Establishing an Efficient Photography Workflow by suchenfz

VIEWS: 10 PAGES: 39

									Establishing an Efficient 
Photography Workflow
Eric Pasarin
November 4, 2010
From your camera to its final destination

WORKFLOW
          Workflow using Explorer or Finder

•   Using just Windows Explorer or the Mac Finder is good for small sets of 
    images, or when you’re just starting out.
     1.   Create a new folder for your photoshoot
     2.   Edit your choice photos in your favorite photo editor
     3.   Save a copy for web or print
     4.   Backup, backup, backup!
Workflow using Library Organizing Software
     Lightroom, Photoshop Elements, Picasa, Aperture, ACDSee

 •   If you are amassing large quantities of images, or have a business 
     utilizing photography, using software to manage your library is essential 
     in streamlining your work and saving time in editing your images
      1. Import photos into library
      2. Reject and select key images
      3. Add optional metadata
      4. Organize into collections
      5. Edit selected images and/or apply custom‐created presets or actions on 
         batches of images
      6. Export for print or web
      7. Backup, backup, backup!
                        Basic Preparation Tips

•   Make sure your time and date are set correctly on your camera
    (You don’t want all your images created on 01‐01‐2001 at 12AM)
•   If you are using a photo library manager, make sure to know where your 
    photos are being stored (ie. My Pictures folder, or a custom folder.) Try to 
    keep your photos in a central location to make organizing and backup 
    easy.
•   You can import your photos 2 ways:
     – Connect your camera directly to your computer with the supplied USB Cable
       (typically slow image transfer)
     – Use a memory card reader to copy your files (typically much faster transfer 
       speeds)



Throughout this presentation, I will use Adobe Lightroom to discuss workflow methods. It is available on PC 
and Mac. There are other applications that do similar things, I just happen to love Lightroom and have been 
                                           using it since version 1.
      Folder Organization the Wrong Way

•   Avoid saving all images loose in one folder
     – Unorganized
     – Hard to find images
     – Possible filename conflicts upon importing
         • Camera counter resets, different cameras
     – Long time to process thumbnails if using 
       explorer or finder to organize your photos
           Folder Organization the Right Way

  •    Creating year folders, and then named, dated folders within to store 
       photos
        – Client work
              • Store each job in a separate, dated folder
        – Personal events
              • Monthly folders for general photos
              • Named folders for important events


Client work example                                          Personal Events example
    Folder Organization the Automated Way

•    Automated via Lightroom, Photoshop Elements or other library software
      – Creates organized folders by year ‐> month ‐> day
Folder Organization with Library Software

•   Keeping an organized folder structure is important, but if your images 
    are properly tagged with correct day, time and optional metadata, your 
    library software will keep you organized automatically!
1
•   Connect your camera 
                                Importing

    directly to your 
    computer OR use a card 
    reader to copy
     – Make sure you’re 
       copying files to the 
       proper directory.
     – Select your desired 
       folder structure
     – Add optional metadata 
       templates to your 
       imported images
•   The above steps will be 
    saved for the next time 
    you import photos
2
•
                  Reject and Select Images

    After importing all your images, go through them and mark the ones that 
    are clearly bad, and select the quality images. There are many ways to 
    organize your picks
     – A simple pick/reject flag system. It’s either good, bad, or neither.
          • This is good for the first run through because when you flag an image as a reject, 
            it’s much easier to delete them from your library (see next slide)
     – 5 Star rating
     – Color tagging
•   Whatever tagging system you use, you can easily view them in groups by 
    filtering the ones you want to see
     – For example, if you want to see 4‐star images that are tagged yellow




                                        Pick / Reject   5 Star Rating          Color Tagging
2
•
                 Deleting Rejected Photos

    Photo ‐> Delete Rejected Photos (Ctrl+Backspace) will give you 2 options
     – Delete from Disk – Will delete image from hard drive. Total deletion
     – Remove – will remove the reference in the Lightroom Library. File will still 
       take up space and be located on your hard drive
•   Saves hard‐drive space
3
•
                Adding Optional Metadata

    Besides the standard EXIF data, there are many types of metadata you 
    can add to your photos for better organization
     –   Captions – Titles, descriptions
     –   Location data – place, city, state and country information.
     –   Keywords – People, places, objects, creative styles, emotions.
     –   Creator information – Author, contact information, copyright restrictions.
•   Any information you add to your images are easily searchable in the 
    database.
     – For example, if you want to see all images of little Billy next to a tree in NJ, 
       you can select the keywords “Billy” and “tree”, and select “NJ” as the 
       location.
4
•
                                  Collections

    Used to organize groups of photos using a 
    drag‐and‐drop interface
     – Create Collection – Standard ‘folder’ of 
       images that you select and can sort in any 
       order
     – Create Smart Collection – Auto creates a 
       collection of images from your entire 
       library based on criteria you set
         • For example, you can add images to a 
           smart collection where the image is
              –   Shot in NJ
              –   Rated 3 stars or greater
              –   Taken between 2009 and present day
              –   Includes the keyword “bird”
         • The options are endless!
4
•
                              Collections

