Bottled Water Strategy Recommendation - Excel by ihg80385

VIEWS: 0 PAGES: 96

Bottled Water Strategy Recommendation document sample

More Info
									LEED for Healthcare 1st Public Comment Period Comments & Responses
Water Efficiency Prerequisite 1 (Now WEp2 in the 2nd PC draft version of LEED for Healthcare)

Requirement Number          CreditDescription
Prereq 1                    No Potable Water Use for
                            Medical Equipment Cooling




Prereq 1                    No Potable Water Use for
                            Medical Equipment Cooling




Prereq 1                    No Potable Water Use for
                            Medical Equipment Cooling
Prereq 1   No Potable Water Use for
           Medical Equipment Cooling
Prereq 1   No Potable Water Use for
           Medical Equipment Cooling
Prereq 1   No Potable Water Use for
           Medical Equipment Cooling
Prereq 1   No Potable Water Use for
           Medical Equipment Cooling
Prereq 1   No Potable Water Use for
           Medical Equipment Cooling




Prereq 1   No Potable Water Use for
           Medical Equipment Cooling




Prereq 1   No Potable Water Use for
           Medical Equipment Cooling
Prereq 1   No Potable Water Use for
           Medical Equipment Cooling




Prereq 1   No Potable Water Use for
           Medical Equipment Cooling
Prereq 1   No Potable Water Use for
           Medical Equipment Cooling




Prereq 1   No Potable Water Use for
           Medical Equipment Cooling
 ment Period Comments & Responses
n the 2nd PC draft version of LEED for Healthcare)

             Comments
             Do you have any general comments?
             The last sentence under T&S needs a strategy to go with it.
             Right now it's just a comment.


             Do you have any general comments?
             Water Efficiency Prerequisite 1: No Potable Water use for
             Medical Equipment Cooling AEI Comment: Affiliated Engineers
             is fully supportive of this prerequisite requirement.


             Do you believe that the requirements presented are
             appropriate for high performance healthcare facility
             construction? Please explain.
             No. The parameters for this prerequisite are a bit vague only
             due to its name. First of all, there must be an option and a
             statement for LEED-HC projects that have no medical
             equipment cooling to begin with to still submit for LEED HC
             certification. Second, in many projects, "no potable water use"
             is impossible. The spirit of this prereq is to MINIMIZE,
             MINIMIZE, MINIMIZE.

             Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the technical
             requirements of this credit? Please explain, providing
             citations to data and research where possible.
             If this is a prerequisite for EVERY LEED-HC project, the verbage
             for compliance must be "crystal clear" for ALL healthcare
             projects. Recommendations are below in question #4.


             Do you have any general comments?
Due to the backup system allowance, this prerequisite cannot
be called its current name. The following is more appropriate:
"WE Prerequisite 1- Minimize Water Use for Medical
Equipment Cooling" I believe the Requirements should read
something like this: Option 1: No Medical Equipment Cooling
 Demonstrate that no medical equipment purchased for the
facility requires potable water use for equipment cooling.
Option 2: Minimize Potable Water Usage for Medical
Equipment Cooling For ALL medical equipment purchased for
the facility, demonstrate that potable water use will be
minimized for equipment cooling. Potable water usage is ONLY
acceptable in emergency backup systems. The following is
required: -No potable water use for once through cooling for
ALL medical equipment that rejects heat. -Where local
requirements.(same as in DRAFT) -New equipment shall be
Will the changes in this credit (if any) affect your ability to
help transform the healthcare facility market? If so, please
explain how and why.
Reducing medical equipment cooling systems potable water
use in a healthcare facility is very important in the big picture
of healthcare water use reduction. However, total elimination
as a PREREQUISITE will discourage too many healthcare
projects from using LEED-HC. For example, the emergency
backup exception means in many cases some potable water
will be required for emergency situations. It should be
explained in the technologies and strategies how much water
savings this prerequisite could provide. Since this is a
prerequisite, the name requires careful attention. I do not feel
"no potable water use" is the correct name.

Do you have any general comments?
Air cooled systems may require more energy to cool. Closed
loop systems would be the best option. Note that closed loop
systems can use potable water.




Will the changes in this credit (if any) affect your ability to
help transform the healthcare facility market? If so, please
explain how and why.
Yes, equipment manufactures have to agree to this
prerequisite. They may have to change their warranties or
change the equipment design for closed loop systems.




Do you believe that the requirements presented are
appropriate for high performance healthcare facility
construction? Please explain.
Yes, once through cooling water is a waste of a resource plus
additional operating cost for the facility.


Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the technical
requirements of this credit? Please explain, providing
citations to data and research where possible.
no

Do you have any general comments?
Water tempering of steam trap devices should be clarified to
be a requirement for systems where returning steam
condensate is not practical such as in a direct-contact sterilizer
(would allow washed-down contaminants to be returned to
"pure steam" makeup sources), or where due to distance, etc.
the economics of returning steam condensate renders it more
expensive to do so. Steam condensate return should always be
considered where possible due to water and energy savings.




Will the changes in this credit (if any) affect your ability to
help transform the healthcare facility market? If so, please
explain how and why.
Possibly. Providing redundant systems is the right choice for
critical systems, especially those with high value, and where
damage to them would result in risk to patient or staff.
However, the infrequency and unliklihood of cooling
equipment failure would seem to encourage a more
reasonable approach to this issue, specificaly, considering the
limited quantity of water that would be involved if the
temporary use of once-through potable water cooling were
allowed in emergency situations.


Do you believe that the requirements presented are
appropriate for high performance healthcare facility
construction? Please explain.
Yes, this is a frequent installation issue and would result in
significant water use reduction, except for the redundant
equipment portion.

Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the technical
requirements of this credit? Please explain, providing
citations to data and research where possible.
As currently written: "Where local requirements mandate
limiting the discharge temperature of fluids into the drainage
system, a tempering device must be used that runs water only
when the equipment discharges hot water." Consider adding
the following sentence: "Alternatively, provide a thermal
recovery heat exchanger that allows drained discharge water
to be cooled below code required maximum discharge
temperatures while simultaneously preheating inlet makeup
water." This would provide both water reduction and energy
use reduction.

Will the changes in this credit (if any) affect your ability to
help transform the healthcare facility market? If so, please
A

Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the technical
requirements of this credit? Please explain, providing
citations to data and research where possible.
- Accommodate for existing equipment on a major renovation
project. - Consider allowing a phase-in schedule similar to the
Refrigerant credits on major renovation projects. - Concerns:
could bring up warranty issues; switching from water-cooled to
air-cooled equipment could dramatically increase energy
consumption.


Do you have any general comments?
COMMENT FROM LEED FOR HEALTHCARE WORKSHOP AT
GREENBUILD 2007.

Do you believe that the requirements presented are
appropriate for high performance healthcare facility
construction? Please explain.
A
Do you have any general comments?
N/A

Will the changes in this credit (if any) affect your ability to
help transform the healthcare facility market? If so, please
explain how and why.
Many times our project application is for a major renovation to
an existing healthcare facility, making it difficult to always
achieve this prerequisite.




Do you believe that the requirements presented are
appropriate for high performance healthcare facility
construction? Please explain.
Yes, especially for new construction design. We avoid the use
of once through cooling on projects with the exception of use
for emergency back-up.

Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the technical
requirements of this credit? Please explain, providing
citations to data and research where possible.
An accommodation for existing equipment or a phase-in to
retrofit older equipment as it fails is suggested.
Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the technical
requirements of this credit? Please explain, providing
citations to data and research where possible.
The 4th requirement is worded in a confusing manner.
Emergency backup = n+1. Also, it would make sense to remove
a lot of the paragraph to make it more clear. "When using
closed-loop cooling systems for critical applications that
require a backup an owner may elect to use potable water in
an open-loop (once-through) configuration as the emergency
back-up cooling system only....." This accomplishes the same
thing in a simpler manner.


Do you have any general comments?
No.

Do you believe that the requirements presented are
appropriate for high performance healthcare facility
construction? Please explain.
Yes.

Will the changes in this credit (if any) affect your ability to
help transform the healthcare facility market? If so, please
explain how and why.
Yes.

Do you believe that the requirements presented are
appropriate for high performance healthcare facility
construction? Please explain.
As a pre-requisite this may be difficult to achieve. Use of non-
potable water in once through (open loop) cooling may
introduce risk of contamination, although the recommended
strategies are to use air-cooled or closed loop systems. Need
input from MEP engineer and healthcare facilities managers.




Do you have any general comments?
Consider adding a Water Efficiency (WE) credit section for
central steam systems. Consider adding points for using
condensate return in lieu of sending condensate to drain.
Do you believe that the requirements presented are
appropriate for high performance healthcare facility
construction? Please explain.
Yes, but they are unclear.

Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the technical
requirements of this credit? Please explain, providing
citations to data and research where possible.
Although the title of the requisite is "No Potable Water Use for
Medical Equipment Cooling", the third bullet-point mentions
"steam traps". The two seem to have no connection. Please
clarify.

Will the changes in this credit (if any) affect your ability to
help transform the healthcare facility market? If so, please
explain how and why.
Yes, we will be able to more clearly understand the requisite
and apply LEED to healthcare buildings.

Do you believe that the requirements presented are
appropriate for high performance healthcare facility
construction? Please explain.
I do not believe that recommending the use of air-cooled
equipment in place of water cooled equipment is appropriate
for high performance healthcare facilities because the
decreased water consumption does not justify the increased
energy consumption resulting from this action.



Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the technical
requirements of this credit? Please explain, providing
citations to data and research where possible.
Consider removing the recommendation to use air-cooled
equipment from the potential technologies & strategies.




Do you believe that the requirements presented are
appropriate for high performance healthcare facility
construction? Please explain.
Lori Sutton, HDR. In general, this prerequisite is achievable,
however there is concern regarding the availability of the
necessary technology for lasers and sterilizers; consequently
an entire separate water system may have to be installed to
address this prerequisite (which would defeat the purpose).
There is also some confusion about which medical equipment
is actually addressed by this prerequisite. It is recommended
that the USGBC collaborate with the sterilizer and laser
manufacturers for development of the necessary technology.
Other possibilities would be to either allow an exception for
water-cooled lasers or to limit the prerequisite to larger
equipment like MRIs; giving an additional credit for smaller
Do you have any general comments?
The exception for using potable water for emergency cooling
should always be available.
LEED for Healthcare Committee Response


Thank you for your comment. We will delete the last sentence. The suggested
change will be incorporated as part of the revisions included in the 2nd public
comment period draft.


Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comments. We will revise the name of the credit and re-write
the Intent statement to read Minimize Potable Water Use for Medical Equipment
Cooling,




Thank you for your comments. We will revise the name of the credit and re-write
the Intent statement to read Minimize Potable Water Use for Medical Equipment
Cooling,
Thank you for your comments. We will incorporate your suggestion revisions as part
of the revisions included in the 2nd public comment period.




Thank you for your comments. We will revise the name of the credit and re-write
the Intent statement to read Minimize Potable Water Use for Medical Equipment
Cooling,




Thank you for your comments. You are correct to observe that air-cooled systems
may require more energy than water-cooled systems, and that closed loop water
systems are the preferred option. However, the HCC feels that the option for air-
cooled solutions be maintained for greater flexibility in this prerequisite.
Thank you for your comments. Our investiagtions and discussions with equipment
manufacturers does not indicate that there are concerns with equipment
performance as long as temperature limits are not exceeded. Temperature limits are
a concern whether or not closed loop systems are used or not.




Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comments.


Thank you for your comment. We believe that the second bulleted Requirement
item properly addresses your concern. We will consider your comment in the
development of the LEED for Healthcare Reference Guide.
Thank you for your comment. The fourth bulleted Requirement item properly
addresses your concerns for allowing potable water for once-through emergency
backup cooling.




Thank you for your comment.




Thank you for your comment. The suggested change will be incorporated for the
second public review.




Thank you for your comments.
Thank you for your comments. The HCC feels that the use of potable water for
uncontrolled once-through cooling is an egregious waste of a critical resource.
Practical experience shows that retrofitting or replacing equipment with closed loop
or demand controlled cooling yields significant operating cost savings that make such
changes very cost effective.




Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comments.

Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comments. The HCC feels that the use of potable water for
uncontrolled once-through cooling is an egregious waste of a critical resource.
Practical experience shows that retrofitting or replacing equipment with closed loop
or demand controlled cooling yields significant operating cost savings that make such
changes very cost effective.




Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comments. The HCC feels that the use of potable water for
uncontrolled once-through cooling is an egregious waste of a critical resource.
Practical experience shows that retrofitting or replacing equipment with closed loop
or demand controlled cooling yields significant operating cost savings that make such
changes very cost effective.
Thank you for your comment. The suggested change will be incorporated as part of
the revisions included in the 2nd public comment period draft.




Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comments. The HCC feels that the use of potable water for
uncontrolled once-through cooling is an egregious waste of a critical resource.
Practical experience shows that retrofitting or replacing equipment with closed loop
or demand controlled cooling yields significant operating cost savings that make such
changes very cost effective. The use of non-potable water is not recommended for
the reasons cited in your comment. The prerequisite intent and requirements were
developed by mechanical engineers and healthcare facility managers


Thank you for your comments. Please refer to the WE Credit 4 Potable Water Use
Reduction-Process Water and Building system Equipment category responses for
further detail.
Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comments. We will revise the name of the credit and re-write
the Intent statement to read Minimize Potable Water Use for Medical Equipment
Cooling, The reference to steam traps is for the use of condensate cooling prior to
discharge to drain.




Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comments. You are correct to observe that air-cooled systems
may require more energy than water-cooled systems, and that closed loop water
systems are the preferred option. However, the HCC feels that the option for air-
cooled solutions be maintained for greater flexibility in this prerequisite.




Thank you for your comments. You are correct to observe that air-cooled systems
may require more energy than water-cooled systems, and that closed loop water
systems are the preferred option. However, the HCC feels that the option for air-
cooled solutions be maintained for greater flexibility in this prerequisite.
Thank you for your comments. At this time, LEED for Healthcare will maintain the
referenced standards as presented. Our research and experience indicate that
demand-controlled cooling systems (refer to the second Requirement bulleted item)
are widely available and acceptable for sterilizers' tailing cooling. The use of closed
loop chilled water systems for laser cooling is a widely adopted practice, and that, in
general, water cooled lasers are no longer widely used. Even smaller equipment can
waste large amounts of water to drain.




