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									          School of Applied Sciences


              Biosciences Division
          HND/Bsc Equine Studies
             Undergraduate
             Pathway Guide

                  2003 – 2004




Dr R Sutton
Lisa Beard
                                    Contents Page
                                                                            Page No
Welcome to the Equine Department of Rodbaston College                          2
Welcome to Biosciences Division of the School of Applied Science………………         3
Using this Guide…………………………………………………………………….                                    4
What is a Programme?………………………………………………………………                                   5
What is a Pathway?………………………………………………………………….                                   5
What is a Route?…………………………………………………………………….                                    5
Aims and Philosophy of Bioscience BSc (honours) Scheme of Award…………….          6
Bsc Equine Studies Award Outcomes………………………………………………                            6
Core Modules………………………………………………………………………..                                      9
Core Option Modules………………………………………………………………..                                  9
Elective Modules……………………………………………………………………                                     9
University Elective Programmes……………………………………………………                             9
Pathway Directory…………………………………………………………………..                                  10
Your Pathway Team………………………………………………………………...                                  10
How the Pathways are Managed……………………………………………………                              11
Terms of Reference………………………………………………………………….                                  12
Staff/Student Liaison Committee…………………………………………………...                         12
Bsc Equine Studies Pathway…………………………………………………....                             13
HND Equine Studies Pathway………………………………………………….                                14
Aims and Philosophy of the Equine HND Scheme ………………                           14
HND Equine Studies Award Outcomes……………………………………………                            14
Equine Higher National Diploma Pathway…………………………………..                         19
Directory of full-time Bioscience Division Teaching Staff 2002-2003 ……………     20
Quick Guide to Equine Modules……………………………………………….                              22
Module Descriptions………………………………………………………………...                                25
A Two-way Contract………………………………………………………………..                                  44
Prizes for Achievement……………………………………………………………...                              45
Communication……………………………………………………………………...                                    46
Contacting Staff……………………………………………………………………..                                  46
Notification of Address……………………………………………………………...                             46
Solving Your Problems……………………………………………………………...                               47
Useful Acronyms……………………………………………………………………                                     47
Rodbaston College Section/Equine Specific Information…………………………..             48
Additionality and British Horse Society Exams…………………………………….                  49
Visits………………………………………………………………………………...                                       49
Study Tour…………………………………………………………………………..                                      49
Shows……………………………………………………………………………….                                          50
Entering a Rodbaston Show…………………………………………………………                               50
Stock Duties…………………………………………………………………………                                      50
Yard Rules…………………………………………………………………………..                                      51
Riding Lessons………………………………………………………………………                                     51
Yard Work…………………………………………………………………………..                                       51
Behaviour……………………………………………………………………………                                        53
Hacking……………………………………………………………………………..                                        53
Glossary of Terms…………………………………………………………………..                                  54




                                         Page 1
Welcome to the Equine Department at Rodbaston College

Welcome onto your first stage of a rewarding yet challenging educational journey. You have embarked
on a HE programme facilitated by us at Rodbaston College and Wolverhampton University. Over the
next two to three years you will be supported by a large team of staff with varying skills and attributes,
all of whom are dedicated to your success in higher education.

Having selected to join the team of two outstanding educational institutions, an understanding of the
role of each will enable you to utilise numerous opportunities on offer to you.

In 2002, Rodbaston college underwent an OFSTED inspection, resulting in the equine department and
the college receiving a grade 2, “…teaching and learning on all courses are good…resources are used
well to promote teaching and learning.” Our excellent standard and quality of both human and physical
resources will play a key role in aiding you to become a knowledgeable and skilled equine
professional. With access and support to all our facilities you will be introduced to independent
learning, equipping you with the necessary tools for employment.

As a well known industry educational institution, Rodbaston college rigourously provides students
with considerable breadth and depth of opportunity. Throughout the year the equine department
organises numerous shows, BHS training and exams, visits, clinics, workshops, forums and a study
tour to a four star championship horse trial, Badminton, Gloucesterhsire.

Your immediate support team include myself, Lisa Beard (HE manager, personal tutor and university
Award Leader), Marcus Clinton (Equine Department Manager) and Dr Chris Perry (Rodbaston Links
Coordinator for Biosciences). It is essential you embrace the variety and diverse communication
channels on offer at Rodbaston and Wolverhampton University. We are all email friendly, ensuring an
efficient and effective response to any issues.


Best of luck

Lisa Beard, HE Curriculum Manager
September, 2003




                                                Page 2
Welcome to the Biosciences Division of the School of Applied Science
On behalf of the Course Management Team I should like to extend to you a very warm welcome and
we would like to take this opportunity to wish you every success in your studies at the University.
The Division offers a full range of study programmes including certificate, diploma, degree and
postgraduate courses, as well as a range of opportunities for postgraduate research. It has an established
reputation for the quality of its study programmes, for an innovative approach to teaching and learning,
and for the friendliness of its staff. Advice and support can be sought not only from your Personal
Tutor, but also from other members of the Pathway Team. You will also be encouraged to make your
own contribution to the effective operation of your Pathway. You will commence your study by
following foundation study in the first year and this will provide a basis on which to base a choice of a
specialist course or a more general programme depending on your interests or career aspirations.

   Course Codes
             HND Equine Studies                                                     51030
             Bsc Equine Studies                                                     51037


Remember that the outcome of your studies could affect the whole of your future career and therefore
study should certainly be your first priority. In resolving to work hard, however, do not forget to have
time for recreation and social activities and take full advantage of the University facilities at your
disposal.
This Pathway Guide should be read in conjunction with the University Undergraduate Scheme Guide.
Together they should provide you with all the basic information that we think you will need for your
period of study here. Obviously even in a document like this we have not covered every query and
problem that you might have about the course. If you find that there is something you need to know,
please do not hesitate to approach your Year Tutor, the Pathway Leader, the Undergraduate
Programme Manager or any other appropriate member of staff with your problem. You can also
consult Student Support and Guidance Services as appropriate. We are pleased to hear your views and
welcome suggestions for ways of improving the operation of the Award.
We wish you every success in your studies and hope that your time at the University of
Wolverhampton will prove to be enjoyable, stimulating and rewarding.

Dr Raul Sutton Bioscience, Pathway Manager
Dr John Mole, Biosciences Module Manager
September 2003




                                                Page 3
Using this Guide

This Pathway Handbook contains all the essential information you will need to understand how the
Bioscience Division undergraduate pathways operate.
You will need also to refer to other sources of information, which are available to you. These include:
Undergraduate Modular Scheme Guide.
This is the document that will contain all the information you require about your programme and how
it is administered at University level. It will contain information on the types of courses available
(Specialist, Joint, Combined, Negotiated) and how you choose a pathway/route. In addition it will tell
you about choice between pathways and within pathways. It will give you the information you require
in order to register your pathway and modules onto the central Student management system. It will
supply generic advice on academic counselling, assessment and details of Level 1 Elective modules
and the University Elective Programmes. This is where you will find the Academic Calendar detailing
semester and term dates, dates for examinations and vacation dates. It is important that you read this
Guide in conjunction with your own Subject pathway guide.

Module Guides. At the commencement of each module that you study, you will be provided with a
module guide which will give full details of the teaching programme, the staff team responsible for the
module, guided reading, and the assessment schedule for the module. These guides are valuable
sources of information that will help you to plan your studies.

University Academic Principles & Regulations. These are contained in the Undergraduate Scheme
Guide, which explains how the credit system operates, and carefully defines the number of credits that
must be studied, and the number that must be passed, at different levels, in order to qualify for the
different awards offered by the University.

Guide To Successful Study. This easily read guide gives you carefully thought out guidance on how
to plan all aspects of your study from taking lecture notes through to planning for your future career.
You should read this early on in your course and try to adopt many of the suggestions that are made.
The guide is the result of over forty years of helping students like you to achieve your maximum
potential.

You are encouraged to read this handbook through now. It will be a considerable advantage to you to
be familiar from the outset with the various aspects of your studies that are described. It may be that
the relevance of some of the sections will not be immediately obvious. Keep it somewhere accessible,
so that you can refer to it as needed.

In order to save yourself and (perhaps others) time, do please read the Handbook carefully. The
answers to many of the questions that you will want to ask over the next three to four years are
contained in it. You should look particularly closely at the section on „Solving Your Problems‟, which
you will find at the back of the Handbook. A list of key words is included in the „Glossary of Terms‟
and common acronyms in „Useful Acronyms‟.

Please note:
In order to develop and improve the Award, it may be necessary on occasions to amend or revise the
details given in this Handbook.




                                               Page 4
What is a Programme?

A programme of study is a record of the modules you have registered for, after you have chosen your
core option and elective modules. This choice should be made with the help and advice of an academic
counsellor. You will receive a transcript on a regular basis showing your programme of study,
consisting of your modules and graded results.


What is a Pathway?

In the University there are two different types of course depending upon what you applied for:
1)      Specialist – This enables you to study one particular subject area in real depth
2)      Joint – Allows you to study two subjects that complement each other
These courses are all made up of modules and the rules governing which modules you must study for
your particular course are called pathway rules and consist of:
Specialist pathways
i) A maximum of 90 credits of core or core option modules in each year (level) of study
ii) A minimum of 60 credits of core or core option modules in each year (level) of study
iii) 30 credits of elective modules in each year (level) of study
Joint pathways
45 credits of core or core option modules in each year (level) of study


What is a Route?

