Basic Real Estate Contract Chapter 7

Document Sample
Basic Real Estate Contract Chapter 7 Powered By Docstoc
					    BASIC
APPRAISAL
PRINCIPLES
                                               TA B L E O F CO N T E N T S
                Suggested Syllabus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .xiii
                Preface. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .xiv
                Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv
CHAPTER 1: Real Property Concepts and Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
                     Basic Real Property Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
                     What Is an Appraisal? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
                           Real Property versus Personal Property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
                           Attachments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
                             Legal Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
                             Appraiser Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
                     What Is Being Transferred? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
                           Real Estate versus Real Property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
                           Real Property Rights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
                           Appurtenances. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
                     How Do Improvements Affect an Appraisal? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
                           Improvements to the Land: Land versus Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
                           Improvements on the Land: Fixtures versus Improvements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
                     Real Property Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
                           Value Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
                             Demand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
                             Utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
                             Scarcity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
                             Transferability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
                           Physical Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
                             Uniqueness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
                             Immobility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
                             Indestructibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
                     Legal Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
                        Government Survey System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
                        Lot and Block System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
                          Plat Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
                        Metes and Bounds System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
                        Other Points About Legal Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
                     Case Study: Corner Commercial Site with Use and
                        Non-Compete Restrictions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
                     Chapter 1 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
                     Chapter 1 Quiz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
CHAPTER 2: Legal Consideration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
                     Ownership: Deed versus Title . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22



                                                                                                                                                              iii
     TA B L E O F CO N T E N T S


                              Requirements for a Valid Deed. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
                                 Other Points About Deeds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
                                    Recording . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
                              Types of Deeds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
                                 Warranty Deeds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
                                    General Warranty Deeds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
                                    Limited Warranty Deeds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
                                 Deed Without Warranties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
                                    Quitclaim Deeds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
                                    Bargain and Sale Deeds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
                                    Fiduciary Deeds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
                                 Transfer on Death Deeds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
                              Forms of Ownership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
                                 Four Unities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
                                 Tenancy in Common. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
                                 Statutory Survivorship Tenancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
                                 Joint Tenancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
                                 Ownership By Associations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
                                    Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
                                    Limited Liability Corporation (LLC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
                                    General Partnerships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
                                    Limited Partnerships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
                                    REIT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
                                    Syndicates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
                                 Condominiums and Cooperatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
                              Non-Ownership Interests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
                                 Leasehold Estates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
                                 Easements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
                                    Appurtenant Easements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
                                    Easements in Gross . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
                                    Creation of Easements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
                                    Termination of Easements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
                                    Easements versus Licenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
                                    Easements and Encroachments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
                                 Equitable Title . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
                                 Life Estates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
                                 Dower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
                              Marketable Title Act . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36



iv
                                                                                                      TA B L E O F CO N T E N T S



                      Recording an Easement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
                      Exceptions to the Act . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
                   Public and Private Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
                      Public Sector Controls. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
                        Zoning Laws . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
                        Environmental Protection Laws . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
                        Eminent Domain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
                      Private Sector Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
                         Deed Restrictions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
                         Subdivision CC&Rs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
                   Real Estate Contracts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
                      Contractual Capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
                      Offer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
                      Acceptance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
                        Genuine Assent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
                      Consideration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
                      Lawful and Possible Objective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
                      Other Points About Contract Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
                      Purchase Contracts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
                        Purchase Contract Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
                      Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
                        Right of Preemption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
                   Leases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
                      Types of Leases. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
                        Gross Lease . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
                        Net Lease . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
                        Percentage Lease . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
                        Land Lease . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
                   Case Study: Single-Family Dwelling with Garage Converted to Living Area . 45
                   Chapter 2 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
                   Chapter 2 Quiz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
CHAPTER 3: Influences On Real Estate Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
                   The Concept of Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
                   Broad Forces That Affect Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
                        Physical Forces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
                          Topography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
                          Water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
                          Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52



