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Guidelines for advisers - Ministry of Foreign Affairs FEB06

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					Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Danida




Guidelines
For Advisers to

Bangladesh




                              1
    GUIDELINES
        FOR
Advisers to Bangladesh




   MINISTRY OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS
    COPENHAGEN, DENMARK
         JANUARY 2006




                                 2
MAP OF BANGLADESH SHOWING DISTRICTS




                                      3
INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................ 6
1.      GENERAL INFORMATION ............................................................................. 8
     1.1       GEOGRAPHY .................................................................................................... 8
     1.2       CLIMATE ........................................................................................................... 8
     1.3       POPULATION.................................................................................................... 8
     1.4       LANGUAGE ...................................................................................................... 8
     1.5       RELIGION.......................................................................................................... 9
     1.6       ADMINISTRATION .......................................................................................... 9
     1.7       OFFICE HOURS ................................................................................................ 9
     1.8       TIME ................................................................................................................... 9
     1.9       CONDUCT ......................................................................................................... 9
     1.10      CURRENCY, WEIGHTS AND MEASURES ................................................. 10
     1.11      ELECTRICITY ............................................................................................... 111
     1.12      LEISURE……………………………………………………………………...11
2       THE DANISH EMBASSY ................................................................................. 13
     2.1  ADDRESS, TELEPHONE NUMBERS AND OFFICE ................................... 14
     2.2  MEETINGS AND APPOINTMENTS.............................................................. 15
     2.3  REIMBURSEMENT OF EXPENSES .............................................................. 15
     2.4  LEGAL ADVICE.............................................................................................. 16
     2.5  PRECAUTIONS ON ARRESTS ...................................................................... 16
     2.6  EMERGENCY SITUATIONS ......................................................................... 16
     2.7  DANISH NATIONAL ELECTIONS ............................................................... 16
     2.8  LIAISON COMMITTEE .................................................................................. 17
     2.9  DANIDA PERSONNEL IN BANGLADESH .................................................. 17
     2.10 THE GOVERNMENT AGREEMENT............................................................. 17
     2.11 CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE MINISTRY OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS,
     COPENHAGEN............................................................................................................ 17
3       PRE-DEPARTURE PREPARATIONS .......................................................... 18
     3.1       VISA FOR BANGLADESH ............................................................................. 18
     3.2       INSURANCE………………………………………………………………….18
     3.3       UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ................................................................. 18
     3.4       MONEY TRANSFER....................................................................................... 19
4       HEALTH CARE AND VACCINATIONS..................................................... 20
     4.1       WATER ............................................................................................................ 20
     4.2       VACCINATIONS............................................................................................. 20
     4.3       HEALTH SERVICE ......................................................................................... 21
5       WHAT TO BRING TO BANGLADESH ....................................................... 22
     5.1       BUYING HOUSEHOLD ITEMS ..................................................................... 22
     5.2       PASSBOOK...................................................................................................... 24
     5.3       DUTY-FREE WAREHOUSES ........................................................................ 24


                                                                                                                                       4
     5.4       KITCHEN EQUIPMENT ................................................................................. 24
     5.5       HARDWARE AND ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT ......................................... 24
     5.6       BEDDING......................................................................................................... 25
     5.7       CLOTHES......................................................................................................... 25
     5.8       SPORTS EQUIPMENT .................................................................................... 26
     5.9       OTHERS ........................................................................................................... 26
6       TRANSPORT AND USE OF A PRIVATE CAR .......................................... 26
     6.1       GENERAL INFORMATION ........................................................................... 26
     6.2       PRIVATE CARS .............................................................................................. 27
     6.3       CAR INSURANCE........................................................................................... 27
     6.4       DRIVING LICENSE ........................................................................................ 28
7       SENDING GOODS, PETS OR MAIL TO BANGLADESH ..................... 28
     7.1       GENERAL INFORMATION ........................................................................... 28
     7.2       PETS ................................................................................................................. 28
8       ACCOMODATION ............................................................................................. 29
     8.1       APARTMENTS/HOUSES ............................................................................... 29
     8.2       RESIDENTIAL STAFF .................................................................................... 30
9       SCHOOLING FACILITIES .............................................................................. 31
10      DUTY STATIONS OUTSIDE DHAKA ......................................................... 31
     10.1 COMMON ISSUES FOR THE TOWNS OF THE COSTAL AREAS WHERE
     DANIDA IS WORKING, NOAKHALI, PATUAKHALI AND BAGUNA. ............... 31
     10.2 BAGUNA.......................................................................................................... 33
     10.3 NOAKHALI...................................................................................................... 33
     10.4 PATUAKHALI ................................................................................................. 34
11      TERMINATION OF CONTRACT................................................................. 34
     11.1      LEAVE BALANCE .......................................................................................... 34
     11.2      SETTLEMENT OF PRIVATE DEBTS ............................................................ 34
     11.3      FINAL REPORT AND WELFARE REPORT ................................................. 35
ANNEX I : THE CLOSING DAYS OF THE DANISH EMBASSY - 2006 .... 35
ANNEX II: TRYG UDLANDS-SERVICE ............................................................. 36
ANNEX III: USEFULL LINKS................................................................................ 36




                                                                                                                                      5
INTRODUCTION

When moving to Bangladesh, advisers are likely to encounter a number of practical
problems. The information given below should be taken as general guidelines for
newly employed advisers to help with initial problems arising during the preparations
while still at home as well as during the establishing process when in Bangladesh.
These guidelines were prepared in collaboration between Danida advisers and the
Danish Embassy in 1992, and again updated in 1998 and in 2005 jointly by the
Danida Advisers Association-Bangladesh and the Embassy.

The information supplements the Staff Rules for Danida Advisers and the Agreement
on Technical Co-operation between the Government of Bangladesh and Denmark,
which should always be referred to for work-related issues.