A route is a set of pathways for which you are registered and which leads to your final award:
For a specialist route, you will be registered for a single specialist pathway:
E.g. BSc (Hons) Biochemistry or HND Biochemistry

For a specialist route, the pathway rules require you to select the specified number of core option
modules and then choose your elective modules to match your interests and possible career ambitions.
For a joint route, you will be registered for two pathways, one from each of your chosen subjects:
E.g. the award of BSc (Hons) Biochemistry and Pharmacology is made up of the Biochemistry joint
pathway and the Pharmacology joint pathway

For a joint route consisting of subjects A and B, you will need to:
 Combine the two joint pathways involved;
 Choose any necessary core option modules in either or both pathways;
 Choose your 30 credits of elective modules which can be;
        1) 30 more credits of subject A
        2) 30 more credits of subject B
        3) 15 more credits of subject A and 15 credits of subject B
        4) 15 or 30 credits of another subject
        5) University Elective Programme




                                                Page 5
Aims and Philosophy of the HND/ BSc (honours) Equine Scheme of Awards

The aim of the equine programme is provide you with the tools and qualities to manage organisations,
with specfic focus on appraising and problem solving management issues. To achieve our objectives
we undertake together exercises in teaching and learning, with the emphasis on what you know and can
do as a result of your learning. We have attempted to make clear statements on what learning is about
by defining the outcomes that we should like to see you achieve. We deliver our learning programmes
in the form of modules, clearly individual module have outcomes related to their individual subject
content but no one module can include the full range of practical skills and key skills required. So
programmes define modules to ensure that there is coherence within the subject and you explore the
complete range of learning outcomes of the programme. Thus linking modules in a programme retains
the integrity of the subject.

The equine studies programme has been constructed to fully meet the QAA benchmark description for
equestrian undergraduate awards that can be found on the QAA website (http://www.qaa.org.uk).

Your programme of study is therefore composed of modules, the content of which is shown in a
module guide. The module guides will also show which module specific outcomes and key skills will
be achieved in that module. The complete modular programme thus should satisfy the overall aims and
objectives

Bsc Equine Studies Award Outcomes

Knowledge and Understanding
1. Fundemental aspects of microbiology, cell biology, genetics, chemical principles and business
   necessary to underpin the study of Equine Studies.
2. Detailed aspects of equine science
3. Current advanced aspects of equine management, physiology and nutrition, together with advances
   in animal biology topics and ethical and social issues surrounding genetic modification.
4. IT skills required by the Equine industry
5. A current equine topic selected by the studenet studied by investigation of primary literature
6. The principles required to plan, implement and evaluatae research work

For all programmes a common set of generic academic outcomes and key skills have been identified.
These are:
        A.     Scientific/Practical Skills (specific to subject) be competent in:

    A1. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN
Level 1 Follow detailed instructions for discrete exercises. Where appropriate briefly describe
         additional work which could extend investigation.
Level 2 Perform practical work, including multistage exercises, using less detailed instruction.
         Demonstrate awareness of key features of experimental design (use of controls, calibration
         curves etc) and where appropriate include these in practical design without instructions.
Level 3 Design experiments/procedures for project or to extend investigation with minimum
         guidance.
         Use published methods as a basis for designing procedures and select materials/equipment
         as appropriate.


                                              Page 6
   A2. TECHNICAL COMPETENCE/SKILLS
Level 1 Perform a range of basic techniques and acquire basic practical skills keeping a logbook.
        Work safely from instructions.
        Know main risk factors and take appropriate precautions.
        Make and record observations and measurements.
Level 2 Routinely apply techniques and skills from level 1 to new situations.
        Acquire more complex practical/analytical skills with staff guidance.
        Develop COSHH and hazard analysis practices.
Level 3 Identify weaknesses/deficiencies in technical competence and seek to remedy these from
        appropriate sources.
        Carry out full COSHH and hazard analysis.

    A3. DATA INTERPRETATION
Level 1 Draw simple conclusions from results for discrete exercises and relate to existing
         theoretical principles.
         Carry out simple numerical and statistical procedures on discrete data sets.
Level 2 Interpret results from multistage or more open-ended exercises and account for deviations
         from theoretical expectations.
         With guidance use appropriate more advanced methods of data analysis e.g. t tests, line of
         best fit by least square regression etc.
Level 3 Select appropriate forms of data analysis and apply appropriate statistical tests.
         Discuss/analyse observation based on current theory or postulated hypotheses.

   A4. PRESENTATION
Level 1 Write simple practical report (abstract, introduction, discussion, conclusion) in 3rd person
        past tense according to detailed guidance.
        Record results in appropriate form, according to detailed guidance, with units.
Level 2 Write practical reports routinely, without guidance, with increased emphasis on analysis
        and data interpretation.
        Where appropriate reference citations to sources according to Harvard reference system.
Level 3 Select most effective method for presentation of results.
        Report information in the form of a scientific paper with limited guidance.
        Routinely support analysis/discussion with literature references where appropriate.

B.        Generic Academic Outcomes. Be competent in:

    B1. ACQUIRE INFORMATION
Level 1 Obtain information from a variety of directed sources.
          Obtain information to rectify deficiencies in pre-requisite knowledge base.
Level 2 Obtain information from a variety of unreferenced recommended textbooks and referenced
        literature sources.
Level 3 Acquire information from sources of own choosing including primary literature using key
        word and other search strategies.
        Carry out systematic literature search on a discrete topic.
        Identify limitations of own knowledge in specialist area and remedy this from appropriate
        sources.




                                              Page 7
   B2. RECALL AND USE INFORMATION
Level 1 Apply knowledge to solve/explain structured problems that test understanding of key
        concepts.
        Identify weaknesses/deficiencies in pre-requisite knowledge base.
Level 2 Use information to explain complex facts/observations that are more open ended, in terms of
        accepted theories.
        Apply knowledge to new problems.
Level 3 Use and extend current knowledge base to allow understanding of primary sources of
        information.
        Use knowledge base to inform decision making regarding new areas of study.

B3. CRITICALLY DISCUSS AND EVALUATE
Level 1 Discuss orally ideas and concepts as a basis for developing skills for evaluation/analysis.
        Limited evaluation with tutor guidance.
Level 2 Examine evidence and question and challenge explanations and hypotheses.
        Appreciate the limitations of forms of evidence and explanations.
Level 3 Discuss/evaluate conflicting ideas and data and justify or substantiate an interpretation or
        point of view.

B4. SUMMARISE
Level 1 Summarise information in closed situations.
        Draw conclusions from defined information set.
Level 2 Assimilate and summarise information from a variety of sources.
Level 3 Summarise information about the current state of knowledge on a defined topic.
        Integrate information from a variety of sources.
C.      Contextual awareness:
Level 1     Awareness of wider issues around field of study. Ability to describe these in relation to
            personal beliefs and values.
            Recognise that science exists and develops within the framework of societal needs, is
            constrained by public opinion and technological expertise.
Level 2     Appreciates the interactions of science, society and technology and examines and
            challenges concepts from a number of different perspectives.
            Correlates scientific knowledge base with ethical principles and justifies their
            applications.
            Identifies biochemical/biological processes and products and demonstrates an
            understanding of the features which underlie their commercial importance.
Level 3     Integrates information and concepts from level 1 and 2 in considering science, society
            and technology as interactive systems.
            Reviews and evaluates the commercial significance of biochemical/biological processes
            and products.
            Critically discusses the relationship between research and development and societal
            needs.
            Evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of a given ethical stance in relation to scientific
            practice and experiment.
2. Key skills - competent in:
1. Communication;
2. Problem Solving
3. Improve own learning and performance;
4. Information Technology;
5. Working with others;
6. Application of Number.
                                               Page 8
Core Modules

A Core Module is a module in a programme which must be taken and passed and which contributes
directly to the programme outcomes.

Core Option Modules

A Core Option Module is a module within a defined group, from which a stated minimum number of
such modules have to be taken and passed in order to satisfy the programme outcomes.

Elective Modules

An Elective Module is a free choice module within a programme, where the student may select any
module from the University‟s portfolio, providing pre-requisite and timetable rules are satisfied. These
modules may comprise more modules of the principal or joint subject, modules from
different/contrasting /cognate subjects, skill-based modules or a University Elective Programme.

University Elective Programmes

As part of your programme you may choose to study a language, information technology or business
studies as part of the University Elective Programme. This programme consists of two modules per
level in one of the three designated elective subjects.




                                               Page 9
PathwayDirectory

The following pages give a description of the specialist and combined programme pathways that form
equine programmes offered by the School of Applied Sceinces

You will find that the pathways are divided into several lines for each undergraduate level of study.
The level of study corresponds roughly with that taken in a respective year by a full-time undergraduate
student.
At each level there will be a set of core or core option modules:
CORE MODULES

The core modules must be studied.
CORE OPTION MODULES

The rules defining the core option modules must be fulfilled if the award as whole is to be fulfilled.
ELECTIVE MODULES

Finally for each award there is a list of recommended subject electives. These subject electives have
been carefully chosen so that they complement and enhance the core and core option modules for the
pathway that you have chosen. These modules should be your first choice of elective module. We do
not mean to prescribe your elective modules in offering you recommended subject electives but to offer
you the best direction in making your choice of modules from what can seem like a bewildering array
of modules. This is because there are over 3000 modules in the University‟s modular catalogue, many
of which would not be a good complement to your studies.

Your Pathway Team

The guidance that you are offered comes from the pathway team of Rodbaston and Wolverhampton
University staff:

The Equine Pathway Manager and University Award Leader is Lisa Beard MBA

The Biosciences Pathway Manager Dr R Sutton oversees the University team

The Rodbaston Links Coordinator for Biosciences is Dr Chris Perry.


In addition there are a number of university specialist staff who will help in the teaching of individual
modules.