    All photos in collections are references to original photos. So if you 
    ‘delete’ a photo while viewing a collection, you have only removed its 
    reference. The photo file itself still remains in your library. (To completely 
    delete the image from your library, you have to be viewing your images 
    in either a “Folder” mode or “Catalog” mode
5                                 Editing Photos

I typically edit photos in 3 phases:
• Global edits
     – Edits that affect the entire photograph. Get your image to look 90% right
          •   White balance
          •   Exposure
          •   Color
          •   Cropping
•   Local edits
     – Edits that affect selected regions of the image.
          •   Burning
          •   Dodging
          •   Dust removal
          •   Cloning
          •   Red eye reduction
•   Global edits part deux
     – These edits usually relate to the final output destination
          • Noise reduction
          • Sharpening
5
•
                    Edit in External Program
                    Photoshop, PS Elements or Any Other Editor

    Use this option for more advanced edits, such as cloning, filters, text effects, 
    photo montages, etc.
•   Right click on an image and select “Edit In…”
     – Edit a copy with Lightroom Adjustments
          • Creates a physical copy of the image with all changes made in lightroom
          • Saving this file will create a PSD file (which retains layers, text effects, filters, etc)
          • Good for creating advanced effects after doing global changes in LR.
     – Edit a copy
          • Creates a physical copy of the original 
            file 
            and opens it up for editing in PS
     – Edit original
          • Opens the original file that you have 
            selected
          • Use this if you have previously created 
            a PSD file using the first option as seen 
            above
                – Lightroom will retain all layers in a PSD file 
                  but can only edit the image globally. Using 
                  this option will allow you to open a PSD file 
                  and view/edit all layers as originally saved
6
•
                   Export Images for Web

    Resize images, export to 
    folders, add watermarks, 
    publish to Flickr, Facebook, 
    Smugmug
•   Create presets for your 
    common export tasks
     – A version for Flickr, eBay 
       images, EPC submissions
6
•
                  Export Images for Print

    Print single images, or a set of images
     – All the same size, or create varying sizes
     – Add watermarks, show file name or other information
•   Print module isn’t just 
    for “print”
     – Create custom 
       montages of a set of 
       images and export it 
       out as a new JPEG to 
       be used in other 
       projects
7
•
                            Backup Options

    Make a backup of all your photos to an external drive 
    (firewire or eSATA are the fastest) or bare drives (with a dock)
•   Network attached storage (NAS)
    (Drobo, Windows Home Server, Netgear ReadyNAS)
•   Archive older images or completed jobs to CD/DVD/Blu‐ray discs
•   Backup to at least 2 media locations. It’s preferred to store at least one 
    copy off‐site
•   Online services
     –   You can access your images anywhere from any computer (+)
     –   May take a while to upload large original images or PSD files (‐)
     –   The cost may be more than just buying physical media
     –   Possibility that the service might no longer exist someday; loss of files (‐)
     –   Just another place to store your cherished images! (++)
So many software options…So little time.

COMPARISONS
                            Picasa 3.8

•   FREE (Windows only)
•   Better with JPG
•   Contains facial recognition
•   Upload albums to google picasa account
•   Non‐destructive 
    editing
•   Good organizer
•   Easily emails photos 
    with outlook or 
    gmail
•   Order prints
                     Photoshop Elements 9

•   More advanced pixel‐based editing (Photoshop Lite).
     – Use of layers, text effects, filters, brushes, etc.
•   Cataloging made easy. Tag images easily, add keywords, create groups.
•   Stitch photos and create animated GIFs
•   Email, order prints, books, web albums
                          Lightroom 3.2

•   Better RAW engine
•   Non‐destructive editing
•   In‐Depth cataloging. 
•   Easily create or download 
    presets to easily apply 
    processing steps to a set of 
    images
•   Create multiple Lightroom
    databases. One for personal 
    images, one for Client work, 
    etc.
•   90% of photo manipulation 
    can be done in Lightroom. For 
    more advanced tools, you can 
    continue editing in PS, PSE or 
    any other editor.
          What is Non‐Destructive Editing?

•   Pixel‐based editor (photoshop, paint shop pro, PSE, etc)
     – When you make any changes to the image and save, it will retain its 
       properties
           • Adding layers, blurring parts of the image, cloning, color shifting.
     – The more layers you add, or adjustment layers you add, the larger the filesize 
       will become
     – If you locate that image in Explorer (or Finder), when you open it, it will be 
       that file, layers, effects and all




Original image from camera:        Black & white version saved        HDR Edited PSD image with 
5.35MB                             As a copy:                         adjustment layers, cloning, etc: 
                                   7.6 MB                             82.5MB
             What is Non‐Destructive Editing?

