Lifelong_Learning_Institutes by xiuliliaofz

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									 What are Lifelong Learning
Institutes and How Do They
            Work
        Julie L. Mitchell, Assistant Dean
  Special Programs and Continuing Education
              University of Dayton

              August 11, 2010
             Lifelong Learning
• “Anyone who stops learning is old, whether
  twenty or eighty. Anyone who keeps learning
  today is young. The greatest thing in life is to
  keep your mind young.” – Henry Ford
• “Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I
  remember. Involve me and I learn.” - Benjamin
  Franklin
• “Learning is a place where paradise can be
  created.”
     Lifelong Learning Institutes
• Began as Institutes for Learning in Retirement
• Harvard is credited with having the first ILR in
  the United States
• As different and unique as the sponsoring
  institution
• Grassroots programs, University/College
  sponsored programs, Peer-driven programs
     Lifelong Learning Institutes
• Non-credit, seminar-based learning
  opportunities for adults 50 years of age and
  better
• Seminar moderators
• Seminar length
• Fee structure
 Osher Lifelong Learning Institute
             Network
• Bernard Osher and the Osher Foundation
• Grant and Endowment Programs
• OLLI Network
          University of Dayton
• The University of Dayton is an urban campus
  located in southwest Ohio
• Founded by the Marianists in 1850, it is Ohio’s
  largest private university
• UD is also one of the nation’s top ten largest
  Catholic universities
• Committed to educating the whole person
  and to linking learning and scholarship with
  leadership and service
Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at UD
• The University of Dayton has a tradition of
  including senior adult learners in its
  community:
  – In 1952 the Senior Fellows Program was begun
  – In 1985 Summer Elderhostel Program
  – In 1994 our largest outreach program was
    established, UD Institute for Learning in
    Retirement Program, presently Osher Lifelong
    Learning Institute
  – In 2000 added New Horizons Band
  OSHER Lifelong Learning Institute Enrollment
           Spring 1994 - Spring 2002
• March 1994 Pilot program:       •   Winter 1999: 121 Participants
   45 Participants                •   Spring 1999: 438 Participants
• Fall 1994: 95 Participants      •   Fall 1999: 432 Participants
• Spring 1995: 98 Participants    •   Winter 2000: 185 Participants
• Fall 1995: 238 Participants     •   Spring 2000: 417 Participants
• Spring 1996: 268 Participants   •   Fall 2000: 531 Participants
• Fall 1996: 350 Participants     •   Winter 2001: 205 Participants
• Spring 1997: 310 Participants   •   Spring 2001: 434 Participants
• Fall 1997: 375 Participants     •   Fall 2001: 490 Participants
• Spring 1998: 406 Participants   •   Winter 2002: 238 Participants
• Fall 1998: 419 Participants     •   Spring 2002: 385 Participants
  OSHER Lifelong Learning Institute Enrollment
           Summer 2002 - Fall 2007
• Summer 2002 Pilot Program:      •   Spring 2005: 397 Participants
  185 Participants                •   Summer 2005: CANCELLED
• Fall 2002: 452 Participants     •   Fall 2005: 516 Participants
• Winter 2003: 271 Participants   •   Winter 2006: 243 Participants
• Spring 2003: 412 Participants   •   Spring 2006: 483 Participants
• Fall 2003: 475 Participants     •   Summer 2006: 151
• Summer 2003: 91 Participants        Participants
• Winter 2004: 181 Participants   •   Fall 2006: 510 Participants
• Spring 2004: 334 Participants   •   Winter 2007: 330 Participants
• Summer 2004: 91 Participants    •   Spring 2007: 495 Participants
• Fall 2004: 376 Participants     •   Summer 2007: 139
                                      Participants
• Winter 2005: 248 Participants
                                  •   Fall 2007: 473 Participants
    OSHER Lifelong Learning Institute Enrollment
           Winter 2008 - Summer 2010
•   Winter 2008: 350 Participants
•   Spring 2008: 530 Participants
•   Summer 2008: 115 Participants
•   Fall 2008: 616 Participants
•   Winter 2009: 365 Participants
•   Spring 2009: 542 Participants
•   Summer 2009: 146 Participants
•   Fall 2009: 94 New, 75 Wait Listed, 567 Total Participants
•   Winter 2010: 66 New, 53 Wait Listed, 406 Total Participants
•   Spring 2010: 96 New, 51 Wait Listed, 613 Total Participants
•   Summer 2010 Week of May 13: 2 New, 154 Total Participants
•   Summer 2010 Week of June 9: 14 New, 170 Total Participants
 Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at
    the University of Dayton
• Became an Osher Lifelong Learning Institute in
  June 2004 when received grant award
• Received second grant award in June 2005
• Endowed in December 2006
• Second endowment gift received September 2007
• UD Osher Lifelong Learning Institute will be one of
  only 110 programs to comprise the Osher Lifelong
  Learning Institute Network, a group representing
  best practices for senior adults
               UDLLI Mission
• The guiding principle of the Osher Lifelong
  Learning Institute is to offer adults 50 years of
  age and older from the Greater Miami Valley
  area a wide variety of seminars based on the
  peer-learning concept and designed to be
  intellectually stimulating in an informal and
  non-competitive environment.
                             Osher Lifelong Learning
                                    Institute
                              University of Dayton
                                 Dayton, Ohio
                  Associate Provost and Dean Graduate, Professional
                              And Continuing Education
                         Assistant Dean Special Programs
                            and Continuing Education

