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    ANNUAL REPORT 2005

LAW & JUSTICE COMMISSION OF PAKISTAN
                AND
  NATIONAL JUDICIAL (POLICY MAKING)
             COMMITTEE




   LAW & JUSTICE COMMISSION SECRETARIAT
          SUPREME COURT BUILDING
           CONSTITUTION AVENUE
                 ISLAMABAD
                            2




The Annual Report 2005 is available on the Commission’s
website. For further information, please contact the
Commission’s Secretariat at the following address:

Law & Justice Commission of Pakistan
Supreme Court Building
Constitution Avenue
Islamabad, Pakistan

Tel: 092-51-9220483
Fax: 092-51-9214416

email: ljcp@ljcp.gov.pk
www.ljcp.gov.pk
                                               3




                              Table of Contents

     Introduction .........................................................................   3

1.   Law and Justice Commission & National Judicial (Policy
     Making) Committee .............................................................           7
     1.1   The Statutes ............................................................           7
     1.2   Functions .................................................................         7
     1.3   Composition ............................................................            8
     1.4   Library & Computerisation .......................................                   9
     1.5   Bio-data of Members ...............................................                 9
     1.6   Commission‘s Secretariat ........................................                  20

2.   Performance of the Commission and NJPMC in 2005 .........                                21
     2.1    Law and Justice Commission ..................................                     21
            2.1.1 Federal Court Bill, 2005 ................................                   21
            2.1.2 Amendment of Access to Justice Development
                   Fund Rules 2002 and Law & Justice
                   Commission of Pakistan Employees Rules. .                                  22
            2.1.3 Accounting Procedure of Access to Justice
                   Development Fund, 2005. ............................                       22
            2.1.4 Law Reform Bill. ...........................................                23
            2.1.5 Enhancement of Fine in Various Federal
                   Laws. ...........................................................          24
            2.1.6 Composition of Law & Justice Commission
                   Completed. ..................................................              25
            2.1.7 Issue of Non-registration of Marriage. ..........                           26
            2.1.8 Requirement for Serving of Notice for
                   Confirmation of Talaq Under Section 7 of
                   Muslim Family Laws Ordinance 1961 ...........                              26
            2.1.9 Section 9 of Muslim Family Laws Ordinance
                   1961 .............................................................         26
            2.1.10 Amendment of Section 11, 13 and 14 of the
                   Offence of Zina (Enforcement of Hudood)
                   Ordinance, 1979 ..........................................                 27
            2.1.11 Amendment of Section 10 of the Family Courts
                   Act 1964.......................................................            28
            2.1.12 Deduction of Fixed Amount Monthly where
                   Deposit fall short of Rs. 5000 at any time .....                           28
     2.2    National Judicial (Policy Making) Committee ...........                           28
            2.2.1 Assets Declaration Form for Judiciary ...........                           29
                                              4




               2.2.2 Implementation of Small Claims and Minor
                     Offences Courts Ordinance 2002 (Training of
                     Judges in ADR Procedure)...........................                      29
               2.2.3 Automation Plan for Judiciary Presentation
                     of Judicial Automation Plan. .........................                   30
               2.2.4 Reference from KANA and SAFRAN Division
                     for Amendment in Shari Nizam-e-Adal
                     Regulation 1999. ..........................................              30
               2.2.5 Elimination of Corruption in the Judiciary. ....                         31
               2.2.6 Training of Judges in ADR Procedure. .........                           32
               2.2.7 Prioritising Cases of Vulnerable Groups
                     (Women and Children): ................................                   32
               2.2.8 Steps to Cleans the Subordinate Judiciary of
                     Corruption. ...................................................          32
     2.3       Automation Plan - Implementation ..........................                    34
               2.3.1 Finalization & Standardization of Automation
                     Plan for Judiciary .........................................             35

3.   Access to Justice Development Fund..................................                     36
     3.1   Governing Body of Access to Justice Development
           Fund. .......................................................................      37
     3.2   Criteria and Procedure for Funding Projects under
           AJDF Windows. .......................................................              39

4.   Activities of Secretariat of the Commission..........................                    39
     4.1      Reports Approved in 2005. ......................................                39
     4.2      Law Reform Proposals. ..........................................                42
     4.3      Implementation of Recommendations. .....................                        42
     4.4      Public Awareness Scheme ......................................                  47
     4.5      Commission/NJPMC publishes Annual Reports of the
              Courts. .....................................................................   47

5.   Commission‘s Website. .......................................................            49

6.   Procedure of Selection of Projects. .....................................                51
     6.1   Commission‘s Finance.............................................                  51

7.   Other Activities: ...................................................................    52
     7.1    Visit of Participants of Shariah Training Course .......                          52
     7.2    In Service Training of Staff of the Secretariat ...........                       53

8.   Legal Discovery Centre .......................................................           55

9.   Relations with other Law Commissions. ..............................                     55
                                               5




10.   Annexures ...........................................................................   57
      10.1 List of Reports (Annex I). .........................................               57
      10.2 Public Awareness Scheme (Annex II). .....................                          61
      10.3 Pending Projects (Annex III). ...................................                  81
      10.4 Officers & Staff of the Secretariat.............................                   93
      10.5 Address of Other Law Commissions (Annex IV) ......                                 95
                                     6




                               FOREWORD

In order to improve the quality of law and justice services and enhance
responsiveness of judicial institutions, the Federal Government
revised the mandate of Law & Justice Commission of Pakistan (LJCP)
in 2002. The aim was to broaden the scope of functional
responsibilities of a federal level statutory institution to work for
reorienting and refashioning the law and justice sector. Pursuant to
this ambitious and critical reform objective, the Federal Government
expanded the composition and functions of LJCP and also created the
National Judicial (Policy Making) Committee (NJPMC).

As confirmed by its composition, the LJCP is a national institution,
designated to drive the whole reform process for the law and justice
sector. The establishment of LJCP reflects strong commitment to
reform the legal system and improve governance in the country. As
per its expanded mandate, the Commission is now tasked with a wide-
ranging reform agenda with a clear responsibility to provide leadership
and technical input in the areas of research, policy development and
capacity building of justice sector.

In addition to performing regular functions related to law reforms, research
and public awareness, the Commission is also serving as Secretariat to
the National Judicial (Policy Making) Committee NJPMC. The NJPMC is a
major stride to bring about coherence in national judicial policy. It
improves the efficiency and performance of judicial institutions in the
country.

To address chronic under-resourcing facing the judiciary, the Federal
Government has also bestowed on LJCP the responsibility to manage
and administer an endowment, "Access to Justice Development
Fund". Ever since the Fund was established, the Commission has
initiated steps to operationalise the fund. Not only a significant amount
has been earned by investing the endowment, the Commission has
also disbursed amounts for strengthening the capacity of subordinate
courts and contracted NGOs to promote legal empowerment of weak and
poor sections of society. This is the first time that a partnership between a
Federal Government institution and civil society has been institu-
tionalized in order for vulnerable groups to enjoy equal protection of law.

As part of its strategy for law reforms, the Commission regularly
undertakes research into areas of law requiring continuous updating
and relevance compatible with the changing needs of the society. The
Commission publishes annual reports covering broad range of topics.
These reports serve two purpose; one, they are used by academics,
scholars, jurists and lawyers as reference material and secondly,
                                    7




these reports aim at making society law-conscious and empower citizens
because these reports are prepared keeping in view the ever-changing
demands of society.

The above makes it apparent that the Commission is dedicated to deliver
its functions to ensure that all the vital aspects of legal/judicial system
are reformed. However, the weighty agenda before the Commission
points to important challenge of reforms particularly the fact that the
Commission is working on diverse fronts to improve the system of
administration of justice. Looking at the Commission's performance, I
have no doubt in expressing my confidence that the Commission will
come up to the expectation of citizens of Pakistan.

I congratulate the Secretary and staff of the Commission for compiling
the Annual Report 2005 and rendering it useful for the readers.




                                  Justice Iftikhar Muhammad Chaudhary
                                                 Chairman

Islamabad
25th June, 2006
                                    8




                            Introduction
The Law & Justice Commission of Pakistan (LJCP) was established in
1979, It is a permanent and independent statutory institution. The
Commission‘s focus is on reforming laws and the system of administration
of justice. The Commission makes legal/judicial reform recommendations to
the Federal/Provincial Governments. The Commission also coordinates its
functions with the National Judicial (Policy Making) Committee (NJPMC)
which is responsible for formulation and implementation of judicial policy.

Commission’s Responsibilities

The Commission is mandated to perform functions such as law reforms
(federal and provincial) improvements in the system of administration of
justice, standard of legal education, and dissemination of legal literacy
through simple explanations of laws. The expanded role of the
Commission now also includes preparing and executing schemes for
human resource development for efficient court administration, case
management, coordination of judiciary and executive, preparing and
implementing plans for access to justice, provision of legal aid and
protection of human rights.

Recognizing the pivotal role of LJCP in the legal/judicial system of
Pakistan, the Government has entrusted LJCP the responsibility to
administer the Access to Justice Development Fund (AJDF) which is
meant for improving the capacity and performance of the subordinate
courts, improving the standards of legal research and education, judicial
training and provision of legal aid to needy and deserving persons. AJDF
is a statutory endowment amounting to total Rs. 1479 million out of which
1421 has been invested in government approved securities while Rs. 58
million as initial grant is being disbursed towards specified objectives of
the fund.

The Secretariat of the Commission has been given the statutory
responsibility to act as the Secretariat to the National Judicial (Policy
Making) Committee (NJPMC), which was set up in 2002 as an apex
national forum for formulation and implementation of judicial policy. The
NJPMC is headed by the Chief Justice of Pakistan and comprises the
Chief Justice, Federal Shariat Court and four Chief Justices of High
Courts. The Secretary, Law and Justice Commission of Pakistan is
designated as Secretary to the Committee.

NJPMC is mandated to formulate and implement judicial policy and
implement schemes for improving the capacity and performance of the
administration of justice. For this purpose, the Commission‘s Secretariat
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provides regular support to the Committee. A number of papers and briefs
were prepared for the consideration of the NJPMC. The key decisions
made by the Committee are included in the relevant part of this report.

Commission’s Performance

The Commission by the end of 2005, approved and published 72 reports
on different issues/subjects and submitted the same to the Government
for implementation. A detailed list of such reports is given at Annex I.

The Secretariat also operates a Legal Awareness Scheme for public
information and education. Under this scheme, write-ups are prepared in
Urdu on legal issues/problems of public concern/ interest and published
through the news media. A list of such published material is attached as
Annex II. The Secretariat of the Commission also published Volume III of
a Report in Urdu titled ―Qanun Fehmi‖ containing write-ups on legal and
judicial issues for public education and awareness. Citizens are
encouraged to obtain further clarification and/or advice on legal issues
from the Secretariat by writing or personal visit or through telephone.
Several other projects of legal/judicial reform are currently under
consideration of the Commission. They are at various stages of
completion. A list of all pending projects is at Annex III.

Secretariat’s Strength & Resources

The Commission‘s Secretariat is headed by a Secretary and comprises
posts for research and ministerial staff. The sanctioned posts include 3
Joint Secretaries, 4 Deputy Secretaries, 5 Research Officers, 2 Section
Officers, MIS Manager, System Analyst, 2 Computer Programmers and
Computer Operator. In keeping with the expanded role of the
Commission, additional staff has been sanctioned by the Government.
Some posts have been filled and for filling of the remaining posts, the
process of recruitment is in hand.

The Commission has its own library, which is further assisted by a Legal
Discovery Center established with the support of the embassy of USA to
enhance research facilities for scholars and officials of the justice sector.
A computer network is functioning effectively in the Secretariat to ensure
discharge of professional work in a speedy manner. The Commission
operates its website www.ljcp.gov.pk.
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The Commission welcomes interaction with research institutions,
professional bodies, jurists, scholars, researchers and citizens on the
issues of legal and judicial reform. Views, comments and suggestions for
reform of law, improvement in administration of justice, standard of legal
education and protection of human rights can be forwarded to the
Secretariat.



                                                   Dr Faqir Hussain,
                                                      Secretary.
Islamabad
13th June, 2006.
                                    11




1.    Law and Justice Commission & National Judicial (Policy
Making) Committee

1.1    The Statutes

The Law and Justice Commission of Pakistan is a Federal Government
institution, established under the Ordinance (XIV) of 1979. Its role and
responsibilities have been redefined and expanded by the Law
Commission (Amendment) Ordinance, 2002. Its name has also been
changed to Law and Justice Commission of Pakistan in order to conform
to the new statutory mandate of the Commission.
The Government of Pakistan has constituted the National Judicial (Policy
Making) Committee under an Ordinance (LXXXI) of 2002 to streamline
the system of judicial administration in the country. The NJPMC provides
a statutory platform to all the superior courts of the federation and the
provinces to jointly formulate and implement policies for judicial
governance and improved service delivery in the judicial and legal sector.

1.2    Functions

The functions of the Commission are listed in Section 6 of the Ordinance.
These include:
1.     carrying out a regular and systematic review of the statutes and
       other laws of the land, with a view to improving/modernizing the
       same and bring it in accord with the changing needs of the
       society;
2.     arranging the codification and unification of laws, so as to
       eliminate multiplicity of laws on the same subject;
3.     removing inconsistencies between Federal and provincial laws;
4.     simplifying laws for easy comprehension            and   suggesting
       measures to make the society law-conscious;
5.     introducing reforms in the administration of justice;
6.     adopting simple and effective procedure for the administration of
       laws to ensure substantial, inexpensive and speedy justice;
7.     recommending improvements in the quality/standard of legal
       education;
8.     taking measures for developing human resources for efficient
       court administration and management of case flow;
9.     co-ordination between the judiciary and executive authorities of
       the Federal Government and provincial governments on
       administrative, financial and other related matters;
                                     12




10.    preparing and operating schemes for access to justice, legal aid
       and protection of human rights;
11.    managing the Access to Justice Development Fund; and
12.    the Federal Government or any provincial government may seek
       the opinion and advice of the Commission on any matter relevant
       to its functions.

This list includes the new functions, which have been entrusted to Law
and Justice Commission vide the amendments made to Law Commission
Ordinance in 2002. The Commission is required to publish an annual
report of its activities and such other periodic or special report as may be
recommended for reformation of the legal/judicial system. The reports are
submitted to President of Pakistan.

The National Judicial (Policy Making) Committee has been entrusted with
the following functions:

1.     improving the capacity and performance of the administration of
       justice;
2.     setting performance standards for judicial officers and persons
       associated with performance of judicial and quasi-judicial
       functions;
3.     improvement in the terms and conditions of service of judicial
       officers and court staff, to ensure skilled and efficient judiciary;
       and
4.     publication of the annual or periodic reports of the Supreme Court,
       Federal Shariat Court, High Courts and courts subordinate to High
       Courts and Administrative Courts and Tribunals.
The Committee is required to publish an annual report of its activities and
such other periodic or special reports, relating to its functions. The reports
are submitted to President of Pakistan.

1.3    Composition

The Commission is headed by the Chief Justice of Pakistan and comprises
twelve other members including the Chief Justices of the superior courts,
Senior Adviser to the Prime Minister on Foreign Affairs and Law & Justice,
Attorney General for Pakistan, Secretary, Ministry of Law & Justice,
Chairperson, National Commission on the Status of Women and one
representative from each of the four provinces.

The non-officio members of the Commission are appointed for a period of
3 years. They are appointed by the Government on the recommendation
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of the Chairman of the Commission. Under the amendments made to the
Law and Justice Commission Ordinance in 2002, the Chairman of the
Commission can also appoint a suitable person(s) as a member (s) for a
specified period to perform specified function.