Thank you for your comments.
LEED for Healthcare 1st Public Comment Period Comments & Responses
Water Efficiency Credit 1

Requirement Number          CreditDescription
Credit 1                    Water Efficient
                            Landscapeing: No Potable
                            Water Use or No Irrigatoin




Credit 1                    Water Efficient
                            Landscapeing: No Potable
                            Water Use or No Irrigatoin




Credit 1                    Water Efficient
                            Landscapeing: No Potable
                            Water Use or No Irrigatoin




Credit 1                    Water Efficient
                            Landscapeing: No Potable
                            Water Use or No Irrigatoin




Credit 1                    Water Efficient
                            Landscapeing: No Potable
                            Water Use or No Irrigatoin
Credit 1   Water Efficient
           Landscapeing: No Potable
           Water Use or No Irrigatoin




Credit 1   Water Efficient
           Landscapeing: No Potable
           Water Use or No Irrigatoin
ment Period Comments & Responses


        Comments
        Do you have any general comments?
        Water Efficiency Credit 1: Water Efficient Landscaping: No
        Potable Water Use or No Irrigation AEI Comment: The
        elimination of the LEED-NC requirement for 50% reduction is a
        step in the right direction as it adds more emphasis to water
        reduction which is good. The allowance, provided in the second
        path for meeting the credit requirements, which provides
        exception for vegetated areas in compliance with other LEED
        Credits, seems inconsistent with this credit's goals and should in
        our opinion be removed.

        Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the
        technical requirements of this credit? Please explain,
        providing citations to data and research where possible.

        Verbiage very confusing. Put back WE credit for 50% reduction
        in water consumption. Decouple from sustainable sites credits.
        Keep it similar to other rating systems.


        Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the
        technical requirements of this credit? Please explain,
        providing citations to data and research where possible.

        Cooling Tower blowdown and condensate capture should be
        alowed to be reused and qualify, but these water sources do not
        fall into the categories listed "...captured rainwater, recycled
        wastewater, recycled greywater, or water treated...." The
        technical description of this type of water is currently under
        review by several municipalities, and should be included
        regardless of its categorization.


        Do you have any general comments?
        This credit would be VERY hard to achieve without municipal
        reclaimed water available on the site. I suggest that this be a 2
        point credit where one could be for a reduction of potable water
        or well water use and the 2nd could be for complete elimination.


        Will the changes in this credit (if any) affect your ability to
        help transform the healthcare facility market? If so, please
        No.
Do you believe that the requirements presented are
appropriate for high performance healthcare facility
construction? Please explain.
Yes. There is a great deal of alternative resources that can be
used to avoid potable water usage for irrigation and help to
conserve water.

Do you have any general comments?
N/A

Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the
technical requirements of this credit? Please explain,
providing citations to data and research where possible.

N/A

Do you have any general comments?
Due to inclement weather for long periods of time in most parts
of the country, interior landscaping should be encouraged to
provide patients and staff an opportunity to interact with nature.
Points could be given for "passive type" interior irrigation
systems that provide water directly to the root systems.




Do you have any general comments?
Water Efficiency Credit 2: Potable Water Use Reduction:
Measurement & Verification AEI Comment: AEI strongly
supports the USGBC and LEED in its effort to deploy more
measurement and verification into current practice. This is a
valuable credit addition.
LEED for Healthcare Committee Response


Thank you for your comments. Allowing for irrigation to be in compliance with other
credits was decided upon as a method to promote achieving the credits in other
sections. At this time, LEED for Healthcare will maintain the referenced standards as
presented. However, this comment will be valuable during the next LEED revision
process.




Thank you for your comments. LEED for Healthcare determined there needed to be
correlation between this credit and other credits in order to promote the new credits
and reduce confusion when applying for the credits. At this time, LEED for Healthcare
will maintain the referenced standards as presented. However, this comment will be
valuable during the next LEED revision process.




Thank you for your comments. To maintain continuity with the other LEED Rating
Systems and to make it easier to update submittal requirements along with market
change, the HCC made the decision to house the submittal documentation in the
reference guide. LEED Rating Systems are meant to be preliminary and basic
guidelines for projects considering the use of LEED. The rating systems are tools that
can be used to determine which credits should be applied to each project and for
parties seeking general information on LEED or Thank you for your comments. The
HCC will incorporate your suggestions into the technologies and strategies section of
the planned Reference Guide.

Thank you for your comments. The HCC made the decision to eliminate the use of
any municipal water with the understanding that the credit may not be achievable in all
areas of the country. The decision was also made to keep as a single credit due to the
number of new credits in other sections. At this time, LEED for Healthcare will maintain
the referenced standards as presented. However, this comment will be valuable during
the next LEED revision process.


Thank you for your comments.
Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comment. Interior gardens may be an option to achieve this and
other credits. Irrigation for these gardens would fall under SS Credit 9.2. At this time,
LEED for Healthcare will maintain the referenced standards as presented. However,
this comment will be valuable during the next LEED revision process




Thank you for your comment.
LEED for Healthcare 1st Public Comment Period Comments & Responses
Water Efficiency Credit 2

Requirement Number          CreditDescription
Credit 2                    Potable Water Use
                            Reduction: Measurement &
                            Verification




Credit 2                    Potable Water Use
                            Reduction: Measurement &
                            Verification
Credit 2   Potable Water Use
           Reduction: Measurement &
           Verification
Credit 2   Potable Water Use
           Reduction: Measurement &
           Verification


Credit 2   Potable Water Use
           Reduction: Measurement &
           Verification




Credit 2   Potable Water Use
           Reduction: Measurement &
           Verification
Credit 2   Potable Water Use
           Reduction: Measurement &
           Verification




Credit 2   Potable Water Use
           Reduction: Measurement &
           Verification
Credit 2   Potable Water Use
           Reduction: Measurement &
           Verification




Credit 2   Potable Water Use
           Reduction: Measurement &
           Verification
ment Period Comments & Responses


        Comments
        Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the technical
        requirements of this credit? Please explain, providing
        citations to data and research where possible.
        1. Where metering a lab is required - There may be little
        consumption in a laboratory that adopts dry chemistry
        processors. A facility should receive credit for adopting non-
        water techniques, and credit for installing low-water
        consumption glassware washers. (Note: there is no indusry
        standard for energy efficient laboratory glassware/instrument
        washers.) 2. Metering CS & Surgical suite - If this refers to
        "flash" sterilizers and instrument processing systems, the
        previous comment remains true. There is no industry standard
        for energy efficiency, so improvement is difficult to determine.
        If this refers to surgical lasers, this technology is no longer
        common, with only one water-cooled urological laser
        remaining on the market in any significant quantity. Metering
        this area is of little value. 3. Metering in radiology & imaging
        department - Wet film processing has not been part of any
        department designed in the last four years, with limited
        exceptions for mammography. MR and DR receptor chillers are
        closed-loop systems that recirculate coolant. There is no
        appreciable water use to meter in this area of the facilty, so
        instead, they should receive credit for implementing expensive
        non-film systems, which also reduce heavy-metal waste and
        manufacturing environmental impact (film production uses
        Do you believe that the requirements presented are
        appropriate for high performance healthcare facility
        construction? Please explain.
        Yes, measurement and verification is important to prove the
        system is performing the way it was designed.

        Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the technical
        requirements of this credit? Please explain, providing
        citations to data and research where possible.
        none

        Do you have any general comments?
Phase in periods for existing equipment should be addressed.
Expansion/Renovations should be address.




Will the changes in this credit (if any) affect your ability to
help transform the healthcare facility market? If so, please
explain how and why.
no

Do you have any general comments?
Good modification of GGHC credit to require metering in only
3 departments.
Do you have any general comments?
Add the suggestion of composting in dietary as an option
instead of a garbage disposal system.