Suggestions for improvement of the guidelines are welcome and should be addressed
to the Danish Embassy in Dhaka. (E-mail address: dacamb@um.dk)




Embassy of Denmark, Dhaka


                                                                                    6
January 2006




               7
1.     GENERAL INFORMATION

1.1    GEOGRAPHY

Bangladesh has a total of 143.998 sq. km. roughly three times the area of Denmark.
Bangladesh borders with India to the west, north and east, and shares a southeastern
border with Myanmar. To the south lies the Bay of Bengal. The topography is
characterized by alluvial plains bounded to the north by the submontane regions of
the Himalayas. The alluvial plain covers 90% of the country and never rises more
than 10 meters above sea level. On average, Bangladesh is affected 16 times a decade
by cyclones, which form in the Bay of Bengal during the monsoon season. The
piedmontane areas in the northeast and eastern fringes adjacent to Assam, Tripura
and Myanmar are broken by the forested hills of Sylhet and Chittagong. The great
Himalayan Rivers, the Ganges and the Brahmaputra divide the country into four
major regions: northwest, southwest, central and eastern.

1.2    CLIMATE

Bangladeshis recognize six seasons: spring (dry-hot) from March to April, early rainy
season (“mango showers”) from May to June, monsoon-summer from July to
August, autumn from September to October, misty season from November to
December and wintertime from January to February. Winter can be quite cold with
temperatures dropping to as low as 3 C at night and summer can be as hot as 35 C or
more during the day. A humidity of 90% to 95% can make April-September days
quite unpleasant. Bangladesh has an annual rainfall of 1,250 mm in the northwest to
5,000 mm in the northeast.

1.3    POPULATION

The population of Bangladesh is more than 140 million people, making it the most
densely populated country in the world. Although urbanization has increased, still
85% of the population lives in the rural areas. Dhaka is expanding rapidly with 8 to
10 million inhabitants in 1998 (6 million in 1992). Population growth rate has come
down from 2.9 percent per annum in the mid-1970s to 1.5 percent in the late –1990s.
Between 1991/1992 and 2000, the incidence of national declined from 58.8 to 49.8,
indicating a modest reduction rate of one percentage point per year (NESEGPR;
2002)

1.4    LANGUAGE

Bangla, the national language, is an Indo-European language with a Sanskrit heritage
and is distantly related to Latin. Bangla was very important in Bangladeshi history and
the Language Movement kicked off the struggle for independence. English is, except
in Dhaka, little spoken and understood in the towns and hardly at all up-country.


                                                                                     8
Senior government officials, however, do speak English. English has again become a
compulsory subject in all schools.


1.5    RELIGION

In 1988 Islam became the official state religion. 87% Bangladeshis are Muslim
(Sunni), 12% are Hindu, the remainder being Buddhist or Christian.


1.6    ADMINISTRATION

Bangladesh is divided into 6 divisions, 64 districts (zilla) and 464 sub-districts
(upazila). Each upazila is again divided into 4-10 unions. The Union Parishads are the
only elected local government institution, led by a Chairman, and have their own
union budget. Each district has one or more Members of Parliament, which has 300
seats. Parliament holds sessions of three weeks, which are well covered by journalists
of the many Bangla and English newspapers.

1.7    OFFICE HOURS

Since September 2005, Bangladesh has recognized a two -day weekend: Friday and
Saturday. Government offices are now open from Sunday to from 09.00 to 17.00,
with a lunch break of 30 minutes. Private offices follow more or less the same hours.
Banks are open from 09.00 to 14.00, some even on Saturdays from 10.00 to 13.00,
post offices from 09.00 to 16.00. Shops and markets are open throughout the day.
On Fridays the shops remain open for only part of the day or just close down for
prayers, varying from place to place. During the holy month of Ramzan (Ramadan)
official government office hours vary and are announced each year.

1.8    TIME

The time difference with European Continental Time is + 5 hrs, during European
summertime + 4 hrs.

1.9    CONDUCT

You can perfectly well continue with what is considered normal behaviour without
anybody particular in noticing. It is important to Bangladeshis that visitors to their
country should feel comfortable. Their tolerance for alien behaviour has no bounds,
which might be necessary when dealing with us. In spite of good intentions mistakes
can be made which are often the result of clashes of difference in interpretation of
rich/poor or man/ woman.



                                                                                    9
The influential Bangladeshi expects a respectful and humble conduct from a
subordinate. A poor Bangladeshi cannot understand how a rich foreigner can be so
friendly. Even well educated Bangladeshi women are reserved in the company of men
and the Bangladeshi men have difficulty in accepting the free mannerism of the
European women (as a rule they will not shake hands with women). The European
women will find it relatively easy to get to know the well-educated Bangladeshi
women, but the social barrier is difficult to cross when it concerns the poor women.

We each have our own culture with our own norms of behaviour. Our ways of
behaviour are strongly influenced by the disintegration of the social and sexual
patterns, which were natural to our grandparents. The Bangladeshi pattern is more
like that of our grandparents and deeply influenced by religion.

Even though as a guest you strive to comply to the Bangladeshi politeness, it can b e
difficult to avoid seeming clumsy or even comical seen with their eyes, perhaps they
even think that we are uncultivated, but all the violations of their rules as regards
correct behaviour is normally forgiven with a smile. Worth remembering though, is
that when eating Bangladeshi style, with your hand, you always use the right hand, as
the left is considered unclean.

Also, a Bangladeshi dinner starts with drinks and snacks, and the dinner itself is often
served as late as 22.00. Guests are expected to leave shortly after dinner has been
eaten.


1.10   CURRENCY, WEIGHTS AND MEASURES

The national currency is the Taka divided in 100 paisa. The Taka is linked to the US$.
In October 2005 Taka 65.7 = 1 US$; Taka 79.2 = 1 Euro.