                                                 Page 10
HOW THE PATHWAYS ARE MANAGED

A Course/Subject Committee oversees the operation of the Awards. The membership, which is
reviewed annually, includes both academic staff and students.
Membership

The proposed membership for the Awards/Subject Committee is given below:-

                                        Room.           Tel.Ext.      E-mail
Chair Prof P Robotham.                  MA104           2136     P.Robotham@wlv.ac.uk
(Dean of School of Applied Sciences)
Associate Dean       Prof T J Hocking   MA118a          2375   T.J.Hocking@wlv.ac.uk
Pathway Manager      Dr Raul Sutton     MA125d          2167   R.Sutton@wlv.ac.uk
Equine Department Marcus Clinton        Rodbaston       3329   marcus.clinton@rodbaston.ac.uk
Manager
Equine Pathway       Lisa Beard         Rodbaston       3381   lisa.beard@rodbaston.ac.uk
Manager
Project Co-ordinator Dr E T Hitchen     MA145           2166   E.T.Hitchen@wlv.ac.uk
Subject Librarian    Mrs J Granger      MD150           2316   Joss.Granger@wlv.ac.uk


Representatives from the student body elected from the Student representatives on the staff/student
liaison committee.




                                              Page 11
Terms of Reference

The Awards Committee meets at least once per semester to approve the annual report and review the
progress of all aspects of the courses. Minutes of Award Committee meetings are held by the School
Administrator (Room MA104) and are open to inspection by any student on the course. Student
elected members will also have copies of minutes covering the meetings during their period of office.

Staff/Student Liaison Committee

The course team undertakes the day to day administration and the team holds at least 3 meetings per
year with student representatives. Elections of student representatives are organised early in the
academic year and you should ensure that you know your currently elected representative. Student
representatives raise issues for discussion at the Committee and other students should inform their
representative about items they want included. The aim of these meetings is to identify both good
practice and problems. We attempt to resolve the problems by deciding on what action to take and the
outcomes are reported in the notes of the meeting which are posted on notice boards. We can only help
you with your problems if we know they exist. Use your representatives

These committees are the main avenue for you to influence the operation and development of the
courses and you are therefore encouraged to participate as much as possible, either directly as a student
elected member, or indirectly via your elected member..
If you have an academic or personal problem let us know as soon as possible. Your tutor has a vital
role as they are familiar with the structure and regulations of the award and will advise you. If in doubt
do not hesitate to consult your tutor or the Awards Manager.




                                                 Page 12
Bsc Equine Studies Pathway
Level 1 Core Modules
          Module Code        Module name                                  Semester    Credits
          EQ1001             Equine Anatomy & Physiology                  2           15
          EQ1002             Equine Husbandry                             Year-long   15
          EQ1003             Equitation Skills                            Year-long   15
          EA1017             Management for Land Based Industries         1           15
          BC1000             Chemistry for Biosciences                    1           15
          AB1101             Introductory Microbiology                    1           15
          AB1102             Cell Biology and Genetics                    2           15


Suggested Elective Modules: Choose one from
          Module Code     Module name                                     Semester    Credits
          BM1008          Human Health & Disease Prevention & Treatment   2           15
          BC1001          Biochemistry                                    2           15



Level 2    Core Modules
                 Module      Module name                                  Semester    Credits
                 Code
                 EQ2001      Equine Physiology & Nutrition                1           15
                 EQ2002      IT Presentational Skills For Equine          1           15
                 EQ2004      Equine Reproduction & Stud Management        2           15
                 EQ2005      Equine Veterinary Managment                  1           15
                 EQ2006      Grassland Management                         2           15
                 EQ2007      Equine Industry                              2           15
                 MK1000      Marketing Planning                           2           15

Core Option Modules Choose One from
           Module   Module        Module name                             Semester    Credits
           Group    Code
           1        EQ2003        Equitation & Coaching Skills            Year long   15
           1        MK2002        Consumer Behaviour                      2           15



Level 3 Core Modules
                 Module      Module name                                  Semester    Credits
                 Code
                 AB3313      Honours Project Module                       Year-long   30
                 AB3017      Science Communication and Graduate Skills    Year-long   15
                 EQ3000      Equine Eneterprise Management                1           15
                 EQ3001      Advanced Phsyiology & Nutrition              2           15
                 BC3001      Advanced Topics in Animal Biology            2           15
                 AB3016      Biosciences In Society: Biotechnology        2           15

Suggested Elective Modules
          Module Code     Module name                                     Semester    Credits
          ED3008          Tutoring Scheme                                 2           15
          BM3022          Biomedical Ethics                               2           15




                                                      Page 13
Higher National Diploma Pathway

We offer both EDEXEL Higher National Diploma and Certificate Pathways in Equine Studies.
The HND/C Pathways are made up of modules which are part of the University Modular Degree and
Diploma Scheme, together with a Vocational Assignment Module which is specific to EDEXEL
Higher National Certificate and Diploma programmes offered in the field of Science and Technology.
The Vocational Assignment Module (VAM) is a key module and aims to provide you with the
opportunity to experience the roles and responsibilities that you need in employment. The module can
be taken as a five or six-week block in a vocational placement during the summer vacation or as a
timetabled module in which you could work on day release. Further details will be provided in a
Group Counselling Session on the Vocational Assignment Module and can be seen in the Module
Guide.

Aims and Philosophy of the Equine HND Scheme of Awards

The outcomes of the programme are the way we describe what you are expected to do by the end of the
programme. These outcomes can be divided into three main areas:
Knowledge and Understanding
Generic Academic
Key Skills
Knowledge and understanding relates to the subject knowledge that forms the basis of your HND
award.

Generic academic outcomes relate to the intellectual scientific skills and awareness of the context of
science in society that you acquire as part of your learning process.
Finally you will improve on the transferable skills that relate to aspects of your study.


HND Equine Studies Award Outcomes

Knowledge and understanding of:
1.     Fudemental aspects of science (Microbiology, Cell Biology and Genetics, Chemical principles)
       necessary to underpin the study of Equine Science

2.     The biological basis of equine form and function
3      The equine industry and equine management

4.     Equitation and teaching skills




                                               Page 14
Generic Academic Outcomes
Scientific/Practical Skills (specific to subject)
At the end of the programme you should be competent in:
      A1. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN
Level 1   Follow detailed instructions for discrete exercises. Where appropriate briefly describe
          additional work which could extend investigation.
Level 2   Perform practical work, including multistage exercises, using less detailed instruction.
          Demonstrate awareness of key features of experimental design (use of controls, calibration
          curves etc) and where appropriate include these in practical design without instructions


    A2. TECHNICAL COMPETENCE/SKILLS
Level 1   Perform a range of basic techniques and acquire basic practical skills keeping a logbook.
          Work safely from instructions.
          Know main risk factors and take appropriate precautions.
          Make and record observations and measurements.
Level 2   Routinely apply techniques and skills from level 1 to new situations.
          Acquire more complex practical/analytical skills with staff guidance.
          Develop COSHH and hazard analysis practices.


      A3. DATA INTERPRETATION

Level 1   Draw simple conclusions from results for discrete exercises and relate to existing
          theoretical principles.
          Carry out simple numerical and statistical procedures on discrete data sets.
Level 2   Interpret results from multistage or more open-ended exercises and account for deviations
          from theoretical expectations.
          With guidance use appropriate more advanced methods of data analysis e.g. t tests, line of
          best fit by least square regression etc.


    A4. PRESENTATION
Level 1   Write simple practical report (abstract, introduction, discussion, conclusion) in 3rd person
          past tense according to detailed guidance.
          Record results in appropriate form, according to detailed guidance, with units.

Level 2   Write practical reports routinely, without guidance, with increased emphasis on analysis
          and data interpretation.
          Where appropriate reference citations to sources according to Harvard reference system.




                                                Page 15
B. Intellectual skills
At the end of the programme you should be competent in:
    B1. ACQUIRE INFORMATION
Level 1   Obtain information from a variety of directed sources.
          Obtain information to rectify deficiencies in pre-requisite knowledge base.
Level 2   Obtain information from a variety of unreferenced recommended textbooks and referenced
          literature sources.
    B2. RECALL AND USE INFORMATION
Level 1   Apply knowledge to solve/explain structured problems that test understanding of key
          concepts.
          Identify weaknesses/deficiencies in pre-requisite knowledge base.
Level 2   Use information to explain complex facts/observations that are more open ended, in terms of
          accepted theories.
          Apply knowledge to new problems.
    B3. CRITICALLY DISCUSS AND EVALUATE
Level 1   Discuss orally ideas and concepts as a basis for developing skills for evaluation/analysis.
          Limited evaluation with tutor guidance.
Level 2   Examine evidence and question and challenge explanations and hypotheses.
          Appreciate the limitations of forms of evidence and explanations.
    B4. SUMMARISE
Level 1   Summarise information in closed situations.
          Draw conclusions from defined information set.
Level 2   Assimilate and summarise information from a variety of sources
C. Contextual awareness:
Level 1   Awareness of wider issues around field of study. Ability to describe these in relation to
          personal beliefs and values.
          Recognise that science exists and develops within the framework of societal needs, is
          constrained by public opinion and technological expertise.
Level 2   Appreciates the interactions of science, society and technology and examines and
          challenges concepts from a number of different perspectives.
          Correlates scientific knowledge base with ethical principles and justifies their applications.
          Identifies biochemical/biological processes and products and demonstrates an
          understanding of the features which underlie their commercial importance.