Do you believe that the requirements presented are
appropriate for high performance healthcare facility
construction? Please explain.
Yes - healthcare facilties have a high usage of water.

Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the technical
requirements of this credit? Please explain, providing
citations to data and research where possible.
No

Do you have any general comments?
Add to the list of water usage in treatment areas - physical
and/or hydro therapy?


Will the changes in this credit (if any) affect your ability to
help transform the healthcare facility market? If so, please
explain how and why.
No

Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the technical
requirements of this credit? Please explain, providing
citations to data and research where possible.
- Designate an innovation credit for taking action in addition to
simply metering water use.




Do you have any general comments?
COMMENT FROM LEED FOR HEALTHCARE WORKSHOP AT
GREENBUILD 2007.

Will the changes in this credit (if any) affect your ability to
help transform the healthcare facility market? If so, please
explain how and why.
A

Do you believe that the requirements presented are
appropriate for high performance healthcare facility
construction? Please explain.
A
Do you have any general comments?
N/A


Do you believe that the requirements presented are
appropriate for high performance healthcare facility
construction? Please explain.
Yes, metering & verification of water usage is very crucial,
especially in healthcare facilities due to the massive amount of
process water used for hospital specific applications.


Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the technical
requirements of this credit? Please explain, providing
citations to data and research where possible.
N/A

Will the changes in this credit (if any) affect your ability to
help transform the healthcare facility market? If so, please
explain how and why.
No.
Do you believe that the requirements presented are
appropriate for high performance healthcare facility
construction? Please explain.
Yes, but are somewhat unclear.


Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the technical
requirements of this credit? Please explain, providing
citations to data and research where possible.
Please clarify whether metering would be required for each
individual cooling tower make-up connection if multiple
towers are used, or, would a single meter in the main serving
multiple towers meet the intent of this credit?


Do you have any general comments?
No.

Will the changes in this credit (if any) affect your ability to
help transform the healthcare facility market? If so, please
explain how and why.
Yes, clarification will allow industry to more easily understand
and apply LEED for Healthcare.
Do you have any general comments?
Add Water Cooling Tower as meter locations, due to
evaporation ratio does not become part of the sewer
discharge and can account for cost savings to facilities.
LEED for Healthcare Committee Response




1. This suggestion is excellent content for Reference Guide for this credit.
2. The intent of this credit is to encourage the reduction of water use; energy
efficiency is not germane to this credit.. At this time, LEED-HC will maintain the
reference standards as presented. However, this comment will be valuable during
the next LEED revision process.
3. This suggestion is excellent content for Reference Guide for this credit.




Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comments.
Thank you for your comment. The credit addresses M&V for new construction and
additions/renovations. HCC discussed existing systems M&V and felt that requiring
metering of these systems was not justifiable at this time. LEED for Healthcare will
maintain the referenced standards as presented. However, this comment will be
valuable during the next LEED revision process




Thank you for your comments.


Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comments. The HCC will incorporate composting into the WE
section of the Reference Guide as a way to meet Option 2 under WE Credit 4.




Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comments.


 Thank you for your comments. The rating system will be modified to reflect the
changes for the addition of physical/hydro therapy areas suggested as part of the
revisions included in the 2nd public comment period.




Thank you for your comments.
Thank you for your comment. Requesting innovation credits for systems that go
beyond the base requirements is at the discretion of the project team. At this time,
LEED for Healthcare will maintain the referenced standards as presented. However,
this comment will be valuable during the next LEED revision process


Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comments.

Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comments.
Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comments. The intent of this credit is to require metering of all
water coming into cooling towers. Credit is received for metering all cooling towers
or for putting a single meter in the main that serves the multiple towers in the
project.


Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comment. Water Cooling Towers are, in fact, a required meter
location, per Credit 2.
LEED for Healthcare 1st Public Comment Period Comments & Responses
Water Efficiency Credit 3

Requirement Number          CreditDescription
Credit 3                    Potable Water Use
                            Reduction: Domestic Water




Credit 3                    Potable Water Use
                            Reduction: Domestic Water
Credit 3   Potable Water Use
           Reduction: Domestic Water




Credit 3   Potable Water Use
           Reduction: Domestic Water




Credit 3   Potable Water Use
           Reduction: Domestic Water




Credit 3   Potable Water Use
           Reduction: Domestic Water
Credit 3   Potable Water Use
           Reduction: Domestic Water




Credit 3   Potable Water Use
           Reduction: Domestic Water




Credit 3   Potable Water Use
           Reduction: Domestic Water
Credit 3   Potable Water Use
           Reduction: Domestic Water
Credit 3   Potable Water Use
           Reduction: Domestic Water




Credit 3   Potable Water Use
           Reduction: Domestic Water
Credit 3   Potable Water Use
           Reduction: Domestic Water
Credit 3   Potable Water Use
           Reduction: Domestic Water




Credit 3   Potable Water Use
           Reduction: Domestic Water
Credit 3   Potable Water Use
           Reduction: Domestic Water
Credit 3   Potable Water Use
           Reduction: Domestic Water




Credit 3   Potable Water Use
           Reduction: Domestic Water
Credit 3   Potable Water Use
           Reduction: Domestic Water




Credit 3   Potable Water Use
           Reduction: Domestic Water
ment Period Comments & Responses


        Comments
        Do you have any general comments?
        New infection control guidelines are recommending against
        sensor operations and handwash sinks. Composting toilets will
        never be allowed.


        Do you believe that the requirements presented are
        appropriate for high performance healthcare facility
        construction? Please explain.
        No. I think that the current requirements of hand wash sinks
        with sensor operators and use of high efficiency plumbing
        fixtures and fittings is minimal. A substantial amount of water
        is used for the regular maintenance of floor coverings. A
        requirement for the use of floor coverings that use minimal
        amounts of water for maintenance would substantially reduce
        the regular water consumption and should be included. The
        potential technologies and strategies should include: o Select
        floor coverings that reduce the use of water due to reduced
        maintenance requirements.


        Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the technical
        requirements of this credit? Please explain, providing
        citations to data and research where possible.
        Maintenance requirements of different types of floor
        coverings should be compared. Many lifecycle cost studies
        have been done on different types floor coverings. These
        studies have shown that maintenance plays a major role in the
        lifetime costs. Floor coverings requiring minimal maintenance
        use less water as well as less cleaning agents, labor and
        equipment, making them much easier and cost effective to
        maintain. The impact on water use for minimal maintenance
        floor coverings versus other types of floors is significant.


        Will the changes in this credit (if any) affect your ability to
        help transform the healthcare facility market? If so, please
        explain how and why.
Yes, the maintenance of some floor coverings requires
substantially more water than others. Requiring the use of
floor coverings which require minimal amounts of water for
regular maintenance would subtantially reduce water
consumption.
Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the technical
requirements of this credit? Please explain, providing
citations to data and research where possible.
Add requirements for dual-flush toilets.




Do you believe that the requirements presented are
appropriate for high performance healthcare facility
construction? Please explain.
Water Efficiency Credit 3: Potable Water Use Reduction:
Domestic Water AEI Comment: Concerns still persist with
respect to the impact on piping systems (drains) for water less
urinal fixtures. Additionally there are a limited number of
products available for low flow urinals and toilet fixtures. AEI
would recommend adding verbiage to this credit that would
emphasize the use of non-potable water use for sewage
conveyance in lieu of the strong presence of waterless-type
fixtures such as composting toilets which will have very little to
no uptake in the healthcare setting.


Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the technical
requirements of this credit? Please explain, providing
citations to data and research where possible.
No, majority of the healthcare facilities specifically request
NOT to have grey water reuse for health reason. We are
working on a healthcare facility and the client strictly specify
that there shall be no grey water reuse for flushing due to
health reason. This healthcare facility will also be registered
with Green Guide for Healthcare.

Do you believe that the requirements presented are
appropriate for high performance healthcare facility
construction? Please explain.
see technical comments
Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the technical
requirements of this credit? Please explain, providing
citations to data and research where possible.
Is there an intent to limit the flow in any way or require a
reduced flow on hand wash sinks? Presumably the primary
purpose of a patient lav is to allow the patient to wash their
hands after using the toilet. Provide evidence that effective
handwashing can be achieved with a reduced flow rate of as
low as 0.5 gpm.

Do you have any general comments?
see technical comments

Will the changes in this credit (if any) affect your ability to
help transform the healthcare facility market? If so, please
explain how and why.
see technical comments
Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the technical
requirements of this credit? Please explain, providing
citations to data and research where possible.
1. The requirements are purely prescriptive. Could provide for
an option to meet this credit on a 'performance' basis.Keep
this consistent with other systems. Note exclusions if
necessary, add performance format of other LEED products.

Do you believe that the requirements presented are
appropriate for high performance healthcare facility
construction? Please explain.
Yes

Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the technical
requirements of this credit? Please explain, providing
citations to data and research where possible.
none

Do you have any general comments?
Dual flush toilets should be included in potential straties
Surgery sinks, scrub sinks, etc. should be added to exempt
fixtures (or simply designate more specifically the areas where
the prescriptive requirements are applicable)
Will the changes in this credit (if any) affect your ability to
help transform the healthcare facility market? If so, please
explain how and why.
no

Will the changes in this credit (if any) affect your ability to
help transform the healthcare facility market? If so, please
explain how and why.
Likely. Not only is it highly unlikely that composting toilets
would be permitted by health officials in a healthcare facility,
especially in a patient care area, it is highly unlikely that a
healthcare facility would give this standard a second look once
they read anything in a LEED-HC document related to
composting toilets, even as an option. Even mentioning
composting toilets would completely tarnish the credibility of
this standard's potential applicability to healthcare and is
inappropriate.
Do you believe that the requirements presented are
appropriate for high performance healthcare facility
construction? Please explain.
Partially. Use of low water-use fixtures is a good goal which
has an extremely beneficial impact to healthcare facilities
because not only does it reduce water use and associated bills
for water and sewer, it also reduces the amount of water that
must be provided in the case of emergency. Backup water
source sizing and capacity would benefit from fixtures with
lower water use requirements. However, composting toilets
are completely inappropriate for healthcare.


Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the technical
requirements of this credit? Please explain, providing
citations to data and research where possible.
As currently written this credit requires "Use high-efficiency
plumbing fixtures and fittings, or control fixture flows to
achieve the following maximum water flows: lavatories 1.5
gpm; showers 2.0 gpm; urinals with an average of 0.5
gallons/flush; and flushometer valve or pressure-assist single-
flush toilets with a maximum flush volume of 1.28
gallons/flush." Consider lavatories with 0.5 gpm instead of 1.5
gpm. However, it is important to note that most municipalities
do not allow aerators, including low flow and laminar flow
aerators due to presence of screens which retain residual
water when not in use and also present concurrent potential
microbial growth sites, a cross-contamination infection control
risks. In these cases, a plain-end spout is currently the only way
to meet the safety requirements of many health departments
and as such lavatory requirements for this credit may need to
Do you have any general comments?
Given above.
Do you have any general comments?
Why is the option to use dual flush toilets not available for this
credit? Also, in my experience, the issue of using sensor
operators at hand sinks but also wanting temperature control
has not been resolved. And our search for low flow shower
heads that have a thermostatic mixer and are not too
institutional looking has been a difficult one. Maybe this credit
will mean more options will become available in the
marketplace.


Do you believe that the requirements presented are
appropriate for high performance healthcare facility
construction? Please explain.
Partially - see below.

Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the technical
requirements of this credit? Please explain, providing
citations to data and research where possible.
This is a highly prescriptive credit, compared with similar
credits in LEED NC other programs. Rather than prescibe the
flow rates of specific fixtures, why not base the credit on
percent reduction as the other programs do? That would
encourage fixtures that conserve even more water areas, and
may allow higher flows in some specific situations not
addressed in the current prescriptive requirement. For
example, there are good showers that use only 1.6 gpm. I
don't think this credit should prescribe them, but they should
be considered in the overall strategy employed in the design.
We don't want anyone to drop this credit because it requires a
specific flow rate in a specific fixture, but we do want to get
the domestic water use as low as reasonable.


Will the changes in this credit (if any) affect your ability to
help transform the healthcare facility market? If so, please
explain how and why.
Not applicable to this comment.


Do you believe that the requirements presented are
appropriate for high performance healthcare facility
construction? Please explain.
See part 3

Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the technical
requirements of this credit? Please explain, providing
citations to data and research where possible.
The proposed limitations on flow rates for various fixture types
have the potential of rendering this credit unachievable for
most health care facilities. The reduction in water
consumption is in direct conflict with infection control
concerns. This is certainly the case for the lavatories where the
maximum proposed flow rate is 1.5 gpm. The available
literature and best design practice suggests that a flow rate of
2.2 gpm should be the minimum at lavatories to ensure proper
hand washing. Refer to the article on the internet at the
following link:
http://plumbingengineer.com/oct_06/fixtures.php Although
these requirements are not currently regulated or mandated,
the current trends in health care design and infection control
suggest that legislation will be in place in the coming years on
the issue of hand wash sinks. Here in Canada, the practice of
specifiying a minimum of 2.2 gpm flow rate for plumbing
fixture is being adopted for all upcoming Health Care projects
in the Province of Ontario built under the Infrastructure
Ontario's mandate. The requirement is stipulated in the
General Output Specifications Document that will form the
basis of design for all public health care facilities built in
Ontario through Infrastructure Ontario. In Canada, the CSA
Do you have any general comments?
See Part 3

Will the changes in this credit (if any) affect your ability to
help transform the healthcare facility market? If so, please
explain how and why.
See part 3

Do you have any general comments?
There is a concern as to the reliability of the sensors in critical
places like a nurse station. A suggestion would be to require
alcohol dispensers as a back up in these areas as an option
where appropriate

Do you believe that the requirements presented are
appropriate for high performance healthcare facility
A

Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the technical
requirements of this credit? Please explain, providing
citations to data and research where possible.
- Sensor controls: require temperature control and continuous
water flow. - Add additional fixture exemptions (surgery sinks,
scrub sinks, etc.) or simply designate more specifically the
areas where the prescriptive requirements are applicable.


Do you have any general comments?
COMMENT FROM LEED FOR HEALTHCARE WORKSHOP AT
GREENBUILD 2007.

Will the changes in this credit (if any) affect your ability to
help transform the healthcare facility market? If so, please
explain how and why.
A
Do you have any general comments?
N/A

Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the technical
requirements of this credit? Please explain, providing
citations to data and research where possible.
I suggest there be an avg gallons/flush instead of the max flush
volume of 1.28 gallons/flush. Most healthcare applications we
have use flush valves rather than tank type and this would
allow the use of the dual flush toilets 1.6gpm/1.1gpm.