The English yard is still widely used. So are inches and feet. In the field 1 bigha=
14400 sq. feet; 1 acre= 31/40 bigha (?); 1m2= 11 sq. ft; 1acre=100 decimal; 1 decimal
= 40 m2; 1 acre=4000 m2

In counting, the subcontinent has its own terms:
100,000=1 lakb = 1,00,000= “lokbo”
10,000,000= 1 crore =1,00,00,000= “kuti”

In weights, the Bangladeshi use kg and grams at the market and for small quantities
(e.g. at the jeweller shops) tota. 11.6 gram –1 tola




                                                                                     10
1.11    ELECTRICITY


In Bangladesh you have 220/240 volts-50 Hz, with frequent fluctuations throughout
the day sometimes reaching a peak level of 410 Volt. Voltage regulators for electric
appliances are essential and are widely available. Regulators for the whole house are
available as well but are costly. Tube lights generally are not affected by the current
disturbances.



If the house remains air-conditioned throughout the day, monthly bill may add up to
10.000 – 20.000 taka per month. There are frequent power cuts, called “load
shedding”.


1.12    LEISURE

Clubs

Almost every nationality has its own club facilities.

The Nordic Club, open to everyone who is Scandinavian or works for a Scandinavian
organisation. House 18, Road 55, Gulshan 2. Telephone 02-883021. Membership
costs per month in taka: Family 2,300.-, adults 1,000.-, children 250.-. Up-country
members pay half price. A deposit has to be paid of 15,000.- on top of an initial fee
of 3,000.-.

The Netherlands Recreation Centre (Dutch Club) is at House 2, Road 80, Gulshan 2.
Telephone 02-881892. It is open to any expatriate who has no own national club and
to people who are somehow linked to a Dutch organisation. Monthly fee taka 750. -
per person. Children pay half price. Joining fee US$100 per family, $ 50.- per single
person. Up-country residents pay half price.

The International Club is at house 54, Road 84, Gulshan, Telephone 02-601773.
Everybody can be a member of the International Club. Joining fee $ 200. - plus a
monthly fee of $ 50.

The Australian High Commission Recreation Centre is open to all Australians and
New Zealenders. Plots 21, Road 83, Gulshan 2, Telephone 02-9881946. Membership
fee from taka 4000.- per person to taka 16,000.- per family

Most clubs have tennis court, a squash court, a swimming pool, and a sandpit for the
smaller members, and the Danish and Dutch clubs have a few guestrooms. The bars
and restaurants are nice places to grab a beer or enjoy a BBQ at reasonable prices.
Tennis and volleyball tournaments are organized.


                                                                                    11
Golf
Two golf clubs are situated 10-15 minutes drive from Gulshan. Kurmitola Golf Club
is very nice well-established 18-hole golf course. Army Golf Club is a 9-hole golf
course, which was established in 2002.

Tours
Several tour operators can organize Tours. The Guide Tours Ltd. at Gulshan 2
Cirkel can be recommended. www.guidetours.com and also www.contic.com at
house 183, Road 69, Gulshan 2

Shopping
http://shop.Bangladesh.net

Books
Unlike neighbouring South Asian countries, recent novels are hard to come by.
However, Kolkata, Delhi and Kathmandu (Pilgrim‟s Book House) are Mecca‟s for
book lovers. For less recent titles, mainly cheap prints from India, one could try New
Market, Stadium Market (second floor), Azziz Co-operative Market at Shababh and
the Bookwork (Old Airport road). The University Press Ltd. (Red Crescent Building
at Motijheel) may order books for you and they have a large number of books on
Bangladesh and development in stock as well. Aarong and Ideas have books on
culture and development and some children‟s books.

Libraries
Dhaka has three libraries open to the public:
British Council, 5 Fuller Road (has also an internet centre)
American International School- Dhaka, United Nations Road
Alliance Françaice, 26 Mirpur Road, Dhanmondi.

Restaurants
In Dhaka the variety of international restaurants is still growing. These are compared
to dining outdoors in Europe, not expensive. You are allowed to bring your own
bottle of wine or beer along, as restaurants are not allowed to sell alcoholic beverage.
Outside Dhaka, bigger towns have the odd Chinese restaurants, serving very odd
Chinese food. Otherwise, just stick to Bangladeshi curries and fries.

Cinemas, Bars and Galleries
Every town has at least one cinema. They show Bangladeshi and Bollywood (Bombay
made Hindi) films. It is a long sit, as most films take 3 hours to finish the singing and
dancing. King‟s Kitchen is a Gulshan Avenue restaurant and, apart from food, shows
recent films during the weeks at 18:00.

There are no bars in Dhaka except at the International Hotels. They sell drinks at
exorbitant prices.


                                                                                      12
Dhanmindi, Banani and Gulshan have a number of art galleries. At regular intervals
expositions are held.

The British Council, the Goethe Institute and the Alliance Françaice organise film
festivals, art and craft expositions and lectures.

Video Connection at DIT II on the Kemal Ataturk Avenue side sells videotapes and
DVDs for around 150.- taka each and has an enormous stock of videos for rent. In
all other towns, one can find video shops, but these stick mainly to hindi and blue
movie tapes.

Museums
The National Museum and the Lalbahg Fort gives a good impression of the
Bangladeshi history. The Rajshhi Museum is famous for its beautiful black stone
Hindu Carvings. For more information, see book on Bangladesh, chapter 13.

Churches
Dhaka International Christ Church holds services every Friday at 9.30 AM at the
Parjanta Akabash Hotel in Mohakhali. Many more churches (Armenien, Roman
Catholic, Assemblies of God), temples and mosques can be visited in Dhaka.


2      THE DANISH EMBASSY

During assignment the Danish Embassy is the focal point for the advisers in all
matters - e.g. contractual matters and housing matters.

The Embassy has an expatriate staff of eight persons and a professional Bangladeshi
staff of six programme officers and support staff who will assist with e.g. visa and
passbook matters. Apart from the diplomatic tasks, the Embassy engages itself in
planning and supervision of Danida activities. Upon arrival, the Embassy will provide
the adviser with a briefing on Danida, specifically the relevant programme and rules
and regulations applied in Bangladesh.