2. Key skills - competent in:
1.     Communication;
2.     Problem Solving
3.     Improve own learning and performance;
4.     Information Technology;
5.     Working with others;
6.     Application of Number




                                                 Page 16
Scientific/Practical Skills (specific to subject)
At the end of the programme you should be competent in:
    A1. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN

Level 1   Follow detailed instructions for discrete exercises.    Where appropriate briefly describe
          additional work which could extend investigation.
    A2. TECHNICAL COMPETENCE/SKILLS
Level 1   Perform a range of basic techniques and acquire basic practical skills keeping a logbook.
          Work safely from instructions.
          Know main risk factors and take appropriate precautions.
          Make and record observations and measurements.
    A3. DATA INTERPRETATION

Level 1   Draw simple conclusions from results for discrete exercises and relate to existing
          theoretical principles.
          Carry out simple numerical and statistical procedures on discrete data sets.
    A4. PRESENTATION
Level 1   Write simple practical report (abstract, introduction, discussion, conclusion) in 3rd person
          past tense according to detailed guidance.
          Record results in appropriate form, according to detailed guidance, with units.
B. Intellectual skills
At the end of the programme you should be competent in:
    B1. ACQUIRE INFORMATION
Level 1 Obtain information from a variety of directed sources.
        Obtain information to rectify deficiencies in pre-requisite knowledge base.
Level 2 Obtain information from a variety of unreferenced recommended textbooks and referenced
        literature sources.




                                                Page 17
     B2. RECALL AND USE INFORMATION
Level 1 Apply knowledge to solve/explain structured problems that test understanding of key
        concepts.
        Identify weaknesses/deficiencies in pre-requisite knowledge base.
Level 2 Apply knowledge to new problems.
     B3. CRITICALLY DISCUSS AND EVALUATE
Level 1 Discuss orally ideas and concepts as a basis for developing skills for evaluation/analysis.
        Limited evaluation with tutor guidance.
     B4. SUMMARISE

Level 1    Summarise information in closed situations.
           Draw conclusions from defined information set

C1. Contextual awareness:
Level 1     Awareness of wider issues around field of study. Ability to describe these in relation to
            personal beliefs and values.
            Recognise that science exists and develops within the framework of societal needs, is
            constrained by public opinion and technological expertise.

Level 2     Appreciates the interactions of science, society and technology.
            Identifies biochemical processes and products and demonstrates an understanding of the
            features which underlie their commercial importance.

2.     Key Skills – competent in:
1.     Communication;
2.     Problem Solving
3.     Improve own learning and performance;
4.     Information Technology;
5.     Working with others;
6.     Application of Number




                                                 Page 18
Equine Higher National Diploma Pathway

The University regulations governing HND awards are currently under review and this may affect the
choice and recommended pathway for your award. This scheme is up-to-date at the time of writing.
Level 1 Core Modules
          Module Code        Module name                                Semester    Credits
          EQ1001             Equine Anatomy & Physiology                2           15
          EQ1002             Equine Husbandry                           Year-long   15
          EQ1003             Equitation Skills                          Year-long   15
          EA1017             Management for Land Based Industries       1           15
          BC1000             Chemistry for Biosciences                  1           15
          AB1101             Introductory Microbiology                  1           15
          AB1102             Cell Biology and Genetics                  2           15


Suggested Elective Modules: Choose one from
          Module Code   Module name                                     Semester    Credits
          BM1008        Human Health & Disease Prevention & Treatment   2           15
          BC1001        Biochemistry                                    2           15



Level 2    Core Modules
                 Module      Module name                                Semester    Credits
                 Code
                 EQ2001      Equine Physiology & Nutrition              1           15
                 EQ2002      IT Presentational Skills For Equine        1           15
                 EQ2004      Equine Reproduction & Stud Management      2           15
                 EQ2005      Equine Veterinary Managment                1           15
                 EQ2006      Grassland Management                       2           15
                 EQ2007      Equine Industry                            2           15
                 MK1000      Marketing Planning                         2           15

Core Option Modules Choose One from
           Module   Module       Module name                            Semester    Credits
           Group    Code
           1        EQ2003       Equitation & Coaching Skills           Year long   15
           1        MK2002       Consumer Behaviour                     2           15




                                                     Page 19
Directory of Full-time Bioscience Division Teaching Staff 2002-2003

Personal contact should be made with those senior staff members (identified below) with specific
management responsibilities



Lisa Beard              Rodbston College         Equine Award Leader
Tele No: 01785 712209   Email: lisa.beard@rodbaston.ac.uk



Marcus Clinton          Rodbaston College        Equine Department Manager
Tele No: 01785 712209   Email: Marcus.clinton@rodbaston.ac.uk



Prof T J Hocking        MA118            Head of Division
Tele No: 01902 322375   Email: T.J.Hocking@wlv.ac.uk



Dr D J Hill             MA107            Learning & Teaching Co-ordinator
Tele No: 01902 322161   Email: D.J.Hill@wlv.ac.uk


Dr R Sutton             MA125d           Divisional Awards Manager
Tele No: 01902 322167   Email: R.Sutton@wlv.ac.uk


Dr C Perry              MA125d           Rodbaston Links Coordinator (Biosciences)
Tele No:01902 322152    Email: C.J.Perry@wlv.ac.uk


Zoe Carden-Pugh         Rodbston College Equine Science Lecturer
                        Email: zoecp@lycos.co.uk




                                             Page 20
RESEARCHERS/PART TIME STAFF (DEMONSTRATORS)



TECHNICAL AND SUPPORT STAFF



Demonstrators
Mrs Julie Walton              Room MA118

Ms Lynda Green                Room MA118



Biosciences Technical Staff


Mrs Fiona BOWERS              Laboratory Manager (Room No. MA137)
Mrs Elaine ATKINSON           Microbiology

Mr Balbir BAINS               Microbiology

Mr Andrew BROOK               Senior Technician Microbiology

Mrs Ann DAWSON                Senior Technician Microbiology

Mrs Barbara HODSON            Cell Biology & Genetics

Mr Robert HOOTON              Senior Technician Agricultural Unit

Mr Malcolm INMAN              Senior Technician Plant Biology

Mr Nick SKIDMORE              Senior Technician Biochemistry

Ms Lesley BATES               Biochemistry

Mrs Doreen BENNETT            Assist Technician

Mrs Ivy PARKES                Assist Technician




                                                  Page 21
                        QUICK GUIDE TO EQUINE MODULES



Module            Module Title                        Module Leader
Code



LEVEL ONE         Fundamental Principles

SEMESTER ONE
BC1000            Chemistry for Biosciences           Dr C J Perry
EA1017            Management for Land Base            Marcus Clinton/Catherine Hughes
                  Industries

AB1101            Introductory Microbiology           Dr D W Sunderland

YEAR LONG MODULES

EQ1002            Equine Husbandry                    Lisa Beard
EQ1003            Equintation Skills                  Lisa Beard


SEMESTER TWO

AB1102      Cell Biology & Genetics                   Dr P Hooley
EQ1001      Equine Anatomy & Physiology               Z Carden-Pugh

ELECTIVE


LEVEL TWO        Methodologies / Techniques


SEMESTER ONE

EQ2001      Equine Physiology & Nutrition             Z Cardin Pugh
EQ2005      Equine Veterinary Management              Z Cardin Pugh
EQ2002      IT Presentational Skills                  Brent Craig
EQ2003      Equitation & Coaching Skills              Lisa Beard
OR
MK2002      Consumer Behaviour                        Chris Cooper

SEMESTER TWO

EQ2006      Grassland Management                      Ian Sanday
EQ2007      Equine Industry                           Lisa Beard
EQ2004      Equine Reproduction & Stud                Marcus Clinton
MK2001      Marketing Planning                        William Mott

                                            Page 22
LEVEL THREE     Applications

SEMESTER ONE


EQ3002         Equine Enterprise Management       Marcus Clinton



YEAR LONG MODULES

AB3015         Honours Project Module             Dr E T Hitchen
AB3017         Science Communication              Prof. T J Hocking
               and Graduate Skills
SEMESTER TWO

AB3014         Adv. Topics in Animal Biol.        Dr E T Hitchen
EQ3001         Advanced equine Physiolgy          Marcus Clinton
               & Nutrition
AB3016         Biosciences in Society:            Dr ATH Burns
               Biotechnolgy

ELECTIVE




                                        Page 23
Module Descriptions

Every attempt has been made to ensure the accuracy of the Module Descriptions that follow,
particularly with respect to the mode of assessment.
The definitive statement of the assessment criteria for a module is that given in the detailed current
module guide.

Module Code:                       EQ1001

Module Title:                      Equine Anatomy & Physiology

Module Leader:                     Zoe Carden Pugh

Level:                             One

Credit Value:                      15

Pre-requisites:                    None

Semester of Study:                 Two

Timetable Slot:                    TBA

Location:                          Rodbaston College


Brief Guide to Module Content

This module covers the fundamental principles of anatomy and physiology of the horse. It examinies the
structure and function of the skeleton, muscular, circulatory, respiratory and urinary systems.

Assessment Regime

Theory Phase Test 1 & 2      50%
Practical Phase Test 3       20%
Assignment                   30%




                                               Page 24
Module Code:                       EQ1002

Module Title:                      Equine Husbandry

Module Leader:                     Lisa Beard

Level:                             One

Credit Value:                      15

Pre-requisites:                    None

Semester of Study:                 All year

Timetable Slot:                    Practical – Wed 1.20 -2.50
                                   Theory - Monday 9.30 -11.00 (Sem II)

Location:                          Rodbaston College


Brief Guide to Module Content

This module provides students with the necessary skills to plan, organise and manage a yard. A recap is
is provided of the more foundation and routine skills that might be covered at National Diploma level
and for those coming direct from A levels, but for the main focus of this module is to look at the more
managerial aspects of running a yard.