                                                                                                                                                      v
     TA B L E O F CO N T E N T S


                                      Climate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
                                      Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
                                 Economic Forces. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
                                    Business Cycles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
                                    Economic Base . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
                                    Supply and Demand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
                                    Inflation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
                                    Cost of Money (Interest Rates) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
                                 Governmental Forces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
                                    Revenue Generating Laws . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
                                    Right to Regulate Laws . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
                                    Fiscal and Monetary Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
                                    Secondary Mortgage Markets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
                                    Government Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
                                 Social Forces. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
                                    Demographic Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
                                    Migrations of the Population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
                                    Social Trends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
                                    Buyer Tastes and Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
                              Specific Factors That Affect Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
                                 Economic (Broad Market) Factors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
                                    Supply and Demand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
                                    Uniqueness and Scarcity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
                                 Physical (Property-Specific) Factors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
                                    Highest and Best Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
                                    Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
                                    Conformity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
                                    Substitution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
                                    Contribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
                              Geographic and Other Neighborhood Influences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
                                 Neighborhood Boundaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
                                 Life Cycle of a Neighborhood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
                                    Growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
                                    Stability/Equilibrium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
                                    Decline. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
                                    Revitalization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
                                 How the Four Broad Forces Affect Neighborhoods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
                                    Physical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61




vi
                                                                                                        TA B L E O F CO N T E N T S



                          Economic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
                          Governmental . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
                          Social. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
                     Environmental Hazards and Nuisances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
                        External Environmental Concerns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
                          Stigmatized Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
                        Environmental Concerns Within a Property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
                          Mold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
                          Lead-Based Paint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
                          Asbestos. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
                          Urea-Formaldehyde Foam Insulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
                          Radon Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
                          Underground Storage Tanks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
                        Other Environmental Concerns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
                     Chapter 3 Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
                     Chapter 3 Quiz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
CHAPTER 4: Real Estate Finance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
                     Real Estate Finance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
                     Primary Mortgage Markets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
                        Mortgage Companies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
                     Secondary Mortgage Markets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
                        Function of Secondary Markets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
                          The Flow of Mortgage Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
                          How Secondary Markets Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
                        Federal National Mortgage Association . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
                        Government National Mortgage Association . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
                        Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
                        Secondary Market Quality Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
                          Underwriting Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
                     Sub-Prime Lending . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
                          Assessing Risk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
                        Predatory Lending Practices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
                     Types of Finance Instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
                     Trust Deeds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
                          Advantages and Disadvantages of Trust Deeds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
                     Mortgages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
                        Mortgage Clauses and Covenants. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
                          Covenants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80



                                                                                                                                                       vii
       TA B L E O F CO N T E N T S


                                Types and Features of Mortgages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
                                   First Mortgage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
                                   Second Mortgage. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
                                   Purchase Money Mortgage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
                                   Cash-Out Mortgage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
                                   Refinance Mortgage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
                                   Home Equity Loan, Home Equity Line of Credit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
                                   Blanket Mortgage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
                                   Bridge Mortgage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
                                   Reverse Mortgage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
                                   Wraparound Mortgage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
                                   Construction Mortgage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
                                     Fixed Disbursement Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
                                     Permanent Construction Loan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
                                Conventional Financing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
                                   Traditional Conventional Loans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
                                      Long Term . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
                                      Fully Amortized . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
                                      Fixed Rate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
                                      Collateral . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
                                      Down Payment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
                                   Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
                                      How Mortgage Insurance Works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
                                      PMI Cancellation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
                                FHA-Insured Loans. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
                                   FHA Loan Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
                                   Property Guidelines for FHA Loans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
                                      Condition of the Property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
                                      Maximum Mortgage Amount . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
                                FHA Loan Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
                                   Section 203(b)—The Standard FHA Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
                                   Section 203(i)—Rural Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
                                   Section 203(k)—Rehabilitation Loans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
                                   Section 234(c)—Condominiums . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
                                   Section 251: FHA ARM Loans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
                                VA-Guaranteed Loans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
                                   Property Guidelines For VA Loans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
                                Rural Economic Community Development (RECD) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
                                Types of Financing Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90


viii
                                                                                                       TA B L E O F CO N T E N T S