The National Judicial (Policy Making) Committee is headed by the Chief
Justice of Pakistan and includes Chief Justice, Federal Shariat Court, and
Chief Justices of four provincial High Courts. The Secretary, Law &
Justice Commission is designated as Secretary to the Committee.
1.4    Library & Computerisation
The Commission has its own library with a collection of 5000 reference
books and law reports. The staff has also access to the libraries of the
Supreme Court, Parliament, Ministry of Law & Justice and National
Library. A computer network has been installed in the Secretariat and
officers and heads of sections have been provided computers. Access to
Internet is available and the Commission operates its website
www.ljcp.gov.pk. The website displays all essential information about the
Commission i.e. its composition, functions, reports already
approved/published and pending projects. The courts annual reports for
the year 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004 and 2005 are also hosted on the web.
1.5    Bio data of Members
A brief introduction of the members of the Law & Justice Commission of
Pakistan and National Judicial Policy Making Committee follows:-




               Members of the Law & Justice Commission of Pakistan
                                   14




Chairman
Mr. Justice Iftikhar Muhammad Chaudhry




Name :                            Mr. Justice Iftikhar Muhammad Chaudhry
Date of Birth :                   12-12-1948
Qualification :                   B.A., LL.B.
Joined Bar :                      1974
Practicing Period :               1974-1990
Elevated to High Court :          06-11-1990
Appointed as Chief Justice High
                                  22-04-1999
Court of Balochistan :
Elevated to Supreme Court :       04-02-2000
Appointed as Chief Justice of
Pakistan and Chairman Law and     30-06-2005
Justice Commission of Pakistan:
Members
                                   15




Barrister Makhdoom Ali Khan,
Attorney General For Pakistan.




       Graduate in Law from University of Karachi, Pakistan and
University of Cambridge, England; LL.M. from London School of
Economics and Political Science, England; Enrolled as Advocate, High
Court of Sindh, 1977; Barrister, England & Wales, Society of Lincoln‘s
Inn, 1978; Enrolled as an Advocate, Supreme Court of Pakistan in 1989
and Senior Advocate Supreme Court of Pakistan in 2001; Lecturer in
Law, University of Keele, England, 1979 -1980; Professor of Law, Law
Faculty, University of Karachi; (S.M. Law College) 1980-88, Attorney
General for Pakistan since 24th September 2001.


Mr. Justice Ch. Ejaz Yousaf,
Chief Justice, Federal Shariat Court.




        Graduate in Law and holding Master degree in Economics;
Enrolled as Advocate in 1976, Advocate of High Court in 1978, Advocate
of Supreme Court in 1991; Appointed as Advocate General, Balochistan
in 1996, Additional Advocate General, Balochistan in 1992; Special Law
Officer by the Federal Ministry of Law, Justice and Human Rights, to
conduct cases in the Speedy Trial Court as well as Supreme Appellate
Court; Special Prosecutor for Pakistan Narcotics Control Board and Anti-
Narcotics Force, Balochistan in 1990; Honorary Lecturer in the University
Law College Balochistan from 1983 to 1992; Elevated as Judge of
Federal Shariat Court in 1997; Appointed Acting Chief Justice on 15
January 2003 and Chief Justice, Federal Shariat Court on 9-5-2003.
                                    16




Mr. Justice Iftikhar Hussain Chaudhry,
Chief Justice, Lahore High Court.




       Mr. Justice Iftikhar Hussain Chaudhry was born in 1946 in a
renowned family of Jhelum, Punjab, having a long history of public
service. He was educated in Jhelum and Lahore. He studied Law in the
Punjab University Law College, Lahore and passed LL.B. Degree
examination in first Division in 1970. He worked with his elder brother
Chaudhry Altaf Hussain, an eminent and leading lawyer of the region,
who became Governor of the Punjab twice. His Lordship started practice
in Lahore High Court, Lahore in 1979. He shifted to Rawalpindi in 1981
when Rawalpindi Bench of Lahore High Court was established. He
remained Federal Government‘s Counsel, Standing Counsel and Deputy
Attorney-General for Pakistan prior to his elevation as Additional Judge of
Lahore High Court on 7th August 1994. He was appointed as permanent
Judge of the Court on 5th June 1995.

       Having vast and varied experience of legal practice in major areas
of law, he can ably deal with Constitutional, Criminal, Civil and
Commercial cases which are brought to High Court and has rendered a
large number of quality judgments in various branches of law.

       He was appointed as 36th Chief Justice of Lahore High Court on
7th September 2002. He is computer-literate and has widely traveled. His
areas of interest are travel and studying history, culture and information
technology.

Mr. Justice Sabihuddin Ahmed,
Chief Justice, High Court of Sindh.




       Mr. Justice Sabihuddin Ahmad was born in 1949 at Hyderabad
(Sindh), earlier education in different parts of the country, did M.A. from
Punjab University in 1969 and LL.B. from Karachi University, participated
in several inter-collegiate debates and edited collage Magazine at
Government Degree College Sukkur, Government College Lahore and
                                      17




S.M. Law College Karachi, Entered legal profession in 1972 in the
chamber of Mr. Khalid M. Ishaque, a leading Advocate in Karachi.
Practiced at the bar for 23 years and appeared before the Supreme Court
in important civil and constitutional matters. Founder member of the
Human Rights Commission of Pakistan and its Vice President (1987 –
1990). Participated in several International Conferences on Human Rights
and allied issues. Contributed several articles to Newspapers and
periodicals on constitutional and Human Rights Issues.

        Elevated to the bench of the Sindh High Court on 11.1.1997.
Participated in several International Judicial Conferences. Elected
member of the International Advisory council of the International Centre
for Promotion of Human Rights (Interights) and steering committee of the
South Asia Forum legal education on gender issues. Member of Board of
Trustee of Aga Khan and Board of Governor Hamdard University. Acting
Chief Justice of the Sindh High Court since 28-4-2000, appointed as
Chief Justice and took oath of office on 05-4-2005.

Mr. Justice Tariq Parvez Khan,
Chief Justice, Peshawar High Court.




        Born on 15th February, 1948 in the capital city of NWFP, Mr.
Justice Tariq Parvez Khan got his education to the graduate level at
Peshawar. He graduated in Law in 1971 from Faculty of Law, University
of Peshawar and did his Master in Political Science in 1975. His track
record is full of co-curricular activities and distinctions. He was enrolled as
advocate at the District Courts of Peshawar in 1972 and was licensed to
practice at the High Court in 1975. After completing 11 years of practice,
he was enrolled as advocate Supreme Court of Pakistan in 1983.

       During his career at the Bar, his lordship not only excelled
professionally, but also manifested his leadership role. He was elected as
President, Young Lawyers Association in 1978. Vice President of the
Peshawar High Court Bar Association in 1980 and President of the High
Court Bar Association in 1996.

       His elevation to the bench in February, 1997 was an
acknowledgement of his professional capabilities. During his tenure as
Judge of the Peshawar High Court, his lordship remained member of the
                                   18




Administration Committee of the Peshawar High Court, member of the
Peshawar University Syndicate, Chairman N.-W.F.P., Bar Council's
Enrolment Committee, member of the Election Tribunal, member and
then Chairman of the Subordinate Judicial Services Tribunal.

       His lordship has a deep insight on major legal issues and as follow
up of his academic pursuits; his lordship is a visiting faculty member of
the Federal Judicial Academy. He delivered discourses at different
Workshops and Seminars including Provincial judicial Conferences.

       He was elevated as Chief Justice of the Peshawar High Court on
5th April, 2005.

Mr. Justice Amanullah Khan,
Chief Justice, High Court of Balochistan.




       Born at Quetta on 7th August, 1954. Matriculated from Cantt.
Public School, Quetta in the year 1970; Passed the Intermediate
Examination in the year 1972, BA in the year 1974 and MA in the year
1976 from F.C. College, Lahore; Passed the LL.B. Examination from
Punjab University in the year 1980; Joined the Bar in January, 1981;
Remained Vice President of Balochistan Bar Association in 1988-89;
Taught as honorary lecturer in University Law College, Quetta from 1989
to 1996; Remained President of Balochistan Bar Association in the year
1994-95; Elevated as Judge of the High Court of Balochistan in February,
1997 and took oath of the Office of Chief Justice on September, 14, 2005.

Mr. Justice (Retd) Qazi Mohammad Farooq,
Supreme Court of Pakistan.




       Law graduated from University Law College, Lahore in 1960;
enrolled as Advocate in 1961; elected Secretary, District Bar Association,
Abbottabad in 1962. Qualified Provincial Civil Service (Judicial)
Examination in 1967 and served as Civil Judge, Senior Civil Judge, and
Additional District and Sessions Judge; promoted as District and
                                  19




Sessions Judge in 1977. Attended the 1st Advanced Course in Shariah at
the Institute of Shariah and Legal Profession, Islamabad and the Islamic
University, Madina, Saudi Arabia; Served as Registrar, Peshawar High
Court from January 1988 to September 1989. Elevated as Judge,
Peshawar High Court in 1991. Attended course on Alternate Dispute
Resolution in San Francisco (USA) in 1998. Appointed as Chief Justice,
Peshawar High Court in May 1999. Elevated as Judge, Supreme Court of
Pakistan on 4th February 2000.

Mr. Justice (R) Amir-Ul-Mulk Mengal,
Chief Justice, High Court of Balochistan.



       Born on 3.4.1945 at Killi Mengal Nushki, District Chaghai; passed
M.A. (Political Science) from University of Karachi; L.L.B. from Islamia
Law College, Karachi in 1968; jointed as Advocate of Subordinate Courts
in 1969; enrolled as an Advocate of High Court in 1972; elected as
General Secretary of Balochistan Bar Association in 1972; unanimously
elected as the President of Balochistan Bar Association 1979-1983;
appointed as Advocate-General, Balochistan on 4th April, 1985; elevated
as Additional Judge of High Court of Balochistan on 26.3.1986; confirmed
as permanent Judge of the High Court of Balochistan on 26th March,
1989; appointed Member, Election Commission of Pakistan on 16th
August, 1990 and remained as such till April, 1993; appointed as
Chairman, Provincial Zakat and Ushr Council, Balochistan on 16th
February, 1991 and continued as such till July, 1994; Chairman,
Balochistan Service Tribunal from 1.7.1990 till date; appointed as
Additional Labour Appellate Tribunal, Balochistan; Member Selection
Board, University of Balochistan twice; nominee/Member Syndicate,
University of Engineering and Technology, Khuzdar; Member, Board of
Governors Federal Judicial Academy; Chairman of Sub-Committee on
Separation of Judiciary from Executive; remained as Member,
Balochistan Subordinate Judiciary Service Tribunal; remained as Acting
Chief Justice, Balochistan High Court from 2.11.1992 to 15.11.1992,
17.4.1993 to 28.4.1993, 27.4.1995 to 8.5.1995, 9.8.1995 to 24.8.1995
and 8.8.1996 to 28.8.1996; visited Islamic Republic of Iran with
Delegation headed by Hon‘ble Chief Justice of Pakistan from 7.9.1996 to
14.9.1996; appointed as Chief Justice High Court of Balochistan on 17th
November, 1996.
                                      20




Justice (Retd) Mansoor Ahmed,
Secretary, Law, Justice and Human Rights.




        Graduate in Law from University of Sindh in 1965; Enrolled as an
advocate in 1966; Advocate of the Lahore High Court in March 1972 and
advocate of the Supreme Court in 1983. Did practice as an advocate for
36 years; Handled numerous cases of constitutional, criminal, civil and
human rights in Superior Court in Pakistan; Appointed legal advisor to
various Government Departments; appointed standing counsel for the
Federal Government in 1992; Elected as President of Bar Association for
the year 1992-93; Appointed prosecutor in high profile accountability
cases in 1996; Appointed as Deputy Attorney General for Pakistan in
1996 and remained as such upto May 2001. As a Deputy Attorney
General defended and prosecuted state cases including criminal cases
at the level of Supreme Court and High Courts of Pakistan; Elevated as
Judge of the Lahore High Court on May 2001; Appointed Secretary Law,
Justice and Human Rights Division while serving as a Judge of High
Court.

Dr. Arfa Sayeda Zehra,
Chairperson, National Commission on the Status
of Women.




Education:
Ph.D History, University of Hawaii, USA.
M.A. Asian Studies.
M.A. Urdu.
B.A. Hons.

Work Experience:
Chairperson, National Commission on the Status of Women Jan 2006 to date
Member, Punjab Public Service Commission, Lahore           2002- 2005.
Principal, Government College for Women, Gulberg Lahore    1989-2002
Principal, Lahore College for Women, Lahore                1988-1989
Vice Principal, Lahore College for Women, Lahore.          1985-1988.
                                     21




Assistant Professor, Lahore College for Women, Lahore.   1972-1984.
Lecturer, Lahore College for Women, Lahore.              1966-1972.

Research & Publication:
Written Research Papers/Articles on public interest issues which are
publish in National and International Magazine.

Mrs. Nasira Iqbal, Advocate.




Education:
1994 Diploma in Intellectual Property Laws, Punjab University (1st
position) 1986 Master of Laws Cum Laude (Honours). Harvard Law
School, USA.
1983 Master of Laws, PU (Distinction)
1975 Bachelor of Laws, PU (Distinction)
1960 Bachelor of Arts, Kinnaird College, ( 1st Position in University)
1958 Intermediate, Kinnaird College (National Talent Scholar)
1956 Matriculation, Queen Mary‘s College, (National Talent Scholar)

Legal Experience Current:
Till 20/11/2002 Judge Lahore High Court
1978- 1994 Advocate District Courts, High Court & Supreme Court of
Pakistan
1995 Pakistan Delegate to Human Rights Commission, Geneva.
Member Supreme Court Bar & Lahore High Court Bar Association
Member of IUCN Commission for Environmental Law.
Member Board of Graduate Studies, Punjab University Law College
Member Advisory Committee British Council Advocacy Training Program
Member Advisory Board, Hamdard School of Law Karachi.
Adjunct Professor, Punjab University Law College, Lahore
Adjunct Professor, Department of Women‘s Studies, Punjab University,
Lahore
Honorary Legal Advisor, International Women‘s Club, Lahore
Legal Advisor & Vice Chairperson, Legal Affairs APWA, Punjab
Member Pakistan Women Lawyers‘ Association
Convener, Fatima Memorial Legal Aid Centre, Shadman.


Non-Legal Experience Current:
                                    22




Trustee Ferozsons Trust, Fatima Memorial Hospital & College, Shadman,
Lahore, A 410 Bed Non-Profit General Hospital, Medical, Dental &
Nursing College.
Chairperson Board of Trustees, Bhandara Foundation.
President Punjab Mental Health Association.
Member Board of Governors Queen Mary College, Lahore.
Member Board of Studies, Women‘s Studies Department, Punjab
University.
Member Interfaith Dialogue Austria, Jordan And Women‘s Peace Initiative
USA
Member Hamdard Majlis-e-Shoora.
Member Zenana Dar-ul-Shafqat, and Darul Aman, Anjuman-e-Himayat-e-
Islam, Lahore.
Member Punjab Managing Committee SOS Children‘s Villages.
Lecture Tours, Conferences and Seminars.
Lectured on Women‘s Rights and Development in Pakistan, Canada,
USA, India, China, Kuwait, Dubai, Austria. Presented papers at
International Christian-Islamic Round Table, Vienna (Austria) 1992, 96,
2000, 2004. Amman 1993, Chesham 1996, Seminars on Women‘s
Rights: Australia 2000, Cairo 2001, Global Peace Initiative Geneva 2002.
Norway & Cochin (India) 2003. Bosnia, Romania, National Defence
College, Islamabad, International Access to Justice Conference,
Islamabad, Several Aurat Foundation Seminars 2004-5, Law Reforms
Seminar Lahore 2004, Islamabad 2005. Focus Pakistan Seminar on
Enhancing Pakistan‘s Image by Empowering Women. Lahore. (2005),
International Conference on Women‘s empowerment 2005.

Mr. Abdul Qadir Halepota, Advocate.