Do you believe that the requirements presented are
appropriate for high performance healthcare facility
construction? Please explain.
In some aspects. The prescriptive measures are great ways to
enforce the use of high efficiency plumbing fixtures. However,
from what I've encountered there are select companies that
have these products available. As the market shift is happening
I am starting to see more and more companies working to
Will the changes in this credit (if any) affect your ability to
help transform the healthcare facility market? If so, please
explain how and why.
Yes. This credit may be difficult to obtain until the majority of
manufacturers make the required high efficiency fixtures
available. Lots of times the owner wants a specific brand for
plumbing fixtures that they know and trust works well. It may
be a challenge at first to test new products but will get easier
as these products become familiar are trusted to perform even
Will the changes in this credit (if any) affect your ability to
help transform the healthcare facility market? If so, please
explain how and why.
Yes, clarification will allow industry to more easily understand
and apply LEED for Healthcare.

Do you believe that the requirements presented are
appropriate for high performance healthcare facility
construction? Please explain.
Not necessarily. Some of the technologies listed may not be
appropriate for hospitals or other healthcare facilities due to
potential health issues, including greywater and composting
toilet systems and waterless urinals.


Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the technical
requirements of this credit? Please explain, providing
citations to data and research where possible.
Please include discussion of water-reducing technologies that
may not be appropriate immuno-compromised patients. This
might include greywater and composting toilet systems and
waterless urinals.

Do you have any general comments?
No.
Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the technical
requirements of this credit? Please explain, providing
citations to data and research where possible.
a. Hospitals can readily reduce their potable water usage and
waste water generation by implementing water conservation
technologies in the construction phase. With this in mind, we
recommend implementing additional credits in this section
similar to the credits issued in the Green Guide for
Healthcare's "Water Conservation" section: "Maximize water
efficiency within buildings to reduce the burden on potable
water supply and wastewater systems." GGHC's Credit 2.1 - 2.5
assign credits to facilities that reduce total building potable
water use from 10%-50%. The greater the reduction, the more
credits allocated. A similar approach in the construction phase
will give healthcare facilities the needed incentives to invest
early to reduce wastewater and improve potable water

Do you have any general comments?
Potential Technologies and Strategies i. Recycled wastewater is
also an appropriate technology/strategy to satisfy this credit.

Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the technical
requirements of this credit? Please explain, providing
citations to data and research where possible.
Scott Beckman: This varies significantly from current LEED NC.
Disagree with using a prescribed maximum flow rates as the
measure of achievement. It will limit motivation to design to
even less water usage. Why not just continue with using the
EPACT approach? Why introduce a different way to measure
achievement in the LEED system?


Do you have any general comments?
Lori Sutton. There are reservations about the use of waterless
urinals and to even greater degree regarding the use of grey
water systems in a hospital environment where patient
immune systems are compromised. Potential exists for tapping
into the wrong line for water resources during future remodel
work. It is recommended that the use of greywater be limited
to use in public areas only, not routed in patient areas.

Do you believe that the requirements presented are
appropriate for high performance healthcare facility
construction? Please explain.
Yes, to an extent. I think that more consideration should be
given to the required use of sensor operators on sinks in
clinical areas and the use of low flow water closets.


Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the technical
requirements of this credit? Please explain, providing
citations to data and research where possible.
Add scrub sinks and staff handwash sinks to the list of
exclusions requiring the use of sensor operators. Exclude
showers used for emergency uses or hydrotherapy from the
low flow requirements. Retract requirement to use 1.28
gpm/flush water closets. Low water flow will lead to increased
occurance of clogs in the sanitary system.


Do you have any general comments?
No
Will the changes in this credit (if any) affect your ability to
help transform the healthcare facility market? If so, please
explain how and why.
No
LEED for Healthcare Committee Response



Thank you for your comment. As stated in the WE Credit 3, Potential Technologies
and Strategies, the LEED for Healthcare committee is recommending these actions
only if they are "consistent with infection control policies and procedures."




Thank you for your comments. The scope of this credit is Domestic Uses, specifically
aimed at the fixtures governed by the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Your comment is
more properly considered under Materials and Resources, and will be passed to the
MR TAG for their consideration in development of future versions of LEED.




Thank you for your comments. The scope of this credit is Domestic Uses, specifically
aimed at the fixtures governed by the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Your comment is
more properly considered under Materials and Resources, and will be passed to the
MR TAG for their consideration in development of future versions of LEED.
Thank you for your comments. The scope of this credit is Domestic Uses, specifically
aimed at the fixtures governed by the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Your comment is
more properly considered under Materials and Resources, and will be passed to the
MR TAG for their consideration in development of future versions of LEED.




Thank you for your comment. This credit will be revised for the second public review
to be consistent with other Water Use Reduction credits in the LEED Rating Systems.




Thank you for your comment. The HCC has decided to keep this recommended
strategy in the rating system as a market driver. Encouraging this type of fixture is
important to the sustainable environment movement and it is important that LEED
supports such options in order to transform the market and raise the bar for water
use reduction.




Thank you for your comment. As stated in the WE Credit 3, Potential Technologies
and Strategies, the LEED for Healthcare committee is recommending these actions
only if they are "consistent with infection control policies and procedures."




Thank you for your comments.
Thank you for your comment. The HCC believes that effective handwashing can be
achieved with a reduced flow rate of .5 gpm. Effective handwashing depends on the
use of soap, not large amounts of water.


Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comment. This credit will be revised for the second public review
to be consistent with other Water Use Reduction credits in the LEED Rating Systems.




Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comment. This credit will be revised in the second public review
comment to be consistent with the Water Use Reduction credits in the LEED 2009
rating systems. The prescriptive requirements noted in the first public review draft
have been largely eliminated.
Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comment. The HCC has decided to keep this recommended
technology in the rating system as a market driver. Encouraging this type of fixture is
important to the sustainable environment movement and it is important that LEED
supports such options in order to transform the market and raise the bar. The HCC
fails to understand what makes composting toilets inappropriate for healthcare.




Thank you for your comment. The HCC has decided to keep this recommended
strategy in the rating system as a market driver. Encouraging this type of fixture is
important to the sustainable environment movement and it is important that LEED
supports such options in order to transform the market and raise the bar for water
use reduction.
Thank you for your comment. This credit will be revised for the second public review
to be consistent with other Water Use Reduction credits in the LEED Rating Systems.


Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comment. This credit will be revised for the second public review
to be consistent with other Water Use Reduction credits in the LEED Rating Systems.




Thank you for your comments.
Thank you for your comment. This credit will be revised for the second public review
to be consistent with other Water Use Reduction credits in the LEED Rating Systems.




Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comments.
Thank you for your comment. This credit will be revised for the second public review
to be consistent with other Water Use Reduction credits in the LEED Rating Systems.


Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comments.


Thank you for your comments. Your suggestion for use of antiseptics as alternatives
to hand-washing are interesting and will be considered in the future development of
the future version of LEED.




Thank you for your comments.
Thank you for your comment. This credit will be revised for the second public review
to be consistent with other Water Use Reduction credits in the LEED Rating Systems.


Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comments.

Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comment. This credit will be revised for the second public review
to be consistent with other Water Use Reduction credits in the LEED Rating Systems.




Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comments. The HCC has decided to keep low flow fixtures in the
rating system as a market driver. Encouraging these types of fixtures is important to
the sustainable environment movement and it is important that LEED supports such
options in order to transform the market and raise the bar.
Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comment. The HCC has decided to keep this credit in the rating
system as a market driver. Encouraging this type of fixture is important to the
sustainable environment movement and it is important that LEED supports such
options in order to transform the market and raise the bar.