When the adviser is the first person in a new project, the Embassy will pick up the
adviser from the airport and arrange temporary lodgings in Dhaka. New advisers in
ongoing projects will be received and temporary accommodation will be arranged
either by the project or by the Embassy. As soon as an adviser‟s appointment has
been approved by the Government of Bangladesh, the Embassy will contact the
adviser and start planning the transfer to Bangladesh.

Shortly after your arrival in Bangladesh, you will be introduced to the Embassy. A
number of meetings will be set up for you – either by the Embassy itself or by the
adviser who received you at the airport. Normally, you will meet the Ambassador and

                                                                                     13
the Deputy Head of Mission, the Danish Counsellor and the local Programme
Officer/Officers working with the relevant programme – and the administrative
section. It is recommended that you bring your passport and a number of passport
photos at your first meeting as this will be needed for the opening of a bank account,
application of correct visa, should you not have the correct one already, application
for a passbook etc. During the meeting with the administrative staff you will be
informed on reimbursements, forms, lists, housing etc. and you will meet the local
support staff whom you can contact on all practical issues. It goes without saying that
you should not hesitate to contact the Embassy in case you need further information
or clarification on any practical/administrative issue.

All advisers have a pigeonhole in the reception and are kindly requested to empty it
regularly and to use the embassy address only for official correspondence. For
advisers staying outside Dhaka the Embassy will send your mail by courier 2-3 times
every month.


2.1    ADDRESS, TELEPHONE NUMBERS AND OFFICE

Royal Danish Embassy
House 1, Road 51, Gulshan 2, Dhaka 1212
Postal address:
G. P. O. Box 2056, Dhaka 1000

Telephone numbers: (00 880 2) 882.17.99, 882.24.99, 882.25.99 and 882.26.99
Emergency mobile phone no: (00 880) 0171.59.51.36

Fax number: (00 880 2) 882.36.38 (it is often very difficult to get through on the fax
and the Embassy recommends that you opt for the e-mail whenever possible)

E-mail address: dandhaka@citechco.net / dacamb@um.dk

Web: www.ambdhaka.um.dk



Office hours:
Sunday to Wednesday 08.00 –15.30
Thursday 08.00-15.00
The embassy is closed on Friday and Saturday

Please refer to Annex I for Embassy holidays is closed.

Danida advisers generally follow government holidays, which may differ from those
followed by the Embassy.

                                                                                         14
The Embassy edits a “List of Danes and Danida Advisers”. The list is often updated
and contains both home and office addresses and telephone numbers and e-mail
addresses of the registered persons. When arriving in Bangladesh, you will b e asked
to fill in a form containing the above-mentioned information in order for the
Embassy to include you in the list. The list is distributed 2 times a year but you can
always request an updated list from the Embassy by sending a request to
dacamb@um.dk indicating whether you want a soft or a hard copy.


2.2    MEETINGS AND APPOINTMENTS

It is recommended that advisers wanting to meet the staff of the Embassy, whenever
possible, make appointments beforehand. For security reasons, you are requested to
sign-in at the front gate of the Embassy compound (joint Danish-Swedish Embassy
compound) and the guards will check your appointment with the receptionist before
letting you enter. Also for security reasons, advisors are request ed to inform the
Embassy in advance before travelling inside and outside Bangladesh. We count on
your comprehension and acceptance of this procedure. Furthermore, all visitors to
the Embassy should at all times be accompanied whenever inside the building.

The receptionist can supply the adviser with a list of extension numbers, should you
need to contact the staff outside office hours, when the operator is not available to
connect you.


2.3    REIMBURSEMENT OF EXPENSES

Advisers pay a number of reimbursable expenses e.g. gas, electricity, salary for night
guard. The Embassy will give you more detailed information on claims, vouchers etc.
in connection with reimbursement during the introduction meeting with the
administrative section shortly after your arrival. It is very important that the claims
for electricity, gas etc. are paid either to the landlord or to the relevant authorities on
time and the Embassy requests you to make sure that you receive the necessary
claims/receipts from the companies or the landlord. In case this does not happen,
please inform the Embassy.

The Embassy reimburses one home leave after each year of contract. All home leaves
have to be approved by the Embassy before reservation is made. In case of a two -
year contract, the adviser and his or her family will only be entitled to one home
leave. The home leave has to take place more than six months before expiry of the
contract. Note that where the spouse is not living in Bangladesh with the advisor,
he/she is entitled to an annual visit or the advisor may make a second trip in lieu.

The Embassy has an agreement with Saimon Travel Services in Gulshan (website:
http://www.saimongroup.com.) and recommends that you make your reservation


                                                                                        15
with them. The Saimon TS will contact the Embassy who will approve and pay the
ticket/tickets directly.

In case you opt for another travel agent, please be noted that the Embassy only
reimburses the amount the ticket would have cost at Saimon TS.

All home leave tickets have to be economy class.

The Embassy will reimburse your claims once a month.

The Embassy strongly advises you to study the “Rules and Regulations for Long
Term Advisers” edited by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, latest edition October
2003. This booklet methodically lists all expenses that can be claimed from the
Embassy.


2.4    LEGAL ADVICE

The Embassy will assist with legal advice and information.


2.5    PRECAUTIONS ON ARRESTS

In the case of arrest, imprisonment and prosecution of an adviser the Embassy must
be informed at once in order to give advice or render assistance. This also applies if
the adviser is involved in a serious traffic accident. In case of such an accident, the
persons involved are advised to leave the place of accident and report to the nearest
police station. The Embassy has an emergency mobile telephone and we recommend
that you keep the number with you (0171595136).


2.6    EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

In case of emergencies, politically or otherwise, the adviser is requested to follow the
instructions given by the Embassy. An emergency plan is available at the Embassy
wherein advice is given on evacuation. It is very important that the Embassy has
updated information on telephone numbers, e -mail addresses etc. at all times.
Furthermore, it is important that you keep the Embassy informed on your
whereabouts – especially in periods of unrest.


