizona

2940 East Banner Gateway Drive
Suite 150
Gilbert, AZ 85234
480.543.6900

Hours: 8:00am – 5:00pm

MRI
CT
General Radiology
Ultrasound
Bone Densitometry
Digital Mammography
Services

Inland Imaging is an internationally recognized leader in medical imaging services. A specialized team of physicians
and staff maintain this distinction by providing the highest level of compassion and knowledge possible, prompting
reports and services to be delivered in a timely manner.

Specific imaging services offered by Inland Imaging include CT, MRI, X-ray, Mammography, Nuclear Medicine,
Ultrasound, Bone Densitometry, and PET/CT. Interventional Radiologists on staff are at the forefront of groundbreaking
procedures and exciting new research, creating new treatment options in ontological, cardiovascular, orthopedic, and
neurological disorders.

Brain and Spine
Women‟s Health
Body Injury and Orthopedics
Cancer
Cardiovascular
Stomach and Gastrointestinal
Pain Management

CT
MRI
X-Ray
Mammography
Ultrasound
Nuclear Medicine
Bone Densitometry
PET/CT
Interventional Radiology
Laser Treatment

Brain and Spine

Inland Imaging offers a wide variety of Neurological imaging services to better diagnose abnormalities, exclude the
presence of disease, and evaluate injury of the brain, spine, head, and neck. Our Neuroradiologists are specially
trained in the diagnostic imaging of conditions such as trauma, stroke, tumors, degenerative disorders, vascular
malformations, and aneurysms.

Inland Imaging physicians and staff are dedicated to providing the highest quality imaging of neurological diseases. In
addition, our fellowship-trained radiologists utilize image-guided interventions to treat disease or injury. Inland Imaging
works closely with clinical specialists including neurologists, neurosurgeons, spine surgeons, and head and neck
surgeons.

Spine
Back Pain
MRI
Stroke
Headaches
Dementia
Alzheimer‟s
Multiple Sclerosis

Spine

Our Neuroradiology Team offers the latest and safest techniques specializing in comprehensive screening, diagnosis,
and treatment of spine disease or injury through using the following imaging procedures including Computed
Tomography (CT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and Myelography.
A CT uses a special x-ray technique to obtain multiple images from different angles and then joins them together using
advanced computer technology to show 2 dimensional and even 3 dimensional images of the spine.

MRI uses a combination of common radio waves and a magnetic field to obtain remarkably detailed images of the
spine, including the spinal cord. MRI images of the neck and spine are clearer and more detailed than other imaging
methods, enabling the detection of abnormalities that might be obscured by bone on a CT or x-ray.

The purpose of a myelogram is to evaluate the spinal cord and nerve roots for displacement or compression. In most
cases, myelography, is used when other studies have failed to yield enough information to confirm a diagnosis.
Myelogram is excellent in evaluating the presence of arthritic bone spurs, narrowing of the spinal cord, or malformation
of the spine.

Spine imaging procedures can help diagnose and plan treatment options associated with a herniated disc, low back
pain, neck discomfort, piriformis syndrome, radiculopathy, scoliosis, stenosis, infection, tumor detection, and
spondylosis or spondylolisthesis.

Like our radiologists, our highly trained staff and technologists are specially trained in orthopedic and neurological care.
Inland Imaging, along with the care of your family practice doctor and other specialists, can provide advanced medical
resources to better aid in your recovery.

Back Pain

Back pain is the second most common cause of visits to the doctor's office behind cold and flu. Neck and low back pain
can be the result of multiple causes, and often requires the use medical imaging to find exact reason for the discomfort.

Following a physical exam that includes an assessment of sensation, strength, and reflexes, your doctor may order
various diagnostic studies to determine more precisely the nature and extent of a possible disorder. These studies may
include x-ray, Computed Tomography (CT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), or myelogram.

X-ray (or radiograph) is a painless medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Taking
and x-ray involves exposing a part of the body to a small dose of radiation to produce pictures of inside the body
according to degree of density. X-rays are the oldest and most frequently used form of medical imaging.

A CT uses a special x-ray technique to obtain multiple images from different angles and then joins them together using
advanced computer technology to show 2 dimensional and even 3 dimensional images of the spine.

MRI uses a combination of radio waves and a magnetic field to obtain remarkably detailed images of the back or neck,
including the spinal cord. MRI images of the neck and spine are clearer and more detailed than other imaging
methods, enabling the detection of abnormalities that might be obscured by bone on a CT or x-ray.

The purpose of a myelogram is to evaluate the spinal cord and nerve roots for displacement or compression. In most
cases, myelography, is used when other studies have failed to yield enough information to confirm a diagnosis.
Myelogram is excellent in evaluating the presence of arthritic bone spurs, narrowing of the spinal cord, or malformation
of the spine.

Neurological MRI

The use of MRI provides diagnostic images to better detect abnormalities of the brain, neck and spine soft tissues. MRI
is the most sensitive exam for brain tumors, strokes, and chronic disorders of the nervous system such as multiple
sclerosis. In addition, it is a useful means of discerning brain abnormalities with dementia, and is commonly used for
patients with disease of the pituitary gland and other brain disorders.

MRI uses a combination of radio waves and a magnetic field to obtain remarkably detailed images of the back or neck,
including the spinal cord. MRI images of the neck and spine are clearer and more detailed than other imaging
methods, enabling the detection of abnormalities that might be obscured by bone on a CT or x-ray.
MRI is an excellent tool to diagnose bulging, degenerated, or herniated disks – frequent causes for severe lower back
pain.

An MR angiography (MRA) is an MRI that may be ordered to study the blood vessels and aid in the treatment of brain
disorders, stroke, and blood vessel disease. After detection, patients with arterial disease can now even have
treatment in the radiology department rather than undergoing surgery in an operating room.

MRA can be used to screen asymptomatic patients with a family history of arterial aneurysm, a ballooning of a vessel
wall, and if an aneurysm is found, it can often be treated before serious bleeding occurs.

Another application of MRI technology is the use of MR spectroscopy (MRS). This technique generates a
representation of the chemical composition of a region of the brain rather than producing an image. MRS is a special
technique used to characterize the biochemistry of tumors, infarcts, and other pathology. It can be a useful addition to
conventional MRI to distinguish tumors, strokes, and other disease.

An MR venography (MRV) also utilizes MRI technology and is highly accurate in show blood flow in the veins of the
head and neck.

Inland Imaging also offers an open MRI machine specially designed to accommodate patients with special needs
including individuals that suffer from severe claustrophobia or are too large or fragile for a conventional MRI machine.
The “open” design allows for free movement around the patient and is not enclosed. Generally, an open MRI exam
takes longer and does not produce the same resolution image of a standard MRI.

Stroke

A stroke occurs when the blood supply to a certain area of the brain is disrupted. When certain parts of the brain are
denied blood flow, body function, thought processes, and communication can be affected. Stroke is the third leading
cause of death in the United States and is the leading cause of disability. Reducing the risk of vascular disease can
greatly decrease the likelihood of a stroke.

There are two primary types of stoke, ischemic and hemorrhagic. An Ischemic stroke is the result of a blood clot or
thrombus obstructing the vessel and causing lack of blood to a region of brain tissue. This tissue begins to degenerate
without the necessary blood supply. A Hemorrhagic stroke is caused by bleeding into the brain by a breakage in a
blood vessel. This produces too much blood for the brain tissue, leading to cellular damage.

Inland Imaging Neuroradiologists have several imaging tests and their discretion to either detect the risk of a stroke or
examine and provide treatment options the post-stroke symptoms. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Computed
Tomography (CT), and Vascular Ultrasound are great imaging tools to better diagnose problems associated with
stroke.

MRI uses a combination of radio waves and a magnetic field to obtain remarkably detailed images of the back or neck,
including the spinal cord. MRI images of the neck and spine are clearer and more detailed than other imaging
methods, enabling the detection of abnormalities that might be obscured by bone on a CT or x-ray.

An MR angiography (MRA) is an MRI that may be ordered to study the blood vessels and aid in the treatment of brain
disorders, stroke, and blood vessel disease. After detection, patients with arterial disease can now even have
treatment in the radiology department rather than undergoing surgery in an operating room.

MRA can be used to screen asymptomatic patients with a family history of arterial aneurysm, a ballooning of a vessel
wall, and if an aneurysm is found, it can often be treated before serious bleeding occurs.

Another application of MRI technology is the use of MR spectroscopy (MRS). This technique generates a
representation of the chemical composition of a region of the brain rather than producing an image. MRS is a special
technique used to characterize the biochemistry of tumors, infarcts, and other pathology. It can be a useful addition to
conventional MRI to distinguish tumors, strokes, and other disease.
A CT uses a special x-ray technique to obtain multiple images from different angles and then joins them together using
advanced computer technology to show 2 dimensional and even 3 dimensional images of the spine.

Inland Imaging has the unique advantage of offering a CTA or Computed Tomography Angiography to visualize blood
flow in arteries and veins throughout the body. This exam is used to screen patients for arterial disease and identify
aneurysms or vascular malformations. CT angiography is increasingly employed in the evaluation of patients with
acute stroke and produce even more detailed images than MRA.

CT perfusion is a technique that evaluates blood flow to the brain and allows neuroradiologists to detect portions of the
brain with impaired blood flow. The CT perfusion test is most often used in providing critical information on acute stroke
patients.

A vascular ultrasound may be ordered to examine blood vessel health or evaluate the presence of arterial plaque. This
painless test does not submit the patient to radiation, but rather uses sound waves to generate an image of vascular
structures and evaluate risk for vascular disease.

In some cases, an interventional radiology procedure may be needed to treat a variety of disorders associated with
stroke without surgery. Through the use of x-rays or other imaging techniques, interventional radiologists are able to
open arteries when narrowed or occluded.

Headaches

Inland Imaging is able to offer imaging techniques to help diagnose and treat patients suffering from recurrent and
painful headaches. Cluster headaches, migraines, and rebound headaches are the most common diagnoses for
patients suffering from repeat headaches and are generally symptomatically diagnosed by your family caregiver.

However, in extreme cases, diagnostic medical imaging may be needed to look for more severe causes of a headache.
A neuroradiologist may use Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Computed Tomography (CT), and Positron Emission
Tomography/CT (PET/CT) to aid diagnosing or ruling out a hematoma, brain aneurysms, meningioma (brain tumor), or
brain trauma.

MRI uses a combination of radio waves and a magnetic field to obtain remarkably detailed images of the back or neck,
including the spinal cord. MRI images of the neck and spine are clearer and more detailed than other imaging
methods, enabling the detection of abnormalities that might be obscured by bone on a CT or x-ray.

An MR angiography (MRA) is an MRI that may be ordered to study the blood vessels and aid in the treatment of brain
disorders, stroke, and blood vessel disease. After detection, patients with arterial disease can now even have
treatment in the radiology department rather than undergoing surgery in an operating room.

MRA can be used to screen asymptomatic patients with a family history of arterial aneurysm, a ballooning of a vessel
wall, and if an aneurysm is found, it can often be treated before serious bleeding occurs.

Another application of MRI technology is the use of MR spectroscopy (MRS). This technique generates a
representation of the chemical composition of a region of the brain rather than producing an image. MRS is a special
technique used to characterize the biochemistry of tumors, infarcts, and other pathology. It can be a useful addition to
conventional MRI to distinguish tumors, strokes, and other disease.

A CT uses a special x-ray technique to obtain multiple images from different angles and then joins them together using
advanced computer technology to show 2 dimensional and even 3 dimensional images of the spine.

CT perfusion is a technique that evaluates blood flow to the brain and allows neuroradiologists to detect portions of the
brain with impaired blood flow.
A Positron Emission Tomography/CT test provides anatomical detail, such as size or location of a mass, and metabolic
detail, such as cellular activity of a mass. Inland Imaging‟s PET/CT scanner is one of the most powerful imaging tools
available for localizing, evaluating and therapeutic monitoring of head and neck cancer.

