Concept Plan Court Ordered Intervention - DOC by juu13022

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Case plan
                                   Contents

Purpose
1.     Engaging Families

       1.1 Cultural considerations for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
       young people and their families
       1.2 Why involve families and significant others

2.     Case plan

3.     Snapshot

4.     Assessment

       4.1 Assessment using the Interview Guide

       4.2 Detailed assessment

       4.3 Risk/Needs assessment tool

       4.4 Assessment of risks and needs

       4.5 Assessment of Other Needs and Special Conditions
       4.6 Professional override
       4.7 Contact level
       4.8 Reassessment

5.     Interventions

       5.1 Completing the intervention plan

       5.2 The intervention framework

       5.3 Intervention categories and types
                                                                               Youth Justice Services Practice Manual, March 2010




       5.4 Implementing the intervention framework through case management

       5.5 Interface between case management and program development

       5.6 Four phases of program development

6.     Documents

       6.1 Referrals

       6.2 Case reviews

       6.3 Versioning the case plan
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       6.4 Completion of the case plan


Appendix 1 Negotiating referrals and support services for Indigenous and non
Indigenous families

Appendix 2 Critical Elements for Engaging Indigenous and non Indigenous
Families




                                                                               Youth Justice Services Practice Manual, March 2010




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Purpose

To explain the case plan, including the process for engaging families in the
assessment and case management process.

1. Engaging families

To ensure a robust assessment of the young person occurs, it is imperative that
caseworkers engage with members of the young person‘s family. Caseworkers need
to ensure that family engagement involves more than the provision of information.

Successful family engagement is a strength-based approach that results in increased
family resources and kinship connections. Family engagement involves family
members actively contributing to outcome-focused planning and decision making for
their child. Effective family engagement requires families to be involved throughout the
duration of the case including intake, assessment, case planning, implementation,
review and case closure.

Involving families in all phases of the case management framework is critical to
ensuring positive outcomes for young people involved in the youth justice system. To
facilitate their involvement families need information, encouragement, assistance and
support. Research suggests that familial engagement in the case management of their
child can contribute to the young person achieving success. The supportive
involvement of a young person‘s family can reduce anxiety in the young person,
increase compliance by reinforcing court orders and provide young people with an
advocate(s) who can help them articulate their risks, needs and desires.

From the family‘s perspective, the ability to participate in the assessment and case
planning process can serve to allay their own fear and anxiety regarding their child‘s
involvement in offending behaviour. Moreover, with support and information parents
and other family members may feel more confident to participate actively in decision
making about their child including the interventions and services to which they are
referred.

It is important to acknowledge however that these families may be in crisis. Families
may present with a number of external and internal factors that will affect the extent to
which they can participate in the assessment and case management process.
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External factors that have been found to impact negatively on familial engagement
include an inability to access transportation to attend meetings, a lack of childcare
services for younger siblings, and employment obligations. Internal factors that can
negatively impact participation may include a perceived social stigma associated with
their child committing offences, a fear that they will be ‗blamed‘ for their child‘s
behaviour, a lack of knowledge about the system that results in a belief that there is no
role for family participation, and cultural and/or language barriers.

Caseworkers can assist families to overcome these obstacles by providing appropriate
referral pathways to support services in the community and/or directing resources to
the family. The provision of assistance in this way can strengthen the family‘s ability to
cope, which may increase the possibility of the young person achieving positive


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outcomes. For information about negotiating referral and support services for families,
refer to Appendix 1.

The successful rehabilitation of young people and their sustained reintegration into the
community relies upon family and community engagement. Working together with the
young person and their family reinforces the concept of mutual responsibility for
outcomes achieved.

1.1 Cultural considerations for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young
people and their families

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people are consistently over-represented
at all levels of the Queensland youth justice system. Research indicates Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander young people experience a much higher rate of contact and are
more likely to be remanded in a youth detention centre compared to their non-
Indigenous counterparts. There are a number of factors that can contribute to
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people‘s involvement in offending
behaviour and over-representation in the youth justice system including exposure to
high levels of social disadvantage, unemployment, poverty, over crowding due to a
lack of appropriate accommodation, poor educational outcomes and alcohol and drug
abuse.

Acculturation and deculturation have been identified in the literature as significant
areas of need for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander offenders. Deculturation is the
loss of knowledge and connection to one‘s culture of origin and acculturation refers to
the process of adjusting to a majority culture which is different to one‘s own culture
(Berry, cited in Jones et al., 2002). Acculturation and deculturation have been at the
heart of many government policies that have promoted assimilation. The removal of
children, loss of land and missionary activities has resulted in a disconnection to
culture which contributes to many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people feeling
caught between two cultures.