Assessment Regime

Exam                                              30%
Assignment                                        20%
Role play exercise                                10%
Practical                                         40%




                                                Page 25
Module Code:                       EQ1003

Module Title:                      Equitation Skills

Module Leader:                     Lisa Beard

Level:                             One

Credit Value:                      15

Pre-requisites:                    None

Semester of Study:                 All year

Timetable Slot:                    Practical – Wed 9.30 -12.40
                                   Theory – Monday 9.30 –10.50 (Sem 1 only)
Location:                          Rodbaston College

Brief Guide to Module Content

This module is desgined to provide the students with the fundamental principles of equitation,
explaining the theory behind the practical enabling them to progress onto further equitation modules in
subsequent years.


Assessment Regime

Theory Test                          20%
Practical Tests x 3                  70%
Attendence Record                    10%




                                                Page 26
Module Code:                      EA1017

Module Title:                     Management for Land Based Industries

Module Leader:                    Marcus Clinton

Level:                            One

Credit Value:                     15

Pre-requisites:                   None

Semester of Study:                1

Timetable Slot:                   Friday AM
Location:                         Rodbaston College

Brief Guide to Module Content

This module explores some of the fundamental principles of business management. Essentially the
structire of businesses, their role within industry, operations, human resources and management,
financial set up, health and operations and marketing strategies are covered. Assessment is by an
ongoing case study which spans the whole module and allows students to devlop themes over the same
chosen organisation. Some of the early concepts of HE study are introduced through the case study.
The module will be delivered through a series of lectures, workshops and tutorials. Overall the module
will provide an insight into the basic management of land based industries.

Assessment Regime

Report                                30%
Presentation & Report                 30%
Written Assignment                    40%




                                               Page 27
Module Code:                         AB1101
Module Title:                        Introductory Microbiology

Module Leader:                       Dr D W Sunderland

Level:                               One

Credit Value:                        15

Pre-requisites:                      None

Semester of Study:                   One

Timetable Slot:                      Theory – Tues am
                                     Practical –Tues pm

Location:                            Main City Campus


Brief Guide to Module Content

To introduce the student to the diversity of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms, including
bacteria, algae, protozoa, fungi, and the viruses. Relate cellular structure to function and describe viral
structure and reproduction. Practical exercises in techniques for microbial cultivation, enumeration,
identification and control. Relate the beneficial and detrimental activities of microorganisms to vital
applications in medicine, industry and the environment. Assessment methods include theory tests and
practical reports.


Assessment Regime

Theory            Test 1                       15%
                  Test 2                       20%
                  Test 3                       35%
Practical                                      30%




                                                  Page 28
Module Code:                       AB1102

Module Title:                      Cell Biology & Genetics

Module Leader:                     Dr P Hooley

Level:                             One

Credit Value:                      15

Pre-requisites:                    None

Semester of Study:                 Two

Timetable Slot:                    Theory – Tues am
                                   Practical – Tues pm or Tues evening or Thurs pm

Location:                          Main City Campus


Brief Guide to Module Content

This module aims to act as a foundation primer for the study of the biology of cells and inheritance. It
provides an introduction to key concepts in gene manipulation. Emphasis is placed upon the relationship
between organelle structure and function. Additionally the study of inheritance in humans, plants, insects
and microorganisms allows the development of analytical techniques in classical genetics. Finally the
unifying themes of molecular biology integrate classical and molecular views of the cell and the gene.
Assessment methods include phase tests and practical reports.




Assessment Regime

Theory Phase Test 1 (MCQT)                   60%
Theory Phase Test 2 (SAQT)
Theory Phase Test 3 (MCQT)
Practical reports                                    40%




                                                 Page 29
Module Code:                      BC1000

Module Title:                     Chemistry for Biosciences

Module Leader:                    Dr C J Perry

Level:                            One

Credit Value:                     15

Pre-requisites:                   None

Semester of Study:                One

Timetable Slot:                   Theory – Mon pm

Location:                         Main City Campus


Brief Guide to Module Content

This module is intended for those students who have not studied or achieved better than a grade N in
'A' level Chemistry or its equivalent and who intend to take no further Chemistry modules. It covers
the fundamental concepts of chemistry and develops these to give an understanding of chemical
principles required to underpin further studies of biological macromolecules and topics in
Biochemistry, Biomedical Science, Biological Science and Environmental Science. The module is
assessed by an assignment and two in-module tests.




Assessment Regime

Phase Tests 1 and 2                 60%
Assignment                          40%




                                              Page 30
                                             ELECTIVE

Module Code:                      BM1008

Module Title:                     Human Health and Disease –
                                  Prevention and Treatment

Module Leader:                    Dr Petula Nurse

Level:                            One

Credit Value:                     15

Pre-requisites:                   None

Semester of Study:                Two

Timetable Slot:                   Thursday PM

Location:                         Main City Campus


Brief Guide to Module Content

This module provides the basic concepts of health and disease, prevention strategies and treatment
modalities in a range of diseases of varying aetiology. These basic concepts are expanded in the study
of five disease states.


Assessment Regime

Poster Portfolio             100%




                                               Page 31
Module Code:                      EQ2001

Module Title:                     Equine Physiology & Nutrition

Module Leader:                    Zoe Carden Pugh

Level:                            Two

Credit Value:                     15

Pre-requisites:                   EQ1001

Semester of Study:                1

Timetable Slot:                   Mon am
                                  Mon pm

Location:                         Rodbaston College

Brief Guide to Module Content

This module concerntrates on three main areas:
    Systems of information and control, which covers structure of the sensory, nervous and endocrine
      systems
    Systems of circulation, lymphatic, respiratory and urinary
    Equine digestive physiology and principles of nutrition




Assessment Regime

Phase Test 1 & 2                      50%
Pracitcal Test 3                      30%
Written Assignment                    20%




                                              Page 32
Module Code:                       EQ2002

Module Title:                      IT Presentational Skills for Equine

Module Leader:                     Brent Craig

Level:                             Two

Credit Value:                      15

Pre-requisites:                    None

Semester of Study:                 1

Timetable Slot:                    Wed pm


Location:                          Rodbaston College

Brief Guide to Module Content

This module is desgined to give the student the skills to use IT in a context sought after by employers
and industry. To be able tocreate presentations throught he use of PowerPoint and link these skills to
the designing and editing of a web page. To allow the student to have modern and useful skills for an
industry lacking in this expertise and fast demanding it.




Assessment Regime

Assignment                             60%
Presentation                           40%




                                                 Page 33
Module Code:                        EQ2003

Module Title:                       Equitation & Coaching

Module Leader:                      Lisa Beard

Level:                              Two

Credit Value:                       15

Pre-requisites:                     EQ1003

Semester of Study:                  1 &2

Timetable Slot:                     Fri am
                                    Fri pm

Location:                           Rodbaston College

Brief Guide to Module Content

This module builds on skills learnt at level one and in addition introduces teaching skills. Students are
encouraged to develop „feel‟ for riding horses and develop skill of training them as individuals.



Assessment Regime

Exam                                  30%
Coursework                            50%
Coaching Portfolio                    20%




                                                 Page 34
Module Code:                      EQ2004

Module Title:                     Equine Reproduction & Stud Managment

Module Leader:                    Zoe Cardin –Pugh

Level:                            Two

Credit Value:                     15

Pre-requisites:                   AB1102

Semester of Study:                2

Timetable Slot:                   TBA

Location:                         Rodbaston College

Brief Guide to Module Content

This module covers the fundamental principles of reproduction and breeding management of the
equine. It looks at the physiological processes of reproduction, care and management of breeding stock
& genetic principles of breeding programmes.




Assessment Regime

Exam                                  60%
Coursework                            40%




                                               Page 35
Module Code:                     EQ2005

Module Title:                    Equine Veterinary Managment

Module Leader:                   Zoe Cardin -Pugh

Level:                           Two

Credit Value:                    15

Pre-requisites:                  AB1001, EQ1002

Semester of Study:               1

Timetable Slot:                  Thurs am
                                 Thurs pm

Location:                        Rodbaston College

Brief Guide to Module Content

This module provides the student with a working knowledge of the horse in sickness. It covers all
necessary topics to ensure a thorough understanding of the many problems tha my be encountered and
the scope of veterinary treatments, whilst working with horses.




Assessment Regime


Coursework                           100%




                                              Page 36
Module Code:                        EQ2006

Module Title:                       Grassland Managment

Module Leader:                      Ian Sanday

Level:                              Two

Credit Value:                       15

Pre-requisites:                     None

Semester of Study:                  2

Timetable Slot:                     TBA

Location:                           Rodbaston College

Brief Guide to Module Content

This module covers the principles of grassland management. It provides the student with the necessary
skills to ensure that the optimum potential of the grazing is reached. Students will learn the benefits of
grazing other livestock with horses & the various methods of grass conservation




Assessment Regime

Exam                                    70%
Coursework                              30%




                                                 Page 37
Module Code:                        EQ2007

Module Title:                       The Equine Industry

Module Leader:                      Lisa Beard

Level:                              Two

Credit Value:                       15

Pre-requisites:                     None

Semester of Study:                  2

Timetable Slot:                     TBA

Location:                           Rodbaston College

Brief Guide to Module Content

This module provides the student with an overview of the equine industry. It begins with the evolution
of equus and charts its progress through history, analysing its many roles in society. Today‟s industry is
evaluated including current changes in the law and legislation.




Assessment Regime

Exam                                    40%
Assignment                              40%
Presentation                            20%




                                                 Page 38
Module Code:                      MK2001

Module Title:                     Marketing Planning

Module Leader:                    William Mott

Level:                            Two

Credit Value:                     15

Pre-requisites:                   None

Semester of Study:                2

Timetable Slot:                   TBA

Location:                         Telford Campus

Brief Guide to Module Content

This module applies the tools and concepts of marketing as learnt in Management for Land Based
Industries. A core theme is the marketing plan. In the seminars students will explore a wide range of
related issues.