Dementia

Dementia is a progressive brain dysfunction that results in limitations with daily activities and increases with advancing
age. Alzheimer‟s patients commonly suffer from dementia and require long term care to help aid with impaired
memory and orientation dysfunctions such as concentration, proper judgment, personality changes, and impaired
motor skills.

In order to better diagnose and treat dementia, your primary care physician may order brain imaging tests such as
Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Computed Tomography (CT), and Positron Emission Tomography/CT (PET/CT)

MRI uses a combination of radio waves and a magnetic field to obtain remarkably detailed images of the back or neck,
including the spinal cord. MRI images of the neck and spine are clearer and more detailed than other imaging
methods, enabling the detection of abnormalities that might be obscured by bone on a CT or x-ray.

A CT uses a special x-ray technique to obtain multiple images from different angles and then joins them together using
advanced computer technology to show 2 dimensional and even 3 dimensional images of the spine.

A Positron Emission Tomography/CT test provides anatomical detail, such as size or location of a mass, and metabolic
detail, such as cellular activity of a mass. Inland Imaging‟s PET/CT scanner is one of the most powerful imaging tools
available for localizing, evaluating and therapeutic monitoring of head and neck cancer.

Alzheimer’s

More than 5 million American‟s have been diagnosed with Alzheimer‟s, a disease affects brain function. Alzheimer‟s
patients commonly suffer from dementia and require long term care to help aid with impaired memory and orientation
dysfunctions such as concentration, proper judgment, personality changes, and impaired motor skills.

Though there is not a cure for Alzheimer‟s, treatment for symptoms combined with the professional support can make
a patient live a more comfortable and productive life.

In order to better diagnose and treat Alzheimer‟s, your primary care physician may order brain imaging tests such as
Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Computed Tomography (CT), and Positron Emission Tomography/CT (PET/CT)

MRI uses a combination of common radio waves and a magnetic field to obtain digital images of the head or brain. MRI
images are clearer and more detailed than other imaging methods, enabling the detection of abnormalities that might
be obscured by bone on a CT or x-ray.

A CT uses a special x-ray to obtain multiple images from different angles and then joins them together using advanced
computer technology to show a cross section of the brain.

A Positron Emission Tomography (PET/CT) test provides anatomical detail, such as size or location of a mass, and
metabolic detail, such as cellular activity of a mass. Inland Imaging‟s PET/CT scanner is one of the most powerful
imaging tools available for localizing, evaluating and therapeutic monitoring of head and neck cancer.

Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple Sclerosis is a result of inflammation of the white matter of the central nervous system. Over time, destruction
of myelin or the fatty covering that insulates nerve cell fibers in the brain and spinal cord begins to hamper the
transmission of electrochemical messages between the brain, spinal cord, and rest of the body.
When the myelin becomes damaged, neurological transmission of messages may be slowed or blocked completely,
leading to diminished or lost function. The name "multiple sclerosis" signifies both the number (multiple) and condition
(sclerosis, meaning scarring or hardening) of the demyelinated areas in the central nervous system.
To monitor or diagnose Multiple Sclerosis, your healthcare provider may order a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)
test to help distinguish new plaques from old and help locate central nervous system lesions. Magnetic Resonance
Spectroscopy (MRS) is a now used to investigate MS. Unlike MRI, which provides an anatomical picture of lesions,
MRS yields information about the biochemistry of the brain in MS.

MRI uses a combination of common radio waves and a magnetic field to obtain digital images of the head or brain. MRI
images are clearer and more detailed than other imaging methods, enabling the detection of abnormalities that might
be obscured by bone on a CT or x-ray.

MR spectroscopy (MRS) is an application of MRI technology that generates a plot representing the chemical
composition of a region of the brain rather than generating a picture.

Women’s Health

At Inland Imaging, we are dedicated to women‟s health and offer the most advanced diagnostic imaging procedures
available. Highly trained medical professionals and board-certified radiologists deliver outstanding care in a
comfortable and compassionate environment.

We work closely with our patients and their health care providers to provide timely and accurate results.

Breast Imaging
Reproductive Imaging
Osteoporosis

Breast Imaging

Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in women today. It is estimated that one in seven women in
the U.S. will develop breast cancer in her lifetime. Yet research shows the 5-year relative survival rate for those who
detect their breast cancer early is 82 percent.

Inland Imaging provides you and your physician with state-of-the-art technology and advanced medical expertise to
gain important information about your breast health. The breast imaging procedures offered include screening and
diagnostic mammography, breast ultrasound, breast biopsies, breast MRI, and PET/CT.

Mammography services at Inland Imaging are accredited by the American College of Radiology (ACR) and certified by
the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Inland Imaging‟s radiologists who read breast-imaging studies are board-
certified physicians who specialize in diagnostic breast imaging. Our mammography technologists are dedicated
mammography professionals who perform over 45,000 exams annually.

A screening mammogram is an examination used for women who have no symptoms of breast problems and is
performed in private by a qualified female technologist. The results of your examination are read and interpreted by a
specialized radiologist. The American Cancer Society (ACS) recommends a yearly screening mammogram for all
women age 40 years and older.

A screening mammogram procedure does not require a referral from your doctor. If you would like to schedule a
screening mammogram for yourself or receive additional information, please call 455-4455.

Computer aided detection (CAD) technology reviews a patient‟s film and evaluates it after the radiologist has made an
initial interpretation. Studies show that CAD analysis improves the detection of early cancer by as much as eight to ten
percent. If the software detects any abnormalities on the mammogram film, it marks them. The radiologist then reviews
the marked areas to determine if the areas are suspicious and require further evaluation.

A diagnostic mammogram is a problem-solving exam that may involve additional views of the breast and is ordered
after an abnormality or symptom is found in an initial screening. The technologist who performs the exam works closely
with a radiologist to determine the best images needed to aid in the breast evaluation. This work up will determine if
further imaging is needed, such as a breast ultrasound or breast MRI.

Breast ultrasound is a noninvasive exam that uses sonar technology to determine if a suspicious area is a fluid filled
cyst or a solid mass that require further testing, such as a biopsy.

A breast biopsy is a tissue sampling technique used to confirm or rule out the presence of breast cancer. Breast
biopsies can be surgical or non-surgical; Inland Imaging specializes in non-surgical breast biopsies. Utilizing these
methods benefits patients by decreasing recovery time and reducing scarring compared with surgical excisional
biopsy. Inland Imaging utilizes two primary non-surgical methods to obtain samples: ultrasound-guided core-needle
breast biopsy and stereotactic breast biopsy.

Ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy is commonly used to evaluate suspicious masses within the breast, whether or
not they can be felt during a clinical examination. An ultrasound probe is placed over the site and a radiologist guides
a biopsy needle directly into the mass. Local anesthesia is used during this procedure as well as during stereotactic
breast biopsy.

Stereotactic biopsy uses a dedicated biopsy table combined with digital mammography to determine the exact biopsy
location. Tissue samples are then extracted using a vacuum assisted biopsy instrument called the Mammotome™.
Patients have minimal discomfort during and after the procedure and can usually resume normal activity the following
day.

Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an excellent problem solving technology. It is often used to investigate
breast concerns first detected with mammography, physical exam, or other imaging exams. Breast MRI has been
approved by the FDA since 1991 for use as a supplement to mammography to help diagnose breast cancer. Unlike
mammography, which uses low dose x-rays to image the breast, MRI uses powerful magnetic fields and radio waves
to create images of the breast.

Patients undergoing a breast MRI exam lie face down on the MRI table that is specially configured so that the breasts
are positioned to hang freely through two openings called breast coils. After images have been acquired and assessed
with CAD, a radiologist reads and interprets the images.

Biopsies may also be performed using breast MRI. MRI-guided breast biopsy is a fast, safe and easy way to find and
biopsy breast abnormalities without any unnecessary surgery.

Positron emission tomography (PET), combined with computed tomography (CT), is a nuclear medicine imaging
technique that uses very short-lived radioactive compounds that localize in cancer cells. Typically a patient will undergo
other imaging exams first before receiving a PET/CT scan. In relation to breast cancer, PET/CT is used solely in the
initial staging or re-staging of cancer, and in evaluating its response to treatment.

Reproductive Imaging

Reproductive imaging has become an essential tool in monitoring pregnancy and fetal health and providing insight into
fertility problems.

Limited pelvic MRI is a non-invasive imaging technique that uses no x-rays or radiation. It produces detailed images
that are often used to evaluate the benefits of surgical interventions. Symptoms such as chronic pelvic pain and
dysfunctional uterine bleeding are often studied using this exam. Limited pelvic MRI can help to identify the source of
these symptoms and their relationship to pregnancy complications.

In women who are pregnant, ultrasound continues to be the preferred imaging method. Inland Imaging technologists
who perform this examination are trained professionals who focus on the internal structures of both the mother and the
baby. Through the use of ultrasound, physicians can confirm early pregnancy; evaluate the baby‟s age, size, and
overall health.

The most common cause of hysterectomy surgery is uterine fibroid tumors. Uterine Artery Embolization (UAE) is a
less-invasive, nonsurgical option that is giving many women new hope for keeping their uterus.
During UAE, an interventional radiologist uses a catheter to deliver a special material that blocks the blood supply to
the fibroids. Your physician may advise you of this minimally invasive therapy, or suggest surgical interventions, such
as hysterectomy. It is important that you discuss each option with your physician to see what is the best treatment for
you.

Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is a disease that causes bones to become more porous, gradually making them brittle and more
susceptible to breaking. Eighty percent of those affected by osteoporosis are women. If bone densitometry is
conducted at intervals of a year or more, it can be used to determine the rate of bone loss and/or monitor the effects of
treatment.

Bone densitometry is a safe, painless and accurate way to measure the density of bones. This testing can help your
physician in making treatment decisions related to your bone status and fracture risk. This makes bone densitometry
an excellent screening exam for osteoporosis.

Body Injury and Orthopedics

Inland Imaging provides a large set of imaging procedures to better evaluate the cause of pain or presence of body
injury. Diagnostic imaging plays a very important role in providing you and your physician with information you will need
to make key decisions about your health.

We continually invest in the latest musculoskeletal and body imaging technology to provide patients with advanced and
accurate medical resources.

Orthopedics is the study of the musculoskeletal system that includes the skeleton, joints, muscles and other supporting
structures such as ligaments and cartilage. Inland Imaging provides valuable diagnostic medical images for the
prevention and repair of body injuries or disorders.

Athletic Pain & Injury
Body Injury

Athletic Pain & Injury

The likelihood of body injury or pain can increase with repetetive activity, athletic competition, or exercise. With an
injury such as a visible dislocation or a broken bone, it's likely to be obvious that you need medical attention. However,
other injuries may be less clear and will require more investigation to evaluate and confirm a diagnosis. In both cases,
medical imaging can be a powerful tool for you and your healthcare provider to determine treatment options.

A Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) test may be ordered to help diagnose and develop treatment options for
orthopedic disorders. Even after a thorough physical examination by an expert, it is often difficult to precisely diagnose
a soft tissue or joint injury. MRI accurately depicts soft tissue injuries such as muscle, ligament and meniscal tears, as
well as cartilage and bone injuries.

Images from an MRI allow your physician to formulate a possible treatment plan. In many cases, MRI documents non-
surgical injuries, such as rotator cuff tendonitis and bone bruises, sparing the patient surgery and ensuring you receive
the appropriate treatment faster and more cost effectively. MRI also detects subtle bone marrow edema and
architectural disturbances of the soft tissues, making it the modality of choice in the diagnosis of many other joint and
bone disorders, such as bone and soft tissue tumors, infection, and avascular necrosis of bone.

Another test, Computed Tomography (CT) is very useful in the diagnosis and follow up of many musculoskeletal
disorders, particularly those pertaining to bone, such as fractures that cannot be seen on x-ray, healing fractures and
bone tumors. Recent developments in multi slice computed tomography (MSCT) allow reconstruction of images in
multiple planes as well as 3D imaging.
An X-ray is perhaps the most familiar type of musculoskeletal imaging test. Its most common use is in evaluating
possible fractures and is also used for evaluation of arthritis or bone tumors.

Nuclear imaging is often used to determine musculoskeletal pain with non-specific x-ray images to determine whether
or not a bony abnormality is the source of pain. Also, this study is used often to diagnose the spread of cancer.