Separation from family, land and culture continues to impact on the personal and
emotional functioning of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (Lippmann,
1991). Contributing to frustration, anger and a sense of powerlessness, separation
and deculturation act to restrict the development of a healthy sense of self and identity
for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (Jones et al, 2002). Strengthening
cultural knowledge and linking Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people to
their family, kin and clan groups can be one way of empowering and engaging young
people and their families.
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Family is the cornerstone of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures, community
and spirit. The maintenance of connections to family and community forms the basis of
the development of the young person‘s identity as an Indigenous person and their
cultural connectedness.1 Incorporating family engagement principles when engaging
with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people in assessment and case
management is essential to achieving a positive outcome for the young person, their
family and their community.

A young person‘s family is comprised of a group of individuals who support that young
person. This can be through the provision of emotional, physical, and/or financial

1
  Secretariat of National Aboriginal and Islander Child Care Inc. 2005. Achieving Culturally Strong Out of Home
Care For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children. Policy Paper. Secretariat of National Aboriginal and
Islander Child Care Inc.
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support. Within this definition, family can include individuals of various ages who are
biologically related, related by marriage, or not related at all (Federation of Families for
Children‘s Mental Health, 2001a). Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families include
an extended arrangement where those not directly related by blood ties are considered
kin. When working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people, it is
important to determine those individuals the young person considers to be part of their
family and support network.

Similarly to engaging parents, the caseworker should actively engage these family
members in the young person‘s case. To facilitate the engagement process it may be
appropriate to seek assistance from Indigenous staff both internal and external to the
department and/or cultural advisors. Indigenous workers can provide information
relevant to the specific family and community and provide advice and guidance to
ensure the assessment is culturally sensitive. The inclusion of Indigenous Service
Support Officers and other Indigenous staff in interviews, particularly when first
meeting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families, can be one way to build rapport
with the family, and ensure communication occurs in a culturally sensitive manner.


1.2 Why involve family and significant others?

The active participation of a young person‘s family in the case management process
increases the likelihood of positive outcomes being achieved by the young person.
Families know their young person the best and can provide valuable information that
may be critical to understanding the young person‘s trajectory into offending. Families
can provide information relevant to:

      the strengths and needs of their child
      the family‘s capacity to support the young person to adhere to the court order/s
       and intervention/s
      circumstances that affect their child‘s emotional, physical and psychological
       well-being
      their child‘s pattern of responding to people and events in their surroundings
      their child‘s education history and status
      their own style of parenting and personal attitude to their child‘s offending
      factors that predisposed their child to, and perpetuate, their child‘s offending
       behaviour
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      the way they view their child and their relationship with them
      required transition and on-going support services that will be essential for
       successful and permanent reintegration into the community.
Ultimately, it is the community that benefits when families are involved in their child‘s
experience with the youth justice system. Valuable knowledge and insights may be
lost if families are not encouraged and supported to participate in the assessment and
case management of their child. For practical tips to encourage family engagement,
refer to appendix 2.

2 Case plan
Case plans are completed for all young people subject to supervised orders,
conditional bail and those remanded in detention.
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The case plan consists of four sections:

   Snapshot
   Assessment
   Interventions
   Documents

3. Snapshot

This section of the case plan provides summary information about the young person
including:

   current supervised order/s
   in progress assessment
   in progress intervention plan
   approved risk assessment rating
   approved intervention plan

4. Assessment

The YLS/CMI risk/needs assessment tool is a checklist that produces a detailed survey
of the risk and need factors of young offenders. The tool is comprised of:

   an assessment
   definitions
   a structured interview guide (available in ICMS)

A comprehensive assessment of the young person and their circumstances requires
the caseworker to gather as much information as possible about the young person,
their family circumstances, behaviour, attitudes and peer relationships (historic and
current). The information is recorded under the tool‘s eight categories, which are:

   Prior and Current Offences/Dispositions
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   Family Circumstances/Parenting
   Education/Employment
   Peer Relations
   Substance Abuse
   Leisure/Recreation
   Personality/Behaviour
   Attitudes/Orientation

To complete the assessment:


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Caseworker responsibilities

Once a caseworker is allocated a case, they engage the young person and their family
in the completion of an assessment. The caseworker will:

   open the case plan and select the assessment tab
   schedule interviews with the young person and their family to gather relevant
    information to inform the assessment
   be guided by the interview guide (use of the interview guide is recommended for
    initial assessments when the young person first enters the youth justice system).
    Refer to section 3.1 of this chapter.
   enter information into the assessment form, as it is gathered
   complete a genogram (this can be completed as a word document and attached to
    the assessment) to ensure familial relationships are identified.


