Odorant Receptor Polymorphisms and Natural Variation in Olfactory Behavior in Drosophila melanogaster

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Odorant Receptor Polymorphisms and Natural Variation in Olfactory Behavior in Drosophila melanogaster Powered By Docstoc
					Copyright Ó 2010 by the Genetics Society of America
DOI: 10.1534/genetics.110.119446



      Odorant Receptor Polymorphisms and Natural Variation in Olfactory
                     Behavior in Drosophila melanogaster

Stephanie M. Rollmann,*,1 Ping Wang,†,‡,2 Priya Date,* Steven A. West,‡,§ Trudy F. C. Mackay†,‡
                               and Robert R. H. Anholt†,‡,§
  *Department of Biological Sciences, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221 and †Department of Genetics, ‡W. M. Keck Center
           for Behavioral Biology and §Department of Biology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695
                                                       Manuscript received May 30, 2010
                                                      Accepted for publication July 10, 2010


                                                              ABSTRACT
                Animals perceive and discriminate among a vast array of sensory cues in their environment. Both genetic
             and environmental factors contribute to individual variation in behavioral responses t
				
DOCUMENT INFO
Description: Animals perceive and discriminate among a vast array of sensory cues in their environment. Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to individual variation in behavioral responses to these cues. Here, we asked to what extent sequence variants in six Drosophila melanogaster odorant receptor (Or) genes are associated with variation in behavioral responses to benzaldehyde by sequencing alleles from a natural population. Sequence analyses showed signatures of deviations from neutrality for Or42b and Or85f, and linkage disequilibrium analyses showed a history of extensive recombination between polymorphic markers for all six Or genes. We identified polymorphisms in Or10a, Or43a, and Or67b that were significantly associated with variation in response to benzaldehyde. To verify these associations, we repeated the analyses with an independent set of behavioral measurements of responses to a structurally similar odorant, acetophenone. Association profiles for both odorants were similar with many polymorphisms and haplotypes associated with variation in responsiveness to both odorants. Some polymorphisms, however, were associated with one, but not the other odorant. We also observed a correspondence between behavioral response to benzaldehyde and differences in Or10a and Or43a expression. These results illustrate that sequence variants that arise during the evolution of odorant receptor genes can contribute to individual variation in olfactory behavior and give rise to subtle shifts in olfactory perception. [PUBLICATION ABSTRACT]
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