Basics of Information Technology Ppt

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					             WELDING TECHNOLOGY & AGRIGULTURE MECHANICS
                                               COURSE SYLLABUS
                                                           2010-2011

Instructor name: Mr. Chuck Miller and Mr. Larry Henneke
Hickman HHS: 214-3043
Columbia Area Career Center: 214-3800
Conference Period: 7:50-8:40 each day
Grade: 10-12
Prerequisite: none
Credit: ½ per semester
Web Address: www.career-center.org

COURSE DESCRIPTION
         This entry-level course will open the doors to a diversified career path. Students will be learning the skills of arc and
mig welding, acetylene cutting, hot and cold metalworking, woodworking, power tools, paints and painting, and sketching
and drawing plans. Students will be constructing entry-level projects in woodworking and metalworking. Attainment of these
skills will enable a student to seek employment in welding, equipment manufacturing and sales, body repair and steel
fabricators. Students will have an opportunity to become active in the Columbia FFA. This is a prerequisite course for
Advanced Welding and Project Fabrication.

COURSE OUTLINE
  1.    Shop, MIG and Arc welding Safety (1 week)
        a. Section # 2, Units 3 thru 6 in Ag. Mechanics textbook.
        b. Lincoln “Welding connects your World”, Introductory PPT presentation.
  2.    Leadership Instruction
        a. FFA Organization & Activity Powerpoint and discussion
  3.    Arc welding required welds using 6010/6011 and 7018 rods (6 weeks)
        a. Arc Welding Basics PPT presentation.
        b. SMAW PPT presentation.
  4.    MIG welding required welds. (3 weeks)
        a. GMAW PPT presentation
  5.    Oxy-Acetylene and plasma arc safety (1 week)
        a. Section # 7, Unit 22in Ag. Mechanics textbook.
  6.    Oxy-Acetylene cutting and welding (3 weeks)
        a. TIG Welding demonstration and practice
  7.    Plasma arc cutting (1 week)
  8.    Hand tool and Power tool identification and safety (1 week)
  9.    Hand tool and Power tool identification required projects. (1 week)
  10.   Plumbing instruction. (1 week)
        a. Guest speaker and demonstrations
  11.   Concrete/Masonry instruction. (1 week)
        a. Guest speaker and demonstrations
        b. Lab exercise
  12.   Electrical instruction. (1 week)
        a. Guest speaker and demonstrations
        b. Extension cord construction
  13.   Project construction. (15 weeks)
        a. Student designed and instructor approved.
  14.   Agricultural Mechanics Careers. (1 week)
        a. Guest speakers b. Resume’s and applications.
Master List of MLO’s to be covered:
Upon successful completion of this course, each student will:
   1.      Describe to the instructor, the safety precautions for Arc welding.
   2.      Identify the various types of metal and their properties.
   3.      Successfully weld in the flat position with stick and MIG welders.
   4.      List Safety procedures for oxy-acetylene equipment.
   5.      Successfully weld and cut in the flat position with oxy-acetylene equipment.
   6.      Demonstrate safe use of classroom power tools.
   7.      Complete a woodworking project, including staining.
   8.      Complete a metalworking project. Including painting.
   9.      Complete a plumbing exercise.
   10.     Complete a concrete/masonry exercise.
   11.     Complete an electrical exercise.
   12.     Safely service/repair classroom hand tools power tools.
   13.     Describe career opportunities in Agricultural Mechanics.
   14.     Students will demonstrate the personal and social responsibility skills needed to obtain and retain employment
   15.     Students will exhibit knowledge of the career/educational opportunities available to them.

TEXTBOOKS, RESOURCE MATERIALS, MEDIA SUPPORT, ETC.:
        Learning materials/activities will include various assignments as we use some of the following materials: welding
technology, guest speakers, numerous videos, and a large amount of current topic discussion.