                                Board of Governors

                               Executive Committee

                                                                  Advisors



 Policy/                                                                           Special
           Marketing Curriculum Membership Finance Nominations         Volunteer
Planning                                                                           Events
Currently, OLLI at UD is serving
  residents in eight counties
            Telephone Survey
• The objective of the survey was to:
  – Gauge overall interest in courses with academic
    content
  – Gauge market demand for particular types of
    courses
  – Understand the relative importance of various
    factors in deciding where to take courses
  – Judge market receptivity to particular pricing
     Overall Interest in Courses with
           Academic Content
• Slightly more than a quarter of 55 to 64 year olds (28%)
  were likely to take a course within the next three years
• Likelihood of taking a course increased once
  respondents were asked about their specific interest
  and given a list of areas to react to. In this situation,
  38% of 55 to 64 year olds indicated that they were
  likely to consider taking a course in the next three
  years
• Conclusion: Listen to what they want, establish your
  curriculum around these suggestions, and they will
  come.
Market Demand for Particular Types of
            Courses
• Respondents were asked
  “What courses would be of interest to you?”
• Courses tied to Science and Computers were
  mentioned most by both 55 to 64 year olds (23%) and
  65 year olds (17%)
• Courses tied to Business, Finance and Investment were
  a close second for those over 65 (7.9% and 8.9%)
• There was substantial interest in both the younger and
  older age groups in Art (7.4 %and 8.9%) and in History
  and International Studies (7.9% and 8.9%)
• Those 55 to 64 were slightly more likely to mention
  Languages than those 65 and older (7.4% vs. 4%)
  Convenience of Particular Times
• There is a strong divergence between the preferred time of
  55 to 64 year olds and the preferred time of those 65 and
  older among those likely to take a course with an academic
  focus
   – 41% of the younger age group indicated a willingness to attend
     a weekday course, with 31% interested in weekday evenings and
     28% interested in weekend offerings
   – In contrast, 80% of those over 65 indicated that weekday
     courses are most convenient
• Conclusion: Offering courses on weekday evenings or
  weekends might draw significant numbers of 55 to 64 year
  olds for whom weekdays are inconvenient. There seems to
  be no additional audience for evenings or weekends from
  those over 65.
  Preferred Method of Instruction
• On average, respondents of any age preferred a
  mixture of discussion and lecture, with a slight
  lean towards discussion
• 68% of the respondents 55 to 64 years of age and
  62% of those 65 and up found the once a week,
  two hour course over a four to six week period to
  be most convenient
• There does appear to be some demand in our
  market for time frames that are shorter but more
  intense
• University affiliation is important to a significantly
  greater percentage of respondents than location.
  52% of the respondents 65 years of age and over
  rated affiliation with the University of Dayton as
  important
• Importance of social interaction as part of the
  course offering varies substantially across
  respondents. Among those likely to consider
  taking a course in the next three years, a higher
  percentage of 55 to 64 than those 65 and older
  considered it important (35% vs. 25%)
    Three Challenges for Finding
     Fulfillment in Retirement
• The deep desire and continued need for
  relationships and companionship
• A continued yearning to learn
• Spiritual and holistic well-being
        Retirement --- Change

• Twenty-first century retirements often come
  in pairs, as husbands and wives have to
  negotiate two retirements: “his” and “hers”
• Older workers tend not to talk about
  retirement
• Retirement is now a “blurred” transition
• Nothing about retirement can be taken for
  granted
• Opportunities to do meaningful work are
  important but can be difficult to find
FUTURE PLANS

								
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