Best Workout Template by plz18720

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									What Is The Best 3-Day Split For Muscle
Building?
By Ravadongon

With 4-day and 5-day splits becoming more and more popular amongst the bodybuilding
and fitness community, it seems that 3-day splits are slowly dying away. What many
people don’t realize is that 3-day splits can be just as effective, if not more so than 4 or 5-
day splits, which generally don’t allow sufficient time for recovery. So if you’re just
starting out, have been experiencing difficulty in choosing a new split or have reached a
plateau of late, then you’ve come to the right place.

What is the best 3-day split workout? Be descriptive. Include exercises, sets, reps,
length of workout, resting intervals, etc.

As I always do, I will not include one workout that I feel is THE best for the category,
but rather, give you 3 different routines, which are my favourite 3-day splits, that have
been proven to yield solid results in both strength and hypertrophy gains. If you like you
can complete all 3 routines in 36 weeks (12 weeks/routine).

**NOTE I:** Before all your workouts I encourage you perform a proper warm-up to
prevent the chances of an injury occurring and also to allow ‘loosen you up’ and get you
both mentally and physically prepared to perform at your best. Here is a suggested warm-
up, you do not have to follow this but at least make sure you warm up by firstly raising
your body temperature slightly (till you break a light sweat) and then performing some
dynamic stretching and mobility drills:

Warm Up (1 circuit, 30 sec rest between exercises):
- Burpees x 30 sec
- Jumping Jacks x 30 sec
- Jump Rope x 30 sec
- Split Shuffles x 30 sec

Dynamic Stretching
- Walking lunges x 20m
- Running High Knees x 20m
- Running Butt Kicks x 20m
- Running Carioca – 20m
- Lying Scorpion
- Arm Swings x 10 each side
- Side Bends x 10 each side

**NOTE II:** Make sure you deload at least every 6 weeks. This means decreasing
your volume/intensity/frequency for 1 week, so your body has a period in which it can
recuperate from hard intense training.
1. Push/Pull/Legs

Legs

Barbell Front Squats/Barbell Lunges – 4 x 4-6
Romanian Deadlifts/Barbell Good Mornings – 3 x 6-10
Barbell Standing Calf Raises/– 3 x 6-10
Weighted Crunches/Weighed Hanging Leg Raises – 3 x 8-15

Push

Dumbbell Flat Bench Press/Barbell Incline Bench Press – 4 x 4-6
DB Seated Shoulder Press/Barbell Push Press – 3 x 6-10
Barbell Lying Tricep Extensions or Barbell Close Grip Bench Press – 3 x 6-10

Pull

Deadlifts/Snatch Grip Deadlifts – 4 x 4-6
Pull ups/Cable Rows – 3 x 6-10
Dumbbell Seated Bicep Curls/Barbell Preacher Curls – 3 x 8-12

Suggested Schedule

Mon: Legs
Tue: GPP/HIIT Cardio/Off
Wed: Push
Thu: GPP/HIIT Cardio/Off
Fri: Pull
Sat: GPP/HIIT Cardio/Off
Sun: REST/Recovery

Comments:

This workout has been designed for beginners. Your experience level does not matter
when using this template, and even more advanced trainers who have been training high
volume for an extended period of time, may find this switch to low volume training
beneficial.

Work on training heavy for the first exercise for each workout, go to failure and attempt
to increase weight from the previous session, or at least repetitions. Make sure you warm
up properly for the exercise (progress to heavier weights). Get at least 3-4 minutes rest
between work sets (less needed for warm up sets).
For the other exercises do not work till complete failure, stop at least 1-2 reps short.
Work on gradually increasing repetitions each session and eventually load, once you have
reached the end of the allotted range. Get at least 2 minutes rest between these work sets.

Rotate exercises every 3 weeks.