CAREER CENTER EXPECTATIONS:
         All Career Center classes strive to prepare students for adult life by teaching skills and behaviors that will be valued
in the workplace. The following workplace expectations are stressed and graded in all Career Center classes. Your instructor
will review these, provide instructions in all areas and answer any questions.
              Attendance, punctuality, preparedness
              High quality of work and perseverance
              Take responsibility for learning
              Take responsibility for language and behavior
              Maintain a safe and efficient work environment

GRADING SYSTEM:
        Students will receive a letter grade each quarter, based upon a point system. Below, is the Columbia Public School’s
grading scale, which explains percentages needed for a specific letter grade. Grade reports will be given to the student on a
regular basis. Students may review their grade at any time, with the instructor.
        In addition to points accumulated on tests, quizzes and reports, each student will earn daily points. These points will
be awarded on the basis of classroom and laboratory performance, and are explained below. There may be a few
opportunities during the year for bonus points, and these activities will be announced and discussed as they become available.
Grades may be lessened or improved, as explained in the “Class-work and Assignment Policy” section of this syllabus.
Please make sure you read and understand it.
A       94 to 100%               A-       90 to 93%                B+       87 to 89%
B       83 to 86%                B-       80 to 82%                C+       77 to 79%
C       73 to 76%                C-       70 to 72%                D+       67 to 69%
D       63 to 66%                D-       60 to 62%                F        59 to 00%

Daily Grade
Each day when students are working in the shop they will receive a daily grade of 30 points. The points will be
awarded as follows:
30 points       10 pts for wearing safety glasses at all times
                10 pts for working on approved project or assignment
                10 pts for assigned clean up
Failure to perform one of the following tasks will result in a deduction of the appropriate point value from the total
daily points.
End-of-Course testing - When a student has taken three (3) credits of a career center program, they will take an industry-
based end-of-course exam, NOCTI, which will account for 10% of the final exam grade.

Attendance
         Students are expected to be in class daily and to be engaged in the learning process. Regular attendance is essential
for success in school and in life. Research shows that students with 95% or above attendance are more successful
academically by earning better grades and performing better on college entrance exams. Our attendance goal for all students
is 95% or better,
         A portion of the class grade is based on Career Center Expectations, which includes attendance and participation in
class, lab, shop, or worksites. Absences, except those for a school-sponsored activity, may affect a student’s grade.

Make-Up work and Class-work/Assignment Policies:
        When you are absent, excused or unexcused, you are responsible for completing all missed assignments,
getting notes from classmates, etc. No late work will be accepted. Assistance will be given when possible, but the
student must take the initiative.
        Excused (Parent Excused, Excused, Medical, Field Trips) and Verified Absences
         All missed work may be made up at full credit.
         It is the student’s responsibility to initiate contact with the teacher to get make up work.
         Work must be made up in a timely fashion, generally within the same number of days as the absence (e.g. absent
            2 days, work made up in 2 days).
           Participation points may be lost due to absence. Students may possibly make up lost points by working in the
            classroom/shop/lab outside of class time or through alternate assignments determined by the instructor. However,
            in some classes experiences are limited and opportunities to repeat them are not available.
            Suspension (ISS, OSS)
           Missed work may be made up at full or partial credit (50%-100%) as specified in individual course syllabi.
           It is the student’s responsibility to initiate contact with the teacher to get make up work.
           Work must be made up in a timely fashion, generally within the same number of days as the absence (e.g. absent
            2 days, work made up in 2 days). Instructors may expect students to make up work during suspension and submit
            upon returning to school.
           Participation points may be lost due to absence. Students may possibly make up lost points by working in the
            classroom/shop/lab outside of class time or through alternate assignments determined by the instructor. However,
            in some classes experiences are limited and opportunities to repeat them are not available.
            Truancy
           Work may not be made up. This will result in zero credit for missed work.
           Students will be subject to loss of participation points.

RETURN POLICY FOR SECOND SEMESTER
      Students who are performing below average, or who are failing the semester are subject to removal from the program at
semester. A student/parent conference will be held prior to the end of the semester with the appropriate individuals present
and alternatives will be discussed.