4.1 Assessment using the Interview Guide

From the point that a young person appears in court and is placed on a conditional bail
program, is remanded in custody or sentenced to a supervised order, information is
gathered by the allocated caseworker from the young person and their family and other
relevant people to inform assessment and case management. The YLS/CMI informs
this information gathering and assessment process.

The YLS/CMI Interview Guide is a tool to help guide interview(s) with a young person.
Your experience and professional judgement should dictate how you manage the
interview(s), for example the approach you take, the order in which topics are raised
and discussed and the language you use. The YLS/CMI Interview Guide is available in
ICMS by selecting ―yes― in the Interview guidelines section of the assessment.

While the YLS/CMI provides a range of questions under the eight categories, there are
many other questions that may be relevant to the individual young person and their
family. It is important that you expand on questions outlined in the guide and ask as
many additional questions as you need to complete a comprehensive assessment.
Recording as much information (historic and current) as you can under the eight
headings in the YLS/CMI Interview Guide will assist in the formulation of your
assessment.      This information gathering process may require you to conduct a
number of interviews with the young person and their various family members. It is
important that you consider the internal and external factors that may affect the
                                                                                            Youth Justice Services Practice Manual, March 2010




participation of the young person or their family in the assessment process and
consider strategies to overcome obstacles to their engagement.

In addition to conducting interviews with the young person and their family, information
should also be sought, where applicable, from other sources including other people
who are significant in the young person‘s life, school personnel and youth workers.
For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people you may also consider
engaging members of the local community justice group and/or Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander Service in the assessment process. Participation of Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander staff members in the assessment interview may also increase
family responsivity.

4.2 Detailed assessment


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The information gathered from interview/s with the young person, their family, and
other significant people is recorded in the ―Detailed Assessment‖ in ICMS.
Information can be documented and saved in the detailed assessment as it is gathered
by the case worker. The information documented in the detailed assessment informs
intervention planning for the young person. Consequently, the information recorded in
the detailed assessment should reflect an assessment of the risks and needs relevant
to the young person. The detailed assessment is not an account of what the various
sources said in the interviews, rather, the information presented should demonstrate
an analysis and assessment of the key issues and their relatedness to the young
person‘s offending behaviour. Summary statements regarding the assessed risks and
needs under each of the eight categories can assist the development of a targeted
intervention plan.


4.3 Risk/needs assessment tool

The YLS/CMI risk/needs assessment tool is used in the case management of
supervised orders, either in the community or detention. It is also applied to young
people subject to conditional bail, and to those on remand to assist in transitioning
young people from detention back into the community. When applied to young people
on remand and those subject to conditional bail, the assessment process must not
take into account or discuss offences for which the young person has not been found
guilty.

When working with young people on conditional bail or those held on remand the tool
will help to:

      provide an insight into a young person‘s relationship with their family, their
       education and employment history, any accommodation issue and significant
       life events
      provide an insight into what factors may be influencing a young person‘s
       behaviour
      assist in determining the level of supervision, monitoring and support the young
       person requires to comply with their bail requirements
      assess the likelihood of a young person offending
      acknowledge and build upon the young person‘s strengths
      help direct programs and activities throughout the remand period
      assist in transitioning a young person from remand.
                                                                                           Youth Justice Services Practice Manual, March 2010




An inability to discuss alleged offending behaviour with young people subject to
conditional bail or those on remand does not prevent the caseworker from conducting
an assessment of the young person‘s current risks and needs. Engagement of the
young person and their family in a comprehensive assessment using the YLS/CMI can
provide valuable information regarding the young person‘s current situation, personal
risks and strengths, familial and peer relationships, educational history, and substance
use issues. The assessment for young people subject to conditional bail or remand is
used to direct services toward the young person and their family. This supports young
people to comply with their bail conditions and aid their reintegration and transition
from remand.



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When working with young people in detention or the community who have been
sentenced the tool helps to:

      provide an insight into a young person‘s relationship with their family, their
       education and employment history, any accommodation issue and significant
       life events
      provide an insight into what factors may have predisposed; or are perpetuating
       the young person‘s offending behaviour
      provide an insight into what factors may be influencing a young person‘s
       behaviour
      provide an understanding of an individual‘s risk factors for reoffending
      assess the likelihood of a young person re-offending
      focus intervention/s on assessed criminogenic factors
      acknowledge and build upon the young person‘s strengths
      assist in determining outcomes of intervention
      help direct interventions over the life of the order.

4.4 Assessment of Risks and Needs

The YLS/CMI ‗Assessment of risk and needs‘ should be completed using the
information you have collected from your interviews with the young person, their family
and any other information sources.

Your focus should be on the young person‘s current circumstances, attitudes and
behaviour. You will have an opportunity to record any events/issues that occurred
previously, that may impact on the young person‘s risk of re-offending or their case
plan, in the YLS/CMI ‗Assessment of other needs and special considerations‘.