2. Upper/Lower

Upper

Weighted Dips/Barbell Incline Bench Press – 5 x 3-6
Bent Over Rows/Weighted Chin-Ups – 3 x 6-8
Barbell Close Grip Bench Press/Barbell Skullcrushers – 3 x 8-12
Dumbbell/Barbell Curls – 3 x 8-12
Weighted Crunches/Weighed Hanging Leg Raises – 3 x 8-12

Lower

Barbell Low Box Squats/Sumo Deadlifts – 5 x 3-6
Dumbbell Split Squats/Dumbbell Lunges – 3 x 8-15
Reverse Hyper Extensions/Good Mornings – 3 x 8-15
Cable Woodchoppers/Side Bends – 3 x 8-12

Suggested Schedule

Week 1

Mon: Upper
Tue: GPP/HIIT Cardio/Off
Wed: Lower
Thu: GPP/HIIT Cardio/Off
Fri: Upper
Sat: GPP/HIIT Cardio/Off
Sun: REST/Recovery

Week 2

Mon: Lower
Tue: GPP/HIIT Cardio/Off
Wed: Upper
Thu: GPP/HIIT Cardio/Off
Fri: Lower
Sat: GPP/HIIT Cardio/Off
Sun: REST/Recovery
Repeat…

Comments:

This template is designed for intermediate trainers, with around 4 months or more worth
of solid training experience.

Work on training heavy for the first exercise for each workout, go to failure and attempt
to increase weight from the previous session, or at least repetitions. Make sure you warm
up properly for the exercise (progress to heavier weights). Get at least 3-4 minutes rest
between work sets (less needed for warm up sets).

For the other exercises do not work till complete failure, stop at least 1-2 reps short.
Work on gradually increasing repetitions each session and eventually load, once you have
reached the end of the allotted range. Get at least 2 minutes rest between these work sets.

Rotate exercises every other session.

3. Full-body

Full-body A

Flat Barbell Bench Press/Barbell Floor Press – 5 x 3-6
Dumbbell Split Squats/Barbell Lunges – 3 x 8-15
Cable/Horizontal Rows – 3 x 8-12
Good Mornings/Hyper extensions – 3 x 8-12

Full-body B

Barbell Back Squats/Deadlifts – 5 x 3-6
Barbell/Dumbbell Military Press – 3 x 8-12
Cable Pull throughs/Reverse Hyper Extensions – 3 x 8-12
(Weighted) Pull-ups/Lat Pulldowns – 3 x 8-12

Full-body C

Barbell/Dumbbell Bent Over Rows – 5 x 4-6
Barbell Front Squats/ – 3 x 8-15
Barbell/Dumbbell Incline Bench Press - 3 x 8-12
Barbell Stiff Legged Deadlifts/Dumbbell Romanian Deadlift – 3 x 8-15

Suggested Schedule

Mon: Fullbody A
Tue: GPP/HIIT Cardio/Off
Wed: Fullbody B
Thu: GPP/HIIT Cardio/Off
Fri: Fullbody C
Sat: GPP/HIIT Cardio/Off
Sun: REST/Recovery

Comments:

This workout is not designed for beginners. Make sure you have at least 6 months worth
of solid training experience before you try a high frequency split like this.

Work on training heavy for the first exercise for each workout, go to failure and attempt
to increase weight from the previous session, or at least repetitions. Make sure you warm
up properly for the exercise (progress to heavier weights). Get at least 3-4 minutes rest
between work sets (less needed for warm up sets).

For the other exercises do not work till complete failure, stop at least 1-2 reps short.
Work on gradually increasing repetitions each session and eventually load, once you have
reached the end of the allotted range. Get at least 2 minutes rest between these work sets.

Rotate exercises every 2-3 weeks.

When doing a 3-day split, should any muscle groups be trained only once per week?
Any twice per week? Why?

This depends on how long you’ve been training and your recovery abilities, which tie in
with that. If you are beginning or with little experience (less than 2 years worth of
training), then training each muscle group once a week is sufficient for a 3 day split, and
anymore will be pushing the boundaries of overtraining. As you become more
experienced and your recovery abilities improve you can start looking at increasing
frequency and possibly putting extra time into working on weaker areas of your physique,
so they can be brought up.