        Born (1st March 1932) at Hyderabad Sindh; participated in All-
Pakistan English debates during School and College days and won
number of prizes; B.A. (Hons.) 1956; L.L.B. (1953) securing 3rd position
in Sindh University; (having passed L.L.B earlier as permitted previously);
Joined Legal profession (1953); Advocate, Sindh Chief Court (1954);
Established flourishing practice; Was Member, Divisional Council,
Hyderabad (1966); Legal Adviser, Sindh University for number of years,
Hon: Legal Adviser, Mehran Arts Council and Shah Abdul Lateef Bhitai
Cultural Centre Committee; Lecturer Government Jinnah Law College,
                                 23




Hyderabad; Member Governing Bodies of Sindh Law College and Jinnah
Law College, Hyderabad, Member, Advisory Committee, Pakistan
National Centre, Hyderabad, Past President, Hyderabad District Bar
Association (1974-75 and 1975-76); Ex-Judge High Court of Sindh;
Nominated as Member Board of Governors for Law Colleges in Sindh
except Karachi; Nominated by the Chief Justice of Pakistan as member
Board of Governor Federal Judicial Academy Islamabad w.e.f.
28.11.1989 for three (3) years. In February 1999; appointed as Member
Board of Governors for Law Colleges in Karachi; Was Member Pakistan
Law Commission, Government of Pakistan; Appointed Provincial Minister
for Law, Human Rights, Social Welfare and Women Development in
Government of Sindh from April 2002 to December 2002; Presently
working as Honorary Chairman of the Legal and Consultative Committee,
Government of Sindh with among other, the Provincial Law Secretary and
Advocate General Sindh as Ex-Officio members of the said Committee;
Appointed as member Law & Justice Commission of Pakistan w.e.f.
13th August 2005.
                                                    24




  1.6        Commission’s Secretariat

  The Secretariat of the Commission is established under Section 5 of the
  Law & Justice Commission of Pakistan Ordinance. It is part of the Federal
  Secretariat and is headed by a Secretary and comprising other officers
  and staff. The functional strength of the Secretariat consists of a
  Secretary, two Joint Secretaries, two Deputy Secretaries, four Research
  Officers and other support staff, given below in the organizational chart.

                                        Secretary



            Joint Secretary-I                                      Joint Secretary-II


          Deputy Secretary-I                                      Deputy Secretary-II



          Research             Research          Research             Research
           Officer-I           Officer-II        Officer-III         Officer Fund



  Supdt.           S.O Fund         Accountant        Computer         Supdt. Res.      Librarian
  Admin.                                             Programmer          & Ref.



Admin.          Protocol and          Bud. &          Computer          Res. & Ref.       Library
& Gen.           Transport             Acctt.          Section           Section
Section           Section             Section




  Under Section 8 of NJPMC statute, the Secretariat of the Commission
  has been entrusted with the responsibility to act as the Secretariat to the
  National Judicial (Policy Making) Committee as well. This new
  responsibility has greatly enhanced the staffing and resource needs of the
  Commission‘s Secretariat and efforts are being made to cater for the new
  requirements with the support of the Government. In the first phase 13
  posts of professional and technical staff were created to strengthen the
  capacity of the Commission. Three posts have been filled and the
  process to fill remaining posts has been initiated.
                                      25




2.      Performance of the Commission and NJMPC in 2005

2.1     Law and Justice Commission




          Chairman and Members of Law & Justice Commission of Pakistan



Activities of Law & Justice Commission during the year, 2005

The Commission made the following decisions/recommendations in its
meetings held on 12 February, 19 March, 9 April, 13, 18, 20 August, and
22 November 2005:

The following decisions were made in the meetings.

Meeting held on 12 February, 2005

2.1.1   Federal Court Bill, 2005

The Commission examined the reference received from the Federal
Government in the shape of Federal Court Bill 2005. The Chief Justice of
Pakistan appreciated the initiative of the Government aimed at early
settlement of disputes in commercial and financial matters to facilitate
investment in the country. The Commission studied the provisions of the
Federal Court Bill in given details in the deliberations, the Commission
examined the law laid down by the Supreme Court of Pakistan in the
                                    26




cases of Mehram Ali and Sh. Liaquat Hussain and the provisions of
Articles 175, 202, 203, 212, 225 and in particular Article 199 of the
Constitution and also kept in mind overall views and perceptions of the
lawyers community. The members opined that the issues and challenges
be addressed on a long-term basis and instead of going for an altogether
new course, away from the established practices and traditions, there is
ample room within the existing framework to achieve the desired goals in
a less expensive way.

Accordingly, the Commission unanimously recommended that the
strength of the High Courts may be increased and various dedicated
Divisions for dealing with different categories of cases including
commercial and financial cases be created.

Meeting held on 19 March, 2005

2.1.2   Amendment of Access to Justice Development Fund Rules
        2002 and Law & Justice Commission of Pakistan Employees
        Rules

      The amendments in the Access to Justice Development Fund
Rules, 2002, in the Schedule to the LJCP Employees (terms and
condition) Rules 1992 and work plan for expenditure of AJDF were
considered by the Commission in its meeting held on 19 March 2005 and
approved the work plan and amendments as per draft notification
followed:

2.1.3   Accounting Procedure of Access to Justice Development
        Fund, 2005

Accounting Procedure of Access to Justice Development Fund concurred
by the Finance Division and Auditor General of the Pakistan were
examined and approved by the Commission in its meeting held on
11-12-2004 and 10-3-2005. During deliberations of the Commission
meetings the Secretary LJCP informed that the principal amount of the
AJDF has been invested in the Government approved Treasury Bills.
Furthermore, the requisite procedural formalities to operationalise the
AJDF are completed and the High Courts have been requested to
constitute appropriate committees and open bank accounts, so that their
respective shares of Provincial Judicial Development Fund (PJDF) may
be transferred to them. He stated that the Chairman has given approval
for appointment against 2 AJDF posts i.e. Research Officer (Fund) in
B-18 and Section Officer (Accounts/Audit) in B-17. He said that it will take
some time before the new staff is recruited and after induction, they will
be on probation for a period of one year. It is therefore inappropriate to
                                       27




handover the responsibility of management of the Fund to the new staff.
In the circumstances, the responsibility for management of the Fund be
assigned to an existing senior staff member i.e. Deputy Secretary (B-19),
who will manage the Fund under the supervision of the Secretary. The
proposal was approved.

Meeting held on 19 March, 2005

2.1.4   Law Reform Bill

The Commission examined a Reference received from the Federal
Government (Ministry of Law, Justice and Human Rights) suggesting
certain amendments to various statutes. The Commission considered the
Reference and approved amendments to the following effect:

1.      Section 379 of the Pakistan Penal Code (PPC) should be
        amended to increase the punishment for the offence of theft from
        3 years to 5 years imprisonment.

2.      Sections 441 and 447 of the PPC should be amended to
        criminalize the act of ―illegal dispossession from property‖,
        punishable with imprisonment for upto 10 years as well as fine.
        The purpose is to provide an effective deterrence against Qabza
        Groups, land grabbers and others who take the law in their own
        hands.

3.      Section 468 of the PPC should be amended to increase the
        punishment of ―forgery for the purpose of cheating‖ from 7 years
        to 10 years imprisonment.

4.      Section 154 of the Code of Criminal Procedure (Cr P.C) should be
        amended to the effect that if the Police refuses to register an FIR,
        then the complainant or informer may lay such information before
        the area Magistrate, so that no undue delay is caused in the
        registration of FIR‘s.

5.      Section 514 of the Cr P.C should be amended to abolish the court
        discretion to remit any portion of penalty on forfeiture of bond of a
        person, being surety for the accused person. This will provide an
        effective check on the Surety to ensure the appearance of the
        accused person before the court.

6.      Section 35 of the Code of Civil Procedure (CPC) should be
        amended to empower and obligate the Court to determine and
        award the cost of litigation, to prevent false and fictitious litigation.
                                      28




         Similarly, Section 35 A of CPC should also be amended to provide
         for compensatory costs to the party, in respect of false or
         vexatious claims or defence. Such compensatory costs may
         extend for upto Rs. 100,000/-.

7.      Section 89 (A) may be substituted to the CPC to provide for the
         use of Alternative Methods of Dispute Resolution such as
         mediation, conciliation or arbitration in suits for partition or
         rendition of accounts or in any other dispute. The Trial Judge may
         therefore refer the matter for settlement to mediator, conciliator or
         arbitrator for decision within a period of three months.

8.      Section 95 should be substituted in the CPC to empower the Court
         to order the party at fault, who obtained arrest or attachment or an
         injunction on insufficient grounds, to pay punitive compensation to
         the aggrieved party for the expense or injury suffered. The Court
         may further direct the party at fault to pay penalty for wasting the
         court‘s time and for abusing the process of law.

9.      An additional clause be added to Section 17 of the Registration Act
         to make ―agreement to sell relating to immovable property‖ and
         ―power of attorney when authorizing the attorney to sell any
         immovable property‖, compulsorily registerable. This will operate
         as check against forged documents being relied upon in trial and
         to prevent false/fictitious claims being filed in the Court.

2.1.5    Enhancement of Fine in Various Federal Laws

The Commission examined the issue of non-increase in the penalty of
fine, prescribed in various Federal statutes and observed that the object
of punishment of fine is to prevent the repetition of commission of
offences and serve as deterrent to would-be offenders. The fines in
various Federal Acts were fixed long ago. Some were revised but most
have remained unchanged. Due to the passage of time and devaluation
of currency, the fines have seemingly lost their impact and are no longer
serving the purpose of deterrence. These fines therefore need to be
reviewed with a view to appropriately enhance them. It may further be
noted that certain offences which were not considered serious in the past,
have now assumed a grievous character, and are on the increase,
particularly because the penalties prescribed in the statutes do not
operate as an effective check on the offenders. Laws need to be changed
from time to time, with a view to keep them relevant and be able to
address the changed conditions in the society. The Commission therefore
recommend the enhancement of fines in some 242 Federal Acts, in
                                     29




existence for the last 150 years. The increase should be as per following
formula:

1.      Statutes made from 1851 to 1900 – 5 fold increase in amount of fine
        should be effected.

2.      Statutes made from 1900 to 1950 – 4 fold increase in amount of fine
        should be effected.

3.      Statutes made from 1950 to 1975 – 3 fold increase in amount of fine
        should be effected.

4.      Statutes made from 1975 to 1995 – 2 fold increase in amount of fine
        should be effected.

No increase has been suggested in fines in those statutes which were
amended in the past, from time to time, or new statutes, enacted since
1995.

Meeting held on 13 August, 2005

2.1.6    Composition of Law & Justice Commission Completed

The Federal Government on the recommendation of the Chief Justice of
Pakistan/Chairman, Law & Justice Commission of Pakistan (LJCP) have
appointed the following 4 new members of the Commission for a period of
three years with effect from 13th August 2005:

1.       Justice (Retd) Qazi Muhammad Farooq (NWFP)
2.       Justice (Retd) Amir-ul-Mulk Mengal (Balochistan)
3.       Mrs. Nasira Iqbal Advocate (Punjab)
4.       Mr. Abdul Qadir Halepota Advocate (Sindh)

It may be stated that the Law and Justice Commission of Pakistan is
headed by the Chief Justice of Pakistan who is the Chairman, ex-officio of
the Commission and comprise other ex-officio members namely, the
Chief Justice of the Federal Shariat Court; Chief Justices of the four High
Courts; Attorney General for Pakistan; Secretary, Ministry of Law, Justice
& Human Rights; Chairperson, National Commission on the Status of
Women. The remaining 4 members, one from each Province, are
appointed by the Federal Government on the recommendation of the
Chief Justice of Pakistan/Chariman, LJCP from amongst eminent lawyers
and persons of repute and integrity from civil society.
                                     30




Meeting held at Islamabad on 20 August 2005

2.1.7   Issue of non-registration of Marriage

It is stated that Sub-section (1) of Section 5 of the Muslim Family Laws
Ordinance 1961 provides that every marriage solemnized under the
Ordinance shall be registered in accordance with provisions of Ordinance.
The Sub-section (4) of the said Section further provides that a person
other than the Nikah Registrar, solemnizing a marriage is required to
report the marriage for registration to the Nikah Registrar, failure to do so
leads to punishment with simple imprisonment for a term which may
extend to three months or with fine which may extend to one thousand
rupees, or with both. It was explained to the Commission that because
of devaluation of the rupee and inflation in the economy the existing
punishment of fine amounting to rupees one thousand has lost its
deterrence value, therefore, the amount of fine may be enhanced from
rupee one thousand to rupees ten thousand and the Commission
approved the proposal.

2.1.8   Requirement for Serving of Notice for confirmation of Talaq
        Under Section 7 of Muslim Family Laws Ordinance

It was proposed that the Commission may approve that if no notice of
Talaq is given to the Chairman by the husband, the wife may give such
notice of the facts of pronouncing Talaq by the husband to the Chairman
and send a copy of it to the husband and the Chairman shall initiate
reconciliation proceedings on it as in case a notice sent by the husband.
Further, a wife while exercising her right of ‗Talaq-e-Tafveez‘, should also
give a notice of it to the Chairman and send a copy of it to the husband.
And if she fails, the husband may give such a notice to the Chairman with
a copy to the wife. The Commission after deliberations approved the
proposal.

2.1.9   Meeting of Committee of LJCP Constituted for examination of
        Section 9 of Muslim Family Laws Ordinance 1961, held on 12
        December, 2005

The Law & Justice commission of Pakistan in its meeting held on August,
2005 constituted a Committee comprising Chief Justice, Federal Shariat
Court, Justice (R) Qazi Muhammad Farooq and Mrs. Nasira Iqbal,
Advocate to examine the question as to whether section 9 of the Muslim
Family Laws Ordinance, 1961 can be amended, so as to enable the
Chariman, Union Council to award cost of living to a suckling mother, on
account of breast feeding the child, beyond the lddat period. It was further
                                      31




decided that an Islamic scholar or Alim Judge of the Federal Shariat
Court may also be co-opted for consultation on the issue.

The issue was discussed in detail in the light of Quranic Commandments,
Traditions of Holy Prophet (PBUH) and consensus of the Muslim Jurists.
Mr. Justice Dr. Fida Mohammad Khan, Judge, Federal Shariat Court
supported the proposal of Mrs Nasira Iqbal to award adequate amount of
compensation as cost of living to mother having suckling baby during the
veining period but not exceeding two years. Mr. Justice (R) Qazi
Muhammad Farooq agreed with the views of the members of the
Committee by referring the decision of jurists reported in Chapter of
Nafqa, or Maintenance in Section IV of ―Hidayah‖ by Hamilten at page
146, that a father must provide for the maintenance of his infant child and
cost of living to a mother of a child after expiration of Iddat period (in case
of divorce pronounced by her husband) for the period she suckles the
baby. Sura Al Baqara Verse: 233 of the Holy Quran provides a maximum
period of two years for suckling of the child and during that period father
of the child shall bear the cost of food and clothing of the mother.

The Committee unanimously agreed to the proposal and re-phrased, new
Sub-Section 1-A of Section 9 of the Muslim Family Laws Ordinance 1961
and Section 3 of the Schedule of Muslim Family Courts Act 1964, as
follows:

         ―(1-A) On divorce, if the wife has a suckling baby, she shall be
         entitled to the adequate cost of living for the period she suckles
         the baby but not exceeding two years‖.

         Accordingly, the words ―cost of living‖ should be added to S. 3 of
         the Schedule of the Family Courts Act 1964 as follows:-

         ―3.    Maintenance and cost of living of divorce wife having a
         suckling baby‖.

The Committee also approved to send the recommendations to LJCP for
consideration in its next meeting.

2.1.10      Amendment of Section 11, 13 and 14 of the Offence of
            Zina (Enforcement of Hudood) Ordinance, 1979

It was explained to the Commission that Sections 11, 13 and 14 of the
Offence of Zina (Enforcement of Hudood) Ordinance, 1979 provide fixed
punishment of imprisonment for life to the accused of the offences falling
under these sections which leave no discretion with the courts to award a
lesser punishment where circumstances of the case and the extent of
                                    32




involvement of the accused in the offence so warrant and the conscious
of the court is not satisfied to award punishment of imprisonment of life to
an accused. Therefore, the courts, having no alternate enabling provision
to award the accused lesser punishment, only acquit the accused in such
cases. The Commission therefore, observed that the aforesaid sections
11, 13 and 14 of the Offence of Zina (Enforcement of Hudood) Ordinance,
1979 may suitably be amended to provide some alternate punishment so
that in appropriate cases lesser punishment can be awarded to the
accused as per facts of the case and the decree of his participation in the
crime. The Commission recommended that the punishment of
imprisonment of life provided in the aforesaid sections may be substituted
with the words ―imprisonment of either description for a term which may
be extended to 25 years‖.