2.7    DANISH NATIONAL ELECTIONS

Danish nationals can cast their vote at the Embassy by personal appearance. Advisers
should apply for inclusion on the electoral register before leaving Denmark. In case
this has not happened, admission forms can be obtained at the Embassy. Advisers,


                                                                                     16
who have been outside Denmark for more than 2 years are not allowed to vote at all
in Denmark for either national or local elections. After returning to Denmark the
adviser can apply to be included on the electoral register again.


2.8    LIAISON COMMITTEE

Since 1997, Danida advisers in Bangladesh have again formed a liaison committee.
The DAA-B (Danida Advisers Committee-Bangladesh) meets 4 times a year, has 5
elected members (advisers and spouses) and organises an annual Advisers‟ Meeting.
The committee discusses all matters of relevance concerning conditions of
employment and adjustment to Bangladesh and is an intermediary between the
Embassy and the Danida advisers. More information about the DAA-B can be
obtained from the committee.


2.9    DANIDA PERSONNEL IN BANGLADESH

At present (November 2005) 17 Danida advisers, and a number of company advisers,
Danes and non-Danes are currently involved in programmes and projects regarding
agriculture and fisheries, human rights and good governance, transport and water and
sanitation. Most advisers are based in Dhaka but a small number of advisers live up
country.

See the Embassy‟s homepage for information about the components and the
advisers. (www.ambdhaka.um.dk/developmentissus/)


2.10   THE GOVERNMENT AGREEMENT

On 26 August 1972 the Danish Agreement on Co -operation with Bangladesh was
signed in Dhaka. This agreement contains a number of regulations on Advisers‟ rights
during their stay in Bangladesh. A copy of this agreement can be obtained at the
Embassy.


2.11   CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE MINISTRY OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS,
         COPENHAGEN

As the Embassy is responsible for all administration regarding advisers, all
correspondence with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Copenhagen must take place
via the Embassy. After the decentralisation in 2003 the Ministry of Foreign Affairs is
responsible only for contractual matters.




                                                                                   17
3      PRE-DEPARTURE PREPARATIONS

3.1    VISA FOR BANGLADESH

Once the Embassy has obtained the approval letter from the GoB (Government of
Bangladesh) for a new adviser, a copy hereof will be forwarded to the adviser. The
Adviser must forward a copy of his passport and of accompanying family members‟
passports to the Danish Embassy in Dhaka. The Danish embassy will then forward a
request letter for a multiple „A‟ type visa (up to one year or more) to the nearest
Embassy of Bangladesh from the adviser‟s point of departure (for instance
Stockholm for the advisers who are living in Denmark).

The Embassy‟s will forward a copy of the visa request letter to the adviser, who
should then obtain the visa application forms from the nearest Bangladeshi Embassy
(or from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Copenhagen). The completed forms must
be forwarded to the Bangladeshi Embassy along with the above-mentioned copy of
GoB clearance and visa request letter plus photos and other visa related documents
(if needed).

Upon arrival of the adviser in Dhaka, the Embassy will apply for a multiple entry for
the full length of the adviser‟s contract period.

3.2.   INSURANCE

Before leaving for Bangladesh it is recommended to take out a family insurance,
including coverage for household effects, as t his is not covered by TRYG the
insurance company of Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

The Ministry does not cover shipment of a private car. Third party liability insurance
is taken out locally and is statutory. Many advisers prefer to take out local
“comprehensive” insurance, since such insurance is inexpensive.

All questions regarding insurance matters should be directed to TRYG UDLANDS-
SERVICE (see annex for more details)


3.3    UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE

Questions regarding unemployment insurance for advisers and accompanying
spouses should be directed to their respective unemployment insurance schemes or
to

        Direktoratet for Arbejdsløshedsforsikring (DfA)

        Finsensvej 78



                                                                                   18
          2000 Frederiksberg

          Phone no.: +45 38 10 60 11



It is recommended to seek information in writing from the “Direktoratet”.

Non-Danish advisers should check with unemployment insurance schemes in their
home country.


3.4      MONEY TRANSFER

Nowadays, transferring money from a home bank to Bangladesh using SWIFT codes
is not difficult. The main bank in Dhaka used by the Embassy of Denmark is
Standard Chartered Bank.

There are three possibilities of transferring money from your home bank to
Bangladesh:

      1. Monthly money transfer via SWIFT (standing order) to your account in
         Dhaka.

      2. By sending a fax to your bank, any amount can be transferred by SWIFT
         (upon request). Both take about a week and cost DKK 50 per transfer (varies
         according to bank) the Standard Chartered is SWIFT-SCBLBDDX

      3. Bring along a letter of guarantee issued by your home bank. Upon arrival the
         Embassy will issue a letter of recommendation to Standard Chartered Bank
         for opening a local convertible Thaka account (or US Dollar account).
         Standard Chartered Bank will then instantly honour foreign cheques up to the
         amount stated in the letter of guarantee. However, there have been cases
         where some banks have refused to cash cheques for large amounts of money.
         However, the SCB will honour cheques up to a maximum of USD 5.000
         because of the advisers‟ affiliation with the Danish Embassy.

All major banks honour Master Cards and have cash dispensing machines throughout
Dhaka. However, outside Dhaka, cash dispensing machines are only available in big
cities like Chittagong. The banks have details of the location of these facilities.

Credit cards from AMEX, Visa, Master Card and Diners Club can be used in the big
restaurants and at the Stadium Market in Dhaka.




                                                                                   19
4      HEALTH CARE AND VACCINATIONS

4.1    WATER

Water supply is satisfactory. The pipes are, however, out-dated so that, in spite of
chlorination, there is a serious risk of contamination and drinking water should
therefore always be boiled. Out of Dhaka it is still customary for houses to have their
own wells from which water of reasonable quality is obtained. Bottled water can be
purchased from several companies, which are not all safe however. Makes like
“Mum” and “Alpine fresh” are of safe quality. Water is sold in bottles from ½ to 20
litres, dispensers can be provided by the suppliers also. In restaurants and elsewhere
take care to accept sealed bottles only. In other cases water should still be boiled
before use.