  •   Non‐destructive editor (Lightroom and Picasa)
        – All changes to the image, both global and local, are simply math equations 
          applied to your image. Steps are saved in the Lightroom database as text 
          information. 
              • This keeps filesize down, as well as makes it easy to apply the exact same steps to 
                other images easily and automatically
        – Creating ‘virtual copies’ allows multiple versions of the image to be created 
          without increasing filesize
        – If you locate that image in Explorer (or Finder), when you open it, it will still 
          be your original image as imported from your media card.




Original image from       Virtual copy 1: Cyan        Virtual copy 2: Exposed    Virtual copy 3: Oldtyme
camera: 5.35MB            way less than 1MB           way less than 1MB          way less than 1MB
                                       EXIFtool
•   Do you know what’s hidden in your 
    image file?
•   Free tool used to view all hidden 
    data stored in your photo
     – EXIF – Information relating to the 
       photo itself: F‐stop, ISO, flash, 
       model of camera, etc.
     – IPTC/XMP – Keywords, titles, 
       descriptions, author and copyright 
       info
          • All lightroom creation data is 
            stored in here as well. You could 
            reverse‐engineer the steps 
            someone made on a photo and 
            apply it to your image
     – Maker – these are custom, non‐
       standard fields from your 
       manufacturer (Sony, Canon, Nikon, 
       etc) that might relate to lens data, 
       what mode of dynamic range used, 
       etc.
Create once, repeat often

ACTIONS
                                  Actions

•   Created in Photoshop
     – Record your actions while editing an image
     – Save these steps as an action
     – Open up a new image and ‘play’ the action. It will apply the same steps to 
       the new image
     – You can modify the steps, or add steps in between to update your action
     – Go to file‐>automate‐>batch… to run your action on a folder of images 
       automatically
             Integration with Lightroom

•   Go to file‐>automate‐>create droplet to save your action as a separate 
    file
•   Copy this file into your Lightroom “Export Actions” folder
•   When you export an image from Lightroom, look for the “After Export” 
    drop down under “Post‐Processing” and select your named action
•   When you export your image using your selected options, Lightroom will 
    then automatically process your image through Photoshop using your 
    action
What you see isn’t always what you get

CALIBRATION
                  Brightness Calibration
        http://www.digitalmasters.com.au/Monitor_Calibration.html




•   The top 'bar' of the calibration image above comprises alternating 0% 
    black and 5% grey squares
•   You should ONLY JUST be able to perceive the bar as bands rather than 
    an all black strip.
•   The bottom comprises 21 steps of neutral grey in 5% steps from 0% black 
    to 100% white.
                       Adjust Brightness


1.   Turn off or dim your room lighting so that glare or ambient light does 
     not affect what you are seeing onscreen.
2.   Set your monitor’s contrast to 100% if CRT or 75% if LCD
3.   Adjust brightness carefully until you only just see the bands in the top 
     portion of the image.



                      Shows that your brightness is too high




                      Shows that your brightness is too low
                          Calibration Tools

  •   Recommended for serious calibration.
  •   Some tools will only calibrate your monitor (or dual screen), others will 
      calibrate your printer and projector. Look for the model that does what 
      you need it to.




Pantone Huey PRO
                                 ColorMunki Photo            Spyder Elite
Pantone Huey PRO Example
Photoshop Color Simulation
                              Summary

•   It takes time to setup an efficient workflow that is easy for you. The key 
    is to stay organized and be consistent in the way you interact with your 
    images.
•   Utilize Photoshop actions or Lightroom presets to save time in processing 
    your photos. You can download actions or presets, or make your own!
•   Make sure backing up files is part of your workflow. Drive failures can 
    occur at any time no matter the make, model or how old it is.
•   Have fun!
           Useful Links – Photo Software

•   Adobe Lightroom 3.2
    http://www.adobe.com/products/photoshoplightroom
•   Adobe Photoshop Elements 9 
    http://www.adobe.com/products/photoshopel
•   Google Picasa 3.8 
    http://picasa.google.com
•   Apple Aperture 3 
    http://www.apple.com/aperture
•   Apple iPhoto 
    http://www.apple.com/ilife/iphoto
•   Windows Photo Gallery 2011 
    http://explore.live.com/windows‐live‐photo‐gallery?os=other
                   Useful Links – Other
•   The Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 3 Book for Digital Photographers 
    (Scott Kelby)
    http://www.amazon.com/Photoshop‐Lightroom‐Digital‐Photographers‐
    Voices/dp/0321700910/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1289975754&sr=8‐1
•   Backup Magic 
    http://www.moonsoftware.com/bmagic.asp
•   Exiftool
    http://www.sno.phy.queensu.ca/~phil/exiftool
•   Exiftool GUI 
    http://freeweb.siol.net/hrastni3/foto/exif/exiftoolgui.htm
•   Cathy disc/drive lister (used for archiving)
    http://www.mtg.sk/rva
•   Spyder3
    http://spyder.datacolor.com/index_us.php
•   ColorMunki Photo
    http://www.xrite.com/product_overview.aspx?ID=1115
•   Pantone Huey Pro
    http://www.pantone.com/Pages/products/product.aspx?pid=562

								
To top