PREREQUISITE FOR ADVANCED COURSES
        To be eligible to take advanced courses, a student must meet the prerequisites for the course in which
he/she wishes to enroll. Prerequisites vary by course, but generally include a minimum grade and satisfactory
performance on attendance and Career Center Expectations. See individual course descriptions for specific
prerequisite information. If the curriculum for a prerequisite course is modified in any way, a pass/fail grade is
issued. Pass/fail grades do not satisfy the grade requirement to take advanced courses.

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY:
        The integrity of the academic program and the evaluation of each student’s achievement are of primary concern to
educational institutions. Cheating on an educational exercise not only reflects dishonesty on the part of the cheater, but also
diminishes the value of the work done by his/her classmates. Students who cheat or plagiarize shall be subject to the
following:
        First Offense:
        1. The student will be referred to the assistant director/principal.
        2. The parent/guardian will be contacted.
        3. A zero will be recorded for the exercise.
        4. the student will be referred to his/her counselor.
        Second Offense:
        1. The student will be referred to the assistant director/principal
        2. A parent/guardian conference will be required.
        3. A zero will be recorded for the exercise.
        4. The student will be assigned a Saturday Detention.
        Third Offense
        1. The student will be referred to the assistant director/principal.
        2. A parent/guardian conference will be required.
        3. A zero will be recorded for the exercise.
        4. The student will be subject to suspension from school for not more than ten days.

STUDENT SERVICES:
        Student services are available to help students succeed in their technical classes. Students in technical
programs are eligible for extra assistance by asking for help or by having their teacher refer them to the Student
Services team. There are reading specialists, a math specialist, counselors and resource personnel who will help
students in classrooms, by appointment and/or before and after school with any problems they are having in their
technical classes. An employment specialist is available to students who are looking for part-time or full-time
jobs. In addition, persons knowledgeable about financial aid for post high school training/education are available,
as well as persons who can help students assess their vocational strengths and preferences in order to make more
informed career choices.

INSTRUCTOR’S PROFESSIONAL BACKGROUND:
         Mr. Miller grew up on a small cattle and hog farm in south-central Missouri. He was an FFA member and graduate
of Salem High School in Salem, Missouri. He received a Bachelor’s Degree in Animal Science and Masters Degree in
Education form the University of Missouri-Columbia. Mr. Miller taught for 3 years in Houston, Missouri and for the past 19
years in the Columbia Public Schools. He is very involved in professional and community organizations and judges several
livestock shows throughout the year. He, his wife Christi, daughter Abby and son Ethan manage a 600 acre farm in eastern
Boone County, that includes 85 acres of crops and 180 registered cows. They also own a commercial cowherd in partnership
with Christi’s family. Mr. Miller enjoys his family, raising cattle, grilling, fishing, shooting and hunting with his registered
Brittany’s, “Pecos, Popper and Pearl.”

STUDENT YOUTH ORGANIZATION:
         Students will have the opportunity to become a member of the Columbia Chapter of the National FFA Organization.
This is the world’s largest youth organization and it provides activities and award programs that greatly compliment the
instruction given in vocational agriculture classes. The FFA allows students opportunities to utilize the skills and knowledge
they receive in the classroom. A major emphasis of the FFA is the development of leadership skills to prepare young people
for leadership roles in their chosen careers.

DISCRIMINATION POLICY:
         As a political subdivision, employer, recipient of federal funds, and an educational institution the Board of Education
is prohibited from, and hereby declares a policy against engaging in unlawful discrimination. This includes harassment and
creating a hostile environment on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, ancestry, disability, age, sexual
orientation, or use of leave protected by the Family and Medical Leave Act, in its programs, activities, and with regard to
employment. The Board of Education is an equal opportunity employer.

COMPUTER USE:
        The use of any Columbia Public School computer is a privilege, not a right. Users of computers are obligated to
conform to district and individual school policies and directions given by a staff member. Using the CPS facilities to access
information carried by the Internet or other such information services must be for academic work assigned by a teacher.
Depending on the nature of the situation, students who violate this regulation shall be subject to disciplinary action, or as the
case is with any other property of the CPS, be held responsible for the cost of repair, replacement or maintenance of any
damaged equipment or materials. The school may have a student assigned to an alternative educational program.

				
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