2.1.11      Amendment of Section 10 of the Family Court Act 1964

The Commission further recommended a suitable amendment to Section
10 of the Family Courts Act 1964 to the effect that if the wife may file the
suit on the sole ground of khula, there should be no trial and the court
should issue decree of the dissolution subject to return of mehr by the
wife to the husband.

2.1.12 Obtaining of Comments from State Bank of Pakistan
       regarding deduction of fixed amount monthly where deposit
       for short of Rs. 5000 at any time

It was brought into the notice of the Commission that the State Bank of
Pakistan has issued a circular to the banks permitting them to deduct a
fixed amount monthly from the accounts of accounts holders of the banks
where their deposits fall short of rupees five thousand at any time, which
is unjust and unfair to the small accounts holders. The accounts of
Government employees, students and Mustahiqeen Zakat are exempted
from such deductions. The banks also arbitrarily deduct a certain amount
from the accounts holders at the time of closing of the account. The
banks have also fixed arbitrary rates of profit and after deduction of
administrative expenditures and other charges, they pass a very small
profit to the account holders. The Commission resolved that the above
permission granted to the banks by the State Bank of Pakistan
necessitates, comments of the State Bank of Pakistan on the issue for
consideration of the Commission in its next meeting.

2.2      National Judicial (Policy Making) Committee

The National Judicial (Policy Making) Committee was established in 2003
and has since become functional. During 2005, the Committee meet two
times and made the followings decisions:
                                    33




Meeting held at Islamabad on 20 August 2005

2.2.1   Assets Declaration Form for Judiciary

The Secretary explained to the Committee that the Ministry of Law,
Justice & Human Rights have forwarded a new Assets Declaration
Proforma, prepared by the National Accountability Bureau to the Chief
Justice of Pakistan with the request to consider it for implementation in
the judiciary. The Chief Justice/Chairman of the NJPMC forwarded the
Declaration Proforma to the Chief Justices of the High Courts for their
comments. The Committee considered comments of the Provincial High
Courts and observed that the said proposal amounts to an inquiry by the
NAB into affairs of the Judiciary.

The Chairman of the Committee further stressed upon the need for
eliminating any sort of corruption from the judiciary and stated that a
major surgery is required for eliminating the evil of corruption from the
judiciary. The Committee further resolved that there should be zero
tolerance for corruption in any form and the Chief Justices must keep
constant watch on the conduct of judicial officers/court staff.

2.2.2   Implementation of Small Claims and Minor Offences Courts
        Ordinance 2002 (Training of Judges in ADR Procedure)

The Committee considered matter related to establishment of the Small
Claims and Minor Offences Courts in the Provinces. The Committee was
informed that the High Courts have assigned cases under the Small
Claims and Minor Offences Courts Ordinance 2002 to the existing courts
designated for that purpose. The Chairman inquired from the Chief
Justices of Provincial High Courts whether such judges are performing
exclusive work under the Ordinance or they are assigned the task in
addition to their own work. He expressed that if the sitting Judges are
also discharging functions under the Ordinance in addition to their own
work there would be hardly any change or improvement in work under the
Ordinance. The Committee required a feed back of performance of such
courts for consideration in the next meeting and upon finding no apparent
change, the Provincial Governments will be requested to create some
fresh vacancies at least one vacancy in each District for the purpose.

The Committee further observed that a training of the judges of lower
courts in Alternate Dispute Resolution (ARD) is required for quick
disposal of cases for which it constituted a Sub-Committee headed by Mr.
Justice Tassaduq Hussain Jillani, Judge of the Supreme Court and a
judge from each High Court to set guidelines for training of judges in ADR
imparting training to District & Sessions Judges/Senior Civil Judges at the
                                    34




provincial headquarters so as to prepare Master Trainees who will
subsequently train their other colleagues. The Committee also resolved
to direct the lower courts to hear the cases of women and children on
priority basis and if there is any transportation problem by the jail
authorities in presenting under trial prisoners before the court, the cases
may be transferred to the courts where there is no such problem as it is
convenient to the prosecution and the accused party.

2.2.3   Automation Plan for Judiciary

The Committee was informed, referring Section 22 Cr.P.C, that different
High Courts adopted a different data reference. The Committee resolved
that major areas may be categorized uniformally and minor areas may be
categorized separately.

The Committee approved the automation Plan and directed for
standardization of data base for all the High Courts and a uniform
categorization of cases, which may be presented for approval in next
meeting of the Committee.

Meeting held at Islamabad on 20 August 2005

Presentation of Judicial Automation Plan

In August 2005, the National Judicial Policy Making Committee (NJPMC)
was given a presentation on Judicial Automation Plan. Under this plan,
different aspects of judicial system will be automated with an aim to
ensure efficiency, effectiveness and transparency. The main focus of the
Automation Plan is on the Case Flow Management System, Archiving of
Old Documents, Administration and Accounts, Public Inquiry System,
Websites, Research and Reference.

One of the key benefits of this plan is the automated database system
which will enable access to Case law database, Pakistan Code,
Provincial Codes, Circulars and Gazette notifications. All this will be
maintained by one organization under the supervision of NJPMC to
ensure monthly updates provided to each judicial institution through
computerized networking.

2.2.4   Reference from KANA and SAFRAN Division for Amendment
        in Shari Nizam-e-Adal Regulation 1999

The Secretary explained that the reference form KANA & SAFRAN
Division has been pending since long. It came up for examination in the
last couple of meetings, in which the pros and cons of the reference were
                                     35




discussed and the members generally agreed with the contents and
conclusions of the note earlier prepared by the Secretary, Law & Justice
Commission of Pakistan.

The NJPMC resolved that the proposed amendments which provide for
deviation from established procedure, may lead to arbitrariness and
whimsical decisions, being rendered by the Qazi Courts in PATA. It
added that the modern trend is towards unification of laws and bringing
about certainty and clarity in the legal system. After thorough
deliberations, the NJPMC expressed its inability to approve the proposed
amendments. It, however, stated that the Federal Shariat Court could
consider establishing circuit bench in the region, depending on the
workload and availability of infrastructure and other facilities in the area.

2.2.5   Elimination of Corruption in the Judiciary

The NJPMC further decided that statements of Assets Declaration should
be obtained from all judges and staff of the subordinate courts on six
monthly basis. These declarations should be minutely scrutinized and
discrepancy detected therein, should be taken notice of. The NJPMC
further resolved that no judicial officer may approach the high authorities
for securing favourable transfer, posting or promotion. Any such attempt
should be treated as misconduct and disciplinary action be taken against
the delinquent judicial officer. Further, it was resolved that if 75%
judgments of a judicial officer are set-aside/reversed, he shall be
considered as inefficient and disciplinary proceedings initiated against
him. Judicial Officer should also be proceeded against fro giving a
stinking judgment.

The Committee further emphasized that the Chief Justice/Judges of High
Courts should regularly carry out inspection and the office of MIT should
be activated to initiate action on complaints of corruption or inefficiency.
The Committee further stated that honest and efficient judicial officers
should be given incentives and rewards. It may be impressed upon them
that strict adherence to the Code of Conduct and honest and efficient
performance will be a major factor for performance evaluation and
suitability for promotion. It was further recommended that complaints
received against judges should be recorded and data maintained by the
Chief Justice of High Court in respect of each individual judge. The ACRs
should be recorded on the basis of slip evaluation and overall
performance/achievements of the judge. Further, the ministerial staff of
the Court be kept under watch. They should be periodically
rotated/transferred. The inefficient or dishonest should be considered for
transfer to unattractive stations. It was further recommended that the
judicial officers, should not be posted at the home district.
                                     36




2.2.6   Training of Judges in ADR Procedure

The NJPMC appreciated the work of the Committee and emphasized
upon systematic and cohesive mechanism for adaptation/enforcement of
ADR, so very essential for economical and expeditious resolution of
disputes.

2.2.7   Prioritising   Case    of   Vulnerable    Groups     (Women     and
        Children)

The Chairman emphasized upon the need for prioritizing the cases of
vulnerable groups for expeditious disposal, in particular women and
children. It was resolved that the High Courts will issue directions to the
trial/appellate courts for priority disposal of family cases as well as cases
of women and children falling under the PPC and Hudood laws. Further,
the High Courts should prepare and forward to the NJPMC a list of
pending cases involving women and children, so that further
strategy/steps could be devised for quick disposal.

Meeting of NJPMC held on 22 November 2005

2.2.8   Steps to Cleans the Subordinate Judiciary of Corruption

The Committee decided upon steps to cleanse the subordinate judiciary
of corruption. Thus it was decided that, judges of subordinate courts shall
submit statement of assets declaration on six monthly basis. These
declarations should be minutely scrutinized and discrepancy therein, if
any, shall be taken notice of. The NJPMC further resolved that no judge
of the subordinate court may approach the higher authorities for securing
favourable transfer, posting or promotion. Any such attempt shall be
treated as misconduct and disciplinary action should be taken against
such judicial officer. Further, it was resolved that if 75 % judgments of a
judicial officer are set aside or reversed, he shall be considered as
inefficient and disciplinary proceedings shall be initiated against him.

The Committee has emphasized upon the need for a full and effective
compliance on the part of the judicial officers with the prescribed Code of
Conduct. The Committee further approved the following additions to be
added to make part of the Code of Conduct of judicial officers.

i.      A judicial officer should be God fearing, law abiding, abstemious,
        truthful of tongue, wise in opinion, cautious and forbearing, patient
        and calm, blameless, untouched by greed, completely detached
        and balanced, faithful to his words and meticulous in his functions.
                                      37




ii.     He must not show any fear or favour to any party before him or
        their lawyers, both in his judgment and conduct.

iii.    He should avoid mixing up with people, roaming in hotels, markets
        and streets except in dire need.

iv.     He should avoid rage and should abstain from deciding in rage.

v.      He should be learned in law and should have command and
        control over the proceedings in the Court.

vi.     He must be consistent in his judgments.

vii.    He should be courteous and polite, but not weak, towards the
        litigants and their lawyers. He must maintain the decorum of the
        Court.

viii.   He should always endeavor to decide cases expeditiously and
        should take all necessary measures to ensure speedy justice.

ix.     He should have effective control over the staff of his court without
        being rude, rough or humiliating.

x.      A judicial officer must be punctual while taking or leaving his seat.

xi.     He must be dressed in prescribed uniform and seated in dignified
        manner, but not so as to look a proud man.

xii.    He must avoid hearing cases, receiving guests or his colleagues in
        the retiring room, besides avoiding frequent use thereof, except in
        urgent need.

xiii.   He must avoid hearing one party or his lawyer in the absence of
        the other except in the case of exparte proceedings.

xiv.    He must not hear those cases in which he, his near relatives or
        close friends have got any interest.

xv.     He should not privately advise any of the parties so that it becomes
        a favour to the prejudice of the other party.

xvi.    Judicial officers must avoid discussing particular cases before them
        save allowed by law or when it is intended to give advice or
        counselling by a higher forum to lower forum.
                                     38




xvii.      He should not engage in business with any party to the case
          before him. If, however, it is unavoidable, he should discontinue
          the hearing of the case forthwith.

2.3       Automation Plan – Implementation

Automation Plan of the judiciary was prepared under Access to Justice
Program of the Government of Pakistan. It provides a detailed blue print
for the automation of different functions of the judiciary, Law & Justice
Commission and some other justice sector institutions.

This Plan was approved by National Judicial (Policy Making) Committee
(NJPMC) in its meeting held on 24 Jan 2003. In a subsequent meeting
held on 27 Sep 2003, the NJPMC decided to constitute a National
Judicial Automation Committee (NJAC) to oversee implementation of the
plan. Its composition is as follows:

Chief Justice, Lahore High Court (Chairman)
Chief Justice, Federal Shariat Court (or nominee)
Chief Justices of NWFP, Balochistan and Sindh High Courts (or their
nominees)
Principal Secretary, Ministry of Law & Justice or his nominee
A nominee of the Ministry of Information Technology
Secretary, Law & Justice Commission (Secretary)

The automation plan proposes a major overhaul of the courts‘ information
management systems in order to improve the courts‘ capacity to
administer and manage their work effectively.

This plan provides the phased introduction of computerization throughout
the superior courts of Pakistan, the Ministry of Law & Justice, Law &
Justice Commission of Pakistan and the Federal Judicial Academy in a
medium-term strategic blueprint. Once successfully established, it is
expected that this project can be extended to the subordinate court
system.

Some important measures planned to operationalise the Automation Plan
are:

         case flow management
         monitoring of performance of lower courts by the respective High
          Court
         inspection of lower courts by the respective High Court
         complaints monitoring system
         library management system
                                    39




       research and reference system
       archiving of old documents
       budget and accounts system
       personnel system
       fixed assets, procurement and other functions of general branch
       public inquiry system
       web site

2.3.1   Finalization & Standardization of Automation Plan for
        Judiciary

1.     In the meeting of National Judicial Policy Making Committee
(NJMPC) held on 20-8-2005 in Supreme Court Building Islamabad, the
issue of Automation Plan for Judiciary was considered. The Committee
directed for standardization of data base for all the High Courts and a
uniform categorization of cases and desired a progress report for
consideration in next meeting of the Committee.

2.     In this regard a meeting in relation to automation plan for judiciary
was held on 22-10-2005 in the Secretariat of Law & Justice Commission
of Pakistan. The Focal Persons of automation plan (Judicial Branch) and
I.T Experts attended the meeting. In the meeting the participants
discussed in detail the draft regarding the case categories for making
recommendation for standardization of data base for Supreme Court,
Federal Shariat Court and Provincial High Courts and to propose a
uniform categories of cases.

3.     The participants unanimously agreed upon and finalized the draft
regarding the case categories of Supreme Court, Federal Shariat Court,
High Courts and Advocates Data Collection Form (Finalized Drafts are
annexed A to D). A draft regarding the case categories of subordinate
courts was also circulated for the comments of participants which are still
awaited.

4.      The participants further suggested that the services of Consultant
of Asian Development Bank on automation be utilized for identification of
automation needs and application of software for case flow management.
The software will cover the functional areas such as case institution, case
fixation, cause list, case tracking, court room working and copying of the
Judgments. An other software for Research & Reference System to
consult the reference material, case law, Pakistan Code, Provincial Code
etc is also required in the Supreme Court and the High Courts.

5.     The Participants from the Supreme Court and High Courts
informed that the hardware infrastructure which applied for automation
have already been provided and in the second phase it is required to
                                   40




finalize the software in relation to automation. The participants further
proposed that the PMU Wing Ministry of Law Justice & Human Rights
may make arrangement for preparation of requisite softwares with the
approval of Judicial Automation Supervision Committee (JASC) and
NJPMC for timely implementation of automation in the superior judiciary.

The centerpiece of the Automation Plan is the case flow management
software for automated institution/tracking of cases and generation of
cause list. Work done on this software under the Access to Justice
Program demonstrated the need for standardization of case categories
list and some other data input formats as a preliminary requirement for
implementation of the new system. At the moment, all four provincial High
Courts under the aegis of the LJC Secretariat are to arrive at a
standardized case categories list and lawyers‘ data collection format.

In addition, the National Judicial Automation Committee is also
considering the possibility of constituting Provincial Judicial Automation
Committees (PJAC) for each High Court to manage/monitor
implementation of the Automation Plan. This step is important to
institutionalize automation initiative at the provincial level.

A Management Information System (MIS) Office is proposed to be set up
in the Secretariat of the Commission to provide support to the
Commission and drive the automation effort of the judicial institutions of
the country.