Ultrasound is useful in evaluating soft tissue abnormalities, such as masses, tendon or muscle injuries, and the hips of
infants suspected of having congenital hip dysplasia. It is most commonly used in the evaluation of rotator cuff injuries.
Ultrasound images are obtained using a wand that is guided across the skin surface over the affected area.

There are also a variety of needle procedures performed by radiologists to diagnose and treat musculoskeletal
disorders. These include therapeutic as well as diagnostic joint aspirations and injections, bone and soft tissue
biopsies, facet and epidural steroid injections and discograms.

Body Injury

Inland Imaging offers several tests that may assist you and your healthcare provider in assessing and developing
treatment options associated with injury to your body. With an injury such as a visible dislocation or a broken bone, it's
likely to be obvious that you need medical attention. However, other injuries may be less clear and will require more
investigation to evaluate and confirm a diagnosis. In both cases, medical imaging can be a powerful tool for you and
your healthcare provider to determine treatment options.

A Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) test may be ordered to help diagnose and develop treatment options for
orthopedic disorders. Even after a thorough physical examination by an expert, it is often difficult to precisely diagnose
a soft tissue or joint injury. MRI accurately depicts soft tissue injuries such as muscle, ligament and meniscal tears, as
well as cartilage and bone injuries.

Images from an MRI allow your physician to formulate a possible treatment plan. In many cases, MRI documents non-
surgical injuries, such as rotator cuff tendonitis and bone bruises, sparing the patient surgery and ensuring you receive
the appropriate treatment faster and more cost effectively. MRI also detects subtle bone marrow edema and
architectural disturbances of the soft tissues, making it the modality of choice in the diagnosis of many other joint and
bone disorders, such as bone and soft tissue tumors, infection, and a vascular necrosis of bone.

Another test, Computed Tomography (CT) is very useful in the diagnosis and follow up of many musculoskeletal
disorders, particularly those pertaining to bone, such as fractures that cannot be seen on x-ray, healing fractures and
bone tumors. Recent developments in multi slice computed tomography (MSCT) allow reconstruction of images in
multiple planes as well as 3D imaging.

An X-ray is perhaps the most familiar type of musculoskeletal imaging test. Its most common use is in evaluating
possible fractures and is also used for evaluation of arthritis or bone tumors.

Nuclear imaging is often used to determine musculoskeletal pain with non-specific x-ray images to determine whether
or not a bony abnormality is the source of pain. Also, this study is used often to diagnose the spread of cancer.

Ultrasound is useful in evaluating soft tissue abnormalities, such as masses, tendon or muscle injuries, and the hips of
infants suspected of having congenital hip dysplasia. It is most commonly used in the evaluation of rotator cuff injuries.
Ultrasound images are obtained using a wand that is guided across the skin surface over the affected area.

There are also a variety of needle procedures performed by radiologists to diagnose and treat musculoskeletal
disorders. These include therapeutic as well as diagnostic joint aspirations and injections, bone and soft tissue
biopsies, facet and epidural steroid injections and discograms.

Cancer

Nearly half of all men and a little over one-third of all women in the United States will develop cancer during their
lifetimes. Today, millions of people are living with cancer or have had cancer. However, research shows the sooner a
cancer is found and treatment begins, the better the chances are for recovery.

Imaging techniques are able to produce pictures of areas inside the body and are becoming the key to early detection.
However, physicians no longer use imaging simply for detection. It can also show what is happening inside the body
during and after cancer treatment. Essentially, it not only can determine the primary location of cancer, but also if the
cancer has spread to surrounding areas. This aids in directing surgery and other cancer treatments, as well as
evaluating tumor recurrence.

At Inland Imaging, there are several different imaging technologies available to cancer patients. Each modality is
designed to acquire specific information. Often an oncologist will utilize several of these technologies to get the best
overall picture of a patient‟s health.

Breast
Prostate
Liver
Head and Neck
Abdomen
Lung
Pelvic
Thyroid

Breast Cancer

Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in women today. It is estimated that one in seven women in
the U.S. will develop breast cancer in her lifetime. Yet research shows the 5-year relative survival rate for those who
detect their breast cancer early is 82 percent.

Inland Imaging provides you and your physician with state-of-the-art technology and advanced medical expertise to
gain important information about your breast health. The breast imaging procedures offered include screening and
diagnostic mammography, breast ultrasound, breast biopsies, breast MRI, and PET/CT.

Mammography services at Inland Imaging are accredited by the American College of Radiology (ACR) and certified by
the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Inland Imaging‟s radiologists who read breast-imaging studies are board-
certified physicians who specialize in diagnostic breast imaging. Our mammography technologists are dedicated
mammography professionals who perform over 45,000 exams annually.

A screening mammogram is an examination used for women who have no symptoms of breast problems and is
performed in private by a qualified female technologist. The results of your examination are read and interpreted by a
specialized radiologist. The American Cancer Society (ACS) recommends a yearly screening mammogram for all
women age 40 years and older.

A screening mammogram procedure does not require a referral from your doctor. If you would like to schedule a
screening mammogram for yourself or receive additional information, please call 455-4455.

Computer aided detection (CAD) technology reviews a patient‟s film and evaluates it after the radiologist has made an
initial interpretation. Studies show that CAD analysis improves the detection of early cancer by as much as eight to ten
percent. If the software detects any abnormalities on the mammogram film, it marks them. The radiologist then reviews
the marked areas to determine if the areas are suspicious and require further evaluation.

A diagnostic mammogram is a problem-solving exam that may involve additional views of the breast and is ordered
after an abnormality or symptom is found in an initial screening. The technologist who performs the exam works closely
with a radiologist to determine the best images needed to aid in the breast evaluation. This work up will determine if
further imaging is needed, such as a breast ultrasound or breast MRI.

Breast ultrasound is a noninvasive exam that uses sonar technology to determine if a suspicious area is a fluid filled
cyst or a solid mass that require further testing, such as a biopsy.
A breast biopsy is a tissue sampling technique used to confirm or rule out the presence of breast cancer. Breast
biopsies can be surgical or non-surgical; Inland Imaging specializes in non-surgical breast biopsies. Utilizing these
methods benefits patients by decreasing recovery time and reducing scarring compared with surgical excisional
biopsy. Inland Imaging utilizes two primary non-surgical methods to obtain samples: ultrasound-guided core-needle
breast biopsy and stereotactic breast biopsy.

Ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy is commonly used to evaluate suspicious masses within the breast, whether or
not they can be felt during a clinical examination. An ultrasound probe is placed over the site and a radiologist guides
a biopsy needle directly into the mass. Local anesthesia is used during this procedure as well as during stereotactic
breast biopsy.

Stereotactic biopsy uses a dedicated biopsy table combined with digital mammography to determine the exact biopsy
location. Tissue samples are then extracted using a vacuum assisted biopsy instrument called the Mammotome™.
Patients have minimal discomfort during and after the procedure and can usually resume normal activity the following
day.

Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an excellent problem solving technology. It is often used to investigate
breast concerns first detected with mammography, physical exam, or other imaging exams. Breast MRI has been
approved by the FDA since 1991 for use as a supplement to mammography to help diagnose breast cancer. Unlike
mammography, which uses low dose x-rays to image the breast, MRI uses powerful magnetic fields and radio waves
to create images of the breast.

Patients undergoing a breast MRI exam lie face down on the MRI table that is specially configured so that the breasts
are positioned to hang freely through two openings called breast coils. After images have been acquired and assessed
with CAD, a radiologist reads and interprets the images.

Biopsies may also be performed using breast MRI. MRI-guided breast biopsy is a fast, safe and easy way to find and
biopsy breast abnormalities without any unnecessary surgery.

Positron emission tomography (PET), combined with computed tomography (CT), is a nuclear medicine imaging
technique that uses very short-lived radioactive compounds that localize in cancer cells. Typically a patient will undergo
other imaging exams first before receiving a PET/CT scan. In relation to breast cancer, PET/CT is used solely in the
initial staging or re-staging of cancer, and in evaluating its response to treatment.

Prostate Cancer

Prostate cancer develops in the small walnut-shaped gland that produces seminal fluid in males. It is one of the most
common types of cancer in men, affecting about one in six men in the United States. Prostate cancer tends to grow
slowly and remains confined to the prostate gland where there may not be initial harm. Some types of prostate cancer
grow slowly and may need minimal or no treatment, while other types are aggressive and can spread quickly. If
detected early, successful treatment of prostate cancer greatly improves.

If symptoms arise or your prostate cancer screening tests come back positive, your doctor may order an imaging test
to better evaluate for the most accurate means of treatment. You may also need further tests to help determine if the
cancer has spread. Many men don't require additional studies and can directly proceed with treatment based on the
characteristics of their tumors and the results of their pre-biopsy PSA tests.

A bone scan may be ordered to take a picture of your skeleton in order to determine whether cancer has spread to the
bone. Prostate cancer can spread to any bones in your body, not just those closest to your prostate, such as your
pelvis or lower spine.

An Ultrasound study not only can help indicate if cancer is present, but also may reveal whether the disease has
spread to nearby tissues.
A Computed Tomography (CT) scan produces a series of detailed cross-sectional images of your body and can
identify enlarged lymph nodes or abnormalities in other organs. However, a CT scan cannot determine whether the
visible problems are due to cancer. Therefore, CT scans are most useful when combined with other tests.

A Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) test produces detailed, cross-sectional images of your body using magnets and
radio waves. An MRI can help detect evidence of the possible spread of cancer to lymph nodes and bones.

Inland Imaging Interventional Radiologists provide amazing new medical technologies to treat lever cancer such as
radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation. In either procedure, several needle probes are inserted directly through the
skin into a tumor, using a series of real-time computed tomography (CT) images to guide the probe. Magnetic
resonance imaging and ultrasound sometimes are used instead of CT scans to view the procedure.

Once the probe is positioned in the center of the tumor, the radiologist applies electrical heat in the form of radio waves
to “vaporize” the tumor or applies cold energy to kill the abnormal tissue.

Liver Cancer

In the United States, cancer affecting the liver is often times metastatic cancer, which occurs when tumors from other
parts of the body spread (metastasize) to the liver. Cancers that commonly spread to the liver include colon, lung and
breast cancers. These kinds of cancers are treated based on where the cancer began, rather than being treated as
primary liver cancers.

Primary liver cancer is rarely discovered early and many times doesn't respond to current treatments. Though
treatments fail to provide great improvement in the liver cancer itself, pain and other signs and symptoms caused by
liver cancer can be aggressively treated to improve quality of life.

If you present liver cancer symptoms, your doctor will perform several screening tests and may order additional
imaging tests and procedures to better evaluate your diagnoses or treatment options. Interventional Radiologists are
on staff to provide groundbreaking treatment options for individuals with lung cancer.

An Ultrasound may be ordered to produce a picture of internal organs, including the liver. During the test, sound waves
that are reflected from your liver and transformed into a computer image. Ultrasound provides information about the
shape, texture and makeup of tumors.

A Computerized Tomography (CT) scan uses X-rays to produce detailed a series of thin cross-sectional images of your
body. Your doctor may also order a variation of the test, called a CT angiogram, where contrast dye is injected into a
vein in your arm. CT uses X-ray technology to track the dye as it flows through the blood vessels in your liver. A CT
angiogram can provide detailed information on the number and location of liver tumors.

A Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) creates images using a magnetic field and radio waves. The test can show
images of the ducts that transport bile from the liver to the upper part of the small intestine (duodenum) as well as of
the arteries and veins within the liver.

Inland Imaging Interventional Radiologists provide amazing new medical technologies to treat lever cancer such as
Yttrium-90 microsphere administration, where microscopic radioactive beads are injected to specially target cancer
within the liver.

Other interventional procedures include radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation. In either procedure, several needle
probes are inserted directly through the skin into a tumor, using a series of real-time computed tomography (CT)
images to guide the probe. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound sometimes are used instead of CT scans to
view the procedure.