                         Buydown Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
                         Adjustable Rate Mortgages (ARMs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
                           Appraisals on ARM Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
                      Seller Financing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
                         Purchase Money Mortgages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
                         Land Contracts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
                           Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
                           Advantages and Disadvantages of Land Contracts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
                      Other Forms of Creative Seller Financing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
                         Lease/Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
                           Consideration for an Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
                           How Does a Lease/Option Work? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
                           Advantages and Disadvantages of Lease/Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
                         Lease/Purchases. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
                           How Does a Lease/Purchase Work? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
                           Advantages and Disadvantages of the Lease/Purchase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
                         Equity Exchanges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
                      Case Study: Listed Single-Family Dwelling for More-than-Market
                         Value Due to Buyer's Motivation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
                      Chapter 4 Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
                      Chapter 4 Quiz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
CHAPTER 5: Types of Value. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
                      Defining Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
                      Market Value of Property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
                         Past versus Future . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
                         Arm's Length Transaction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
                         Substitution and the Typical Buyer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
                           Theory of Substitution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
                           Objective Appraisal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
                      Value Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
                         Anticipation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
                         Balance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
                         Change . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
                         Competition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
                         Externalities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
                         Substitution. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
                      Other Value Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
                           Inexperienced Buyers and Sellers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111




                                                                                                                                                     ix
    TA B L E O F CO N T E N T S


                                            Price Volatility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
                                            Unequal Supply and Demand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
                                            Ubiquitous Restrictions and Regulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
                                       USPAP Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
                                    Other Types of Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
                                       Loan Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
                                       Insurance Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
                                       Assessed Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
                                       Asset Value. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
                                       Book Value. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
                                       Liquidation Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
                                       Salvage Value. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
                                       Value in Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
                                    Site Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
                                       Inherent Value of Land . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
                                          Land Value Theorem #1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
                                          Land Value Theorem #2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
                                       Ways To Increase the Value of Land. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
                                          Assemblage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
                                          Plottage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
                                          Subdividing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
                                          Value of Frontage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
                                    Case Study: FSBO Single-Family Priced and Selling Below Market Value . . 118
                                    Chapter 5 Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
                                    Chapter 5 Quiz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
               CHAPTER 6: Economic Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
                                    Classical Economic Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
                                       Command Economy versus Market Economy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
                                       Supply-side versus Demand-side . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
                                       Macroeconomic versus Microeconomic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
                                    Supply and Demand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
                                       Buyer's Market. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
                                       Seller's Market . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
                                    Government Policies and Interest Rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
                                    Application and Illustration of Economic Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
                                       Business Cycles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
                                       Real Estate Cycles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
                                    Market Data and Economic Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129



x
                                                                                                  TA B L E O F CO N T E N T S



                  Chapter 6 Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
                  Chapter 6 Quiz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
CHAPTER 7: Overview of Real Estate Markets and Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
                  Real Estate Market Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
                  Defining Real Estate Markets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
                     Defining Markets by Location. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
                     Defining Markets by Property Type. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
                     Sub-Markets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
                  Market Segmentation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
                  Market Disaggregation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
                  Real Estate Market Fundamentals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
                     Value Characteristics at Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
                       Segmentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
                       Disaggregation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
                  Demand Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
                  Supply Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
                  Other Supply and Demand Analyses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
                     Economic Base Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
                       Focusing on True Base Companies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
                     Absorption Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
                       Looking at the Whole Market . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
                  Uses of Market Analysis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
                     Market Study versus Marketability Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
                       Market Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
                       Marketability Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
                     Market Analysis and the Approaches to Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
                       Sales Comparison Approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
                       Cost Approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
                       Income Approach. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
                  Other Useful Analyses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
                     Productivity Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
                     Feasibility Study. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
                  Final Thoughts On Supply and Demand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
                  Chapter 7 Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
                  Chapter 7 Quiz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
CHAPTER 8: Ethics: Application in Appraisal Theory and Practice. . . . . . . . . . 149
                  Ethics in Appraisal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
                  Federal Laws and Regulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150