Thank you for your comment. As stated in the WE Credit 3, Potential Technologies
and Strategies, the LEED for Healthcare committee is recommending these actions
only if they are "consistent with infection control policies and procedures."


Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comment. The credit was written prescriptively to make it easier
to use in the special healthcare environment. The performance, flow calculation
method in other LEED rating systems is not representative of fixture usage in
healthcare facilities - for instance, there is considerably greater hand-washing in a
healthcare facility than in an office building or school. Prescribing fixture flows
removes ambiguity with different usage practices from facility to facility.The HCC will
give an exemplary performance points to projects that conserve water during the
construction phase. This will be outlined in the reference guide.
Thank you for your comment. This credit will be revised in the second public review
comment to be consistent with the Water Use Reduction credits in the LEED 2009
rating systems




Thank you for your comment. This credit will be revised in the second public review
comment to be consistent with the Water Use Reduction credits in the LEED 2009
rating systems. The prescriptive requirements noted in the first public review draft
have been largely eliminated.




Thank you for your comment. The HCC has decided to keep this recommended
technology in the rating system as a market driver. Encouraging this type of fixture is
important to the sustainable environment movement and it is important that LEED
supports such options in order to transform the market and raise the bar. The HCC
fails to understand what makes composting toilets inappropriate for healthcare.




Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comment. This credit will be revised for the second public review
to be consistent with other Water Use Reduction credits in the LEED Rating Systems.


Thank you for your comments.
Thank you for your comments.
LEED for Healthcare 1st Public Comment Period Comments & Responses
Water Efficiency Credit 4 (This credit has been split into 3 separate credits in the 2nd PC draft version of LEED for Healthcare

Requirement Number            CreditDescription
Credit 4                      Potable Water Use
                              Reduction: Process Water
                              & Building System
                              Equipment

Credit 4                      Potable Water Use
                              Reduction: Process Water
                              & Building System
                              Equipment
Credit 4   Potable Water Use
           Reduction: Process Water
           & Building System
           Equipment




Credit 4   Potable Water Use
           Reduction: Process Water
           & Building System
           Equipment
Credit 4   Potable Water Use
           Reduction: Process Water
           & Building System
           Equipment




Credit 4   Potable Water Use
           Reduction: Process Water
           & Building System
           Equipment




Credit 4   Potable Water Use
           Reduction: Process Water
           & Building System
           Equipment
Credit 4   Potable Water Use
           Reduction: Process Water
           & Building System
           Equipment
Credit 4   Potable Water Use
           Reduction: Process Water
           & Building System
           Equipment




Credit 4   Potable Water Use
           Reduction: Process Water
           & Building System
           Equipment

Credit 4   Potable Water Use
           Reduction: Process Water
           & Building System
           Equipment
           Equipment




Credit 4   Potable Water Use
           Reduction: Process Water
           & Building System
           Equipment
ment Period Comments & Responses
n split into 3 separate credits in the 2nd PC draft version of LEED for Healthcare)

              Comments
              Do you have any general comments?
              Xrays are quickly being replaced with digital equipment -
              consider adding that as a potential strategy.


              Do you believe that the requirements presented are
              appropriate for high performance healthcare facility
              construction? Please explain.
              See part 4

              Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the technical
              requirements of this credit? Please explain, providing
              citations to data and research where possible.
              See part 4

              Do you have any general comments?
              The proposed reductions in drift loss will mean an increase in
              the cooling tower fan motor horsepower to overcome the
              larger static pressure drop of the added drift eliminators
              required to achieve the target. It therefore seems that water
              conservation will be achieved at the detriment of energy
              conservation. Some research should be done to confirm
              whether the water saving benefits achieved significantly
              outweigh the energy penalty. Cooling tower manufacturer's
              have advised that proposed 0.001 drift loss for counter flow
              tower is not achievable. They suggest using the 0.005 drift loss
              target for all tower types. The wind velocity should be
              specified along with the drift loss target as this is a key factor
              in writing the tower specifications One suggestion to improve
              this credit would be to impose limits on the tower basin
              leakage. Many installations are seen with very leaky basins,
              particularly on the wood towers. Placing limitations on the
              evaporation rates is not addressed in the credit.




              Will the changes in this credit (if any) affect your ability to
              help transform the healthcare facility market? If so, please
              explain how and why.
See part 4
Do you have any general comments?
1. Requirements format - First paragraph repeats instructions
given below (Option 1, Option 2 etc.). 2. Needs to specify a
general rule. Specifying examples may/may not cover the
entire range of design.

Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the technical
requirements of this credit? Please explain, providing
citations to data and research where possible.
1. Water use reduction credits should be uniformly
performance based for consistency with other LEED products.
Set a percentage reduction, provide examples of how to
achieve, and leave the design to the design team. 2. Dry
vacumn pumps - Trade off - Dry pumps are less efficient than
wet vacuum pumps, and therefore, consume more electricity.
We may reduce water consumption by shifting the burden to
another resource. 3. Large frame X-Ray facilities - This
technology is not part of any design created in at least four
years. Instead, facilities should gain credit for adopting CR/DR
technology. Note that the requirement exempts dental and, by
size definition, mammography systems. Since CR/DR
technology exists for these modalities, the exemption should
be removed. As noted above, manufacturing X-ray film has
environmental impact beyond the end user. 4. Option 2 - Is
this list exhaustive enough? Add Sterlizers, cart washers. There
are no industry standards for the efficiency of medical devices,
although market forces drove manufacturers to improve the
efficiency of instrument washers and sterilizers. It may be
difficult to improve performance beyond that achieved by
contemporary devices, and there is no appropriate data for
device sold 5-10 years ago. Note that theimprove the technical
Do you have any suggestions on how to typical live
requirements of this credit? Please explain, providing
citations to data and research where possible.
Requiring the use of dry vacuum pumps has an impact on
equipment cost, efficiency, and life. This approach would save
water (over once-through domestic water cooling) but would
require more frequent replacement, energy use, fuel for
shipping of new units, etc. so it's not clear that a requirement
for no-water use in cooling of vacuum pumps is the most
sustainable option. Consider making the requirement read
"cooling for vacuum pumps shall be via closed-loop
recirculating water loop cooled by air (dry coil), water
evaporation (fluid cooler), or indirectly via heat exchanger and
a dedicated process cooling tower sized to meet constant
facility cooling needs such as this during the winter so that
central chillers may be turned off (water economizer free
cooling), as permitted by energy codes. Use of domestic water
as a cooling source shall not be permitted." Similar comment
for air compressors. Option 1 may not be feasible at every site,
depending on water quality, treatment, etc. This may result in
greater scaling, fouling, decreased cooling efficiency, greater
electricity use, higher maintenance costs, and premature
failure of cooling tower
components, -or conversely- increased use of and associated
cost for water
treatment chemicals to keep water soluble minerals in
solution. This would
increase the chemical concentrations in water that is
discharged, even moreso
since the option requires higher cycles of concentration. An
alternative toany general comments?
Do you have
The requirement of 4-5 cycles in the cooling towers will mean
that the water coming out will be more difficult to treat for
other uses. I suggest making this a variable, so that if the waste
water from the cooling tower will be 100% reused (for
irrigation, for example), then fewer cycles can be allowed.