Once the probe is positioned in the center of the tumor, the radiologist applies electrical heat in the form of radio waves
to “vaporize” the tumor or applies cold energy to kill the abnormal tissue.
Head and Neck Cancer

Cancer that arises in the head or neck region includes the brain, nasal cavity, sinuses, lips, mouth, salivary glands,
throat, or larynx (voice box).

If symptoms are present or cancer tests come back positive, your doctor may order further imaging tests to better
evaluate the most accurate means of treatment. You may also need further tests to help determine if or how far the
cancer has spread.

A Computerized Tomography (CT) scan may be ordered to produce a series of detailed images of your head or area of
concern. A special contrast may be injected into your bloodstream after a few CT scans are taken. The contrast helps
make tumors more visible on X-rays.

A Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scan uses magnetic fields and radio waves to generate images of the head.
Images produced by an MRI are particularly useful in diagnosing brain tumors. Sometimes a special contrast is
injected into your bloodstream during the procedure to help distinguish cancerous areas from healthy tissue.

An Angiogram test involves injecting a special dye into your bloodstream. The dye flows through the blood vessels in
your brain and can be seen on an X-ray. This test helps show the location of blood vessels in and around a brain
tumor.

An X-ray of your head may show alterations in skull bones that could indicate a tumor. It may show calcium deposits,
which are sometimes associated with brain tumors. However, a routine X-ray is a far less sensitive test than are brain
scans.

Other tests include magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), single-photon emission computerized tomography
(SPECT) or positron emission tomography (PET) scanning, help doctors gauge brain activity by studying brain
metabolism and chemistry and blood flow within your brain. These scans can be combined with an MRI or CT to help
doctors understand the effects of a tumor on brain activity and function, but doctors don't typically use them to make an
initial diagnosis of brain tumor.

Ultrasound imaging technique uses no radiation, but combines high-frequency sound waves and computer processing.
Ultrasound is especially good for providing information about the shape, texture and makeup of tumors and cysts.
While you relax on a bed or examining table, a wand-like device (transducer) is placed next to your head. It emits
inaudible sound waves that are reflected back to the transducer (similar to sonar). Those reflected sound waves are
then translated into a moving image by a computer.

Abdomen

Abdominal or Gastrointestinal cancers include colorectal cancer, pancreatic cancer and stomach (gastric) cancer. If
symptoms are present, your doctor may order specific blood tests or a colonoscopy to better diagnose colon or
abdominal cancers. Several additional imaging techniques can help your doctor detect the exact location of cancer,
determine if cancer has spread, or evaluate possible treatment options.

A fluoroscopy x-ray may be ordered to image the gastrointestinal or digestive system. The x-ray tests examine the
gastrointestinal (GI) tract, the areas of the body from the esophagus to the rectum. These x-rays are able to detect
cancers or abnormalities that occur in any portion of the GI tract.

Fluoroscopy is used to better contrast the outline of the GI tract, with areas of concern appearing white on the x-ray
images. It helps to visualize problem areas and can indicate difficulties with swallowing (dysphagia) or digestion,
ulcerations, malignancy or structural abnormalities.

A newer procedure that might be an option for detecting presence of colon cancer is virtual colonoscopy. The test uses
Computed Tomography technology to scan to take pictures of the colon. The CT scan creates cross-sectional and 3-D
images than can reveal polyps or other irregularities.
An endoscopic ultrasound may help determine whether cancer has spread into the walls of your stomach or to nearby
tissues and lymph nodes. An endoscope carries a small ultrasound probe that uses high-frequency sound waves to
create images of your stomach and surrounding tissues, including lymph nodes.

Your doctor may order a Computerized Tomography (CT) scan to evaluate the spread of cancer outside your stomach,
especially to organs such as your liver and lungs. A CT scan uses split-second computer processing and X-ray beams
to produce detailed cross-sectional images of your internal organs.

A Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) also looks for the spread of cancer to areas outside of your stomach. Unlike a
CT scan, MRI uses a powerful magnetic field and radio waves to produce cross-sectional images of your body.

Another test is a Chest X-ray that checks whether cancer has spread to your lungs. An X-ray is not as sensitive as a
CT scan.

Lung

In the United States, lung cancer is the number one cause of cancer death among men and women. Lung cancer
generally starts to develop in the cells that line your lungs and may spread if not treated early. Nearly 90 percent of
lung cancer cases are directly related to smoking, whether it is in smokers or those exposed to secondhand smoke.

There are two major types of lung cancer based on the appearance of lung cancer cells, small cell lung cancer and
non-small lung cancer. Inland Imaging offers several imaging tests to better assist your physician in deciding what
treatment plan will help you most. Interventional Radiologists are also on staff to provide groundbreaking treatment
options for individuals with lung cancer.

Your healthcare provider may order a chest x-ray of your lungs to look for an abnormal mass or nodule based on
symptoms associated with lung cancer.

A Computed Tomography (CT) scan produces a series of detailed cross-sectional images of your body and can
identify small lesions in your lungs.

Positron emission tomography (PET), combined with computed tomography (CT), is a nuclear medicine imaging
technique that uses very short-lived radioactive compounds that localize in cancer cells. Typically a patient will undergo
other imaging exams first before receiving a PET/CT scan.

Inland Imaging Interventional Radiologists provide amazing new medical technologies to treat lever cancer such as
radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation. In either procedure, several needle probes are inserted directly through the
skin into a tumor, using a series of real-time computed tomography (CT) images to guide the probe. Magnetic
resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound sometimes are used instead of CT scans to view the procedure.

Once the probe is positioned in the center of the tumor, the radiologist applies electrical heat in the form of radio waves
to “vaporize” the tumor or applies cold energy to kill the abnormal tissue.

Pelvic

Pelvic cancers can b e characterized as bladder, uterine, ovarian and prostate cancer. It is generally referenced as any
cancer that appears in the large, bony, basin-shaped cavity where the hips and legs join to the lower part of the body.

With many cancers, survival of the disease increases when found early. However, in many cases the disease can be
difficult to detect in its early stage because of its location and unfortunately the disease has spread before it is
diagnosed.

Inland Imaging offers a wide variety of imaging techniques to evaluate the presence of cancer or assist your doctor in
formulating a treatment plan if you have been diagnosed with the disease.
Your healthcare provider may order a pelvic ultrasound, a test that uses high-frequency sound waves to produce
images of the inside the body. The test is a safe, noninvasive way to evaluate the size, shape and configuration of the
pelvic area. It can also detect fluid build up associated with some forms of pelvic cancer.

Other imaging tests offered by Inland Imaging for pelvic evaluation include computerized tomography (CT) and
magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which both provide detailed, cross-sectional images of the inside of your body. A
chest X-ray may help determine if cancer has spread to other parts of your body.

Thyroid

Your thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland located at the base of your neck, just below your Adam's apple. Though the
thyroid gland is small, it produces important hormones that regulate every aspect of your metabolism, from heart rate
to calorie burning.

Development of one or more solid or fluid-filled lumps called nodules may form in your thyroid. In many cases, these
are noncancerous and do not cause any major health risks. However, a small percentage of cases come back as
cancerous and can result with serious complications.

Prognosis is often excellent for those that are diagnosed with thyroid cancer and can often be completely removed with
surgery.

An ultrasound uses high-frequency sound waves to outline the neck anatomy and detect abnormal growths. While very
good at identifying whether a growth or nodule is present, ultrasound scans can't tell for sure whether it's malignant or
benign. Ultrasound is safe, with virtually no complications associated with its use.

A computerized tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) test may be ordered by your doctor to
determine if cancer is present or evaluate if it has spread to the lymph nodes or other areas of your neck.

Cardiovascular

58 million Americans have been diagnosed with one or more forms of cardiovascular disease, making coronary artery
disease (CAD) the number one cause of death in the United States. More Americans die each year of heart disease
than all types of cancer combined.

Coronary artery disease is most commonly a result of plaque deposits in the wall of the coronary arteries. The “waxy”
build up causes a narrowing of the arteries and can eventually lead to heart attack or stroke. Until recently, there were
no non-invasive studies that could directly evaluate coronary arteries for the presence of atherosclerotic disease.

Inland Imaging is taking the necessary steps to help your healthcare provider eradicate heart disease and reverse the
deadly treads associated with it. We offer several tests that can better help your doctor measure your cardiovascular
health and begin treatment if there is presence of heart disease.

Cardiac CTA
Calcium Scoring
Coronary PET/CT
MRA
Cardiac MRI
Vascular Ultrasound

Cardiac CTA

Coronary CT Angiography (CCTA) is a powerful tool used to examine the small arteries that feed nutrients to the heart
muscle. Through Computed Tomography (CT) technology, we are able to visualize blood flow in the coronary arteries
with greater detail than more traditional studies.
Advanced computer software manipulates the data into 3 dimensional (3D) images with exceptional quality. CCTA is a
noninvasive procedure to examine the walls of the coronary arteries and evaluate the presence of hard and soft
plaque. Information from the procedure can help your healthcare provider determine your risk of a heart attack and
develop a treatment plan.

If coronary disease is present following a cardiovascular screening test done by your doctor, a Coronary CT Angiogram
may be ordered to help with preventive management and treatment of the disease. Those recommended for the exam
include:

     -    Patients with an intermediate to high-risk profile with no typical coronary symptoms
     -    Patients who have had inconclusive results from a stress test
     -    Patients with unusual symptoms for CAD, but low to intermediate risk profiles.

Prior to a CCTA, avoid drinking or eating anything four hours before your exam. Do not consume anything containing
caffeine or nicotine starting at midnight on the day of exam. Three hours proceeding, you will be given or prescribed
100 mg of a medication in order to lower your heart rate. You will also take one 0.4 mg tablet of sublingual nitroglycerin
just prior to the exam and 80-120 cc of IV contrast. Following the CT exam, you should expect to wait an additional 15-
30 minutes for observation.

The images from the test will be sent to a subspecialized coronary radiologist for review. Your physician will receive the
results and determine appropriate treatment options for reducing the signs of heart disease. This may include diet and
lifestyle changes, medication and/or further testing.

Calcium Scoring

A Calcium Scoring exam is a screening tool to evaluate coronary artery disease. The test quantifies the total load of
calcified, or hardened plaque, in the coronary arteries. Results of the exam are based on the volume and density of
calcified plaque and then comparing that score to a large reference population matched to a patient's age and sex.

The exam can be used as a valuable tool in conjunction with other clinical risk factors such as family history,
cholesterol level, and lipid profile. Results from the test can help your healthcare provider determine a treatment plane
for reversing coronary artery disease.

A Calcium Scoring Exam is a strong problem-solving tool for individuals considered to be at high risk for developing
heart disease. The risk factors for heart disease include:

     -    Men 40 years or older, women 45 or older
     -    High cholesterol
     -    History of smoking
     -    High blood pressure
     -    Family history of heart disease
     -    High stress levels
     -    Sedentary lifestyle

If any categories apply to you, we encourage talking with your doctor about considering a Calcium Scoring exam.
Individuals not recommended for the procedure include those that have had previous cardiovascular treatment or
surgery, including coronary stinting, coronary bypass surgery, pacemaker placement, or valve replacement.

The scan itself generally takes ten minutes and does not involve any injections or medications. Lying down on a table
fully dressed, a trained staff technologist will place EKG leads on your chest. You will be asked to hold your breath for
a brief period to better capture still pictures. A cardiovascular specialized radiologist from Inland Imaging will read the
scan and send the results to your physician.

Coronary PET/CT

An efficient and noninvasive test, PET/CT serves as a powerful tool for evaluating the coronary anatomy and tissue
viability. PET/CT is a form of molecular imaging that has the ability to visualize and monitor processes on a cell level,
providing information about possible defects or pathology transformation.

PET/CT requires an ingestion or injection of a radioactive isotope that releases positrons at the cellular level. These
collide with electrons creating a light pattern that can be scanned. The combination of PET and CT technology uses
two „machines‟ on a single scanner, allowing the clinician to see images at the metabolic level and uncover physical
problems or anatomical abnormalities.