Fruit and vegetables should be cleaned in iodine solution or potassium permanganate.
However, not all find this necessary. At restaurants you will be told that water has
been boiled, but even so you are advised to keep to tea, coffee and to sealed bottled
or tinned mineral water.


4.2    VACCINATIONS

According to the World Health Organisation before departure to Bangladesh, it is
recommended to have vaccinations against:

Tuberculosis. Children from the age of 1 week can receive a BCG.

Typhoid, injected or orally. Not for children below the age of 1 year. Booster after 3
years.

Diphtheria, tetanus and poliomyelitis. One time booster every 15 years.

Japanese Encephalitis. Check this with the institute that provides you with the
vaccines or the Rigshospitalet in Copenhagen, as the Japanese Encephalitis
vaccination is not without risks. Protects only for one year.

Yellow fever vaccination is only required if you have come from a region where it is
endemic: central Africa and northern South America.

Hepatitis B, 3 injections give a high rate of protection. Check serum titre when you
go for medical check up.

Havrix against hepatitis A. Quite new, so far results have shown that 2 injectio ns give
a 10-year protection. It is definitely better than the immunoglobulin.




                                                                                     20
Meningogococcen meningitis. Protection of about 3 years. Children below 2 years
of age are not to be vaccinated.

For children it is advisable to have the combined vaccine of mu mps, measles and
rubella.

Rabies vaccination only gives a slight protection and when bitten by a dog or cat with
rabies it is advised to booster (post-exposition) again immediately. Do get your
animal pets vaccinated against rabies as a preventive measure ment. Malaria is not
endemic in Dhaka.

Beware, though, if you travel to the Chittagong Hill Tracts or visit the hilly tea area
around Sylhet even for a few days! Malaria is prevalent there. Prophylactics are
available in Dhaka although most pharmacies have never heard of Fansidar, Lariam
and the likes.

Dengue Fever has occurred around the few lakes in Dhaka. There are no prophylactic
medicines available yet.

In Dhaka Dr. Wahab‟s Clinic (See address in section 4.3) has a supply of all kinds of
vaccines at hand.

It is not necessary to bring a cold chain supply of vaccines to Bangladesh. Sterile
needles and syringes are widely available.

Pets

When imported into Bangladesh pets require a proper vaccination record, see chapter
7. The normal vaccinations for pets are available.

Vets: Dr. Md. Azmat Ali, Gulshan Pet-Animal Clinic, 4&5, DCC Market (Ext.),
Gulshan 2, tel. 0175078434; 9883486.

For the latest info on health related topics, the Danish Serum Institute has a site on
Internet: http:/www.vaccination.dk


4.3    HEALTH SERVICE

Apollo Hospitals recently has opened a hospital in Dhaka, (see address below). They
are very well equipped, including ambulances.

Cardiac problems can be taken care of at Cardiohope Heart Centre, Dr. Hasina
Banoo. Telephone 02-604661-884852 res. Dr. Zaman is a cardiologist, trained in
Britain. House 6, Road 51, Gulshan, telephone 02-601962.



                                                                                    21
Dental Clinics are to be found as well. When needed, expats usually go to Johnson‟s
Place, or 7th Day Adventist Dental Clinic (see addresses below);

Lake View Clinic for Ob/gyn speciality clinic, Paediatrician available for consulting,
diagnostic lab and ultrasound facility. House 5, Road 79, Gulshan. Tel. 8814887

Apollo Hospital, Dhaka
Plot #81, Block E, Bashundhara R/A, Dhaka -1229
http://www.apollodhaka.com/
Phone:
Information: 9891661-5
Appointment: 9891680-1
Emergency: 9896623 or 0173063067.
Fax: 9896139, email: info@apollodhaka.com

Dr. M. A. Wahab Dr. Wahab‟s Clinic (Laboratory, vaccinations, ECG, X-ray)
House # 3, Road 12
Baridhara, DhakA- 1212.
Phone: 8821454, 8827553
Mobile: 017-565444
Email: wahab@dhaka.agni.com

D ENTAL AND ORTHODONTICS

Dr. Nalini Bayen
Johnson‟s Place
Road # 11, House # 52
Plot # F, Banani, Dhaka
Phone: 8826789, 8822849, 604415
Mobile: 017-530887, 8918836 (Res)
Email: bayen@bdonline.com

Adventist Dental Clinic
78, Gulshan Avenue, Gulshan, Dhaka
Phone: 8822529, 9894948

Swedish Free Mission,
House 44, Road 13A, Dhanmondi,
Phone 02-310917.) SdH

5      WHAT TO BRING TO BANGLADESH

5.1    BUYING HOUSEHOLD ITEMS

Generally, everything is available in Dhaka. Household electric appliances, cookers,
air conditioners, kitchenware, etc. can be bought at reasonable prices, although some
items such as hot water pots common in East Asia are surprisingly hard to find. Even


                                                                                   22
outside Dhaka, in such remote places like Patuakhali and Noakhali, all kinds of
appliances are now available. Everyday consumer goods vary according to the
seasons. In addition to this Danida advisers with a Passbook may do their shopping
at the duty free warehouses in Dhaka.

Import of household items is a time consuming and lengthy process. It is almost
impossible to do it by yourself, as customs want the importer to collect a lot of
signatures on various forms. Homebound Ltd. shippers and movers can do the job,
but even then it takes time (from 1 to 5 months) and money for the customs, clearing
inwards of the imported goods, and the bill for the services provided by
Homebound.