Assessment Regime

Coursework                   100%




                                               Page 39
Module Code:                      MK2002

Module Title:                     Consumer Behaviour

Module Leader:                    Chris Cooper

Level:                            Two

Credit Value:                     15

Pre-requisites:                   None

Semester of Study:                1

Timetable Slot:                   Tues 10 – 1pm

Location:                         Telford Campus

Brief Guide to Module Content

This module explores the actions and reactions of individual and sets of consumers before, during and
after the purchase process, and what influences such actions. This understanding is vital to the
informed development of marketing strategies and planning.



Assessment Regime

Group Research Project                50%
Examination                                        50%




                                               Page 40
Module Code:                       EQ3001

Module Title:                      Advanced Physiology & Nutrition

Module Leader:                     Marcus Clinton

Team Members:                      Zoe Cardin –Pugh
                                   Dr David Hill
                                   Dr Chris Perry

Level:                             Three

Credit Value:                      15

Pre-requisites:                    EQ2001

Semester of Study:                 Two

Timetable Slot:                    Tues AM

Location:                          Rodbaston College

Brief Guide to Module Content

This module will develop an understanding of how control of animal nutrition/feeding can be used to
control/aid animal health issues. An understanding of the biochemistry and microbiology of the
digestive tract along with physiological aspects will be developed to explain nutritional
benefits/disadvantages. Recently developed commercial feed additives (plant extracts, bacterial,
mineral etc) will be explored with respect to claimed health benefits. In addition students will develop
skills on how nutritional research studies are implemented and evaluated at the research level.
Development of advanced literature searching and communication skills will be a key aspect of this
module.

Assessment Regime


Formal end of semester examination           50%
Writen Review                                40%
Oral Presentation                            10%




                                                Page 41
Module Code:                       EQ3002

Module Title:                      Equine Enterprise Management

Module Leader:                     Marcus Clinton

Team Members:                      Lisa Beard
                                   Dr R. Alcock

Level:                             Three

Credit Value:                      15

Pre-requisites:                    EQ2007

Semester of Study:                 One

Timetable Slot:                    Tues AM

Location:                          Rodbaston College

Brief Guide to Module Content

This module investigates the characteristics and nature of the Equine industry by looking at the diverse
range of enterprises, the unique management styles and demands, the demographics of the industry and
aims to blend these areas together and bring them to life through a combination of lectures, work shops
and visits. The central element in demonstrating competance will be live organisational experience on
two levels. The first level will be an Equine show eg dressage and the second level will be either a
conference or lecture demonstration. The students will be expected to manage the experience in groups
and have full autonomy over strategies including marketing, finance and style and nature of the event,
encapsulating and using knowledge and skills gained from this and previous studies.

Assessment Regime


Assignment                                   50%
Organisation of Equine Event                 50%




                                                Page 42
Module Code:                        AB3014

Module Title:                       Advanced Topics in Animal Biology

Module Leader:                      Dr E T Hitchen

Level:                              Three

Credit Value:                       15

Pre-requisites:                     AB2021 (AB2212)

Semester of Study:                  Two

Timetable Slot:                     Tues pm

Location:                           Main City Campus

Brief Guide to Module Content

This module will allow students to explore advanced topics and the latest developments and issues in
the field of animal biology. By its very nature the content will vary from year to year and not all topics
will be covered in all years. After an introduction to the topics through key note lectures students will
use their bibliographic skills to access primary sources on these topics in preparation for tutorials and
exam.




Assessment Regime


Formal end of semester examination            100%




                                                 Page 43
Module Code:                        AB3015

Module Title:                       Honours Project

Module Leader:                      Dr E T Hitchen

Level:                              Three

Credit Value:                       30

Pre-requisites:                     Progression requirements for Honours

Semester of Study:                  Year Long

Timetable Slot:                     Various

Location:                           Main City Campus

Brief Guide to Module Content

This is a double-sized module to provide ample opportunity for a thorough piece of scientific research.
The initial scientific question and experimental design are formulated by the supervisor and the
student, working together. A set of practical, hands-on experiments is conducted, usually in a
laboratory setting. Observations and measurements are made. Results are accumulated and subjected
to appropriate statistical analyses. A project report, constructed along the lines of a scientific research
publication, presents the material and puts it into the literature context. Through this process, the
student learns about the scientific method first-hand, from formulating a question, testing it
experimentally, collecting and manipulating data, interpreting the results and presenting them in an
appropriate fashion.



Assessment Regime

Project Report                         80%
Viva voce examination                  20%




                                                  Page 44
Module Code:                               AB3016

Module Title:                              Biosciences in Society: Biotechnology

Module Leader:                             Dr A T H Burns

Level:                                     Three

Credit Value:                              15

Pre-requisites:                     NONE (Social Aspects of Science and Technology-type module) but
                                    students should have an appropriate background to contribute to and
                                    benefit from an expanded discussion of the wider social, legal and ethical
                                    implications arising from the latest advances in the fascinating science of
                                    Biotechnology. Consequently students should normally have studied and
                                    passed at least two level 2 modules.

Semester of Study:                         2

Timetable Slot:                            Thurs a.m.

Location:                                  Main City Campus

Brief Guide to Module Content

To provide a positive, enjoyable learning experience using scientific debate, tutorials and lectures to investigate all of the
ramifications occurring in the rapidly developing science of Biotechnology by consideration of social, legal and ethical
issues. To develop an appreciation of both the risks and the benefits and positive application of many biotechnological
processes. To enable students to synthesise varied view points into a rational synopsis in controversial areas like genetic
screening of employees, foetal detection of abberant genes and ownership of information derived from sequencing human
genomes. To contribute to the development of communication, organisational and scientific skills.




Assessment Regime

Coursework                                     50%
Open examination                               50%




                                                           Page 45
Module Code:                      ED3006

Module Title:                     Tutoring Scheme

Module Leader:                    Anne Hollinshead

Level:                            Three

Credit Value:                     15

Pre-requisites:                   None

Semester of Study:                2

Timetable Slot:                   Fri pm for training. Flexible for tutoring placement

Location:                         Walsall

Brief Guide to Module Content

This is an independent study module and students are explected to undertake responsibility for their
own learning.



Assessment Regime

Presentation content         60%
Presentation skills          pass/fail (peer assessed)
Self-assessment profile      20%
Link teach assessment        20%




                                                Page 46
Module Code:                      BM3022

Module Title:                     Biomedical Ethics

Module Leader:                    Dr Iain Coleman

Level:                            Three

Credit Value:                     15

Pre-requisites:                   Entry to Level 3

Semester of Study:                2

Timetable Slot:                   Monday AM

Location:                         City Campus

Brief Guide to Module Content

This module provides students from a biological and healthcare sciences, academic background with a
knowledge and comprehension of the philosophy and ethical thinking related to the experience of
human and animal subjects in medicine and related biomedical research. This is extended by an
evaluation, articulation and application of those ethical principles in biomedicine.



Assessment Regime

Timed Class Exercise        35%
Group Presentation          65%




                                                Page 47
Module Code:                      AB3017

Module Title:                     Science Communication and Graduate Skills

Module Leader:                    Professor T J Hocking

Level:                            Three

Credit Value:                     15

Pre-requisites:                   --

Semester of Study:                One

Timetable Slot:                   Thurs am

Location:                         Main City Campus

Brief Guide to Module Content

This module is core on all Biosciences programmes and provides an opportunity for students to
develop and demonstrate key skills to a level or competence expected in graduates. It covers a
dissertation component, linked to the honours project, which develops literature review, scientific
writing and abstracting skills, oral communication skills, career management skills, personal
development and time management skills, teamworking skills, project management skills. It is not
linked to a formal semester-based timetable and will be carried out in a range of formats during the
final year.




Assessment Regime

Communications:      Dissertation & Abstract              100%

Graduate skills:     Oral communication
                     Career management
                     Time management
                     Teamwork
                     Project management




                                               Page 48
A Two Way Contract

The Award Management Team and Staff will generally endeavour to give you the support and advice
you will need to complete your studies successfully and on most occasions lend a sympathetic ear. It
is, however, important you realise that you are entering into a form of contract or agreement with those
responsible for you and that you too, have certain responsibilities. In the time that you are with us, you
will have to make a number of decisions affecting your study and by implication, your career and
future life. Only you can make these decisions. In particular, you will be expected to ensure that:
- you plan and register your programme of study as advised by the Award Team and via the student
     access points. Failure to register correctly could mean that you are not able to follow your
     preferred programme of study. Similarly, any changes should be made through the Award Team
     and at the student access points
- you complete all elements of assessment according to the instructions given to you by the Module
     Leaders
- you take advantage, when necessary, of the counselling facilities available to you
- you attend classes at all times unless circumstances prevent you from doing so
- you inform the Award Leader or Year Tutor of any circumstances likely to affect your academic
     performance
- you immediately inform the student registries of any change of address or absence from the
     University
- you check regularly the Award notice-boards and respond promptly to notices and notes posted by
     the Award Team.




                                                 Page 49
Prizes for Achievement

There are prizes available to reward outstanding performances by students during the course of their
studies.

Best Equine graduate

There is an annual award of for the best biosciences undergraduate degree achievement. This will be
decided when the Biosciences award board meets in the summer vacation.

Best Equine HND student

There is an award to the best biosciences full-time HND student, which will be decided at the annual
BTEC Award Board during the summer vacation.

Best Equine Year 1 student

There is an award to the best bioscience (BTEC or BSc) year 1 student performance, which will be decided
by the Biosciences Subject and Award Committee during the summer vacation.