MRA

A Magnetic Resonance Angiogram of the cardiovascular system is a minimally invasive medical test that uses MRI
technology and in some cases contrast material to produce pictures of major blood vessels throughout the body. The
test uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves, and a computer produce the detailed images.

A computer processes the radio wave signals and generates a series of detailed images. The computer compiles the
images into three-dimensional representations of the body that can be studied from many different angles on a
computer monitor.

During the MRA study, contrast material may be administered to generate clearly defined images of blood flow
throughout specific areas of the vascular system.

Cardiac MRI

A Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) test is a noninvasive, painless medical procedure that helps physicians
diagnose and treat cardiovascular conditions.

MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed images of the heart and vascular
system. A Cardiac MRI may be ordered by your healthcare provider to evaluate the structures and function of the
heart, valves and major vessels or detect and evaluate coronary artery disease.

Cardiac MRI allows radiologists and your doctor examine the size and thickness of the chambers of the heart. And
determine the extent of damage caused by a heart attack or progressive heart disease. It may also be used to detect
the buildup of plaque and blockages in the blood vessels.

Detailed Cardiac MRI images may allow physicians to better evaluate your cardiovascular health more adequately than
other imaging methods such as x-ray, ultrasound or computed tomography (CT).

Vascular Ultrasound

Vascular Ultrasound, also known as vascular sonography, involves the use of high-frequency sound waves to produce
images of the vascular system. Ultrasound images are captured in real-time and are able to visualize internal
structures, movement, and blood flow.

During an ultrasound examination, a transducer is pressed against the skin and directs a stream of inaudible, high
frequency sound waves into the body. As the sound waves bounce off of internal organs, fluids and tissues, images
are produced through tiny changes in the sound's pitch and direction.

Vascular Ultrasound is a useful tool for evaluating the body's circulatory system, identifying blockages (stenosis), blood
clots, plaque or emboli. The test can also help determine whether a patient is a good candidate for angioplasty.

Doppler ultrasound, a special application of ultrasound, measures the direction and speed of blood cells as they move
through vessels. Computer technology collects and processes the sounds, creating graphs or pictures that represent
the blood flow. It is good test to evaluate blood flow through a blood vessel, including the body's major arteries and
veins in the abdomen, arms, legs and neck.

Stomach and Gastrointestinal
Stomach and Gastrointestinal problems can present symptoms that can easily be treated through diet change or
specific medications. In some cases, more tests may be ordered by your doctor to better evaluate the seriousness of
your stomach problems or develop a treatment plan.

Inland Imaging offers a wide variety of imaging techniques to help your doctor better evaluate your stomach and
gastrointestinal health.

Stomach Pain
Indigestion
Bowel and Colon

Stomach Pain

Stomach pain is fairly common and can be a result of a variety of conditions. Pain can be related to overeating, food
poisoning, or infection. However in more sever cases, the pain may be an early indication of more a more serious
disorder.

Inland Imaging offers several imaging techniques that may help your doctor detect the problem causing stomach pain
or determine possible treatment options.

A fluoroscopy x-ray may be ordered to image the gastrointestinal or digestive system. The x-ray tests examine the
gastrointestinal (GI) tract, the areas of the body from the esophagus to the rectum. These x-rays are able to detect
abnormalities that occur in any portion of the GI tract.

Fluoroscopy is used to better contrast the outline of the GI tract, with areas of concern appearing white on the x-ray
images. It helps to visualize problem areas and can indicate difficulties with swallowing (dysphagia) or digestion,
ulcerations, malignancy or structural abnormalities.

A newer procedure that might be an option for detecting areas of concern is a virtual colonoscopy. The test uses
Computed Tomography technology to scan to take pictures of the colon. The CT scan creates cross-sectional and 3-D
images than can reveal polyps or other irregularities.

An endoscopic ultrasound may help evaluate your stomach health or evaluate your abdominal organs. An endoscope
carries a small ultrasound probe that uses high-frequency sound waves to create images of your stomach and
surrounding tissues.

Your doctor may order a Computerized Tomography (CT) scan to evaluate your internal abdominal organs. A CT scan
uses split-second computer processing and X-ray technology to produce detailed cross-sectional images of your
internal organs.

A Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is also able to produce detailed images of areas in and around your stomach
area. Unlike a CT scan, MRI uses a powerful magnetic field and radio waves to produce cross-sectional images of your
body.

Another test used to evaluate and diagnose areas of concern is a standard Chest X-ray.

Indigestion

Indigestion is common and generally can be treated with over-the-counter medications or changing your diet. However,
if frequent enough, indigestion can be a sign of a more serious problem that requires medical attention.

If you experience reoccurring and irritating symptoms associated with indigestion, your doctor may order more
extensive testing to better evaluate the cause or develop a treatment plan. Inland Imaging offers several imaging tests
to help with pinpointing the source of indigestion.
During a fluoroscopy X-ray, you will be asked to drink a liquid that coats and fills the hollows of your digestive tract. The
coating and X-ray image generate a silhouette of the shape and condition of your esophagus, stomach and upper
intestine (duodenum). The test can evaluate if indigestion is the result of more serious problems such as a hiatal
hernia, esophageal narrowing, stricture, or growth development.

Fluoroscopy is used to better contrast the outline of the GI tract, with areas of concern appearing white on the x-ray
images. It helps to visualize problem areas and can indicate difficulties with swallowing (dysphagia) or digestion,
ulcerations, malignancy or structural abnormalities.

A more direct test, called an Endoscopy, is used to help diagnose the cause of indigestion. During an endoscopy, a
thin, flexible tube equipped with a light and camera (endoscope) is inserted down your throat. The endoscope can
visualize the presence of ulcers or inflammation.

Bowel and Colon

Pain in your bowel or colon can be a result of a variety of conditions. Pain may be related to ulcers, diverticulitis,
irritable bowel syndrome, proctitis, intestinal obstruction, or cancer.

Inland Imaging offers several imaging techniques that may help your doctor detect the problem causing bowel or colon
pain or determine possible treatment options.

A fluoroscopy x-ray may be ordered to image the gastrointestinal or digestive system. The x-ray tests examine the
gastrointestinal (GI) tract, the areas of the body from the esophagus to the rectum. These x-rays are able to detect
abnormalities that occur in any portion of the GI tract.

Fluoroscopy is used to better contrast the outline of the GI tract, with areas of concern appearing white on the x-ray
images. It helps to visualize problem areas and can indicate difficulties with swallowing (dysphagia) or digestion,
ulcerations, malignancy or structural abnormalities.

A newer procedure that might be an option for detecting areas of concern is a virtual colonoscopy. The test uses
Computed Tomography technology to scan to take pictures of the colon. The CT scan creates cross-sectional and 3-D
images than can reveal polyps or other irregularities.

An endoscopic ultrasound may help evaluate your stomach health or evaluate your abdominal organs. An endoscope
carries a small ultrasound probe that uses high-frequency sound waves to create images of your stomach and
surrounding tissues.

Your doctor may order a Computerized Tomography (CT) scan to evaluate your internal abdominal organs. A CT scan
uses split-second computer processing and X-ray technology to produce detailed cross-sectional images of your
internal organs.

A Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is also able to produce detailed images of areas in and around your stomach
area. Unlike a CT scan, MRI uses a powerful magnetic field and radio waves to produce cross-sectional images of your
body.

Another test used to evaluate and diagnose areas of concern is a standard Chest X-ray.

Pain Management

Information to come…


CT

Computed Tomography, CT, is an x-ray examination using a scanner to produce a series of cross-sectional images of
a selected part of the body. The CT examination involves the use of very small amounts of radiation. The images are
made using a computer as well as x-rays. The examination is painless and is very helpful in evaluation of diseases of
the bone, abdomen, and brain.

The CT scanner opening encircles the body during the examination. This opening contains an x-ray tube and
receptors, which are mounted opposite each other. These rotate around the body. With each rotation, or scan, a
portion of the total image is accumulated by the receptor.

The receptor then feeds the information into a computer. The computer calculates the density of each area within the
body, based on the energy absorbed as the scanner rotates, and converts it into a picture of a section of your body.
The calculations that are required by each scan take the computer only a few seconds to make, but would take a
mathematician years of effort.

The Procedure

For the examination, the patient may be asked to remove part or all of your clothing, and to wear a gown. After entering
the examination room, the technologist will position the patient on a special table. Blankets will be provided to keep
them warm.

Once you are securely in place, the patient will be moved into the scanner opening. The technologist will control the
scanner and monitor the progress of the examination from an adjacent room. Patients are shown how to communicate
with the technologist, if necessary.

While moved through the scanner opening, patients are asked to remain relaxed and still. The patient may be asked to
hold their breath for a few seconds as each scan is made. A brief whirring sound can be heard as the x-ray equipment
scans the body. After each image, or scan, is made, the table will move into position for the next scan. Once the scan
sequence has begun, it is important that the patient remains still until the technologist has completed the scan.

After The Exam

The intravenous contrast medium, if used, will be eliminated through the urine and should cause no discoloration. Fluid
intake should be increased after the scan to help the body eliminate the contrast. Regular food intake can resume
immediately after the examination, unless otherwise determined by a doctor.

MRI

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) does not use x-rays or radiation. Instead, a combination of common radio waves
and a magnetic field are used to obtain the images.

During the examination, a large magnet in the MRI unit aligns the nuclei of hydrogen atoms in the body in one
direction. Radio waves transmitted into the MRI unit change the alignment of the hydrogen atoms at a rapid rate.
These changes are measured and fed into the MRI computer system where thousands of mathematical calculations
are made.

The results are displayed as images on a computer screen. MRI, in effect, draws a map of the hydrogen atoms in your
body. These images can help your physician diagnose your condition and plan your treatment.

Procedure

If necessary, the patient will be asked to change into a gown. Patients are informed to remove all jewelry, metal objects
and credit cards as not to interfere with the large magnet used during the examination.

The technologist assists the patient and lies them down on a comfortable, padded table. Patients are positioned in the
appropriate position and reminded to remain as still as possible during the examination. The table will electronically
move the patient through the scanner. During the study, a rapid drumming noise can be heard and may cause some
vibration. A friend or relative may be in the room during the examination if necessary.
After The Exam

The radiologist will review the examination before a patient leaves to ensure the adequate images have been captured.
He will then interpret the images and send a written report to their doctor.

Breast MRI
Pelvic MRI

Breast MRI

Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an excellent problem solving technology. It is often used to investigate
breast concerns first detected with mammography, physical exam, or other imaging exams. The FDA has approved
breast MRI since 1991 for use as a supplement to mammography to help diagnose breast cancer. Unlike
mammography, which uses low dose x-rays to image the breast, MRI uses powerful magnetic fields and radio waves
to create images of the breast.

Patients undergoing a breast MRI exam lie face down on the MRI table that is specially configured so that the breasts
are positioned to hang freely through two openings called breast coils. After images have been acquired and assessed
with CAD, a radiologist reads and interprets the images.

Pelvic MRI

Limited pelvic MRI is a completely non-invasive imaging technique that uses no x-rays or radiation. It produces detailed
images that are often used to evaluate the benefits of surgical interventions. Symptoms such as chronic pelvic pain
and dysfunctional uterine bleeding are often studied using this exam. Limited pelvic MRI can help to identify the source
of these symptoms and their relationship to pregnancy complications.

X-Ray

What is an X-Ray?

X-ray exams include a wide range of diagnostic procedures used to demonstrate areas of the body. X-ray technology
today is often referred as to general radiography. X-ray is a focused beam of energy that produces images of the body
on either film or a computer. X-ray beams move differently through bones than they would tissues or organs.

The difference can be seen by the density of the impression they give to the image. Bones for example will absorb
more of the beam than an organ or soft tissue making them appear white or gray on x-ray image while tissue appears
darker.

X-rays and general radiography play a very important role in helping physicians make their diagnostic decisions for
treatment. X-ray findings often suggest to the radiologist that further diagnostic imaging procedures will be required.
The Procedure

General radiography exams usually take between 10 to 30 minutes depending on the type of procedure. Some patients
may be asked to change into a gown if their clothing has zippers or buttons that are in the view.