This section cannot be completed without reference to the definitions document.

The sources of the information you use to make your assessment are to be noted
under the heading ‗sources of information‘ for each of the eight headings. If there are
any significant comments from your interview or information obtained from other
sources that you believe is relevant to the assessment, you can make a brief note
under the heading ‗comments‘.
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4.5 Assessment of Other Needs and Special Conditions

The YLS/CMI ‗Assessment of other needs and special considerations‘ section enables
you to assess other needs and issues relevant to the young person. Factors that may
warrant special consideration or assessment can relate to family circumstances and
parenting and/or the young person. You should concentrate on historic factors/events
and issues in this section. This section should be completed by referring to the
definitions document.

While the boxes you check in this section do not directly impact on the risk/need
assessment they may be relevant to the preparation of the young person‘s case plan.
Further, the information may also be taken into account when determining if the
calculated risk level is appropriate for the young person.

Caseworker responsibilities

   once the assessment is completed, open the assessment form and select the
    ―Start risk/needs assessment‖ button
   refer to the guidance notes (located on the right of the assessment screen)
   complete the YLS/CMI risk/needs assessment tool by selecting the appropriate
    boxes under each of the eight headings in the detailed assessment section, refer
    to 3.1 of this chapter
   you may select multiple boxes under a heading, or the ―assessed but not
    applicable‖ box, depending on the information gathered
   if applicable, you may select relevant strengths by selecting a ‗strength‘ box,
    although the indication of a strength will not influence the risk classification, it will
    help when determining appropriate interventions for the young person
   document the strength in the young person‘s assessment information

   complete the other assessed areas section
   once you have completed the risk/needs assessment select the ―Calculate risk
    level‖ button
   then select the ―Retrieve risk level results‖
   determine if the identified risk level is appropriate and if professional override is
                                                                                                     Youth Justice Services Practice Manual, March 2010




    required
   submit the completed YLS/CMI risk/needs assessment to the team leader for
    approval of the risk level


Team leader responsibilities
   review the completed YLS/CMI risk/needs assessment
   approve the assessment if no further changes are required




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The risk classification level is not disclosed to the young person or their family.
If a young person‘s circumstances change or additional information is gathered, it
should be documented in case notes and added to the detailed assessment section of
the case plan.


4.6 Professional override

If you believe, based on your experience and professional judgement, that the
risk/needs assessment tool has not accurately classified a young person‘s risk level,a
professional override may be applied by selecting ―no― when asked if you agree with
the risk level. This will then enable you to increase or decrease the risk classification
level by one increment.

Before proceeding with a professional override you should review your responses to
the questions provided in the interview guide and discuss your findings with the team
leader. Should you still wish to apply a professional override, you must provide a
reason for applying the override and seek approval from the team leader.


4.7 Contact level

The level of contact/supervision that is required to effectively case manage a young
person should be directly proportionate to an individual‘s risk classification. Therefore,
if a young person is deemed to be a low risk, the contact should be minimal. A young
person assessed as being a moderate risk should receive medium supervision and
high and very high risk cases should receive maximum supervision. This may include
more frequent reporting sessions and reviews and increased referrals to specialist
interventions or programs.

In all cases the department‘s policies regarding the administration of orders/programs
applies, which may not align to the tool‘s assessment of the contact/supervision that is
required:

   Minimum supervision = Low Risk classification
   Medium supervision     = Moderate Risk classification
   Maximum supervision = High Risk and Very High Risk classifications

4.8 Reassessment
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The YLS/CMI risk/needs assessment tool supports the ongoing assessment of a
young person‘s risks/needs. A reassessment is the term used for all subsequent
assessments conducted after the first assessment. Reassessments are conducted
every six months, but can be conducted at more frequent intervals, subject to the
team leader‘s discretion. For example a reassessment may occur within the six month
period if the young person commits a new offence of a serious nature.

A reassessment is not conducted each time a review is conducted and a
reassessment is not required if a young person is transferred from one service to
another or to a detention centre. Instead these changes in circumstances would
trigger a review of the assessment and intervention plan in which new or additional
information may be added.


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Caseworker responsibilities

To complete a reassessment, the caseworker will:
   open the last approved risk/needs assessment
   select the ―Clear answers to re-assess risk/needs‖ button
   complete the risk/needs assessment based on current information about the young
    person
   follow the same procedure as outlined in 4.5 of this chapter to complete the
    reassessment

The contact level may have changed once a reassessment is complete.
Contact/supervision arrangements however must comply with departmental procedure.