3.     Access to Justice Development Fund

Law and Justice Commission of Pakistan (LJCP) is managing an
endowment fund to support reforms for legal education, judicial training,
legal/judicial research, legal empowerment and subordinate courts
development. In this regard, several activities were held in 2005.

From March to December 2005, LJCP invested endowment fund in
government approved securities in different phases and earned
significant amount of profit on various investments. Another important
development was the transfer of share of High Courts by LJCP under
AJDF allocations.

LJCP also organized a commission/orientation authority in April 2005 to
raise awareness on objectives purposes & operating procedures of AJDF.

To operationalize windows of AJDF, LJCP also invited proposals from
stakeholders interested in reforms in the law and justice sector. To
examine project proposals received from various organizations/
individuals, a Technical Evaluation Committee was formed in 2005 to
check quality of project proposals against prescribed standard criteria.
                                    41




This committee assessed 27 project proposals and approved 6 projects to
be funded under a sub-fund of AJDF ―Legal Empowerment Fund‖.

At present, LJCP is working on finalizing modalities to fund the approved
project proposals which mainly aim at promoting public awareness
programs on legal rights and free legal aid services to vulnerable groups.

The Governing Body endorsed the allocation of Rs.58 million to various
fund management windows and approved the criteria and procedure of
funding projects from the Access to Justice Development Fund. The
Governing Body constituted a Technical Evaluation Committee under the
chairmanship of the Secretary, Law & Justice Commission of Pakistan for
evaluation of the projects seeking funding from various Fund Windows.
The Governing Body resolved that a research on the law laid in the
judgments of the superior courts may also be conducted to explore the
new trends and developments in laws. The Governing Body sought
regular periodic feed back of the expenditure made out from the allocation
of the fund to various fund windows.


3.1    Governing Body of Access to Justice Development Fund

i.      The Governing body in its meeting held on 11 December 2004
       approved AJDF Accounting Procedure, Workplan for Rs 58 million
       and investment of AJDF (Rs 1421 million) in the Government
       guaranteed securities to generate and maximize the profit which
       will be expended for the objectives of the Access to Justice
       Development Fund namely to strengthen the capacity of the
       subordinate courts, provide amenities to the litigant public and
       legal aid to the needy and deserving persons and sections of the
       society.

ii.    The Governing Body also approved distribution of Rs. 58 Million,
       an initial grant made by the Federal Government as per ratio
       prescribed in Access to Justice Development Fund Management
       Rules, out of which 34.80 million will go to the provincial High
       Courts on the basis of population of the Province. The remaining
       amount will be disbursed to the appropriate institutions for legal
       empowerment, legal innovation, legal and judicial research,
       improvement in the quality and standard of legal education and
       training of the judicial officers and court staff. The amount will be
       released to the concerned agencies and authorities on fulfillment
       of codal formalities as soon as possible.
                                     42




Meeting held on 9 April, 2005

Access to Justice Development Fund (AJDF) is a positive step to address
the neglected areas in judicial sphere, such as legal empowerment and
free legal aid, judicial research, court infrastructure development etc. I am
sure that AJDF will go a long way in addressing the resource constraints
faced by the justice sector institutions besides ensuring that justice
services are provided to citizens in just and timely manner. This was
stated by Chief Justice of Pakistan Mr. Justice Nazim Hussain Siddiqui in
his speech, read out by Mr. Justice Nasir Aslam Zahid - former Pakistan
Supreme Court judge. The Chief Justice was scheduled to attend the
consultation workshop on AJDF organized by Law and Justice
Commission of Pakistan at Supreme Court building however, due to
some other pre-occupations he could not attend the workshop. The
workshop was attended by former judges of the Supreme Court,
registrars of the Superior Courts, Director General Federal Judicial
Academy, heads of law schools, judges of subordinate courts and civil
society representatives. Members of bars also attended the session.

The workshop was held with a view to explain AJDF funding options and
procedures for accessing funds available to judiciary especially the
subordinate courts. AJDF funds are also available for judicial trainings,
improvement in the quality of legal education, legal awareness and
empowerment. Academic institutions, NGOs and professionals are also
eligible for accessing funds to support legal and judicial reforms
implemented in the country.

Dr. Faqir Hussain, Secretary Law and Justice Commission of Pakistan
(LJCP), in his keynote address said: ―The Government of Pakistan (GOP)
has established Rs. 1479 million Access to Justice Development Fund
(AJDF) as a statutory endowment to address the chronic budgetary
constraints facing the justice sector institutions‖. He observed that AJDF
was a unique initiative first of its kind in the Asia Pacific aimed at
strengthening the judicial independence by making available additional
funds to the courts and judicial training institutes besides providing legal
aid to the poor.

―The Fund has been placed at the disposal of LJCP to manage and
disburse towards specified objectives‖. The secretary noted that it was a
major step to consolidate and strengthen the capacity of courts to deal
with the backlog of cases and ensure the speedy dispensation of justice
in civil as well as criminal cases.

Presiding over the inaugural session, Justice (retd) Nasir Aslam Zahid
applauded government‘s efforts to provide additional resources needed
                                  43




for providing timely and inexpensive justice to the poor, particularly
children and women.

The workshop participants agreed that the judiciary had long been
suffering from resource constraints and AJDF reflected on the
government‘s commitment to improve citizens‘ access to justice.
Workshop participants appreciated the government‘s efforts to address
hitherto neglected areas concerned with access to justice. They observed
that AJDF would be instrumental in providing additional funding to
facilitate public access to justice sector services.


Meeting of the Governing Body held at Islamabad on 20 August 2005

3.2    Criteria and procedure for funding projects under AJDF
       windows

The Governing Body agreed to the proposal. After consideration, the
Governing Body appointed Mr. Ahmed Bilal Soofi, Advocate, Lahore,
Prof. Abdul Ghafoor Retd. Dean and Vice Chancellor of the Peshawar
University, Mr. Justice (Retd) Nasir Aslam Zahid and Mr. Fakhar Hayat,
(Retd) District & Sessions Judge, Lahore as members of the TEC.

The Chairman further observed that an advertisement calling project
proposal, should have a transparent procedure. He further observed that
the High Courts may inform the Commission whether the amount at
present transferred to them has been utilized or not. The Commission
should get some feed back on it. With the above observations the
Governing Body approved the criteria and procedure of funding AJDF
projects.

4.     Activities of Secretariat of the Commission

4.1    Reports Approved in 2005

During the Year 2005, the Commission approved 5 reports on
legal/judicial reform and forwarded its recommendations to the Federal
Government for implementation.

Report No. 68: Establishment of the Federal Court.

The Federal Court Bill, 2005 was considered by the Law and Justice
Commission of Pakistan in its meeting held on 12-2-2005. The Chairman
appreciated the realization by the Federal Government of its obligations
                                     44




under Article 3 and 37 read with Article 175 of the Constitution and its
concern and anxiety to provide expeditious and speedy justice in
commercial and financial matters. He remarked:

The Law & Justice Commission unanimously recommended that instead
of establishing      Federal Court, which concept is not free from
legal/constitutional complications, an effort be made to find a remedy
within the existing system, such as by-


        Immediately filling in the vacancies in the High Courts;
        Increasing the number of judges in the High Courts; and
        Creating Divisions in the High Courts for various categories of
         cases, including the commercial and financial cases.

Report No. 69: Commission‘s deliberation.

The draft of Law Reform Bill, 2005 was considered and deliberated by the
Law and Justice Commission of Pakistan in its meeting on 12-2-2005.
The rationale and justification for the draft law is to removing anomalies,
minimizing delays and expediting trial proceedings, to check the police
highhandedness and abuses of powers, particularly in the rural areas, to
restrict their discretion of arrest and detention on suspicion and to redress
the problem of unusual delays in trial. The draft also envisages new
procedure for pretrial stage to complete the case record and fix the case
for trial. The trial judge should then proceed to take evidence and
conclude the trial on day-to-day hearing. It has also discussed the need
for bifurcation of civil and criminal functions of courts, as under the
present system, the civil cases linger on, on account of urgency accorded
to criminal matters. The draft further incorporates new modes and devices
for service of summons on defendant to expedite the judicial process.

After deliberations, it was agreed that the Secretariat will examine the
draft Bill, taking into account the written comments received from High
Courts, and prepare a comprehensive draft for consideration of the
Commission in its next meeting.

Pursuant to the direction of the Commission, Secretary Law and Justice
Commission of Pakistan, has requested the Chief Justice, Federal Shariat
Court and Chief Justices of 4 High courts to offer their comments on the
Bill. The Federal Shariat Court and 3 High Courts have offered their
comments on Bill.
                                    45




Report No. 70: Enhancing the Punishment of Fines Prescribed in Various
Statues:

        The Secretariat carried out a comprehensive review of a large
number of statutes, wherein the penalty of fine was fixed long ago, but the
sums have not been increased in keeping with the devaluation of
currency and rate of inflation. The object of punishment of fine is to
prevent the repetition of commission of offences and serve as deterrent to
would-be offenders. The fines in various federal Acts were fixed long ago.
Some were revised but most have remained unchanged. Due to the
passage of time and devaluation of currency, the fines have seemingly
lost their impact and are no longer serving the purpose of deterrence.
These fines therefore need to be reviewed with a view to appropriately
enhance them. It may further be noted that certain offences which were
not considered serious in the past, have now assumed a grievious
character, and are on the increase, particularly because the penalties
prescribed in the statues do not operate as an effective check on the
offenders. Law need to be changed from time to time, with a view to keep
them relevant and be able to address the changed conditions in the
society. The Commission in its meeting held on March 19, 2005
recommended the enhancement of fines in various federal Acts, in
existence since 1850. The increase should be as per following formula:

     (a) Statutes form 1851 to 1900 -5 fold increase in amount of fine.
     (b) Statutes form 1900 to 1950 -4 fold increase in amount of fine.
     (c) Statutes form 1955 to 1975 -3 fold increase in amount of fine.
     (d) Statutes form 1975 to 1995 -2 fold increase in amount of fine.

     No increase has been suggested in fines in those statutes which
were amended in the past, from time to time, or new statutes, enacted
since 1995.

Report No. 71: Amendment in Access to Justice Development Fund
Rules 2002 and in LJCP Employees Rules.

      The amendments in the Access to Justice Development Fund
Rules, 2002, in the Schedule to the LJCP Employees (terms and
condition) Rules 1992 and work plan for expenditure of AJDF were
considered by the Commission in its meeting held on 19 March 2005 and
approved the work plan and amendments as per drat notification
followed:
                                         46




Report No. 72: Accounting Procedure of Access to Justice Development
Fund, 2005.

        Accounting Procedure of Access to Justice Development Fund
concurred by the Finance Division and Auditor General of the Pakistan
were examined and approved by the Commission in its meeting held on
11-12-2004 and 10-3-2005. During deliberation of the Commission
meeting the Secretary LJCP informed that the principal amount of the
AJDF has been invested in the Government Treasury Bills. Furthermore,
the requisite procedural formalities to operationalise the AJDF are
completed and the High Courts have been requested to constitute
appropriate committees and open bank accounts, so that their respective
shares of Provincial Judicial Development Fund (PJDF) may be
transferred to them. He stated that the Chairman has given approval for
appointment against 2 AJDF posts i.e. Research Officer (Fund) in B-18
and Section Officer (Accounts/Audit) in B-17. He said that it will take
some time before the new staff is recruited and after induction, they will
be on probation for a period of one year. It is therefore inappropriate to
handover the responsibility of management of the Fund to the new staff.
In the circumstances, the responsibility for management of the Fund be
assigned to an existing senior staff member i.e. Deputy Secretary (B-19),
who will manage the Fund under the supervision of the Secretary. The
proposal was approved.

4.2     Law Reform Proposals

The Commission has several law reform proposals pending before it for
consideration. The Secretariat has completed working papers on 55
different laws/subjects for amendment of existing laws as well as
enactment of new laws. Work on 238 projects concerning reforms of
various existing laws is in progress. The list of pending and completed
projects is placed at Annex I.

4.3     Implementation of Recommendations

The Commission has so far published 65 reports on review of various
laws and referred them to the Federal/Provincial Governments for
implementation (see Annex I). The Law Commission Ordinance provides
for publication of reports of the Commission and their submission to the
President. Thus reports No. 66 to 72 of the Commission were submitted
to the President. The remaining reports were sent to the Federal
Government/provincial governments to take further action with regard to
enactment of the laws through the Parliament/Provincial Assemblies1.

1
  The reports are published in the form of book which can be purchased from sale points
of the National Book Foundation.
                                    47




The Commission having examined the status of implementation of its
recommendations, have from time to time, expressed its dissatisfaction
on the slow process of consideration of its proposals by the Federal and
Provincial Governments. The status of implementation of Commission‘s
recommendations in the past few years is given below :

By the Federal Government
S.No   Report    Subject                           Status
       #
1.     32        The Small Claims and Minor        Implemented vide the
                 Offences Courts Ordinance,        Small Claims and Minor
                 2001                              Offences Courts
                                                   Ordinance, 2002 (XXVI
                                                   of 2002, dated
                                                   19.6.2002).
2.     33        The Family Courts                 Implemented vide the
                 (Amendment) Ordinance             Family Courts
                 2001                              (Amendment) Ordinance
                                                   2002 (LV of 2002 dated
                                                   1.10.2002).
3.     34        Conferring Powers under           Implemented vide the
                 Section 491(1) (a) (b) of the     Code of Criminal
                 Code of Criminal Procedure        Procedure (Amendment)
                 1898 on the Court of              Ordinance, 2002 (VIII of
                 Session.                          2002 dated 9.2.2002).
4.     35        Amicable Settlement of            Implemented vide the
                 Disputes.                         Code of Civil Procedure
                                                   (Amendment)
                                                   Ordinance, 2002 (XXXIV
                                                   of 2002 dated
                                                   21.7.2002).
5.     36        Enhancement of pecuniary          Implemented by
                 original jurisdiction of civil    Peshawar High Court
                 courts                            and High Court of Sindh
6.     37&38     Enhancement of pecuniary          Implemented by
                 original/appellate jurisdiction   Government of Sindh
                 of District Courts at Karachi
                 and other than Karachi in
                 Sindh
                                 48




S.No   Report   Subject                        Status
       #
7.     39       Enhancement of punishment       Implemented vide the
                of fine under the Pakistan     Criminal Law Reforms
                Penal Code                     Ordinance, 2002
                                               (LXXXVI of 2002 dated
                                               25.10.2002).
8.     40       Amendment of Sections 32,      Implemented vide the
                260 and 261 of the Code of     Criminal Law
                Criminal Procedure 1898        (Amendment)
                                               Ordinance, 2002
                                               (LXXXV of 2002 dated
                                               25.10.2002).
9.     41       Trafficking in Children for    Implemented vide the
                use as Camel Jockeys and       Prevention and Control
                engaging in hazardous          of Human Trafficking
                employment                     Ordinance, 2002 (LIX of
                                               2002 dated 3.10.2002).
10.    42       Addition of the Offence of     Not yet implemented.
                Molestation to the Pakistan
                Penal Code 1860.
11.    43       Right of Appeal Against        Not yet implemented.
                Acquittal to Private
                complainant under the Anti -
                Terrorism Act 1997.
12.    44       Punishment on bouncing of      Implemented vide the
                cheque                         Criminal Law
                                               (Amendment) Ordinance
                                               2002 (LXXXV of 2002
                                               dated 25.10.2002).
13.    45       Strengthening Capacity and     Implemented vide the
                Expanding the Functions of     Law Commission
                Law and Justice                (Amendment) Ordinance
                Commission of Pakistan         2002(LXXX of 2002
                                               dated 9.10.2002)

14.    46       Amendment in Section 345       Not yet implemented.
                and the Schedule of the
                Code of Criminal Procedure
                1898 to make the Offence of
                Rioting Compoundable
                                   49