Do you have any general comments?
Interested to know how no more than 2.3 gallons per ton hour
was decided.
Will the changes in this credit (if any) affect your ability to
help transform the healthcare facility market? If so, please
explain how and why.
Yes. The minimum of 5 cycles of concentration can be difficult
to achieve in municipal settings with poor water quality. This
may lead to the use of adding a greater quantity of chemicals.


Do you believe that the requirements presented are
appropriate for high performance healthcare facility
construction? Please explain.
Yes, the requirements presented are appropriate. However,
Option 1 would be more obtainable if it followed the GGHC
measures to reduce cooling tower blowdown rate by a
percentage. Also, for Option 2 the elimination of garbage
disposals is not easy in large commercial kitchens.


Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the technical
requirements of this credit? Please explain, providing
citations to data and research where possible.
A suggestion would be to establish a standard to account for
regional areas or create a range for the amount of potable
water used for cooling tower make-up in Option 1 rather than
a fixed number. The amount of evaporation depends largely on
the surrounding climate.


Do you believe that the requirements presented are
appropriate for high performance healthcare facility
Yes.

Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the technical
requirements of this credit? Please explain, providing
citations to data and research where possible.
Where it says "Large frame X-Ray facilities of more than
150mm" it should instead say "Large frame X-Ray Processors
and/or Developers of more than 150mm" to clarify that this is
for x-ray film processors or developers, not x-ray machines.


Do you have any general comments?
No.

Will the changes in this credit (if any) affect your ability to
help transform the healthcare facility market? If so, please
explain how and why.
Yes.

Do you have any general comments?
Potential Technologies and Strategies i.Recycled wastewater
should be considered as an appropriate technology/strategy to
satisfy this credit. New Credit - Bottle Water The vast majority
of hospitals utilize bottled water and or bottled water coolers
in public areas and offices. Rewards should be given for
designs that eliminate plastic waste and that encourage
recycling of waste generated.


Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the technical
requirements of this credit? Please explain, providing
citations to data and research where possible.
a. Hospital laboratories have very stringent water quality
requirements, which also can benefit the entire hospital.
Technologies used to achieve the lab requirements improve
overall efficiency for the hospital. Labs require ion exchange,
deionization, and reverse osmosis for treatment of boilers and
autoclaves. These technologies greatly reduce heat loss and
increase efficiency by reducing scale or minimizing energy
consumption. These benefits should be considered for
additional credit.

Do you have any general comments?
Scott Beckman: Agree with the approach. It offers significant
opportunities for the team to find ways to reduce process
usage. If the requirements of Option 1 could be streamlined it
would be very helpful.
Do you have any general comments?
No

Will the changes in this credit (if any) affect your ability to
help transform the healthcare facility market? If so, please
explain how and why.
No
Do you believe that the requirements presented are
appropriate for high performance healthcare facility
construction? Please explain.
Yes.

Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the technical
requirements of this credit? Please explain, providing
citations to data and research where possible.
Change requirement to state "dry or oil lubricated" vacuum
pumps. Option to employ strategies which reduce water usage
by 10% needs to have a baseline calculated usaged for
comparison.
Do you believe that the requirements presented are
appropriate for high performance healthcare facility
construction? Please explain.
A water purification system could be added, or built into
facility construction.

Do you have any suggestions on how to improve the technical
requirements of this credit? Please explain, providing
citations to data and research where possible.
From: Laurrie Cozza and Phil Festa RE: LEED for Healthcare
Public Comment Period - Water / Environmental Health and
Safety Concerns We as citizens, and our company, H2Only Pure
Water On Tap are committed to providing pure drinking water
through the use of distillation. As the water quality
deteriorates across our nation, water purification needs will
only continue to grow. People with compromised immune
systems and those at health care centers are a priority for this
much needed service. We believe LEED for Healthcare could
lead the way in this inevitable next step in protecting and
purifying our drinking water, and introduce the term Indoor
Water Quality (IWQ) 1. In the statement of privacy, the guide
for healthcare states "Protecting immediate health of building
occupants.", while Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) is a priority; we
believe Indoor Water Quality (IWQ) should also be discussed.
The following should be examined: Quality of Drinking Water:
o More than 140 contaminants with no enforceable safety
limits are found in the nation's drinking water o EWG found
over 90 percent compliance on the part of water utilities in
applying and enforcing standards that exist, but faults the U.S.
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for failing to establish
standards on so many of the contaminants from industry,
Will the changes in this credit (if any) affect your ability to
help transform the healthcare facility market? If so, please
explain how and why.
We believe a credit should be added to purify drinking water.
for Healthcare)

             LEED for Healthcare Committee Response


             Thank you for your comment. The rating system will be incorporated to reflect the
             changes suggested as part of the revisions included in the 2nd public comment
             period draft.




             Thank you for your comments.




             Thank you for your comments.


             Thank you for your comment. The HCC will consider including cooling tower fan
             energy costs versus water costs in the WE section of the rating system during the
             next revision.
Thank you for your comments.

Thank you for your comments. At this time, LEED for Healthcare will maintain the
referenced standards as presented. However, this comment will be valuable during
the next LEED revision process.




Thank you for your comment. The HCC will consider including CD/DR imaging
technology in the WE section of the rating system during the next revision.
Regarding vacuum pumps and air compressor, we apologize for this oversight.
Cooling for vacuum pumps and air compressor via closed loop recirculation water
loops … will be included in the final version of the rating system.

Option 1, thank you for your comments. At this time, LEED for Healthcare will
maintain the referenced standards as presented. However, this comment will be
valuable during the next LEED revision process.

Option 2, we apologize for this oversight. Composting will be included in the final
version of the Potential Technologies and Strategies of the rating system.

Option 2, Process Items, Thank you for your comments,. At this time LEED for
Healthcare will maintain the referenced standards as presented. However, this
comment will be valuable during the next LEED revision process.




Thank you for your comment. The HCC will consider including fewer cycles for
recycling of cooling tower water in the WE section of the rating system during the
next revision.




Thank you for your comment. The HCC's decision was based upon the following
assumptions:

3 gpm per ton
95 degree hot water
85 degree cold water
78 degree wet bulb
0.005% drift
5 cycles of concentration
Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comments. At this time, LEED for Healthcare will maintain the
referenced standards as presented. However, this comment will be valuable during
the next LEED revision process.




Thank you for your comment. It is our experience that the evaporation rate is more
heavily dependent on the amount of heat rejected, in other words, the load on the
tower. Local water quality may make this credit more or less difficult, however, this
requirement represents a common level of better practice across most water
conditions.




Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comment. The rating system will be incorporated to reflect the
changes suggested as part of the revisions included in the 2nd public comment
period draft.
Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comments.


We apologize for this oversight. Recycled wastewater will be included in the final
draft of the rating systems.

Thank you for your idea for a credit to reduce the waste associated with bottled
water. The HCC will consider including reduction in the generation of bottled water
waste in the WE section of the rating system during the next revision.




Thank you for your comment. The HCC will consider including water quality credits in
the WE section of the rating system during the next revision.




Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comments.
Thank you for your comments.




Thank you for your comment. The rating system will be incorporated to reflect the
changes suggested as part of the revisions included in the 2nd public comment
period draft.




Thank you for your comment. Your recommendation will be considered during the
next overall LEED upgrade.




Thank you for your comment. Your recommendation will be considered during the
next overall LEED upgrade.
Thank you for your comment. Your recommendation will be considered during the
next overall LEED upgrade.

								
To top