5. Interventions

5.1 Completing the intervention plan


Caseworker responsibilities

To complete the intervention plan, the caseworker will:

   select the interventions tab

   select the mandatory interventions tab
   input mandatory activities and a time frame for when they are to be completed. For
    example a young person subject to a Probation order would have ―reporting to
    caseworker‖ as an activity and the timeframe may be weekly
   select the elective interventions tab
   select the appropriate intervention types as outlined in section 4.3 of this chapter
   input activities and timeframes for each intervention type selected.

With the exception of Court orders/interventions (mandatory interventions), where
statutory requirements constitute the activities to be completed by the young person,
there is some flexibility regarding the activities that may be implemented under the
umbrella of an intervention type as long as the activity is aimed at achieving the
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desired outcomes.

   Identify success indicators for the short term outcomes and long term outcomes of
    each intervention type selected
   document the success indicators in the Review of interventions/activities
    completion status section of the case review form
   document the outcomes to be achieved and an explanation of those not achieved
    in the Review of interventions/activities completion status section of the case
    review form




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   the success indicators, outcomes to be achieved and an explanation of those not
    achieved will be discussed at a case review meeting. Refer to section 5.2 of this
    chapter.

5.2 The intervention framework

The intervention framework supports youth justice staff to respond in a consistent and
evidence-based way to the assessed risks and needs of young people by:

   categorising intervention
   detailing a range of intervention types and activities that may be implemented in
    response to assessed risk and needs
   defining the desired outcomes of the intervention types
   providing uniform success indicators with which to monitor progress in relation to
    the outcomes
   outlining intervention principles that provide a structure for intervention delivery.

5.3 Intervention categories and types

For a detailed understanding, this section should be read in conjunction with the Youth
Justice Intervention Framework document, located on the youth justice infonet site.
                                                                                                 Youth Justice Services Practice Manual, March 2010




The intervention framework defines the following four categories of intervention:

   Court orders and bail support
   Support services
   Offence focussed intervention
   Developmental intervention.


Whilst ICMS does not categorise interventions it does define each type (as outlined
below) these are located in the Interventions (elective) section of the case plan


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Within each category of intervention there are a range of intervention types :

Court orders and bail support

   Probation Order
   Community Service Order
   Intensive Supervision Order
   Conditional Release Order
   Detention Order/Remand
   Supervised Release Order
   Conditional Bail Programs.


Support services
   Personal and practical support
   Health and therapeutic support.

Offence focussed intervention

   Modifying offending thoughts and behaviour
   Reparative action
   Substance misuse treatment.


Developmental Intervention

   Social skills development
   Life skills development
   Family support
   Cultural identity development and support
   Access to recreation and leisure activities
   Access to education, training and/or employment.
                                                                                               Youth Justice Services Practice Manual, March 2010




Each intervention type has short term and long term outcomes and a set of success
indicators that are used to monitor a young person‘s progress towards the identified
outcomes. Refer to the Youth Justice Intervention Framework – Appendices 1-4,
located on the youth justice infonet site.

The intervention framework provides guidance around the nature of activities that are
suitable under each of the intervention types. For example:

Cultural Identity Development and Support involves young people engaging in the
following:
   strengthening knowledge of cultural beliefs, values, traditions, lore and language.


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   history and ancestor/family tracing

   mentoring/support from Elders and respected persons

   developing skills for interpreting, coping and responding to racism

   connecting with or maintaining connection with family and other members of their
    cultural community.

5.4 Implementing the intervention framework through case management

The intervention framework was designed for implementation through the case
management framework. Details of how the intervention framework applies to each
phase of case management are outlined below:

Phase 1- Intake

Caseworker responsibilities

Upon allocation of a case, the caseworker will implement the intervention framework
by:

   implementing the intervention type ―Court orders and bail support‖ at the
    commencement of the order/s (mandatory interventions)
   implementing additional support services if a need is assessed during the intake
    phase (elective interventions).

Phase 2 - Assessment

Caseworker responsibilities

The caseworker will ensure the intervention framework is applied during the
assessment process by:

   gathering all relevant information including outcomes of the risk/needs assessment
    tool and any specialist assessments
   determining the criminogenic needs to be addressed
   identifying responsivity issues to be addressed prior to or accommodated during
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    intervention delivery
   determining the intensity of the intervention depending on the young person‘s
    assessed risk level. For example, moderate to high risk young people are
    engaged in intense offence-focussed intervention and developmental intervention
    to reduce the risk of re-offending whilst low risk young people are engaged in
    developmental intervention at minimal intensity

The assessed risk of re-offending will inform decision making around the focus and
intensity of intervention. The intervention framework states that while all young people
will be engaged in intervention, the focus and intensity of intervention will vary
according to the assessed risk level of each young person


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The criminogenic needs identified through the assessment will inform the selection of
intervention types to be implemented. The intervention types described within the
Offence-focussed intervention and Developmental intervention categories are
designed to correlate closely with the assessment domains set out in the risk/needs
assessment tool and other areas explored in the case plan. For example in a case
where Family Circumstances/Parenting is identified as an area of need, Family support
is the appropriate intervention type; where exploration of Community and cultural
considerations highlights a need, Cultural identity development and support is the
appropriate intervention type.