Cars and durable household items can be bought tax-free in Bangladesh through the
Duty Free Warehouses with a Passbook System. However, on departure from
Bangladesh, these items have to be sold to other Passbook holders (which can be
difficult). If the items are sold to a non-privileged person, outstanding taxes have to
be paid to the customs. In any case, all durable items must be cleared from the
Passbook before departure or re-exported.

It is generally more convenient to buy a second hand car in Dhaka and buy the other
durable items from the Stadium Market or DIT I in Dhaka.

The accommodation provided by Danida is usually unfurnished. The following is a
list of expenses in Taka (January 2004) likely to be incurred per house:

Air-conditioners, one for each bedroom and one in the living room, will be provided
by the Embassy



       The following is a list of expenses in Bangladesh

       ceiling fans              6              1.000              6.000

       refrigerator              1              27.000             27.000

       gas oven                  1              24.000             24.000

       washing machine           1              24.000             24.000

       mixer, toaster, blender   3              1.000              3.000

       stereo set, 2005 model    1              20.000             20.000

       colour TV, 2005 model 1                  20.000             20.000

       furniture cane set        1              80.000             80.000

                                                                                    23
       curtains, bedding etc.                   10.000             10.000

       TOTAL                                                       304.000


5.2    PASSBOOK

The Embassy arranges your Passbook with which you can import goods, including a
car, from abroad duty free within the first 6 months upon arrival in Bangladesh. The
Passbooks must be renewed yearly (follows the renewal of the visa) and the E mbassy
will assist with the renewal. In 2003 the GOB introduced a new system whereas all
passbook holders have to go personally to the Customs House, Zia International
Airport, after all paperwork has been done. However, the process of renewal is
remarkable efficient and courteous, taking no more than one hour.


5.3    DUTY-FREE WAREHOUSES

With the Passbook you can buy a limited amount of liquor, food and toiletries at the
warehouse. The amount one can spend depends on the size of the family. The quota
for three months per single adult is US$ 450-for liquor and tobacco, $243-for
foodstuffs and $27-for toiletries. Outside the warehouses it is difficult to buy
alcoholic beverages. Anything else can be bought at the local markets around the
Gulshan II and I circles. At some of the warehouses they also sell perfume, television
sets and microwaves, but prices do not differ very much anymore from the Stadium
Market in Dhaka. There are 6 diplomatic bonded warehouses in Dhaka, all centred
around Gulshan Avenue.

Only a limited amount of foodstuff can be bought in the warehouses these days.


5.4    KITCHEN EQUIPMENT

If you want stainless steel pots and pans, shopping in Dhaka can be expensive.
Locally made kitchen utensils are not as good as in Europe but do well and are
inexpensive. For tableware, there are several large factories at Sarvar, north of Dhaka
and all the latest creations (possibly with small defects) are available in the shops
along Elephant Road in Dhaka. Even complete 113 piece dining sets can be bought
there. Prices are extremely low compared to Europe. Wine glasses are still quite
expensive but other glassware is available at good prices.


5.5    HARDWARE AND ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT

Hardware like washing machines, gas ovens etc. are sometimes to be got second hand
from expatriates about to return home. Prices asked are usually not very high. All

                                                                                    24
hardware and electrical equipment can be bought from the Stadium Market in Dhaka.
Prices are higher than in Europe and it does require a bit of bargaining. The latest
models of Samsung, Sony and Philips CD-players, midi sets, stereo equipment, etc.
can be found.

All over Dhaka, the latest models of PC, desktop and laptop, other computer
hardware and software are for sale. Local clones as well as imported equipment are
available at compatible prices.

Note that power cuts, load shedding etc. resulting in electricity failures are frequent
day and night. Voltage stabilisers and UPS can be bought in Dhaka.

Lamp bulbs are widely available with bayonet fitting only. Bulbs with screw fittings
are available at DIT II. Lamp stands can be bought at Ideas, Aarong and around DIT
II.


5.6    BEDDING

It is difficult to find bed linen for non-metric king or queen size beds. Bangladeshis
generally sleep in smaller beds. However, there is an enormous amount of cotton
cloth on the market and tailors located at the material shops or elsewhere along the
street. Mattresses are available at Italian furniture, Gulshan, Dhaka and many other
shops in Gulshan

During winter it can be rather chilly at night. Things like woollen blankets or down
quilts are not available in Bangladesh.


5.7    CLOTHES

Women wear salwar kameez (dress plus pants) or a sari; at work, men wear western
clothes, and poor men wear a lungi with a long shirt. Inside their homes most men
wear a lungi. For women, tight dresses, blouses not covering the crotch, bare
shoulders, shorts and the like are not appreciated in Bangladesh, except when the
adviser is together with other expatriates at the Club or at home. A normal summer
outfit will do throughout the year and the many tailors in Bangladesh can copy a new
supply. Bring a sweater and light windbreaker for the chilly winter evenings. Pure
cotton underwear and bras are difficult to find. Western style, fashionable clothes are
hard to find in and around Dhaka. There is one Benetton shop, though.

For babies and small children only a little stock of clothes is necessary as there are a
lot of children‟s clothes available in Dhaka. Cotton diapers/ nappies come in handy,
disposable diapers are expensive outside the warehouses, however still cheaper than
shipping them from home.


                                                                                     25
Leather shoes are available, but if you have a special request on shoes, bring them
from home. Men‟s shoes exceeding size 42-49 are difficult to find.


5.8    SPORTS EQUIPMENT

Sports equipment, including bathing suits, is widely available at DIT II. If you like to
explore your neighbourhood on bicycle, it is advisable to bring a mountain bike from
home, as local bicycles are not very reliable and not designed for long -legged
foreigners.


5.9     OTHERS

Photo and camera equipment is becoming easier to find. Fuji and Kodak films (slides
and pictures) are cheap.

Children‟s books have to be brought. Many toys available are made of local plastics
and contain poisonous paints.

Christmas decorations are available, also plastic trees.

Most kinds of medicine can be bought and even ordered locally. In case of special
medication, bring it along. Anti mosquito ointment like Autan is not available.

