A Study of Ogbu and Simons' Thesis Regarding Black Children's Immigrant and Non-Immigrant Status and School Achievement by ProQuest

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Ogbu and Simons' thesis, based on the Cultural-Ecological Theory of School Performance that Black immigrant students academically outperform their non-immigrant counterparts and that achievement differences are attributed to stronger educational commitment in Black immigrant families, was examined. Two hypotheses, based on data from the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study of 2006 (N=782), are that Black immigrant students differ from non-immigrants in school performance and that the effect of immigrant status as predictors persists, after including selected behavioral and cultural factors. Using analysis of variance, correlation, and multiple-regression techniques, the findings refute the Ogbu-Simons thesis in that immigrant and non-immigrant students did not differ in school achievement and that other predictors may be more important. [PUBLICATION ABSTRACT]

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									                                          Ogbu and Simons’ Thesis


A Study of Ogbu and Simons’ Thesis Regarding Black Children’s Im-
   migrant and Non-Immigrant Status and School Achievement



                                           Shelby Gilbert1
                                    Florida	Gulf	Coast	University



                                                Abstract
          Ogbu and Simons’ thesis, based on the Cultural-Ecological Theory of School
          Performance that Black immigrant students academically outperform their
          non-immigrant counterparts and that achievement differences are attributed to
          stronger educational commitment in Black immigrant families, was examined.
          Two hypotheses, based on data from the Progress in International Reading
          Literacy Study of
								
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