                                                                                                                                               xi
      TA B L E O F CO N T E N T S


                                    Laws Prohibiting Discrimination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
                                      Civil Rights Act of 1866 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
                                      Federal Fair Housing Act . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
                                      Equal Credit Opportunity Act (ECOA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
                                      Appraiser Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
                                    Laws Requiring Financial Disclosures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
                                      Truth-In-Lending Act . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
                                    Closings: RESPA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
                                      Appraiser Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
                                 The Role of USPAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
                                    The Beginning: FIRREA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
                                 Historical Overview of Appraisal and USPAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
                                    USPAP Rules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
                                    Appraisal Report Guidelines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
                                    Limiting Conditions and Extraordinary Assumptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
                                    Certification Statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
                                 Duties To the Public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
                                    Ethical Obligations Imposed by USPAP Relating to General Conduct. . . . . . . . . . 162
                                    Ethical Obligations Relating to Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
                                    Ethical Obligations Relating to Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
                                    The Appraiser's Role. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
                                    Reconciliation as a Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
                                      Indicated Value Range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
                                    Trying to Reduce Fraud. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
                                    Fannie Mae Guidelines for Unacceptable Appraisal Practices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
                                 Final Thoughts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
                                 Chapter 8 Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
                                 Chapter 8 Quiz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170

                            Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
                            Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197




xii
                                                                            P R E FA C E

H
        ondros Learning™ is proud to present this newest book in our appraisal series—
        Basic Appraisal Principles—the result of ongoing contributions and collaboration
        among Hondros College faculty—many of whom are practicing appraisers active in
the field—students, and our own research in the appraisal industry.
Written specifically to correspond to the 2008 Appraisal Qualifications Board’s educational
requirements, Basic Appraisal Principles features clear writing, real-world examples and case
studies, numerous practice questions, and an extensive glossary, making this text the most
up-to-date tool available for achieving appraisal course mastery and exam success! As well as
launching a successful program of study, this text will continue to bring value as a reference
tool throughout your appraisal career.
In addition to following the new AQB guidelines and course outlines, all texts in our appraisal
series are affordably priced and feature a clear writing style and numerous study aids to
guide students from start to finish. Concepts range from simple to complex, accommodating
all levels of learning. Key terms are highlighted and defined throughout, and reviewed in a
comprehensive glossary to assist in learning definitions required for state exams. Real-world
examples and case studies clarify procedures appraisers use every day.
Chapter 1 examines the difference between real property and personal property. In addition,
the effect of improvements on an appraisal, with respect to land, site, and fixtures is discussed.
The chapter concludes with the seven characteristics of real estate and an overview of legal
descriptions. Chapter 2 explores the numerous legal considerations in the transfer of real
property ownership. Deeds, forms of ownership, Marketable Title Act, public and private
controls, and real estate contracts complete the discussion. The four broad forces that affect
value are detailed in Chapter 3. An introduction to real estate finance, including the primary
and secondary mortgage markets, is presented in Chapter 4, along with financing tools and
mortgages. Chapter 5 introduces types of value, beginning with market value and concluding
with a brief overview of site value. Chapter 6 looks at the relationship between real estate
cycles and the economy—specifically the real estate market relative to financing. Interest rates,
supply and demand, loan activity, and inflation indicators are all discussed relative to appraisers’
needs. Chapter 7 provides an overview of real estate markets and analysis, with an emphasis
on identifying specific markets and sub-markets, including segmentation and disaggregation,
to determine whether property value is being maximized. Our introduction to basic appraisal
principles concludes with Chapter 8, ethics in appraisal practice. A detailed Glossary completes
this textbook.
 Additional appraisal products from Hondros Learning to help you prepare for your exam
include CompuCram™ Appraisal Exam Prep Software, Appraisal Vocabulary Crammer™ Audio
CD, Appraisal Vocabulary Crammer Flash Cards, and Appraisal Review Crammer™.