S.No   Report   Subject                          Status
       #
15.    47       Punishment for the Offence       Not yet implemented.
                of Gang Rape
16.    48       Releasing the Female             Not yet implemented.
                Accused on Bail.
17.    49       Examination of Section 54 &      Not yet implemented.
                167 of the Code of Criminal
                Procedure 1898.
18.    50       Prohibition of Unauthorized      Not yet implemented.
                Business of sale/Purchase
                of National Prize Bond.
19.    51       Banning the Tradition of         Implemented.
                Vani(Giving Female as
                consideration for
                compromise).
20.    52       Access to Justice                Implemented.
                Development Fund Rules
                2002.
21.    53       Amendment in the Pakistan        Not yet implemented.
                Penal code 1860 to provide
                Punishment for Absconding
                from Trial.
22.    54       Reforming the W.P.               Not yet implemented.
                requisitioning of Immovable
                Property (Temporary
                Powers) Act 1956.
23.    55       Amendment in the Children        Not yet implemented.
                (Pledging of Labour) Act
                1933.
24.    56       Amendment in sections            Not yet implemented.
                11-A, 11-B & 11-C of the
                Security of Pakistan Act 1952.
25.    57       Amendment in Sections            Not yet implemented.
                427, 428, 429& 435 of the
                Pakistan Penal Code 1860.
26.    58       Enhancing the Limit              Not yet implemented.
                Prescribed to File suit in
                forma Pauperis.
27.    59       Amendment in the Federal         Not yet implemented.
                Services Medical
                attendance Rules 1990.
                                   50




S.No   Report   Subject                        Status
       #
28.    60       Amendments in the Land         Not yet implemented.
                Revenues Rules 1968.
29.    61       Prohibiting Excessive          The Supreme Court by
                Expenditure on Marriage        its judgment validated
                Ceremony and Dowry.            the Federal Govt. Law
                                               on the subject.
30.    62       Expediting Trial               Not yet implemented.
                Proceedings.
31.    63       Omission of Repealed           Not yet implemented.
                Sections of Pakistan Penal
                Code, 1860 from the Code
                of Criminal Procedure, 1898.
32.    64       Amendment in Section 351       Not yet implemented.
                of Code of Criminal
                Procedure, 1898.
33.    65       Amendment in Section 67 of     Not yet implemented.
                the Pakistan Penal Code,
                1860.
34.    66.      Amendment in Sections 513      Not yet implemented.
                and 514 of the Code of
                Criminal Procedure, 1898.
35.    67.      Amendment of Section 17 of     Not yet implemented.
                Registration Act, 1908.
36.    68.      The Federal Court Bill,        Not yet implemented.
                2005.
37.    69.      The Law Reforms Bill, 2005.    Not yet implemented.
38.    70.      Enhancing the Punishment       Not yet implemented.
                of Fine Prescribed in
                Various Statutes.
39.    71.      Amendment in Access to         implemented.
                Justice Development Fund
                Rules 2002, and LJCP
                Employees Rules.
40.    72.      Accounting Procedure of        implemented.
                Access to Justice
                Development Fund, 2005.
                                     51




4.4       Public Awareness Scheme

The Commission runs a Public Awareness Scheme where under write-
ups are prepared in Urdu on issues/problems of public interests/concern
and published through the national press. The purpose is to inform the
people of their legal rights/entitlements and describe the procedure for
enforcing such rights/entitlements. The material is also hosted on the
Commission‘s website.

The Commission published write-ups in Urdu on various subjects in the
shape of a book titled ―Qanun-Fehmi‖, two volumes have been published,
which can be obtained from the sale centres of National Book Foundation
at Islamabad and its regional offices. List of topics already completed and
pending is mentioned in Annex II.

4.5       Commission/NJPMC publishes Annual Reports of the Courts

Under amendments made to its own law and the NJPMC Ordinance,
2002, the Law and Justice Commission of Pakistan has been entrusted
with the responsibility to print court reports on annual basis along the
same lines as the other official reports such as the Economic Survey of
Pakistan, Report of the Ombudsman‘s Office and others. The
Commission‘s Secretariat managed to compile the following reports of the
courts:

         Judicial Statistics of Pakistan, 2005
         Administration Tribunals and Special Courts, 2005

The publication of the annual reports of the Courts in Pakistan is an
endeavour to ensure greater transparency and accountability in the
judicial system. Judicial data/statistics indicating institution/disposal of
cases and court/judge performance has been included in these reports
along with organizational set up, finances and an evaluation of the
performance of the institution at the federal/provincial levels. This is
indeed a pioneering effort in the Asian-Pacific region, and even beyond.

The data included in the reports can be very effectively used to formulate
effective policies for judicial and law and order administration in the
country. For example, the following sample statistics not only give us an
idea of the huge workload of the courts but also highlight the importance
of continued efforts for delay reduction in some of the provinces;
                                           52




 SUMMARY DATA FOR THE SUPREME COURT

                Pending       Institution                                   Pending
                                                           Disposal
  Category      cases on        during          Total                      cases on
                st                                        during year      st
               1 Jan 2005        year                                     1 Jan 2006
   Petitions     20890          7370        28260           12009           16251
   Appeals       6724           2185            8909         3348            5561
    Total        27614          9555        37169           15357           21812

 In the Supreme Court, the total number of pending cases decreased by
 15357 from 37169 cases to 27614 cases at the beginning of the year
 2005. The Supreme Court disposed more petitions than appeals during
 the year; however, the overall disposal was less than the fresh institution
 of cases in each of the two categories during 2005.

 SUMMARY DATA FOR HIGH COURTS/SUBORDINATE JUDICIARY

               Pending                                                        Pending
                             Institution                       Disposal
               cases on                                                       cases on
  Courts         st            during             Total         during          st
                1 Jan                                                          1 Jan
                                2005                             2005
                 2005                                                           2006
BALOCHISTAN
Balochistan
High Court      2,625          3,766              6,391          3,948         2,443

Subordinate
                7335           21617              28952         20280           8672
Judiciary
SINDH             1-1-2005         2005            Total      2005       31-12-2005
Sindh High
                25005          15190              40195          17248         22911
Court
Subordinate
                118166         153119            271285         148777         122508
Judiciary
NWFP               1-1-2005         2005            Total      2005      31-12-2005
Peshawar
                10578          10578              14857          25435         12772
High Court
Subordinate
               153643         364047             517690         354453         163237
Judiciary
PUNJAB             1-1-2005         2005            Total      2005       31-12-2005
Lahore
                65999          80898        146897              77200          69697
High Court
Subordinate
               991340         1293322           2284662        1304637         980025
Judiciary
                                   53




In the Balochistan High Court, the total pending cases were 2625 on
1st January, 2005, which were decreased from 2625 to 2443 on
31st December 2006; while in the Subordinate Courts of Balochistan, the
total pending cases were 8672 on 1st January 2005, which were
decreased from 8672 to 7335 on 31st December 2006.

In the Sindh High Court, the total pending cases were 25005 on
1st January 2005, which were decreased from 25005 to 22911 on
31st December 2006. In the Subordinate Courts of Sindh, the total
pending cases were 118166 on 1st January 2005, which were increased
from 118166 to 122508 on 31st December 2006.

In the Peshawar High Court, the total pending cases were 10578 on
1st January 2005, which were increased from 10578 to 12772 on
31st December 2006. In the Subordinate Courts of NWFP, the total
pending figure was increased from 153643 cases on 1st January 2005 to
163237 cases on 31st December 2006.

In the Lahore High Court, the total pending cases were 69697 on
1st January 2005, which were increased from 10578 to 12772 on
31st December 2006. In the Subordinate Courts of Punjab, the total
pending figure was decreased from 991340 cases on 1st January 2005 to
980025 cases on 31st December 2006.

The reports and judicial data/statistics are being shared with all
stakeholders, in particular judges, lawyers, government functionaries,
teaching/research institutions, representatives of NGO‘s and the civil
society. Advance copies of these works have already been sent to the
President and the Prime Minister. The reports are available on the LJC
website www.ljcp.gov.pk for the benefit of the public as well as
researchers; their hard copies can also be obtained from the Secretariat
of Law and Justice Commission in Islamabad.

5.     Commission’s Website

The Commission is equipped with computers, which are interlinked
through network. All the officers of the Secretariat have the facility of
computers. The Commission also has its website i.e. www.ljcp.gov.pk. It
contains detailed information about the functions and composition of the
Commission and its Secretariat. The Commission‘s statutes and rules are
also available on the website. All approved reports of Commission on
different subjects are available on the website.
                                   54




A Public Awareness Scheme, containing write-ups in Urdu on topical
issues/problems is also being run on the website to make the society law-
conscious.

The following Annual Reports of courts of Pakistan for the year 2001 and
2002 published by the Commission‘s Secretariat are available on the
website

Reports 2001

The Supreme Court of Pakistan
The High Court of Sindh
The High Court of Lahore
The High Court of Balochistan

Reports 2002

The Supreme Court of Pakistan
The Federal Shariat Court
The High Court of Sindh
The High Court of Balochistan
Judicial Statistics of Pakistan
The Administrative Tribunals and Special Courts

Reports 2003

The Supreme Court of Pakistan
The Federal Shariat Court
The High Court of Sindh
The High Court of Balochistan
Judicial Statistics of Pakistan
The Administrative Tribunals and Special Courts

Reports 2004

Judicial Statistics of Pakistan
The Administrative Tribunals and Special Courts

The Constitution of Pakistan, 1973 including all the amendments made
therein, is also available on the site.
                                      55




The lists of Federal and Provincial statues and articles published in
various law journals are available in chronological order and with
consolidated index. Information about the judicial system in the country
i.e. hierarchy of judicature, strength of judges, advocates and law officers
is also available on the web-site.

6.       Procedure of Selection of Projects

A project is selected on receipt of reference from the Federal or a
Provincial Government or upon feedback received from the general public
either directly addressed to the Commission or referred by any
Ministry/Division/Department of the Government. Anomalies in laws
pointed out by the High Courts, Federal Shariat Court and the Supreme
Court of Pakistan are also taken note of by the Secretariat. A review of
implementation of directions of the Federal Shariat Court and the Shariat
Appellate Bench of the Supreme Court is also carried out regularly to
remove the provisions of laws from the statute book/code held contrary to
the injunctions of Islam. Issues on laws raised in the national press also
come under consideration of the Commission.

The Chairman or the Secretary determines the priority of any project for
study. A study includes reference to various law books on the subject,
discussions and consultations with the experts in the relevant field. Views
of the concerned agency of the Federal or Provincial Governments
administering the law are also invited. Draft proposals are considered in
meetings of the Secretariat for improvement. Workshops are held and
public opinion is solicited where considered necessary.

6.1 Commission’s Finances

In order to perform its functions, LJC had been allocated the following
budget by the Government for the year 2004 -2005:

Budget 2004-05 (Pakistan Rupees)

                           Ratio of salary                  Ratio of salary
Category      Allocation   to non-salary      Utilization   to non-salary
                            budget (%)                       budget (%)
Total          9869293          100            9787957            100

Salary         7289831         73.86           7247316          74.043

Non-Salary     2579462         26.13           2540641           25.95
                                        56




The salary budget of LJC includes all the establishment costs incurred on
pay and allowances of the officers and staff; while the non-salary budget
is meant for provision of goods and services to run the day-to-day
business of the organization.

In view of the expanded mandate of the LJC, the non-salary budget is no
longer sufficient to meet the needs of the organization. Some of the new
statutory functions of LJC such as the publication of the annual reports of
the judiciary were discharged with the financial support provided by the
Program Management Unit of Access to Justice Program.
7.     Other Activities:
7.1    Visit of participants of Shariah Training Course:
 Twenty Judicial & Executive officers from all over the country and four
members from Sudan Judiciary, training for in service training course in
Shariah (Islamic Law) from Shariah Academy International Islamic
University Islamabad visited the Secretariat of Law and Justice
Commission of Pakistan on 26-8-2005. Dr. Faqir Hussain, Secretary of
the LJCP briefed the participants about the research activities of the
Commission. The participants appreciated the work done by the
Commission in reforming the laws. They were grateful for giving time by
the Secretary and providing useful information regarding reforming of
laws. The participants also discussed issues relating to administration of
Justice and need for reform of outdated statutes due to changing
condition of the society.




          Secretary, LJCP, is briefing the participants of Shariah Academy
                                   57




 A farewell party was arranged for Mr. Riaz Ahmed Khan, P.A to
Secretary who proceeded on LPR with effect from 1-1-2005. The
Secretary LJCP appreciated the performance of Mr. Riaz Ahmed Khan
who was very honest, punctual and dutiful official. He never gives any
complaint to the officers while working with them. He performed his duties
with the senior officers diligently.

Farewell parties were also arranged for Mr. Mohammad Afzal Assistant
(B-11) who proceeded on LPR with effect from 1-9-2005 and
Mr. Maqsood Qasid proceeded on LPR on 4-6-2005.

7.2    In Service training of Staff of the Secretariat:

Details of training imparted to the staff of the Commission Secretariat
during the year 2005:-

1-     Training in Information Technology for the Government
       employees, w.e.f. 2 to 16 February, 2005, in Pakistan Computer
       Bureau, Islamabad, Mr. Adnan Khuram, ex-Computer
       Programmer attended the training course.

2-     One-week (part-time) training course in ―Rules of Business
       (Consultation Amongst Divisions/Assembly Business)‖ w.e.f. 21 to
       26 February, 2005, Mr. Ihsanullah, Supdt. (R&R), attended the
       training course at S.T.I. Islamabad.

3-     Visit of Shariah Trainees visit to the Commission Secretariat for a
       briefing by the Secretary, Law and Justice Commission of
       Pakistan, on 26-8-2005, to the trainees in the conference room of
       the Secretariat of Law and Justice Commission of Pakistan list of
       trainee participants attached.

4-     4-Months (part-time) english shorthand/theory and type-writing
       courses for Government employees and their Dependents with
       Additional Syllabus of Ms-Word/Ms-Excel w.e.f. 1-9-2005 to 31-
       12-2005, in S.T.I., Islamabad, Mr. Zamar Said, LDC, Sajid Javed,
       N/Qasid, Ifitkhar Khan, N/Qasid & Gul Rehman, N/Qasid attended
       the training course.

5-     3-Months (part-time) Urdu Shorthand, Typewriting and In-Page
       (Urdu Computer Programme) for Clerks, Stenotypists, in S.T.I.,
       Islamabad, Mr. Ali Muhammad Mughal, UDC attended the training
       course.
                                  58




6-    One-week (part-time) training course in ―Personnel Administration
      And Service Law & Rules‖, w.e.f. 19 to 24 September, 2005, in
      S.T.I., Islamabad, Mr. Waseem Javid, Research Officer (Fund)
      attended the training course.

7-    One-Week (part-time) training in ―Rules of Business (Official
      Management)‖ w.e.f. 5-9-2005 to 10-9-2005, in S.T.I. Islamabad,
      Mr. Qasim Aslam Minhas, Research Officer attended the training
      course.

8-    Meeting of experts of protection of rights of Juvenile Delinquents,
      attended by Mr. Qasim Aslam Minhas, Research Officer on 22-9-
      2005 at Lahore.

9-    One-week (part-time) training course in ―Human Resource
      Management (HRM)‖ w.e.f. 3-10-2009 to 8-10-2005, in S.T.I.
      Islamabad, Mr. Muhammad Irfan, Assistant attended the course.

10-   One-week (part-time) training course in ―Financial Rules
      (Leave/G.P.F/Benevolent Fund Rules)‖ w.e.f. 10-10-2005 to 15-
      10-2005, in S.T.I, Islamabad, Mr. Muhammad Sajad, Section
      Officer (Audit/Accounts) attended the course.

11-   Two-weeks (part-time) training course on ―Duties and
      Responsibilities of Private Secretaries/Personal Assistants with
      Additional Syllabus of Secretariat Instructions, forms of
      Communication & Record Management ― w.e.f. 24-5-2005 to 7-5-
      2005, in S.T.I, Islamabad, Mr. Riaz Ahmed, PA to Secretary and
      Mr. Muhammad Khattab, PA to JS-I attended the course.