                                                Page 50
Communication

One of the most important ingredients contributing to the success of any organisation (and the
operation of a degree Award such as BSc Biochemistry is no exception) is an effective system of
communication. At any time we may need to contact you on important matters relating to your work or
personal life. You too from time to time, will want to consult us, possibly urgently.
It is important that you follow some of the guidelines below:
Regularly check the BSc Biosciences notice-boards on a regular basis, preferably daily. If you are
unable to do this yourself, ask some to check for you. There are separate panels for each year of the
course.
Ensure that your tutor has your e-mail number; get used to the idea of checking your e-mail on a
regular basis.

Contacting Staff

The staff try to be as helpful as possible and you should not feel inhibited about approaching any
member of our staff that you think may be able to help you at any time. Clearly, staff have a large
number of commitments, and it is sensible, except in extreme emergency, to try to make an
appointment to ensure that the person you wish to consult is available to talk with you.
If the member of staff that you wish to contact is not there, don‟t just go away. Rather, leave a
message or e-mail explaining briefly your query and problem and giving times when you could meet.
Similarly you are expected to attend counselling and cohort meetings whenever arranged.
As part of your experience at the University it is important for you to develop evaluative and critical
skills. Accordingly, you will be given many opportunities to feed back your opinions on the content of
your course, and on the methods of teaching delivery and assessment. The feedback will be achieved
in various ways: by Award Committee representatives, by direct contact with the staff teaching the
module, through year tutors and by questionnaires. Please don‟t hesitate to avail yourself of this
feature of our Award - it can be a useful learning process for both parties!

Notification of Address

Do please make sure that the student registries has your up to date home and term time address (and
„phone no.). It may be necessary to contact you urgently and this can only be done if we have both
your current addresses correctly recorded.
We also need your address to contact you about your end of Semester/Year results.




                                                Page 51
Solving Your Problems
This section is designed to save the time of both you and academic staff. Listed below are the initial
points of contact for the different questions and problems that you might encounter. Please train
yourself to look things up in this guide before you approach someone for help.
Questions or problems                       Contact
Approval for transfer to other schemes      Pathway Leader
or Awards
Permission for leave of absence             Pathway Leader
Withdrawal from the University              Pathway Leader
Timetable                                   Student Access Point/Student Server
Examination timetable                       Student Access Point/Student Server
Regulations                                 Year Tutor/Pathway Leader
Enrolment                                   Student Access Point
Programme Registration/Amendment            Year tutor/assistant year tutor
Careers                                    University Graduate Careers Service/
                                           Divisional Careers Officer (Dr Protheroe)
Projects                                    Relevant Subject Project co-ordinator
Course Committee                            Student representative/ Year Tutor
Discussion of academic performance          YearTutor/Personal Tutor
Personal or domestic problems               University Counselling and Guidance Service
Absence through ill health.                 Student Access Point
Extension for course work assignment.       Student Access Point /Year tutor
Content of a specific module                Module Leader
APA (Accreditation of Prior Achievement) Pathway Leader
Matters relating to appeals                 Pathway Leader/ Dean of School

Useful Acronyms
GAO          Generic Academic Outcome
LRC          Learning Resources Centre (Library)
KS           Key Skill
SAP          Student Administration Point
SAS          School of Applied Sciences
UGCS         University Graduate Careers Service
UW           University of Wolverhampton
UWSU         University of Wolverhampton Students' Union



                                               Page 52
          EQUINE DEPARTMENT

                  Bsc/HND
         Equine Specific Information




Marcus Clinton
Lisa Beard




                     Page 53
Additionality and British Horse Society Exams
Additionality takes place on a Tuesday OR Wednesday afternoons. The BHS additonality is centred
around the British Horse Society Exams and coordinated by Mandy Lewis and Lisa Beard. You will
receive a full induction on how this works as part of your induction.

In short we aim to provide for those that want an individual training plan towards BHS exams.
This will include regular tutorials on your progress and training towards the riding and stable
management part of the exam you are aiming for.

If you are committed to your training and attend all your training sessions and the equine team feel you
have a realistic chance of passing the exam you are working towards, then the College will pay for your
exam fee. However you must also be a member of the BHS (all exams) and have passed your riding
and road safety (all exams above stage 1).

Visits

A number of visits have been Identified for each course as important to the curriculum and these form
the basis of the visit money fund that you paid at the start of the course. Details of these will be given
to you by your course manager – Lisa Beard at the appropriate time.

There are a number of additional optional visits, details of these will appear on the notice boards and
include events such as Olympia. There will also be lecture demonstrations held at Rodbaston with
leading Equine personalities and we would actively encourage you to attend these and purchase tickets.
Try and plan ahead and save a little money if you can so you can get to some of these great learning
opportunities. Remember you could always earn money by working a few shows.

Study Tour

In 2003/04) we are planning a HE trip to Badminton Horse Trials for the duration of the competition.
Commencing on Thursday 30 April 04 and staying on sight (in tents and/or caravans) until Sunday 2
May 04, you will absorb the ambience and scale of the competition, combined with observing the
riding and management skills of the worlds best event riders. A student committee of volunteers will
organise and finalise arrangements early in Semester 1.




                                                 Page 54
Shows

During the academic year many shows will take place at the Equestrian Centre at an average of two a
week. These include unaffiliated and affiliated show jumping and dressage, combined training and
affiliated eventing. They are run to benefit your time at Rodbaston, to allow you to experience
competing and hands on show organisation and planning. Other benefits include raising the profile of
the College to local employers and the equine industry at large; which can only help when it's your turn
to seek employment and recognition.

By running so many shows we are also able to raise some funds to put back into the resources from
which you benefit daily. For full details of the show programme you will be given a copy of the show
schedules during induction.

Entering a Rodbaston Show

We wish to see as many of you as possible having a go and it couldn't be easier. All students benefit
from reduced entry fees £2.00 per dressage test and a £ 1 off advertised show jumping entry fees. If you
don't have your own horse at College or to bring from home then don't worry. We aim to provide you
with a horse to compete on free of charge. T'o do this you need to book a horse through the yard
manager, she may not be able to give you your first choice but every effort will be made to allocate you
a suitable horse.

Once you have got a horse booked it's your responsibility to enter the show as in the show schedule.
It's also your responsibility to ensure the horse is well turned out, looked after during the show and put
away properly after the show. Failure to do this will result in this privilege being withdrawn. So good
luck, get stuck in and enjoy. Many people do their first show at Rodbaston and you have to do it some
time!!

SO MAKE THE MOST OF YOUR TIME AT RODBASTON – HAVE A GO !!



Stock Duty

As a „potential‟ manager for the industry, all HND equine students must complete a minimum of one
week of stock duties. You must statisfy the assessment critieria, and achieve a minimum grade of a
B13. The criteria range from mucking out to motivation and leadership of other students. If you are
unsuccessful in one or more criteria, you will repeat a weak of stocks. You will be reassessed, with the
new assessment being independent of any previous grades. Ultimately you must gain a minimum B13
to pass the assessment by 29 March 2003 in order to complete Equine Husbandry, EQ1002.

It is YOUR responsibility to tell the yard manager the dates you will commence stocks. Flexibility has
been created in order for YOU to organise busy work schedules and personal commitments to achieve
this assessment.




                                                 Page 55
Yard Rules

       When riding you must always be correctly dressed, e.g. PASOl5/BSENl384 standard riding hat
        Jodhpurs or breeches
       Riding boots, long or short UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES SHOULD MUCKERS,
        TRAINERS OR WELLINGTONS BE USED TO RIDE IN.
       No one should be mounted on a horse on the yard.

Riding Lessons

You must always be correctly dressed as follows:-
    PAS O15 ENl384 standard riding hat, if a silk is needed it must be plain blue or black - no
      bright or multi-coloured silks Plain coloured jodhpurs or breeches.
    Long riding boots
    Gloves
    You will be required to wear a shirt and tie; or Rodbaston Equestrian Polo Shirt as stated in
      your clothing list. Failure to do so will result in your instructor sending you out of the lesson.
      ALL SHIRTS MUST BE TUCKED IN !
    AT NO TIME WHILST ON THE YARD OR RIDING MUST JEWELLERY BE WORN,
      THIS INCLUDES EARRINGS, NOSE RINGS OR OTHER BODY PIERCING. THIS IS FOR
      YOUR OWN SAFETY.
    LONG HAIR MUST BE TIED BACK AT ALL TIMES, AND HAlRNETS WORN AS
      APPROPRIATE

Pre- and Post-Riding Lesson Procedure
    You will notice on your timetable that you have a ½ hour slot before and after your 1 hour
       riding lesson. You MUST arrive on time at the start of the 'Tack up' slot. Students who are late
       may not be allocated a horse, and will therefore miss their riding session. This 'Tack up' time
       has been set aside to enable you to groom and tack up your horse correctly before you ride.
       Sloppy turn out WILL NOT be tolerated and any horse that arrives at a lesson that has not been
       properly groomed; i.e. has straw in its tailor boots; or is incorrectly tacked up, will be sent back.

       Similarly, the ½ hour „Untack' slot is to allow you to care for the horse after the lesson,
        ensuring that any sweat or sweat marks are washed off correctly and that the tack is cleaned. If
        you fail to do this black marks will be awarded.

Yard Work

When working on the yard the following points apply:

       When mucking out, grooming and tacking up, etc. ALL horses must be tied up.

       When tacking up, ALL horses must be groomed first - to reduce the chance of tack sores,
        check for problems and to make them presentable. This should include removal of stable or
        grass / mud stains; removal of bedding from mane and tail and laying the mane on the right
        hand side with a damp (not wet) water brush.

       Always pick out the horse's feet into a skip before bringing out of the stable. Feet must also be
        picked out before the horse is returned to the stable after exercise or after being turned out.

                                                  Page 56
   Always skip out the box ~ bringing the horse out of the stable. If you do not do this you will be
    asked to leave your lesson and skip out the box before you are allowed to rejoin the lesson.