REVIEWER ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
Hondros Learning™ would like to thank the following expert reviewers for their valuable
contributions and assistance in developing this text:
TIM DETTY                                              J. CRAIG JULIAN, SRA
Certified General Real Estate Appraiser                 General Certified Appraiser
Hondros College                                        Champions School of Real Estate
Westerville, Ohio                                      Houston, Texas




                                                                                                      xv
                                                       INTRODUCTION
THE APPRAISAL PROFESSION


 O
           f the many possessions held by man, real estate is generally considered to hold the
           greatest value. Naturally then, real estate appraisal is a profession that, throughout
           time, has proven to be a key link to the financial security and strength of the nation.
 Appraisers themselves also serve an important role in society—one for which they’re continually
 striving to earn and keep the respect of the general public.
 Generally, there are two types of appraisers. Fee appraisers, independent and without
 employment ties to any particular appraisal firm or client, take work as it comes with their
 compensation directly linked to personal productivity; and staff appraisers, found in many
 arenas, typically work for a particular appraisal company or other entity, with all or part of their
 compensation based on salary. In addition to the typical appraisal firm, staff appraisers can be
 found in various other places of employment, like government and the corporate world.
 The primary standards and rules relating to the appraisal profession are known as the Uniform
 Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP). Study of appraisal will include gaining an
                                       ,
 in-depth understanding of the USPAP which is promulgated by a not-for-profit, independent
 foundation known as the Appraisal Foundation. Within this foundation are two primary
                                                                                         ,
 boards—the Appraisal Standards Board (ASB), which oversees and maintains the USPAP and the
 Appraiser Qualifications Board (AQB). The AQB establishes qualifying standards for appraiser
 licensing and the education, both pre-licensing and continuing education.
 The AQB defines three levels of licensing or certification—1. Licensed Residential Appraiser; 2.
 Certified Residential Appraiser; and 3. Certified General Real Estate Appraiser. The Residential
 license and certification allow for the appraisal of 1- to 4-unit residential properties, or land
 for such use. A residential license is limited by the complexity of the appraisal assignment
 and the property’s value. Certified Residential, however, has no limits based on complexity
 or value. Certified General Appraisers may appraise any type of real property, for any purpose
 and of any value. Minimum education and experience criteria have been issued to states to
 determine qualification for these licenses and certifications. However, each state may set its
 own minimum standard, above this prescribed benchmark.
 Opportunities abound for the appraiser today. When you think of real estate appraisal, it’s
 often in relation to mortgage appraisal. Admittedly, a great amount of appraisal work is in this
 area. However, many other areas require the services of an appraiser. Some of these include
 estates, trusts, insurance, taxation, divorces, asset management, real estate consulting, and
 litigation—just to name a few.
 Earning opportunities depend on competition and typical fees in the given geographic area in
 which an appraiser practices, and the type of work performed. An appraiser’s earnings are also
 directly related to the level of license or certification attained. Residential appraisals typically
 have lower, more predictable fees, but occur in higher volume. A Certified General Appraiser,
 in comparison, has a broader range of potential properties to appraise. Of course, the Certified
 General Appraiser may also perform residential appraisals but most times will work with more
 complex properties. Ask most appraisers and they’ll tell you the more complex the assignment,
 the higher the fee earned. Fees for appraisals performed by Certified General Appraisers
 typically range from several hundred dollars to, in some cases, several thousand dollars.
 A question often asked in the classroom is: “How is technology affecting the real estate
 appraisal industry?” Technology has streamlined the appraisal process and has become an
 important tool for today’s appraiser. The technological advancements available to the field
 are developing rapidly. Some appraisers are concerned that technology will someday replace

                                                                                                        xvii
    INTRODUCTION


           them. While computerized databases and appraisal methods are available to the appraisal
           user, appraisers typically are involved with the creation and continued maintenance of
           these sources. And, a computer cannot replace the subjectivity and independent thinking
           that only an appraiser, with knowledge gained through education and experience, can
           lend to a situation.
           So as you embark on this exciting career, be confident that you’re entering a profession
           filled with opportunity and promise. The ethical, knowledgeable, and experienced real
           estate appraiser will be in demand for years to come. The appraiser’s key role in society
           will continue, sustained by an ongoing awareness of industry issues and professional
           elevation through education. Best wishes for continued success in your chosen career!




xviii

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Description: Basic Real Estate Contract Chapter 7 document sample