12-   Two-weeks (part-time) training course on Duties and
      Responsibilities of P.S. & P.As with Additional Syllabus of Ms-
      Word/Ms-Excel w.e.f. 14-11-2005 to 26-11-2005, in S.T.I,
      Islamabad, Mr. Irshad Ali, P.A to Deputy Secretary.


13-   Study tour for the Participants of 2 Weeks (part-time) training
      course on Duties & Responsibilities of P.Ss/P.As With Additional
      Syllabus of Ms-Word/Ms-Excel, to Khewera Mines on 25-11-2005,
      was attended alongwith other Trainees of S.T.I, by Mr. Irshad Ali,
      Stenographer.

14-   Study tour for the participants of 4-Months (part-time) English
      Shorthand theory course for Government employee with
      Additional Syallabus of Ms-Word and Ms-Excel, to Khewera
                                   59




       Mines, Lahore, Shalimar Garden, Wagha Border, Lahore Fort,
       Lahore Zoo and Hiran Minar w.e.f. 26-12-2005 to 29-12-2005, was
       attended by Mr. Zamar Said, LDC, alongwith other Trainees of
       S.T.I.

8.     Legal Discovery Centre

The U.S. Embassy in Pakistan has launched the American Legal
Discovery Centre (ALDC) project to equip 7 law libraries in Pakistan with
access to the latest legal information in United States and provide
opportunity for the Pakistani legal community, scholars, and researchers
to broaden their knowledge of the legal system of the United States. The
first American Legal Discovery Centre was presented to the Library of
Law and Justice Commission of Pakistan on 7-12-2004 by the Embassy
Press Attaché Greggory Crouch.

9.     Relations with other Law Commissions

The Commission maintained its contacts with overseas law reform
agencies during the year. Through such interaction, ideas have been
exchanged on issues of common interest and information has been
shared. Copies of reports of the Commission are sent to law reform
commissions of the other countries and vice versa. A list of useful
contacts is available in Annexure IV.
                                  60




                                                               Annex-I

10.    Annexures

10.1   List of Reports

1.     First Report on Fatal Accident Act 1855.
2.     Second Report on Fatal Accident Act 1855.
3.     Report on Establishment of Courts of Qazis Ordinance 1981.
4.     Report on Law of Evidence.
5.     Report on Rent Restriction Laws and Draft Ordinance.
6.     Report - re: the Proposed Draft "Law of Evidence" Prepared by the
       Council of Islamic Ideology.
7.     Report on Elimination of False Evidence from the Judicial System
       in the Country.
8.     Report on Elimination of False Evidence.
9.     Report on a Reference Received from the Federal Government on
       the Proposed Ordinance re: Law of Evidence.
10.    Report on Qisas and Diyat.
11.    Filling a Legal Vacuum.
12.    Reformation of Family Laws.
13.    Reformation and Modernization of Service Laws.
14.    Report on Rent Restriction Laws.
15.    Enhancing the Powers of Wafaqi Mohtasib (Ombudsman).
16.    Scheme for the Redressal of Public Complaints.
17.    Amendment in the Code of Criminal Procedure.
18.    Extension of Jurisdiction of Service Tribunals to Employees of
       Statutory Corporations.
19.    Eradication of 'QABZA GROUP' Activities.
20.    Prevention of Unfair Means in Examination.
21.    Improving the Performance of Pakistan Law Commission.
22.    Report on Criminal Justice System.
23.    Report on Jail Reform.
24.    Reformation and Modernisation of Service Laws (Part-II).
25.    The Role of Pakistan Bar Council in the Promotion of Human
       Rights.
26.    Administrative Procedures Act for the Federal Government of
       Pakistan.
27.    Legislation Pertaining to Maternity Benefits.
28.    Elimination of Child Labour.
29.    Eliminating Double Jeopardy in Drugs-Related.
30.    Reforming the Juvenile Justice System.
31.    Amendment in Section 145 of the Cr. P. C.
32.    The Small Claims and Minor Offences Courts Ordinance 2001.
33.    The Family Courts (Amendment) Ordinance 2001.
                                 61




34.   Conferring the Powers under Section 491 (1) (a) & (b) of the Code
      of Criminal Procedure 1898 on the Court of Session.
35.   Amicable Settlement Disputes.
36.   Enhancement of Pecuniary Jurisdiction of Civil Courts.
37.   Enhancement of Pecuniary Appellate Jurisdiction of District
      Courts.
38.   Enhancement of Pecuniary Original Jurisdiction of District Courts
      at Karachi.
39.   Enhancement of Punishments of Fine under the Pakistan Penal
      Code.
40.   Amendment of Sections 32, 260 and 261 of the Code of Criminal
      Procedure 1898.
41.   Trafficking in Children for use as Camel jockeys and engaging in
      Hazardous Employment.
42.   Addition of the Offence of Molestation to the Pakistan Penal Code
      1860
43.   Right of Appeal Against Acquittal to Private Complainant under
      the Anti Terrorism Act 1997
44.   Punishment on Bouncing of Cheques
45.   Strengthening Capacity and Expanding the Functions of Law and
      Justice Commission of Pakistan
46.   Amendment in Section 345 and the Schedule of the Code of
      Criminal Procedure 1898 to make the Offence of Rioting
      Compoundable
47.   Punishment for the Offence of Gang Rape
48.   Releasing the Female Accused on Bail
49.    Examination of Sections 54 & 167 of the Code of Criminal
      Procedure 1898.
50.   Prohibition of Unauthorized Business of Sale/Purchase of National
      Prize Bonds
51.   Banning the Tradition of Vani (Giving Female as Consideration for
      Compromise)
52.   Access to Justice Development Fund Rules 2002
53.   Amendment in the Pakistan Penal Code 1860 to Provide
      Punishment for Absconding from Trial.
54.   Reforming the W.P Requisitioning of Immovable Property
      (Temporary Powers) Act 1956.
55.   Amendment in the Children (Pledging of Labour) Act 1933.
56.   Amendment in Sections 11-A, 11-B and 11-C of the Security of
      Pakistan Act 1952
57.   Amendment in Sections 427,428,429 & 435 of the Pakistan Penal
       Code 1860
58.   Enhancing the Limit Prescribed to File Suit in Forma Pauperis
59.   Prohibiting Excessive Expenditure on Marriage Ceremony and
      Dowry
                                 62




60.   Expediting Trial Proceedings
61.   Amendments in the Land Revenue Rules 1968
62.   Amendment in the Federal Services Medical Attendance Rules
      1990
63.   Omission of Repealed Section of the Pakistan Penal Code 1860
      from the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1898.
64.   Amendment in Section 351 of the Code of Criminal Procedure
      1898
65.   Amendment in Section 67 of the Pakistan Penal Code 1860
66.   Amendment in Section 513 and 514 of the Code of Criminal
      Procedure 1898
67.   Amendment in Section 17 of the Registration Act 1908
68.   The Federal Court Bill, 2005
69.   Enhancing the Punishment of Fine Prescribed in Various Statutes.
70.   The Law Reforms Bill, 2005.
71.   Amendment in Access to Justice Development Fund Rules 2002,
      Work plan for expenditure of AJDF fund and Amendment in LJCP
      Employees Rules.
72.   Accounting Procedure of Access to Justice Development Fund,
      2005.
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
                                 84




                                                        Annex-III
10.3     Pending Projects

Papers Completed by the Secretariat


   1-      Registration of Documents
   2-      Code of Conduct for Judges
   3-      Establishment of Administrative Courts for Tortious
           Liability of Government
   4-      Impeaching the Moral Character of Victim of Rape
           (Deletion of Section 151 (4) of Qanun-e-Shahdat Order
           1984)
   5-      Post-divorce Matta‘a (   ) for Wife
   6-      Amendments Suggested in the Pre-emption Acts
   7-      Extension of Transfer of Property Act 1882 to Islamabad
           Capital Territory
   8-      Rationalising Stamp Duty on Instruments
   9-      Rationalising the Amount of Court Fees Prescribed by
           the Court Fees Act 1870
   10-     Reform of Hudood Laws
   11-     Amendment in the Dissolution of Muslim Marriages Act
           1939
   12-     Amendments in the Pakistan Citizenship Act 1951
   13-     Amendment in the Baluchistan, NWFP, Punjab and
           Sindh Motor Vehicles Ordinance 1965 and Section 94 of
           the Motor Vehicles Act 1939
   14-     Rescision of Notification Issued Under Section 10 (1) &
           (2) of the Criminal Law Amendment Act 1932
   15-     Amendment in Section 60 and Order XXI of the Code of
           Civil Procedure 1908
   16-     Eradication of ―Qabza‖ Group Activities
                            85




17-   Amendment of Section 197 of the Code of Criminal
      Procedure 1898 and Section 6 (5) of the Criminal Law
      Amendment Act 1958
18-   Amendment in Section 96 & 115 of the Code of Civil
      Procedure 1908
19-   Execution of Foreign Decrees
20-   Amendment in the First Schedule of the Limitation Act
      1908 and Section 115 of the Code of Civil Procedure
      1908
21-   Amendment in the Majority Act 1875
22-   Amendment in the Guardian and Wards Act 1890
23-   Eliminating the Custom of Vanni (Giving Female in
      Marriage    as    Consideration for   Compounding
      Disputes/Offences)
24-   Deletion of Sub-Section (2) of Section 12 of the Code of
      Civil Procedure 1908
25-   Amendment in Section 128 of the Qanun-e-Shahadat
      Order 1984
26-   Effective Enforcement of Female Right to Inheritance
27-   Deletion of Paras 22, 23 & 24 of the Land Reforms
      Regulation 1972
28-   Reforming the Legal Practitioners and Bar Councils Act
      1973
29-   Amendment in Section 54 & 55 of the Code of Criminal
      Procedure 1898
30-   Early Hearing of Appeals Against Death Penalty
31-   Amendment in Article 17 of the Qanun-e-Shahadat Order
      1984
32-   Amendment in the Code of Criminal Procedure 1898
33-   Amendment in the Sindh Rented Premises Ordinance
      1979
34-   Amendment in the Arms Ordinance 1965
                                     86




     35-      Amendment in the Pakistan Names and Emblems
              (Prevention of Unauthorised Use) Act 1957
     36-      Confinement for Non-Payment of Diyat
     37-      Amendment in Section 17 of               the    Prohibition
              (Enforcement of Hadd) Order 1979
     38-      Amendment in Section 107 of the PPC to Make Unlawful
              Jirga Verdict an Offence
     39-      Amendment in Juvenile Justice System Ordinance 2000
     40-      Amendment in the Payment of Wages Act 1936
     41-      Pre-trial Hearing/Conference
     42-      The Islamabad Rented Premises Bill 2000
     43-      Changing the Nomenclature of Subordinate Judicial
              Officers
     44-      The Utility Services (Redressal of Complaints) Bill 2000
     45-      The Water Supply Service (Redressal of Complaints) Bill
              2000
     46-      The Consumer Protection Bill 2000
     47-      Early Disposal of 10 Years Old Cases
Papers on Which Work is in Progress
1-         Measures for Welfare of Senior Citizens
1-         Tribunal for Tortious Liability of Government Servants
2-         Amendment in       the   PPC    to   Make   More    Offences
           Compoundable
3-         Amendment in Cr. P. C. and P. P. C. Concerning Blasphemy
           Law
4-         Legislation for Regulating Domestic Servants
5-         Reformation of Laws Relating to Children to Bring them in
           Conformity with the International Convention on the Rights of
           the Child 1989, Including Issues such as Birth Registration,
           Health, Education, Child Labour, Juvenile Justice System.
6-         Amendments in Hudood Laws
                               87




8-    Reformation of Personal Law of the Christian Community
      Pertaining to Inheritance and Family Matters
9-    Modernisation of Transportation Laws
10-   Reformation of Electoral Laws (Including issues such as
      Composition and Functions of Election Commission, Political
      Parties Law, Representation of People Act 1976,
      Delimitation of Constituencies Act 1974, Electoral Rolls Act
      1974, Proportional Representation System, Representation
      of Women in Elective Bodies).
11-   Amendments in Laws/ Rules Relating to Forests
12-   Amendment in Qanun-e-Shahadat Order 1984
13-   Regulating the Brick-Kiln Labour
14-   Amendments in Qisas and Diyat Law
15-   Unification/Codification of Hindu Personal Law Relating to
      Matrimonial Affairs and Inheritance.
16-   Reformation of Cantonment Act/Rules.
17-   Reviewing Discriminatory Legislation Pertaining to Women.
18-   Amendments in Child Marriage Restraint Act, 1929.
19-   Proposed Legislation for Regulating the Business of Motor
      Vehicle Dealers and Real Estate Agents.
20-   Law of Accountability.
21-   Law of Freedom of Information.
22-   Law on Regulating Shelter Home/Darul Aman.
23-   Amendments in the Arbitration Act 1940.
24-   Scheme for Provision of Free Legal Aid and Protection of
      Human Rights/Freedoms.
25-   Controlling the Abuse of Discretionary Powers.
26-   Amendments in Fatal Accidents Act 1855
27-   Amendment in Canal and Drainage Act 1873
28-   Reformation and Modernisation of the Civil Service
      (Amendments to the Civil Servants Act 1973, the Service
      Tribunal Act 1973, The Public Service Commission
      Ordinance 1977 and the Rules Made Thereunder)
                                88




29-   Amendment in Companies Ordinance 1984
30-   Amendment in Zakat and Ushr Ordinance to Remove
      Anomalies/Contradiction Therefrom
31-   To Check Unauthorised Telephone Taping/Eavesdropping
      as per Direction Contained in Judgment of the Supreme
      Court.
32-   Liability of Directors of the Company Towards its
      Creditors and Shareholders for Healthy Economic Growth
33-   Reformation of Emigration Laws
34-   Reforming the Limitation Act 1908
35-   Curbing Sexual Harassment at the Workplace
36-   Law of Nazar-ul-Mazalim (Giving Special Powers to Existing
      Courts for Handling Tort Cases)
37-   Reforming the NWFP Tenancy Act 1950
38-   Reforming the Law and Procedure of Liquidation and
      Auctioning.
39-   Reforming the Code of Civil Procedure 1908
40-   Measures to Check Incidents of Domestic Violence
41-   Regulating Benami Transactions
42-   Reforming the Code of Criminal Procedure 1898
43-   Registration of Land Titles
44-   Maintenance (Kifalat) of Young and Elderly Indigent
      Relatives
48-   Amendment in Pure Food Ordinance 1960.
49-   Amendment in Bonded Labour System (Abolition) Act 1992
50-   Amendment in the Electricity Act 1910
51-   Amendment in W.P. WAPDA Act 1958
52-   Amendment in Sales of Goods Act 1930
53-   Amendment in Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act 1890
54-   Amendment in Easements Act 1882
55-   Amendment in Shops and Establishment Ordinance 1965
                                89




56-   Amendment in Land Revenue Act 1967
57-   Amendment in Order 37 of Civil Procedure Code 1908
68-   Amendment in Probation of Offenders Ordinance 1960
69-   Amendment in Pakistan Bait-ul-Mal Act 1991
70-   Amendment in the Cooperative Societies Act 1912
71-   Amendment in the Society Registration Act 1860
72-   Amendment in Islamabad Rent Restriction Ordinance 2001
73-   Amendment in Juvenile Justice System Ordinance 2000
74-   Examine the Original, Appellate, Review and Revisional
      Jurisdiction of Various Courts
75-   Amendment in the Oaths Act 1873
76-   Amendment in       Loudspeakers     and      Sound   Amplifiers
      Ordinance 1964.
77-   Amendment in Federal Employees Benevolent Fund and
      Groups Insurance Act 1969.
78-   Amendment in Wild Birds and Animals Protection Act 1912
79-   Amendment in Dangerous Cargoes Act, 1953
80-   Amendment in Conciliation Courts Ordinance 1961
81-   Amendment in Female Infanticide Prevention Act 1870
82-   Amendment in Promissory Notes Stamps Act 1899
83-   Amendment in Workmen‘s Compensation Act 1923
84-   Reform of the Frontier Crimes Regulation 1901
85-   Rationalizing the Punishment of Imprisonment Prescribed
      under Various Statutes
86-   The Interest Act, 1839
87-   The Public Accountants Default Act, 1850
88-   The Judicial Officers Protection Act, 1850
89-   The Caste Disabilities Removal Act, 1850
90-   The Tolls Act, 1851
91-   The Recusant Witnesses Act, 1853
                                90




