; ANOSOGNOSIA, OR THE POLITICAL UNCONSCIOUS: LIMITS OF VISION IN IAN MCEWAN'S SATURDAY
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ANOSOGNOSIA, OR THE POLITICAL UNCONSCIOUS: LIMITS OF VISION IN IAN MCEWAN'S SATURDAY

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The action occurs entirely on that day, and while it is scarcely about the impending war, or about "Islamic terrorism" (77) (the phrase is used by the protagonist, consultant neurosurgeon Henry Perowne, whose focalizing consciousness mediates everything), Saturday is very much about the pressure that public histories and emergencies exert upon the happiness and self-esteem of the private citizen. [...] Perowne's opinions and reflections have at times a strongly ideological tenor, which invites or provokes readers to respond by articulating their own views.

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									ANoSogNoSIA, or the PolItIcAl
UNcoNScIoUS: lIMItS of VISIoN
IN IAN MceWAN’S Saturday
Martin ryle




No British literary novelist has recently been enjoying more favorable
reviews than Ian Mcewan.1 Many of Mcewan’s novels combine event-
ful—sometimes violent—narratives with an explicit address to social and
political topics. (this is the case in his latest work, Solar [2010], as it is in
Saturday.) this has made part of their claim to 
								
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