   Gloves and hat to be worn at all times when leading horses, and the correct leading technique
    to be used, i.e. walking at horse's side and not dragging it along. If leading a tacked up horse,
    the reins should be taken over the horse's head, unless a martingale is worn, and the stirrups
    run up. Always lead a horse holding the leadrope or reins in two hands. Care to be taken at all
    times when leading horses.

   Headcollars should be tied up off the floor at all times. A dangling headcollar could cause a
    serious accident! If a horse is left tacked up, reins must be crossed up through the throat lash
    (NOT tucked behind stirrups!) and he must be tied up safely with the headcollar on correctly.

   Sensible footwear e.g. boots, Muckers, etc. should be worn at all times when handling horses
    i.e. no trainers, high heels or sandals.

   Always close the stable door when handling a horse in the stable and after bringing a horse out
    of the stable. Gates and electric fences to be closed / done up at all times.

   Tack must ALWAYS be cleaned thoroughly and bits washed every time they are used. This
    will be checked and you will be asked to clean it again if it is not cleaned properly. Numnahs
    should be detached and laid over the saddle after use. All horse boots must be brushed or
    wiped clean after use. AL WAYS check the tack notices or ask a member of staff if you are
    unsure if a horse needs to wear boots or a particular piece of tack. No tack should be 'borrowed'
    for another horse without the permission of the yard staff.

   Rugs must be hung up outside the box when not in use. Rugs with leg straps should have the
    straps clipped up if not in use or being removed. If a rug is left over the horse whilst waiting to
    be ridden then all straps must be left undone.

   Correct procedures for rugging up and tacking up to be used AT ALL TIMES!

   Empty haynets must be taken down

   All tools should be cleaned and put away immediately after use.

   ALL breakages and accidents MUST be reported to a member of staff.

   Students must farniliarise themselves with and adhere to all Health & Safety / Fire notices
    around the yard.

   No bags or coats to be left on the yard - these must be put in the lockers provided at the
    Grange.




                                              Page 57
Behavior
    No shouting or abusive language on the yard at any time. - No chewing gum to be eaten on the
      yard.

      Students must be polite and courteous to anyone on the yard. Visitors, clients, horse owners and
       Councillors / Governors may appear at any time and should be greeted and help offered.

Hacking

      Students must be accompanied by a member of staff if they ride round the College tracks. Only
       students on their own horses are allowed to ride around the tracks on their own, even then it
       would be advisable to go in pairs. All riders on the College tracks must be courteous to other
       people and riders and slow down to a walk to pass anyone.

      If the track is wet and muddy, please only walk. If one wet trail is being worn please walk to the
       side of it to limit the damage to the track. Never ride in any field (off the track) unless you are
       sure that the field is stubble awaiting nitration or has been designated for horse use (ask staff).

      If the red shooting flags are flying by the football field do not go down into Pig \ Wood. Check
       the noticeboard or ask the staff for availability.

      Leave all gates as you find them.

       I have read the rules and agree to abide by them.




   Signed
……………………………………………………………………Date:……………………………




                                                 Page 58
GLOSSARY OF TERMS
ASSESSMENT REQUIREMENTS OF A MODULE. The total range of coursework assignments
and/or examinations that must be passed to be awarded credits for the module.
ASSESSMENT COMPONENT. Each assessment task which must be passed for successful
completion of the module. A component may consist of a number of elements.
ASSESSMENT ELEMENT. A sub-division of an assessment component.
ASSIGNMENTS: An item of coursework.
AWARD: The qualification achieved by a student when they have obtained the required number of
credits at an appropriate level. All awards have an Award title that describes the programme of study.
AWARD LEADER: A member of academic staff responsible for the management of a named award or
group of awards
BTEC. The Business and Technician Education Council. which licences the University to Award
Higher National Diplomas and Certificates.
CAMPUS REGISTRY. The office on each campus through which registry services are made available
to students.
CAREERS AND GRADUATE EMPLOYMENT SERVICE. A centre with responsibility for advising
students on employment and post graduate opportunities.
COMBINED AWARDS. Awards whose regulations recognise more than one subject of study in the
title of the award..
CORE MODULE. A compulsory module which must be taken and passed
CORE OPTIONAL MODULE. A module in a range of modules that must be studied for a student to
receive an award.
CO-REQUISITE: A module that must be studied simultaneously with another module
COURSE COMMITTEE: A Committee that meets once each semester to consider issues and
problems raised by students and staff. Its membership comprises the management team, subject leaders
and student representatives.
COURSEWORK: The total number of assignments that have to be completed during the module.
CREDIT: The number of credits gained when a module is passed, based upon 1 credit for every ten
hours of study..
DEFERRAL: The action taken by an Assessment Board to postpone to a later date a decision on a
student who has not completed all or part of the assessment for a module, modules or programme of
study.
ELECTIVE MODULE A „free‟ choice module included to form a coherent part of the student
programme.
EXAMINATION: A timed assessment task within a module undertaken under controlled conditions.



                                               Page 59
AWARD BOARD: The committee responsible for making decisions on student progression and final
award and degree classification.
EXTENSION. The changing of a published deadline for submission of a piece of coursework when a
student has a valid reason for being unable to meet that deadline.
EXTENUATING CIRCUMSTANCES. A problem that a student believes has adversely affected
his/her performance in any coursework or examination and which is presented to an Award
Assessment Board
GRADE POINTS: The marks awarded for assignments, course work, examinations and the final grade
of a module. A16,A15,A14,B13,B12,B11,C10,C9,C8,D7,D6,D5 are all pass grades. E4,F3,F2,F1 are
all fail grades. F0 is given for non-attendance without certified cause of all or any coursework
assignments. Modules for which assessment is incomplete are allocated an I grade. Z grades are
awarded for cheating/plagiarism.
LEVEL 1 MODULES: Modules studied mainly during Part I that are introductory and serve as pre-
requisites to level 2 modules.
LEVEL 2 MODULES: Modules studied mainly during the second year which are intermediate in
standard and which normally have introductory or level 1 modules as pre-requisites. They may also
have other intermediate modules as pre-requisites.

LEVEL 3 MODULES: Modules studied mainly during the third year that are advanced modules,
normally having a pre-requisite level 2 module. They may also have level 3 modules as pre-requisites.
The levels 2 and 3 credit envelope is 300 (315 for sandwich).
LINKED SCHEME: An arrangement whereby all the full-time and Sandwich degree and Honours
degree courses (together with their part-time, Cert HE and DipHE versions) are linked in a standard
modular structure enabling appropriate modules to be taught in common between awards.
MITIGATING CIRCUMSTANCES. A problem that a student believes has adversely affected his/her
performance in any coursework or examination and which is presented to an Award Assessment Board
MODE OF STUDY. Method of attendance - full-time, part-time or sandwich.
MODULE: A fraction of a programme being the equivalent of one quarter of the work normally
undertaken by an honours degree student in a semester of full-time study. Each module is equivalent to
15 credits. Each 15 credit module aims to generate an average workload of 10 hours per week. Thus
study for 60 credits in a semester will normally produce 40 hours of study per week.
MODULE GUIDE: The detailed description of a module's content and assessment procedure.
MODULE LEADER: The member of staff responsible for the organisation of the module.
PACE OF STUDY: The number of credits studied during a semester. For full-time students the
minimum is 45 credits a semester or 90 credits per year. The normal pace of study is 60 credits per
semester of 120 credits per year. Exceptionally a student may study for a maximum of 75 credits per
semester.
Part-time students may study up to a maximum of 45 credits per semester and must complete their
programme within the maximum period of registration.
PART I and II: Courses are divided into Parts I and II. Part I is the equivalent of the first year of a full-
time course and Part II is the equivalent of the second and third years of a full-time course. In Part I,
introductory or level 1 modules are studied. In Part II, level 2 modules are normally studied in year 2

                                                   Page 60
and level 3 modules in year 3 but considerable flexibility exists in that any level of module can be
studied at any time providing the required prerequisites have been obtained.
PATHWAY REGISTRATION FORMS: The forms that have to be completed to register (or to modify
a previous registration) for a module. FAILURE TO REGISTER CORRECTLY MAY AFFECT
YOUR PROGRESS ON THE AWARD
PLAGIARISM. Any attempt to incorporate a significant amount of unattributed direct quotation from,
or unattributed paraphrasing of the work of another within a piece of assessed work.
PRACTICAL WORK: Supervised laboratory-based activities.
PRE-REQUISITE: A module specified as a pre-requisite to a later module must normally be studied
and at least an E3 Grade obtained before the later module can be attempted.
PROGRAMME OF STUDY: A complete series of studies undertaken by an individual student leading
to the award of a degree, diploma or certificate.
PROGRESSION: Qualification to proceed to the next stage of the Award which normally depends on a
specified number of credits
RETAKE: The opportunity following repeated failure of a component within a module to study the
whole module and to fulfil all the requirements of that module. A maximum grade is not imposed on a
repeated module.
RESIT: The opportunity for the retrieval of the failed component(s) of a module following the award
of an E or F grade. The term applied to both coursework and examination.
SAP. Student Access Point
SEMESTER: Half an academic session. Each semester is 15 or 16 weeks duration and comprises a
week for counselling and/or other course related activities and a week for assessments.
SENIOR ACADEMIC COUNSELLOR. An academic member of staff who advises students on
academic matters and programme planning but has specific responsibility for validating programmes of
study.
STUDY TIME: This is the total amount of time that should be devoted to a module in one week. The
time includes all class contact and private study. Each 15 credit module involves 10 hours of study
time per week.
VALIDATION. The process whereby the University judges a programme of study to be appropriate to
lead to the award of an approved qualification of the University.




                                               Page 61

								
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