After The Exam

There are no restrictions following an x-ray and a patient can return to work or normal activity immediately. Your results
are reviewed and interpreted by a staff radiologist. Any previous studies are compared against the new exam and the
results are sent directly to the referring physician. The goal is to provide a physician with the report the same or next
day. Often if there is injury doctors would like immediate results.

Angiogram
Barium Enema
Hysterosalpinogram
IVP
Myelogram
Upper GI
VCUG

Angiogram

An angiogram is an X-ray test that uses a special dye and camera (fluoroscopy) to take pictures of the blood flow of
your arteries or veins in the arms, legs, chest, or belly.

Common angiograms can look at the arteries near the heart (coronary angiogram), lungs (pulmonary angiogram), brain
(cerebral angiogram), head and neck (carotid angiogram), legs or arms (peripheral), and the aorta (aortogram).

During an angiogram, a thin tube called a catheter is placed into the femoral blood vessel (femoral artery or vein) in the
groin or just above the elbow (brachial artery). The catheter is guided to the area to be studied. Then an iodine dye
(contrast material) is injected into the vessel to make the area show clearly on the X-ray pictures. This method is
known as conventional or catheter angiogram. The angiogram pictures can be made into regular X-ray films or stored
as digital pictures in a computer.

An angiogram can find a bulge in a blood vessel (aneurysm). It can also show narrowing or a blockage in a blood
vessel that affects blood flow. An angiogram can show if coronary artery disease is present and how bad it is.

Barium Enema

Information to come…

Hysterosalpinogram

Information to come…

IVP

Information to come…

Myelogram

Information to come…

Upper GI

Information to come…

VCUG

Information to come…

Mammography

Mammography is an x-ray examination of the breast using very low levels of radiation. It is currently the best available
tool for detecting breast cancer when no symptoms exist. A mammogram can discover breast cancer before a lump or
mass can be felt, and early detection enables more treatment options. However, a mammogram can also reveal
something that is not cancerous.

A screening mammogram procedure does not require a referral from your doctor. If you would like to schedule a
screening mammogram for yourself or receive additional information, please call 455-4455.
Procedure

The procedure involves two x-rays of each breast, one from the side and one from above. Compression of the breast
during the x-ray procedure is required. Compressing the breast reduces the radiation and improves the image by
bringing the breast structure closer to the film. Squeezing of the breast may be uncomfortable but usually only lasts a
few seconds. A female registered radiologic technologist who is an expert in the operation of the x-ray equipment
performs the procedure itself. Once the images have been taken, a radiologist, (a physician specializing in x-ray
diagnosis) studies and interprets the films.

Post Exam

The radiologist will study your examination and prepare a dictated report, which will be sent to your physician. Your
physician will review the radiologist's findings and communicate the results to you. In some cases your physician may
recommend a tissue diagnosis called a biopsy.

Computer Aided Detected (CAD)

Computer aided detection (CAD) technology works much like a spell checker on all screening mammograms,
reviewing a patient‟s film after the radiologist has already made an initial interpretation. Studies show that CAD
analysis improves the detection of early cancer by as much as 20 percent. If the software detects any abnormalities on
the mammogram film, it marks them. The radiologist then reviews the marked areas to determine if the areas are
suspicious and require further evaluation, such as a diagnostic mammogram.

Breast Cancer Screening
Localization
Breast Biopsy

Breast Cancer Screening

Information to come…

Localization

Information to come…

Breast Biopsy

Information to come…

Ultrasound

Information to come…

Abdomen
Obstetrical
Prostate
Vascular

Abdomen

Information to come…
Obstetrical

Information to come…

Prostate

Information to come…

Vascular

Vascular Ultrasound, also known as vascular sonography, involves the use of high-frequency sound waves to produce
images of the vascular system. Ultrasound images are captured in real-time and are able to visualize internal
structures, movement, and blood flow.

During an ultrasound examination, a transducer is pressed against the skin and directs a stream of inaudible, high
frequency sound waves into the body. As the sound waves bounce off of internal organs, fluids and tissues, images
are produced through tiny changes in the sound's pitch and direction.

Vascular Ultrasound is a useful tool for evaluating the body's circulatory system, identifying blockages (stenosis), blood
clots, plaque or emboli. The test can also help determine whether a patient is a good candidate for angioplasty.

Doppler ultrasound, a special application of ultrasound, measures the direction and speed of blood cells as they move
through vessels. Computer technology collects and processes the sounds, creating graphs or pictures that represent
the blood flow. It is good test to evaluate blood flow through a blood vessel, including the body's major arteries and
veins in the abdomen, arms, legs and neck.

Nuclear Medicine

Nuclear Medicine is a safe, painless and commonly performed procedure. It provides valuable information to your
doctor in evaluating the function and structure of body organs.

The imaging of various organs and/or systems is made possible by the injection of a compound containing a small
amount of radioactive substance. This compound will collect in the organ/system, depending upon the way that
organ/system is functioning.

The radioactive substance will then give off energy by emitting gamma rays. A special detection device called a
gamma camera picks up the rays and records where they originated. Because the radioactive substance collects in an
organ varying by the way the organ is functioning, the energy given off will also vary, allowing for diagnosis. This
information is then transferred to x-ray film for permanent record.

Procedure

When you have a nuclear medicine procedure, called a "scan", a compound containing a small amount of radioactive
substance is administered, usually by injection into your vein. After the injection, you may be asked to wait a period of
time before the actual scan can begin. This waiting time will vary for each scan, while some scans may begin
immediately. This waiting period is necessary because the compounds take different amounts of time to accumulate in
the area of your body being studied.

When it is time for your scan, you will be positioned next to a special detector, called a gamma camera, which will be
placed close to the part of your body being studied. These images will be seen on a screen and copied onto film for
later study. The camera does not produce radiation. It detects signals from the radioactive substance you received
earlier. Multiple pictures, without additional radiation exposure, make it possible to gather more diagnostic information
with no increased risk to you.

Post Exam

The radiologist will review your examination before you leave to make sure adequate images have been obtained. He
will then interpret the images and send a written report to your doctor. You doctor will discuss the results with you.

Bone Densitometry

Bone Densitometry is a non-invasive procedure in which a patient‟s bone mineral density (BMD) is measured and then
compared against a normal population of people who are the same age, weight, sex and ethnic background as the
patient. It uses a very low energy x-ray beam to produce a "scan" of the lumbar spine, either hip, and/or either forearm.
Your doctor uses the information gathered from this study to assess your bone condition, risk of fracture, and to assist
in deciding whether treatment is necessary. If you are already undergoing treatment or therapy for osteoporosis or
osteopoenia, periodic follow up studies are recommended to assess changes in bone density.

Procedure

The study is performed by an x-ray technologist and takes about 15-20 minutes to complete. Comfortable clothing
should be worn such as sweat suits or soft cotton clothing. Metal objects such as belt buckles, rivets, snaps, zippers,
and or buttons over the mid-abdomen or hip areas interfere with the scan and must be removed, along with shoes.

During the exam, you will lie quietly on a comfortable (well padded) scan table while a "C-Arm" (x-ray tube) moves over
the area being scanned. Breathing is not suspended during the scan, but talking is discouraged while the C-Arm is in
motion.

After The Exam

Once the chosen areas have been scanned satisfactorily the exam is complete and the patient is allowed to replace
items and/or clothing that have been removed and leave. The technologist will apply the computer program to analyze
the images that have been produced. The computer will print a copy of the scan and the analysis of the area of bone
that has been imaged. The printed copies are given to a radiologist who will prepare a report on the information
obtained. A copy of the completed scanned image and the radiologist‟s report will be sent to your physician. The
information gathered and the image scans are stored on the computer making it possible to do future studies and
comparisons.

PET/CT

In one continuous full-body scan (usually about 30 minutes), PET captures images of miniscule changes in the body's
metabolism caused by the growth of abnormal cells, while CT images simultaneously allow physicians to pinpoint the
exact location, size, and shape of the diseased tissue or tumor. Essentially, small lesions or tumors are detected with
PET and then precisely located with CT.

While a CT scan provides anatomical detail (size and location of the tumor, mass, etc.), a PET scan provides metabolic
detail (cellular activity of the tumor, mass, etc.). Combining these two scanner technologies makes a PET/CT superior
to either technology alone.

Anatomical: CT scanners send x-rays through the body, which are then measured by detectors in the CT scanner. A
computer algorithm then processes those measurements to produce pictures of the body's internal structures.

Metabolic: PET images begin with an injection of a solution of glucose (sugar) that has been "tagged" with a
radioactive chemical isotope (generally fluorine 18, or FDG). Metabolically active organs or tumors consume sugar at
high rates, and as the tagged sugar starts to decay, it emits positrons. These positrons then collide with electrons,
giving off gamma rays, and a computer converts the gamma rays into images. These images indicate metabolic "hot
spots," often indicating rapidly growing tumors (because cancerous cells generally consume more sugar/energy than
other organs or tumors).

Procedure

The entire examination usually takes less than 30 minutes, providing comprehensive diagnostic information to your
health care team very quickly. The PET/CT system provides exceptional image quality and accuracy of diagnostic
information.

Preparation for the Exam

Do not eat or drink any sugars or carbohydrates for the entire day prior to your exam and avoid vitamins for 24 hours
prior to your exam. For morning appointments, do not eat or drink (except water) after midnight the night before. If you
have an afternoon appointment, do not eat or drink (except water) after 6:00 am. If you have breakfast before 6:00 am,
it must consist only of proteins – no sugars or carbohydrates. Drinking water prior to the study is encouraged. All
necessary medication may be taken with water. Do not drink any other kind of fluid.

Including preparation for the exam and time in the scanner, please allow up to three hours for the entire visit. Upon
your arrival, a technologist will escort you to the imaging area and administer a very small amount of radioactive
glucose. Following the injection, you will rest in a private room for 60 to 90 minutes while the glucose distributes
through your body. The scanning procedure is performed while you lie comfortably on the scanner bed.

The PET exam itself causes no side effects and you will be able to drive yourself home. However, some patients may
request a mild sedative be given to relieve anxiety. These patients must have someone drive them home.

Interventional Radiology

Information to come…

Laser Treatment

Information to come…

Mobile MRI

Information to come…

Vascular Services

Information to come…

Patient Safety

Information to come…


Radiation Dosage

Information to come…

Proper Utilization
Information to come…

Billing Services

Information to come…

Financial Assistance

Information to come…

Pay Your Bill

Information to come…

Payer Information

Information to come…


About Us

Our Philosophy

Inland Imaging strives to provide industry-leading diagnostic medical imaging services while maintaining
uncompromising ethical and professional standards while utilizing best practices. Our goal is to provide a safe,
comfortable and productive environment that ensures high quality patient care. Inland Imaging Radiologists,
technologists, and staff members are encouraged to advance their radiology specialty.

Technology and Innovation

In order to increase workflow productivity and patient test result turnaround, Inland Imaging has integrated and
developed new technologies. Each imaging center has the ability to electronically send information and medical
images at the click of a mouse. Referring physicians have secure login access to patient results as they become
available online. Inland Imaging IT specialists develop and install new software designed to maximize system
performance and minimize the likelihood of error. A 24 hour/365 day a year help desk is available to answer questions
and offer full support to clients and staff members.

Inland Imaging Centers

Each Inland Imaging center is built with the patient in mind. Our universal goal is to ensure that each visit to one of our
centers is as comfortable, clean, and as safe as possible. Every facility offers an inviting and friendly environment to
accommodate the needs of any visitor. Inland Imaging uses the most groundbreaking technology and reviews the
standards of each piece of equipment on a regular basis. Upgrades and remodels are in constant cycle in order to
keep pace with the ever-changing needs and improvements within our medical community.

Quality

Information to come…

History

A leader in diagnostic medical imaging, Inland Imaging has been providing radiology services since 1930. Inland
installed its first Computed Tomography (CT) scanner in 1977 followed by implementation of Spokane‟s first Magnetic
Resonance Imaging (MRI) machine in 1984. With more than 75 subspecialty Radiologists, 6 Vascular Surgeons, and
600 staff members, Inland Imaging of today is the result of the merging of three companies in Spokane. Expansion
continued with the addition of Inland Vascular Institute, a vascular surgery, diagnostic imaging, and interventional
treatment center.