The intervention framework suggests that other needs and special considerations
(responsivity factors) identified during assessment may need to be addressed prior to
other intervention or accommodated during intervention. Some needs may be
addressed by implementing support services, while other needs may influence the way
the intervention is delivered. Overall this will ensure that the intervention is delivered as
responsively as possible.

Phase 3 - Intervention plan

Caseworker responsibilities

During the development of the young person‘s case plan, the caseworker will adhere
to the intervention framework by:

   assessing the information gathered during the assessment phase

   considering the order/s and any extra conditions the young person is subject to

   determining the intervention types, activities and success indicators required to
    meet statutory requirements and to address the risk/needs identified during the
    assessment phase

   completing the intervention plan in consultation with the young person and their
    parent/s or carer.



Phase 4 - Implementation

Caseworker responsibilities
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   Monitors the activities that the young person is completing to ensure they are
    engaging appropriately.

Upon completion and approval of the intervention plan, the caseworker must
implement the interventions.

Caseworker responsibilities

   Monitors the activities that the young person is completing to ensure they are
    engaging appropriately.



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Phase 5 - Review

As part of case management, the caseworker will also monitor the young person‘s
progress through the completion of reviews:

Caseworker responsibilities

   Complete reviews as per the order schedule and at each review discuss the
    activities being undertaken by the young person

   explore the progress made in relation to the outcomes of the intervention plan,
    reassess the appropriateness of the intervention types/activities and agree on
    future intervention

   if a young person is attending activities external to the department the caseworker
    should have regular contact with the external agency and if appropriate involve
    them in reviews.

Team Leader responsibilities

   Chairs the review and approves the case review form which includes the
    intervention plan

The success indicators should be used to structure discussion around the progress
made in relation to the outcomes of the intervention plan. Where it is established that
the intervention types/activities originally planned are no longer appropriate to the
needs of the young person, the intervention framework should be used to select new
intervention types/activities.

At the final review meeting, the long term success indicators for the intervention types
completed during the case should be used to structure the exit interview.

5.5 Interface between case management and program development

The intervention framework was also designed to be implemented through the program
development process. Refer to the Youth Justice Program Development Toolkit
located on the youth justice infonet site. While this process is primarily employed by
program staff there is a significant interface with case management.

Details of the interface between case management and program development, at each
program development phase, is outlined below:
                                                                                           Youth Justice Services Practice Manual, March 2010




5.6 Four phases of program development

Phase 1 - Program Needs Assessments

The Program Needs Assessment phase is based on the premise that program
development is informed by comprehensive assessment of the young person‘s risks
and needs.

Caseworker responsibilities

In the event that an appropriate program designed to meet the young person‘s
identified risk/needs is not available, the caseworker will:

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   complete a program referral to the program coordinator
   include information about:
               the desired outcomes identified in the intervention plan
               the intervention type
               details of any responsivity issues.


Program coordinator responsibilities

Upon receipt of a referral, the program coordinator will:

   determine whether a suitable program is available, either internally or in the
    community, to meet the identified risk/needs of the young person
   if a suitable program is not available, develops a program using the program
    development toolkit.


As required, the program coordinator may also undertake a program needs
assessment using relevant data and case file information to identify common
risk/needs of young people to inform program development and design. Caseworkers
can assist program coordinators in this process by ensuring intervention plans are
completed using the intervention framework and by providing detailed information
about the risk/needs of the young people they are referring.

Phase 2 - Program Design

The program design phase involves the findings from the program needs assessment
being translated into specific program components and formalised into a program plan.

Program coordinator responsibilities

To enable program design, the program coordinator will:

   clearly document the program outcome(s) and intervention types to be employed
   set out the program structure and content (activities)
   determine the resources required to effectively implement the program

                                                                                         Youth Justice Services Practice Manual, March 2010




    develop a risk management strategy
   plan for monitoring data collection
   develop a communication strategy.

Case workers may assist program coordinators in the following:

   Endorse the program outcome(s) and intervention types, structure and content
   act as a facilitator of the program
   engage in developing the risk management strategy
   be involved in collecting data

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   identify their communication needs so that these can be factored into the
    communication strategy.

Phase 3 - Program Implementation

Implementation is the process of putting the program plan into action.

Caseworker responsibilities

   Identify potential problems or challenges to the program and report these to the
    program coordinator
   facilitate some or all of the program activities
   collect monitoring data as planned
   regularly communicate with program staff.