Who would be interested in doing a 3 day split and how would it help them if they
did?

Anyone can do a 3-day split, regardless of you experience and training goals.

Beginners can start of with low volume splits to learn the ropes and build up a solid base.
Intermediate trainers can start to step up the volume a little (or keep it low voume), as
well as the intensity, as their recovery abilities start to improve. Advanced trainers can
use high volume 3-day splits, or increase frequency, by incorporating full-body workouts.

Bodybuilders, powerlifters and athletes can all use 3-days splits. Although these trainers
all have slightly different goals with their weight training splits, they can all follow a
structure based on weight training 3-days per week, because of its versatility, adaptability
and recovery time.
Also a 3-day split is ideal for busy people, who find themselves always on the go, with
very little time to make it to the gym. 3-day splits make it easier for such people to find
time in their busy lives to workout and keep strong and fit.

Are there any pros that do a three day split?

You’ll find that no IFBB professionals will NOT use 3-day splits, because of their
massive supplement arsenal, that allows them to enhance their recovery abilities by
copious amounts compared to the average trainer. So these guys will tend to use much
higher frequency templates (>5 days per week), due to the fact the more you stimulate a
muscle to grow, the greater opportunity it has to grow (providing the CNS is fully
recovered each workout and you are training hard and smart).

However, a lot of WNBF professionals, and amateur bodybuilders and powerlifters, as
well as a lot of professional athletes in other sports such as football, wrestling, track and
field, boxing, Aussie Rules Football and rugby, use 3-day per week weight training
routines.

Are 3-day splits better for bulking, cutting, maintaining? Why?

These goals are almost entirely dependent on your diet, not on your lifting routine. For
bulking a calorie surplus is required, for cutting a calorie deficit is needed and for
maintaining your current weight, calorie equilibrium should be aimed for.

However Some lifters find that muscle group splits allow them to lift greater loads,
because specific and general fatigue will be less inclined to occur, as say, in upper/lower
of fullbody workouts. So people who follow this train of thought will tend to choose
those types of splits, whether they be 3, 4 or 5 days, for their bulking cycles. Some lifters
also believe that fullbody splits should be used for cutting because of the fact fullbody
splits (which can be performed 2 or 3 days per week) burn much calories per workout, as
more muscle groups are being drawn upon each session.

In my opinion, it really doesn’t matter what type of format you use for
bulking/cutting/maintaining, as long as the format you are using advocates progressive
overload, mainly by encouraging progressively heavier weights to be used, and does not
promote overtraining, then I am all for it. As I said before, three day splits are very
versatile and because of this can be used whatever you goals are.

Bonus: How does a 3-day split match up to a 4-day or 5-day split? Better or worse?
Why?

In my opinion 3-day splits are in general the best option for the natural trainer.

Firstly, three day splits also allow for a lot of variety. You can use a wide range of
different combinations of muscle groups, movements and the like, to construct your own
three day split. You can do muscle group splits like the famous push/pull/legs, or if you
feel inclined to increase the frequency more then a three day upper/lower template or full
body split can be arranged. It doesn’t matter whether you’re training goals are, whether
they are primarily based around strength or hypertrophy gains or combination of the two,
three days splits can be used by anyone, whether you’re experienced or not.

Secondly, three day splits are very convenient. Not everyone has time to go to the gym,
four or five days a week, but only having to go three days per week, makes the equation
much easier for busy people to still get the fitness results they desire.

Thirdly and finally, you are less likely to be overtraining with a three day split, while still
getting intense workouts when you do train. With at least 1 day of recovery or rest
between each workout, your CNS gets a break from high intensity training, and you can
come back the next day, fresh and ready for another intense workout.

Best of luck with your goals,

Ravadongon

								
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