Inland Imaging, recognized as an international leader, has services throughout the Western United States and provides
business services, physician staffing, investments, imaging centers, and software development. The vision of these
companies directly contributes to the success of Inland Imaging‟s diverse growth.

Physicians – (Sent in an email to Shawn)

In order to enhance treatment and provide the highest level of professional services, Inland Imaging takes great effort
to recruit and hire the most qualified individuals available to the Radiology and Vascular fields. Employees understand
the importance of delivering outstanding patient care through innovative medical solutions and unprecedented
customer service. Inland Imaging is dedicated to creating a highly productive and innovative work setting through
dynamic communication, education, training and evolving technology.

Executive Staff

Inland Imaging has a team of highly skilled and knowledgeable medical professionals with strong backgrounds in
practice management medical facility operations. Their knowledge is gained through years of experience in all aspects
of starting and operating successful medical practices. Unlike most imaging companies, our team is responsible for
practice success on a daily basis. This unique perspective is invaluable when making decisions and providing
outstanding patient care.

President (Inland Imaging Physicians Services) – Daniel J. Murray, M.D.
President (Inland Imaging Investments Inc.) – William D. Keys, M.D.
President (Inland Imaging, LLC) – Bill Shulte, M.D.

CEO (Inland Imaging Investments Inc.) – Steve Duvoisin
CEO (Inland Imaging Business Associates) – John Copeland
COO (Inland Imaging, LLC) – Kathleen Wilson
COO (Inland Imaging Physicians Services) – Sarah Russell
CFO (Inland Imaging Business Associates) – Tavi Lohman
CAO (Inland Imaging Physician Services) – Toni Cooley
CIO (Inland Imaging Business Associates) – Cole Hanford
CRO (Inland Imaging Business Associates) – Dan Heibert
COO (Inland Imaging Physicians Services) – Sarah Russell
CMO (Inland Imaging Business Associates) – Dennis Hake

News

News Article 1

CT Radiation Exposure Strictly Monitored to Minimize Risk to Patients

Recently, the New England Journal of Medicine, outlined radiation doses in Computed Tomography (CT) scans, the
biologic effect of low doses of ionizing radiation, and the risks of CT use. The Columbia University researchers raised
the possibility that the carcinogenic risks of CT imaging may have been underestimated in the past.

According to the article, more than 62 million CT scans are performed annually in the U.S. as opposed to just under 3
million scans in 1980. The authors stated their concern of the overuse in unnecessary orders of CT scans. The
substantial growth is attributed to technological advancements that have made CT scanning more easy to use for both
patients and practitioners.

In response, the American College of Radiology (ACR) believes or challenges that certain conclusions and
comparisons made in the study may be inappropriate and cause patients to mistakenly avoid receiving life-saving
medical imaging care. However, there is little doubt in the medical community that CT scans help save lives and has
increasingly allowed imaging exams to replace more invasive techniques.

Inland Imaging and Spokane referring physicians take strong measures to evaluate the risk versus benefit of a CT
scan before performing an exam. A CT scan is conducted in a controlled setting and results in limited radiated
exposure to a specific part of the body. Patient history and age are major factors taken into consideration and
evaluated before a CT scan will proceed as ordered.

In addition, radiation doses are strictly monitored and are reduced to the lowest possible level to perform the test
correctly. If a CT scan is ordered and a patient were determined to be at-risk, Inland Imaging will, in consultation with
the patient‟s physician, recommend a more appropriate imaging modality.

“Inland Imaging Radiologists and other medical professionals have long recognized that there are risks associated with
CT imaging and that is why we have implemented rigorous standards guiding this modality,” says Dr. Terri Lewis,
Inland Imaging Radiologist. She adds that, “In a case by case basis, when a CT scan is determined to be a medical
necessity, the associated risk is small relative to the diagnostic information obtained.”

A CT scan is an X-ray examination using a scanner to produce a series of cross-sectional images of a selected part of
the body. The procedure involves the use of very small amounts of radiation to aid in producing an image. The
examination is painless and is very helpful in evaluation of diseases of the bone,
abdomen, and brain.

News Article 2

Dr. Jeff Boone Speaks to Area Medical Professionals
Preventive Cardiology Consultant for the National Football League says Early Detection Key to Offsetting
Cardiovascular Disease.

Dr. Jeff Boone, Consultant in Preventive Cardiology, Stress Medicine, and Hypertension in Denver, CO, spoke to
Spokane area physicians, sports trainers, and other medical professionals at two events held November 27 and 28th.
Dr. Boone, who works directly with the Denver Broncos, spoke about the significance of early risk factor detection
associated with cardiovascular disease. He stressed the importance of medical screening to better find dangerous
precursors to heart attacks and stroke that can lead to early death.

In his presentation, Dr. Boone discussed his goal to empower patients and medical professionals to take a more active
role in preventive health care. Many times, insurance companies will not assist in payment of a
preventive screening procedure for cardiovascular disease, but rather wait until a stroke or heart attack has already
occurred before payment is approved.

In order to catch life-threatening heart conditions or vascular disease, he suggests employers and business leaders
offer company wide cardiac screening options to all staff members. Dr. Boone believes the general public, with the
correct information and knowledge from trained physicians, would make more proactive choices to reverse the deadly
trends of heart disease in United States.

Dr. Boone said, “The most critical work in preventive cardiology occurs long before you feel chest pain or shortness of
breath. Our preventive cardiology mission is to find the heart and blood vessel disease early before symptoms occur,
determine the causation and vulnerability of the disease, and stabilize and eradicate the disease.”

 “The Four Horsemen,” as Dr. Boone calls it, “of heart and blood vessel disease consist of the presence of dangerous
arterial wall plaque, blood clots, heart muscle damage, and improper electrical signaling.
Without proper care, unknown vascular problems can result in premature, preventable death.” Dr. Boone states
“medical providers need to be committed to continually upgrading state-of-the-art preventive cardiology evaluation and
treatment programs to better stop the Four Horsemen in their tracks. ”

Dr. Boone explained to the group of attendees that those individuals that have the means to request a cardiac 64-slice
CTA scan should consult their doctor about scheduling this exam. He believes a 64-slice
CTA scan provides superior image quality for caregivers and radiologists to better determine and evaluate a patient‟s
susceptibility to heart disease. For now, insurance providers are hesitant to pay for this service because it is
considered preventive care.
For those that may not have the financial means to pay for a 64-slice CT scan, Dr. Boone says there are alternative
imaging procedures available to determine cardiovascular risk factors. Carotid ultrasound, blood tests, cardiac
angiograms, and stress tests can also serve as viable and affordable tests to evaluate if an individual might be at risk.

Dr. Boone was a recipient of the prestigious Secretary‟s Award for Innovations in Health Promotion and Disease
Prevention presented by the United States Department of Health and Human Services. As an active clinician and
researcher, he has authored numerous professional articles and books pertaining to
Preventive Cardiology, Stress Medicine, and Hypertension.

As an international lecturer, Dr. Boone has spoken with tens of thousands of health care professionals throughout the
world. His approach to the early detection and aggressive prevention of cardiovascular disease has been presented to
audiences on four continents in twelve countries and in forty-seven of the
United States. The evaluation of the cardiovascular consequences of mental stress and intensity and the uses of
advanced cardiac imaging in the prevention of heart disease are unique components of Dr. Boone‟s clinical practice.

News Article 3

New Imaging Center Opens in Deer Park
Inland Imaging Expands Services to North of Spokane

Inland Imaging opened its newest center in Deer Park last November of 2007. The new center in Deer Park is located
adjacent to the Deer Park Urgent Care Center.

The center, just north of Spokane, provides MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) and CT (computerized tomography)
services and procedures. In addition to providing services at its Holy Family Imaging Center, the Deer Park Center will
help alleviate the high demand for imaging services in the North County.

“We are extremely pleased to announce the opening of the new Deer Park facility,” said Kathleen Wilson, Chief
Operations Officer of Inland Imaging. “The new center will enhance patient access to MRI and CT services and provide
an additional option to referring physicians.”

News Article 4


Inland Imaging Achieves PET/CT Accreditation
American College of Radiology Grants Award After Strict Evaluation Process

Inland Imaging was recently awarded the area‟s first and only PET/CT accreditation by the American College of
Radiology (ACR). The ACR, with headquarters in Reston, Virginia, determines accreditation to medical facilities based
on the achievement of high practice standards and a peer-review evaluation. Board-certified physicians and medical
physicists who are experts in the field conduct the evaluation, measuring qualifications of personnel and adequacy of
the facility equipment.

“Inland Imaging is excited to be granted the highest quality evaluation by the ACR. We are committed to providing the
most advanced testing available as well as highly trained physicians and technologists. I am proud to work for the only
PET/CT department in the area to receive this recognition,” says Nick Andrizzi, PET/CT Team Leader. Chief
Operations Officer, Kathleen Wilson adds, “ACR accreditation provides the highest level of confidence for our patients
and referring physicians. It gives assurance that the equipment and staff have passed rigorous evaluations.”

ACR accreditation assesses the qualifications of staff members, policies, procedures, equipment specifications, quality
assurance activities, patient safety, and quality of patient care. Those physicians, who supervise and interpret the
medical images, must meet stringent education and training standards while the technologists administering tests are
to be appropriately certified. In addition, qualified medical physicists must regularly monitor the PET/CT imaging
equipment.

Peer-review programs conducted by the ACR provide for systematic review of examinations to assure quality and
accuracy of the PET/CT procedure. The appropriateness and adverse events are heavily monitored, analyzed, and
reported. The required program evaluations include double-readings, random reviews, exams, and summary data for
each physician and facility.

The ACR has been offering accreditation services since 1963 and their goal is to set quality standards for practices,
provide guidance for continuous improvement, and offer proof of best value.

Position Openings

From Cyber Recruiter

Returning Applicants

From Cyber Recruiter

Benefits

From Cyber Recruiter

Relocation Information

Privacy

Inland Imaging
HIPAA Notice of Privacy Practices
THIS NOTICE DESCRIBES HOW MEDICAL INFORMATION ABOUT YOU MAY BE USED AND DISCLOSED AND
HOW YOU CAN GET ACCESS TO THIS INFORMATION. PLEASE REVIEW IT CAREFULLY.

If you have any questions about this notice, please contact:

Inland Imaging Privacy Official
Phone: (509) 455-4455
Physical Address:
801 S Stevens
Spokane WA 99204

This Notice of Privacy Practices describes how we may use and disclose your protected health information to carry out
treatment, payment, or health care operations, and for other purposes that are permitted or required by law. It also
describes your rights to access and control your protected health information. Please review it carefully.
“Protected health information” is information about you, including information that may identify you and that relates to
your past, present, or future physical or mental health or condition and related to health care services.
We understand that medical information about you and your health is personal. We are committed to protecting
medical information about you.

This notice applies to all of the records of your care generated by Inland Imaging, whether made by Inland
Imagingpersonnel or by your doctor.

Other doctors may have different policies or notices regarding their use and disclosure of your medical information.

CHANGES TO THIS NOTICE
We are required by law to abide by the terms of this Notice of Privacy Practices. We are required by law to keep your
protected health information private and to provide you with a notice of our legal duties and our privacy practices. We
may change the terms of our notice, at any time. The new notice will be effective for all protected health information
that we maintain at that time. Upon your request, we will provide you with any revised Notice of Privacy Practices.
The Notice is available by accessing our website at www.inlandimagingAZ.com; calling the phone number at the top of
this page and requesting that a revised copy be sent to you in the mail, or by asking for a copy at the time of your next
visit or admission.

HOW WE MAY USE AND DISCLOSE MEDICAL INFORMATION ABOUT YOU

The following categories describe different ways that we use and disclose medical information. For each category of
uses or disclosures we will explain what we mean and try to give some examples. Not every use or disclosure in a
category will be listed. However, all of the ways we are permitted to use and disclose information will fall within one of
the categories.