Phase 4 - Preparing a monitoring data summary report

Program coordinator responsibilities

   Consults with staff involved in the program regarding any feedback about the
    program and initial findings
   completes the Monitoring Data Summary Report including a summary of the data,
    conclusions about the program‘s overall efficiency and effectiveness and
    recommendations for future program delivery.

6. Documents
This section of the case plan can be accessed by selecting the ―Documents‖ tab. It
contains seven sections:
   Forms and attachments
   Referrals
   Case reviews
   Approved risk assessments
   Previous case plans
   Case closure
                                                                                        Youth Justice Services Practice Manual, March 2010




   Consolidated views.


6.1 Referrals
Referral forms that can be created in this section of the case plan include:
   Griffith referral. Refer to chapter 9. Arranging a court ordered psychological or
    psychiatric assessment.
   Youth worker support referral
   After hours referral (Crisis Care)
   Youth Detention Centre therapeutic programs referral


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6.2 Case reviews
The frequency of reviews is dependent on the following:

      type of order to which the young person is subject
      the young person‘s assessed risk level which acknowledges that high and very
       high risk young people require intensive supervision
      current circumstances impacting the young person (e.g. suicide risk).
Reviews are also held when there are significant changes in the young person‘s
circumstances. Refer to the chapter relevant to the young person‘s order or
intervention.

Case worker responsibilities

      identifies that a review is required in accordance with the relevant order review
       schedule or the young person‘s assessed risks/needs
      determines an appropriate date and time for the review in conjunction with the
       team leader
      sends a letter to the young person and their parent/s or carer inviting them to
       the review
      identifies any other stakeholders that should be in attendance (for example a
       departmental youth worker) and arranges for their attendance
      provides a copy of the intervention plan to all participants. A young person or
       their family do not receive a copy of the assessment or the risk rating
      records the minutes of the meeting on the case review form (printed out from
       ICMS)
      ensures all relevant parties sign the case review form at the review meeting
      submits the case review and assessment form to the team leader for approval
      once the case review form is approved the version number of the case plan will
       automatically be changed in ICMS
      once the case review form has been approved and a new version of the case
       plan has been created, update the entire case plan including the assessment
       and interventions, with additional/new information gathered during the review
       meeting.
                                                                                           Youth Justice Services Practice Manual, March 2010




Team leader responsibilities
      chairs the review meeting
      engages all parties in discussion about the young person‘s progress on the
       order or conditional bail program, including any non-compliance
      leads discussion regarding an intervention plan for the young person that is
       reflective of their assessed needs
      following the review meeting, reviews and approves the case review form.
Please note: For reviews that occur in a youth detention centre, the team leader
(YDC) will review the case review form but the team leader (YJSC) will approve the
form.
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6.3 Versioning the case plan

The initial case plan for a young person is version 1.0. When a young person attends
the first review of their order, the case review form is completed as required, saved
and approved. The interventions and assessment may also need to be updated. Once
the case review form is approved by the team leader, ICMS will create version 1.1 of
the case plan. This process continues for the life of the order and after each review a
new version of the case plan is created in ICMS. In cases where an order is reviewed
frequently (as with a Conditional Release Order) the case plan is updated following
each review and once approved a new version is created each time.

In situations where a young person exits the youth justice system and the case plan is
closed, but the young person subsequently re-offends and is sentenced to a new
order, a new case plan is created in ICMS. The new information is entered and
becomes version 2.0. Following a review, ICMS will then save it as version 2.1.

6.4 Completion of the case plan

To complete a case plan in ICMS, a detailed assessment, risk/needs assessment,
intervention table and activities schedule must be completed and have progressed to a
review (resulting in v.1.0 of the case plan). Although the intervention plan and activities
schedule do not require approval within ICMS, the case plan is not completed until all
elements have been recorded in ICMS and your line supervisor has endorsed the
intervention plan and activities.




                                                                                              Youth Justice Services Practice Manual, March 2010




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Appendix 1

                     Negotiating referrals and support services for
                       Indigenous and non Indigenous families

Providing families with the support they need, when they need it, is crucial. This
includes determining whether a parent needs information, support or referral to a
community agency. There are four steps involved in referring a family to another
service. They are:

       Deciding that a referral is needed.
       Agreeing that a referral is needed.
       Finding a suitable service.
       Supporting clients to follow-up a referral.

Deciding a referral is needed

Some families may have problems that are beyond the scope of your role. In any work
you do with young people or families you need to be alert to signs that the young
person or their family needs extra help. The most obvious sign is when the young
person or their parent directly asks for help. Other indirect signs might include:

       reports of prolonged, severe or frequent conflict within the family unit
       parent having unrealistic or age inappropriate expectations of their child
       parent reporting child behaviour problems that they are struggling to manage
       parents exhibiting personal problems that are impacting their capacity to
        support their child
       observations of a parent responding to the child inappropriately (e.g., harsh or
        extreme consequences to seemingly minor misbehaviours)
       observation of the absence of positive interactions between parent and child
       reports or observations that indicate the presence of child protection concerns.