92-   The Mesne Profits and Improvements Act, 1855.
93-   The Legal Representatives Suits Act, 1855
94-   The Bills of Lading Act, 1856
95-   The Hindu Widows Re-Marriage Act, 1856
96-   The Society Registration Act, 1860.
97-   The Stage-Carriages Act, 1861.
98-   The Excise (Spirits) Act, 1863.
99-   The Carriers Act, 1865.
100- The Public Gambling Act, 1867.
101- The Sarais Act, 1867.
102- The Divorce Act, 1869.
103- The Cattle-Trespass Act, 1871.
104- The Pensions Act, 1871.
105- The Punjab Laws Act, 1872.
106- The Government Savings Banks Act, 1873.
107- The Married Women‘s Property Act, 1874.
108- The Laws Local Extent Act, 1874.
109- The Sind Revenue Jurisdiction Act, 1876.
110- The Treasurer-Trove Act, 1878.
111- The Arms Act, 1878.
112- The Ferries Act, 1878.
113- The Elephants‘ Preservation Act, 1879.
114- The Hackney-Carriage Act, 1879.
115- The Dekkhan Agriculturists‘ Relief Act, 1879.
116- The Kazis Act, 1880.
117- The Obstruction of Fairways Act, 1881.
118- The Tramways Act, 1886.
119- The Merchandise Marks Act, 1889.
120- The Bankers‘ Books Evidence Act, 1891.
                                 91




121- The Marriages Validation Act, 1892.
122- The Lansdowne Bridge Act, 1892.
123- The Government Tenants (North-West Frontier) Act, 1893.
124- The Sind Encumbered Estates Act, 1896.
125- The Fisheries Act, 1897.
126- The Lepers Act, 1898.
127- The Post Office Act, 1898.
128- The Stamps Act, 1899.
129- The Government Buildings Act, 1899.
130- The Glanders and Farcy Act, 1899.
131- The Church of Scotland Kirk Sessions Act,1899.
132- The Tolls (Army and Air Force) Act, 1901.
133- The Pakistan Coinage Act,
134- The Criminal Law Amendment Act, 1908.
135- The Insolvency (Karachi Division) Act, 1909.
136- The Whipping Act, 1909.
137- The Dourine Act, 1910.
138- The Prevention of Seditious Meetings Act, 1911.
139- The Wild Birds and Animals Protection Act, 1912.
140- The Official Trustees Act, 1913.
141- The Hindu Disposition of Property Act,1916
142- The Destruction of Records Act, 1917.
143- The Cotton Cloth Act, 1918.
144- The Local Authorities Pensions and Gratuities Act, 1919.
145- The Poisons Act, 1919.
146- The Securities Act, 1920.
147- The Charitable and Religious Trusts Act, 1920.
148- The Maintenance Orders Enforcement Act, 1921.
149- The Cotton Transport Act, 1923.
                                92




150- The Mines Act, 1923.
151- The Cantonments (House-Accommodation) Act, 1923.
152- The Cotton Cess Act, 1923.
153- The Official Secrets Act, 1923.
154- The Mussalman Wakaf Act, 1923.
155- The Cotton Ginning and Pressing Factories Act, 1925.
156- The Provident Funds Act, 1925.
157- The Sikh Gurdwaras (Supplementary) Act, 1925.
158- The Government Trading Taxation Act, 1926.
159- The Legal Practitioners (Fees) Act, 1926.
160- The Forest Act, 1927.
161- The Lighthouse Act, 1927.
162- The Lac Cess Act, 1930.
163- The Hindu Gains of Learning Act, 1930.
164- The Provisional Collection of Taxes Act, 1931.
165- The Criminal Law Amendment Act, 1932.
166- The Factories Act, 1934.
167- The Petroleum Act, 1934.
168- The Parsi Marriage and Divorce Act, 1936.
169- The Arbitration (Protocol and Convention) Act, 1937.
170- The Hindu Women‘s Rights to Property Act, 1937.
171- The Arya Marriage Validation Act, 1937.
172- The Rules and Regulations Continuance Act, 1937.
173- The Federal Court Act, 1937.
174- The Cutchi Memons Act, 1938.
175- The Criminal Law Amendment Act, 1938.
176- The Dissolution of Muslim Marriages Act, 1939.
177- The Standards of Weight Act, 1939.
178- The Registration of Foreigners Act, 1939.
                               93




179- The Commercial Documents Evidence Act.
180- The Agricultural Produce Cess Act, 1940.
181- The Mines Maternity Benefit Act, 1941.
182- The Professions Tax Limitation Act, 1941.
183- The War Injuries Ordinance, 1941.
184- The Railways (Local Authorities, Taxation) Act, 1941.
185- The Motor Vehicles (Drivers) Ordinance, 1942.
186- The War Injuries (Compensation Insurance) Act, 1943.
187- The Cotton Cloth and Yarn (Contracts) Ordinance, 1944.
188- The Coconut Committee Act, 1944.
189- The Railway Stores (Unlawful Possession) Ordinance, 1944.
190- The Public Debt Act, 1944.
191- The Criminal Law Amendment Ordinance, 1944.
192- The Post Office National Savings Certificates Ordinance,
     1944.
193- The Oil Seeds Committee Act, 1946.
194- The Riot and Civil Commotion Risks Insurance Ordinance,
     1947.
195- The Prevention of Corruption Act, 1947.
196- The Foreign Exchange Regulation Act, 1947.
197- The Pakistan (Exchange of Prisoners) Ordinance, 1948.
198- The Sindh Textile Board Ordinance, 1949.
199- The Imports and Exports (Control) Act, 1950.
200- The Karachi Hotels and Lodging-Houses (Control) Act, 1950.
201- The Vagrancy (Karachi Division) Act, 1950.
202- The Land Control (Karachi Division) Act, 1952
203- The House Building Finance Corporation Act, 1952.
204- The Employment (Record of Services) Act, 1952.
205- The Karachi Electricity Control Act, 1952.
206- The Dangerous Cargoes Act, 1953.
                               94




207- The Karachi Rent Restriction Act, 1953.
208- The Karachi Essential Articles (Price Control and Anti
     Hoarding) Act, 1953.
209- The Charitable Funds (Regulation of Collections) Act, 1953.
210- The Pakistan Junior Cadet Corps Act, 1953.
211- The Emergency Powers Ordinance, 1955.
212- The Invalid Provincial Acts Confirmation Ordinance, 1955.
213- The Questioned Provincial Act, Confirmation Ordinance,
     1955.
214- The Pakistan Commission of Inquiry Act, 1956.
215- The United Nations (Declaration of Death of Missing
     Persons) Act, 1956.
216- The International Finance Corporation Act, 1956.
217- The Drugs and Medicines (Indemnity) Act, 1957.
218- The Cotton Act, 1957.
219- The Pakistan Criminal Law Amendment Act, 1958.
220- The Public Order (Meetings) Ordinance, 1958.
221- The Medical Qualifications (Information) Ordinance, 1960.
222- The Coal Mines (Fixation of Rates of Wages) Ordinance,
     1960.
223- The Notaries Ordinance, 1961.
224- The Pakistan College        of   Physicians   and   Surgeons
     Ordinance, 1962.
225- The Employees Social Insurance Ordinance, 1962.
226- The Indecent Advertisements Prohibition Act, 1963.
227- The Central Government Lands and Buildings (Recovery of
     Possession) Ordinance, 1965.
228- The Civil Services (Qualification for Appointment as High
     Court Judge) Act, 1965.
229- The Ex-Government Servants (Employment with Foreign
     Governments) (Prohibition) Act, 1966.
                               95




230- The Dormant Funds (Administration) Act, 1966.
231- The Import of Goods (Price Equalization Surcharge) Act,
     1967.
232- The Pharmacy Act, 1967.
233- The Companies Profits (Workers Participation) Act, 1968.
234- The Enemy Property (Continuance            of   Emergency
     Provisions) Ordinance, 1969.
235- The Federal Employees Benevolent Fund and Group
     Insurance Act, 1969.
236- The War Risks Insurance Continuance Ordinance, 1969.
237- The Bait-ul-Mal Act, 1991.
238- The Islamabad Rent Restriction Ordinance, 2001.
                                     96




                   Officers & Staff of the Secretariat
                 Exchange: 051-9220483, Fax: 9214416
                        Email: ljcp@ljcp.gov.pk

S. No.        Designation                    Name                Office
 1.    Secretary,                   Dr. Faqir Hussain       9214109
                                                            9220581/274
                                                            9220483/101
 2.    PS to Secretary              Raja Khalid Mehmood     9214109
                                                            9220483 Ext. 108
 3.    Joint Secretary – I          Malik Muhammad Iqbal    9217454
                                                            9220483 Ext. 103
 4.    Joint Secretary – II         Sh. Habib-ur-Rehman     9214506
                                                            9220483 Ext. 102
 5.    Deputy Secretary – I         Mr. Mumtaz Ahmed        9214797
                                                            9220483 Ext. 104
 6.    Research Officer – I         Dr. Muhammad Tahir      9208752
                                                            9220483 Ext. 110
 7.    Research Officer – II        Ms. Fowzia Jalal Shah   9209412
                                                            9220486 Ext. 106
 8.    Research Officer – III       Mr. Qasim Aslam         9214793
                                    Minhas                  9220483 Ext. 105
 9.    Research Officer –Fund       Mr. Waseem Javaid       9220486 Ext. 118
 10.   Section Officer              Mr. Muhammad Sajjad     9220370
       (Audit/Accounts)
 11.   Assistant Accounts Officer   Mr. Irfan-Ul-Haq        9220486 Ext. 113
 12.   Superintendent Admin         Mr. Shahid Khalid       9220376
 13.   Superintendent (Research)    Mr. Ihsanullah Khan     9220486 Ext. 111
 14.   Librarian                    Syed Nasir Ali Shah     9203584
                                                            9220486 Ext. 116
 15.   Computer Programmer          Mr. Muhammad Ali        9220486
 16.   Computer Operator            Mr. Farrukh Zia         9220486 Ext. 117
 17.   Incharge Protocol            Mr. Humayun Khan        9220483
                                    Jadoon                  9220486 Ext. 114
                                          97




                                                                          Annex IV
  10.5 Addresses of other Law Commissions


AUSTRALIA                     GAMBIA                          KENYA
Australian Law Reform         The Law Reform Commission       Kenya Law Reform
Commission                    Of the Gambia                   Commission
GPO Box 3708                  PO Box 266                      Box 34999
Sydney NSW 1044               Banjul                          Nairobi
Ph:       (02) 9284 6333      THE GAMBIA                      KENYA
Fax:      (02) 9284 6363                                      Ph: + 254 2 220 888/9
E-mail: info@alrc.gov.au                                      Fax: + 254 2 336 499
URL:      www.alrc.gov.au

BANGLADESH                    GHANA                           LESOTHO
Bangladesh Law Reform         Ghana Law Reform                Law Reform Commission of
Commission                    Commission                      Lesotho
Old High Court Building       PO Box M. 63                    PO Box 33
Dhaka 1000                    Accra                           Maseru 100
BANGLADESH                    GHANA                           LESOTHO
Ph:      + 880 2 9559004      Ph: + 233 21 228898             Ph: + 266 313236
Fax:     + 880 2 9560843      E-mail: Lawrefgh@ghana.com      Fax: + 266 311092
E-mail:lawcom@bdonline.com

CANADA                        HONG KONG                       MALAWI
Law Commission of Canada      Law Reform Commission of        Malawi Law Commission
                     th
473 Albert Street, 11 Floor   Hong Kong                       Private Bag 373
Ottawa Ontario KIA OH8        20th Floor, Harcourt House      Lilongwe 3
CANADA                        39 Gloucester Road              MALAWI
Ph:       + 1613 946 8980     Wanchai                         Ph: + 265 782822
Fax:      + 1613 946 8988     HONG KONG                       Fax: + 265 782532
E-mail: info@lcc.gc.ca        Ph: + 852 2528 0472             E-mail:
URL:      www.lcc.gc.ca       Fax: + 852 2865 2902            lawcommission@malawi.net
                              E-mail: reform@doj.gov.hk.
                              URL:
                              www.info.gov.hk/hkreform

ENGLAND & WALES               INDIA                           MALAYSIA
Law Commission                Law Commission of India         Commissioner of Law
 Conquest House               7th Floor, A Wing               Revision
37-38 John St                 Shastri Bhawan                  Attorney-General‘s
Theobalds Road                New Delhi 110001                Chambers
London WC1N 2BQ               INDIA                           17th Floor, Bank Rakyat
UNITED KINGDOM                Ph: + 91 11 338 3382            Building
Ph:      + 44 171 453 1220    Fax: + 91 11 338 8870           Jalan Tangsi
Fax:     + 44 171 453 1297    E-mail: law Nathan@hub.nic.in   50512 Kuala Lumpur
E-mail:                       URL: www.nic.in/lawcom          MALAYSIA
secretary.lawcomm@gtnet.go                                    Ph: + 60 3 292 3077
v.uk                                                          Fax: + 60 3 293 2021
URL:www.gtnet.gov.uk/                                         E-mail:
                                                              peglib1@po.jaring.my
                                            98




FIJI                            IRELAND                           NAMIBIA
Fiji Law Reform Commission      The Law Reform Commission         Law Reform and
Box 2194, Government            IPC House, 1st Floor              Development Commission
Buildings                       35-39 Shelbourne Road             Ministry of Justice
Suva                            Ballsbridge                       Private Bag 13302
FIJI                            Dublin 4                          Windhoek
Ph: + 679 303 900               IRELAND                           NAMIBIA
Fax: + 679 303 646              Ph: + 353 1 637 7600              Ph: + 264 61 239 280
E-mail: auluivit@govnet.gov.f   Fax: + 353 1 637 7601             Fax: + 264 61 240 064
                                E-mail: info@lawreform.ie

NEW ZEALAND                     SOUTH AFRICA                      California Law Revision
Law Commission PO Box           South African Law Commission      Commission
2590                            Private Bag X668                  4000 Middlefield Road,Room
Wellington                      Pretoria 0001                     D-I
NEW ZEALAND                     REPUBLIC OF SOUTH                 Palo Alto, CA 9403-4739
Ph: + 64 4 473 3453             AFRICA                            UNITED STATES OF
Fax: + 64 4 471 0959            Ph: + 27 12 322 6440              AMERICA
E-mail: com@lawcom.govt.nz      Fax: + 27 12 320 0936             Ph:      +1650 494 1335
URL: www.lawcom.govt.nz/        E-mail:                           Fax:     + 1650 494 1827
                                lawcom@salawcom.org.za            E-mail:
                                URL:                              commission@clrc.ca.gov
                                www.law.wits.ac.za/salc/salc.ht   URL:     www.clrc.ca.gov/
                                ml
NIGERIA                         SRI LANKA                         Connecticut Law Revision
Nigeria Law Reform              Law Commission                    Commission
Commission                      C/56 Keppetipola Mawatha          Room 509A, State Capitol
Federal Secretariat Complex     Colombo 5                         Hartford, CT 06106
1                               SRI LANKA                         UNITED STATES OF
Po Box 60008 Ikoyi                                                AMERICA
Lagos                                                             Ph:      +1 860 240 0220
                                                                  Fax:     +1 860 240 0322
                                                                  E-Mail: Irc@po.state.ct.us
                                                                  URL:www.cga.state.ct.us/lrc/




    PCPPI—1009(06) LJCP—22-09-2006—1,000.

								
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