For Treatment: We may use medical information about you to provide you with medical treatment or services. We
may disclose medical information about you to doctors, nurses, technicians, or other healthcare personnel who are
involved in taking care of you. For example, a doctor treating you may request a copy of your medical record. Your
protected health information may be provided from time-to-time to another doctor or health care provider who, at the
request of your doctor, becomes involved in your care. This is done to ensure that the doctor has the necessary
information to diagnose or treat you. In addition, if you are hospitalized, medical information may be shared with
different departments of the hospital in order to coordinate the different services that you need. We may also make
your protected health information available to other health care organizations that are involved in your care via our
computer network. We may also disclose medical information about you to people who may be involved in your
medical care after you leave the hospital, such as family members, clergy, or others that are part of your care. We
may also contact you regarding treatment alternatives.

For Payment: We may use and disclose medical information about you so that the treatment and services you receive
at Inland Imagingcan be billed and payment can be collected from you, an insurance company or a third party. For
example, we may need to give your health plan information about services you received so your health plan will pay us
or reimburse you for the services. We may also tell your health plan or the sponsor of the health plan about services or
treatment you are going to receive to obtain prior approval or to determine whether your plan will cover the services.
For example, your health plan may require prior authorization before services are covered.

For Health Care Operations: We may use and disclose medical information about you in order to support the business
activities of our organization. These uses and disclosures are necessary to provide services and make sure that all of
our patients receive quality care. For example, we may use medical information to review our treatment and services
and to evaluate the performance of our staff in caring for you. We may also combine medical information about many
of our patients to decide what additional services we should offer, what services are not needed, and whether certain
new procedures are effective. We may also disclose information to your doctor, nurse, technician, or other personnel
for review and educational purposes. We may also combine the medical information we have with medical information
from other health care organizations to compare how we are doing and see where we can make improvements in the
care and services we offer. We may remove information identifying you from such combined sets of medical
information so that others may use the information for clinical studies without learning the identity of specific patients.

For Appointments: We may call you by name in the waiting room when we are ready to see you. We may use or
disclose your protected health information, as necessary, to remind you of your appointment.

For Billing and Transcription Services: We will share your protected health information with business associates that
perform various activities (for example, billing, or transcription services) for us.

For Health-Related Benefits and Services: We may also use and disclose your protected health information, as
necessary, to provide you with information about health-related benefits and services that may be of interest to you.

Individuals Involved in Your Care or Payment for Your Care: We may release medical information about you to a friend
or family member who is involved in your medical care. We may also give information to someone who helps pay for
your care. We may disclose medical information about you to an entity assisting in a disaster relief effort so that your
family can be notified about your condition, status or location.

As Required By Law: We will disclose medical information about you when required to do so by federal, state or local
law.

For Fundraising: We may disclose protected health information about you for fundraising. For example, we may
provide your name and phone number to an organization to enable them to solicit a donation.

For Marketing: We may provide you with general marketing information about our services or give you small
promotional gifts when we see you in person without your written authorization.

For example, we may send you a newsletter or a list of our health classes or we may give you a pen with our
organization‟s name on it. We must obtain your written authorization before we can send you marketing information
about specific products or services that we provide. You may contact our Privacy Officer to request that these materials
not be sent to you.

To Avert a Serious Threat to Health or Safety: We may use and disclose medical information about you when
necessary to prevent a serious threat to your health and safety or the health and safety of the public or another person.
Any disclosure would only be to someone able to help prevent the threat.
Other Permitted and Required Uses and Disclosures of Protected Health Information That May be Made Without Your
Authorization or Opportunity to Object

Military Activity and National Security: When the appropriate conditions apply, we may use or disclose protected
health information of individuals who are Armed Forces personnel (1) for activities deemed necessary by appropriate
military command authorities; (2) for the purpose of a determination by the Department of Veterans Affairs of your
eligibility for benefits; or (3) to foreign military authority if you are a member of that foreign military services. We may
also disclose your protected health information to authorized federal officials for conducting national security and
intelligence activities, including for the provision of protective services to the President or others legally authorized.

Workers' Compensation: Your protected health information may be disclosed by us as authorized to comply with
workers‟ compensation laws and other similar legally-established programs. For example, we are required by
Washington state law to disclose health information to the Department of Labor and Industries or a self-insured
employer for workers‟ compensation or crime victims‟ claims. We can disclose health information to an employer about
light duty work without any authorization from you. We can disclose health information to an employer without an
authorization from you if the information is about a workplace injury or illness, a workplace medical surveillance or a
return-to-work examination.

Public Health Risks. We may disclose your protected health information for public health activities and purposes to a
public health authority that is permitted by law to collect or receive the information. The disclosure will be made for the
purpose of controlling disease, injury or disability; to report the abuse or neglect of children, elders or dependent
adults; to notify the appropriate government authority if we believe a patient has been the victim of abuse, neglect, or
domestic violence. We may also disclose your protected health information, if directed by the public health authority, to
a foreign government agency that is collaborating with the public health authority. We may disclose your protected
health information, if authorized by law, to a person who may have been exposed to a communicable disease or may
otherwise be at risk of contracting or spreading the disease or condition.

Health Oversight Activities. We may disclose your protected health information to a health oversight agency for
activities authorized by law, such as audits, investigations, and inspections. Oversight agencies seeking such
information would include: government agencies that oversee health care systems, government benefit programs and
government agencies that oversee compliance with civil rights laws.

Legal Proceedings, Lawsuits and Disputes. We may disclose your protected health information in response to a court
or administrative order or in response to a subpoena, discovery request, or other lawful process to the extent such
disclosure is expressly authorized.
Law Enforcement. We may disclose your protected health information for law enforcement purposes when applicable
legal requirements are met. These law enforcement purposes include: (1) legal processes, or as otherwise required by
law, (2) identification or location of a suspect, fugitive, material witness, or missing person; (3) investigations pertaining
to victims of a crime; (4) suspicion that death has occurred as a result of criminal conduct; (5) investigations of a crime
that occurred on our premises; and (6) in a medical emergency (not on our premises) in which it is likely that a crime
may have been committed.

Coroners, Medical Examiners, Funeral Directors, and Organ Donation: We may disclose your protected health
information to a coroner or medical examiner for identification purposes, for determining cause of death, or for the
coroner or medical examiner to perform other duties authorized by law. We may also disclose protected health
information to a funeral director, as authorized by law, in order to permit the funeral director to carry out their duties.
Protected health information may be used and disclosed for cadaveric organ, eye, or tissue donation purposes.

Research: Under certain circumstances, we may use and disclose protected health information about you for research
purposes. For example, a research project may involve comparing the health and recovery of all patients who receive
one medication to those who received another, for the same condition. All research projects, however, are subject to
a special approval process. This process evaluates a proposed research project and its use of protected health
information, trying to balance the research needs with patients' need for privacy of their protected health information.
Before we use or disclose protected health information for research, the project will have been approved through this
research approval process, but we may, however, disclose protected health information about you to people preparing
to conduct a research project, for example, to help them look for patients with specific medical needs, so long as the
information they review does not leave Inland Imaging. We will ask for your specific permission if the researcher will
have access to your name, address or other information that reveals who you are, or will be involved in your care at
Inland Imaging.

Inmates: If you are an inmate of a correctional institution or under the custody of a law enforcement official, we may
disclose your protected health information to the correctional institution or law enforcement official. This release would
be necessary (1) for the institution to provide you with health care; (2) to protect your health and safety or that of
others; or (3) for the safety and security of the correctional institution.

Other uses and disclosures will be made only with your written authorization: You may revoke such authorization at
any time.

YOUR RIGHTS REGARDING YOUR MEDICAL INFORMATION

You have the following rights regarding your protected health information:

Right to Inspect and Copy: You have the right to inspect and copy protected health information that may be used to
make decisions about your care. Usually, this includes medical and billing records. Under Federal law, however, you
may not inspect or copy the following records: psychotherapy notes; information compiled in reasonable anticipation
of, or use in, a civil, criminal, or administrative action or proceeding; and protected health information that is subject to
law that prohibits access to protected health information.

To inspect and copy protected health information that may be used to make decisions about your care, you must
submit your request in writing to Inland Imaging Medical Records. If you request a copy of the information, we may
charge a fee for the costs of copying, mailing or other supplies associated with your request.

We may deny your request to inspect and copy in certain very limited circumstances. If you are denied access to
protected health information, you may request that the denial be reviewed. Another licensed health care professional
chosen by Inland Imaging will review your request and the denial. The person conducting the review will not be the
person who denied your request. We will comply with the outcome of the review.

Right to Amend: If you feel that protected health information we have about you is incorrect or incomplete, you may
ask us to amend the information. You have the right to request an amendment for as long as the information is kept by
Inland Imaging.
To request an amendment, your request must be made in writing and submitted to Inland Imaging Medical Records. In
addition, you must provide a reason that supports your request.

We may deny your request for an amendment if it is not in writing or does not include a reason to support the request.
In addition, we may deny your request if you ask us to amend information that: (1) was not created by us, unless the
person or entity that created the information is no longer available to make the amendment; (2) is not part of the
protected health information kept by or for Inland Imaging; (3) is not part of the information which you would be
permitted to inspect and copy; or (4) is accurate and complete.

Right to an Accounting of Certain Disclosures: You have the right to request an "accounting of disclosures.” An
accounting of disclosures is a listing of the disclosures we have made of your health information, except as it was used
for treatment, payment, or health care operations. It also excludes disclosures we may have made to you, to family
members or friends involved in your care, or for notification purposes. You have the right to receive specific
information regarding these disclosures.

To request this list or accounting of disclosures, you must submit your request in writing to the Privacy Officer identified
at the beginning of this Notice of Privacy Practices. Your request must state a time period which may not be longer
than six years. The first list you request within a 12 month period will be free. For additional lists, we may charge you
for the costs of providing the list. We will notify you of the cost involved and you may choose to withdraw or modify
your request before any costs are incurred.

Right to Request Restrictions: You have the right to request a restriction or limitation on the protected health
information we use or disclose about you for treatment, payment or health care operations. This means you may ask
us not to use or disclose any part of your protected health information for the purposes of treatment, payment, or
healthcare operations. You may also request that any part of your protected health information not be disclosed to
family members or friends who may be involved in your care or for notification purposes as described in the Notice of
Privacy Practices.

We are not required to agree to a restriction that you may request. If we believe it is in your best interest to permit use
and disclosure of your protected health information, use and disclosure of your protected health information will not be
restricted. If we do agree to the requested restriction, we agree to comply with your request, unless the information is
needed to provide you with emergency treatment. With this in mind, please discuss any restriction you wish to request
with your physician.
To request restrictions, you must make your request in writing to the Privacy Officer identified at the beginning of this
Notice of Privacy Practices. In your request, you must tell us: (1) what information you want to limit; (2) whether you
want to limit our use, our disclosure or both; and (3) specifically, to whom you want the restriction to apply.

Right to Request Confidential Communications: You have the right to request that we communicate with you about
medical matters in a certain way or at a certain location or alternative address. For example, you can ask that we only
contact you by mail at a different address. We will accommodate reasonable requests. We will not ask the reason for
your request. We may, however, ask you for information as to how payment will be handled.

To request confidential communications, you must make your request in writing to the Privacy Officer identified at the
beginning of this Notice of Privacy Practices. Your request must specify how or where you wish to be contacted.

Right to a Paper Copy of This Notice: You have the right to obtain a paper copy of this notice. You may ask us to give
you a copy of this notice at any time. Even if you have agreed to receive this notice electronically, you are still entitled
to a paper copy of this notice. Or, you can obtain a copy of this notice from our website at www.inlandimagingAZ.com.
PRIVACY COMPLAINTS

If you believe your privacy rights have been violated, you may file a complaint with Inland Imagingor with the Secretary
of the Department of Health and Human Services. To file a complaint with Inland Imaging, contact the Privacy Officer
identified at the beginning of this Notice of Privacy Practices. All complaints must be submitted in writing. You will not
be penalized for filing a concern.

This notice is effective as of September 1, 2007.

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Stats:
views:74
posted:1/12/2011
language:English
pages:49