Agreeing that a referral is needed

If any of these signs are present, talk to the young person and/or their parent about
your concern. Ask your client if they want extra help. Remember that it can be difficult
                                                                                            Youth Justice Services Practice Manual, March 2010




for some people to ask for help.

There are three major stages to encouraging a young person and/or their parent to
seek help:

       Validate and normalise the situation.
       Acknowledge the issues they have without minimising or exaggerating.
       Put your concerns in context. Let them know that what they are experiencing is
        not unusual and getting extra help is common and normal.

A referral is more likely to be effective if:


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       it is relevant to the family‘s needs or problem
       the agency or service is available when and where the family can attend
       the young person and/or parent agrees to the referral, and understands why
        you‘ve suggested it.

Finding a suitable service

If the young person and/or parent are interested in accessing further assistance, the
next step is to find an appropriate service. You‘ll need to find out from your client what
they think would help solve the problem. The assistance they need might be in the
form of skill development, relationship counselling, financial assistance or emotional
support. Having a clear description of the problem and its impact will help you to find
the best service for the young person and/or their parent. Liaising with the program
coordinator, Indigenous Service Support Officer, or staff from Community Capacity and
Service Quality (CCSQ) and other government agencies in your region may help you
to identify appropriate referral pathways.

Supporting young people and/or parents to follow-up a referral

To encourage the young person and/or their parent to obtain help from other services,
talk to them about their referral options and the advantages and disadvantages of
each. This can be done informally and casually. It may be helpful to:

       Present the list of services as options.
       Include the service information you‘ve collected so the young person and/or
        parent can make an informed choice.
       Use simple language – avoid jargon, negative terms.
       Suggest only appropriate agencies that are relevant to their needs.
       Develop a practical plan – who will make the referral, when, what will be said,
        etc.
       Identify whether they require support and assistance to call (e.g., do they know
        what questions to ask, information to give or how to manage appointments?)


Adapted from: Parenting Support Toolkit for Alcohol & Other Drug Workers, booklet 2 located at:
http://www.health.vic.gov.au/drugservices/pubs/parenting-support.htm
                                                                                                  Youth Justice Services Practice Manual, March 2010




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Appendix 2

Critical Elements for Engaging Indigenous and non Indigenous Families


      Meet the family where the family is: Engagement is more likely when a family
       is in a familiar setting, and engaging on their own terms. Consideration should
       be given to conducting home visits with families.
      Build on strengths: Families are more likely to be engaged if they feel their
       strengths are recognised, not just their problems. Case planning involves
       identifying the strengths and resources young people and their families can
       draw on to help address the identified risk factors and increase their child‘s
       likelihood of successful disengagement from offending. A family‘s cultural
       community may have strengths that are uniquely valuable in the change
       process. Caseworkers should communicate respect for a family‘s strengths.
      Family empowerment: Engagement is more likely when families feel that they
       are affecting the change process. Caseworkers empower families when they
       communicate respect for the family and acknowledge the efforts they are
       making to change their lives.
      Steps to success: Engagement is more likely to result when caseworkers
       understand, and convey to families that the process of change happens in
       small steps. It is important to acknowledge incremental victories.
      Family involvement in assessment, case planning, and decision-making:
       Engagement is more likely when the young person and their family has all the
       information necessary to address concerns and is actively engaged in defining
       the issues and creating the solution.
      Hope, expectancy: Engagement is more likely when caseworkers convey
       hope and an expectation that the young person and their family is capable of
       succeeding.
      Honoring and connecting with cultural resources: A young person and their
       family will be more likely to engage if/when the family‘s cultural ways of
       knowing, communicating, and nurturing are recognised as strengths, and when
       the culture of the family is respected, considered and valued.
      Concrete services: Young people and their family are engaged best when the
       needs they identify can be met. Often the more obvious and immediate needs
       require concrete services. Providing the young person and their family with
       referral information to local support services can increase responsivity to
       intervention.
                                                                                         Youth Justice Services Practice Manual, March 2010




      Skills-based: Engagement results from the teaching of specific skills such as
       motivational interviewing. Increasing skills results in increased confidence.
      Honest communication: Caseworkers should communicate with honesty,
       integrity, respect, and cultural competence.


Adapted from: Engaging Families: Skills Workshop for Social Workers, May 22, 2007
—Training presented by Traci Tippett, LCSW, New Mexico State School Work and
CYFD




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