Women may bring a supply of female sanitary napkins or tampons. Those available
are old fashioned or only of a single brand.

6      TRANSPORT AND USE OF A PRIVATE CAR

6.1    GENERAL INFORMATION

There are train connections between the larger towns, but due to the many river
crossings it remains a relatively slow means of public transport.

Most Bangladeshis take the long distance day or night buses. They are cheap, quite
fast but extremely dangerous as well. It is inadvisable to travel on these buses at night,
when most of the accidents occur. Several Components specifically ban travel after
dusk.

Transport by boat (“rocket” from Dhaka via Barisal to Khulna, and “launch” from
Dhaka to Barisal, Bogra, Patuakhali, Barguna, Bhola, Jalokathi and Chandpur) is
relatively comfortable (First class cabins) and a pleasant way of travelling the mighty
rivers of Bangladesh. However, there have been an increasing number of launch
accidents in recent years.



                                                                                       26
The roads are relatively well maintained but dangerous to travel and crowded with
people and rickshaws. Most advisers travel by car when they go to the field during
work.

It is possible to go by air to domestic destinations. Bangladesh Biman is flying to the
major cities. GMG, a private airline, flies to Sylhet and Chittagong in connection with
British Airways international flights. GMG flies to Barisal o nce daily from where it
takes about 2 hours by car to reach Patuakhali.

Taxis are for hire near the big hotels like Sheraton and Sonargaon, at the airport for
fixed prices (350/- airport to Gulshan) and through local entrepreneurs such as
London Taxi (tel. 02-870343 or 011-861237).

Transport in smaller towns is primarily by rickshaw, for longer distances by baby taxi
(motorised rickshaw) and by cab. Travel by rickshaw is becoming complicated since
many main roads and crossings are now closed for rickshaws.


6.2    PRIVATE CARS

Most advisers who reside in Dhaka require a car for private use as the project cars
may be used for project purposes only. Outside Dhaka a car comes in handy if one
does not want to feel locked up up -country. Note that there are not too many sights
to visit and travelling usually includes waiting at river crossings. Travelling with a
private car from Bangladesh to India requires a deposit (8 lakh taka) plus export and
re-import permission from several ministries and from the Indian High Commission
in Dhaka.

Bangladesh follows the British system and has left hand drive. Therefore a car with
right hand steering wheel is much easier.

Maintenance possibilities at the many workshops are limited to Japanese brands and
specialist vehicles such as Land Rovers

Cars can be bought second hand from experts leaving the country, right away at the
show rooms around Gulshan and Tejgaon, or by importing (high transport and
insurance costs and a long shipping is to be expected)


6.3    CAR INSURANCE

Should the adviser choose a local loss and damage insurance, which may be sufficient,
one should realize that it can take up to six months or more to have possible claims
redeemed.




                                                                                    27
6.4    DRIVING LICENSE

The national driving license can be used until a Bangladeshi license is obtained. An
international license is valid up to 1 year. In Dhaka, obtaining a license is normally
just a formality of filling in the forms. In other places, some advisers or their spouses
have been asked to pass the theoretical examination.


7      SENDING GOODS, PETS OR MAIL TO BANGLADESH

7.1    GENERAL INFORMATION

According to the Government Agreement between Denmark and Bangladesh, the
adviser is entitled to import personal belongings duty free within the first 6 months
of arrival. Purchases made at home can be made free of customs duty and VAT for
delivery through a forwarding agent when a Passbook has been obtained. Obtaining a
Passbook normally takes between 4 to 6 months after arrival in Bangladesh. Many big
firms have their own shipping agent. Quite often this is Homebound Ltd. Barlows or
Transpeed Ltd. as they deal with foreigners every day.

If you choose to ship freight, bear in mind that 1 to 2 months of total transport time
should be allowed. Upon arrival, goods have to be cleared inwards at Chittagong.

If you intend to ship your personal belongings by air, it is advised to send the goods
after you have obtained your Passbook, as storage for more than 45 days at Zia
International Airport is a costly affair. After the goods have been received at Zia
International Airport, it has to be cleared in wards.

Personal belongings, with the exception of articles for which a Passbook is needed
(electric equipment etc.), can be sent by airfreight as unaccompanied luggage in
connection with your departure.

Mail in Patuakhali and Noakhali is delivered to the house and is usually not a
problem. Small packages are cleared by customs in Patuakhali, which is much easier
than in Dhaka. Outgoing mail is usually sent by registered mail, which is reliable and
not expensive.


7.2    PETS

Before bringing in your pet you should make sure that you can accommodate it, as
some landlords do not accept pets in their provided accommodation, especially
apartments. In particular dogs may not be accepted, even if houserules state that
“pets “are allowed. So verify beforehand!




                                                                                      28
You should employ a local shipment agency like “Homebound”
(www.homeboundbd.com; tel. +880-2-9894745 till 50) to process the customs
clearance of your pet. They have experience with importi ng pets and are normally
helpful and can advise about the process. Before shipment a “No Objection
Certificate” should be obtained from the Director General of the Livestock
Department (The Director General, Livestock Department, Khamarbari, Farmgate);
Homebound can provide an example request letter. Without this certificate the pet
cannot be shipped. Pets should have the proper vaccinations like rabies and
vaccination records are required. Names of companies to ship your pet can be
obtained from the major airlines.

NOTE: For bringing/returning pets to Europe a proper vaccination record and pet
passport are vital. Further a blood test for rabies antibodies should have been carried
out (before departure from Europe) to verify that the vaccination is effecti ve. For this
test a blood sample should be taken not earlier than 2 weeks after vaccination.
Further for Europe pets have to be registered and to be identified with a chip under
the skin, for which it is advised to insert it before departure.


8      ACCOMODATION

8.1    APARTMENTS/HOUSES

In Dhaka, most foreigners settle in the Gulshan, Baridhara and Banani residential
areas where also all Embassies and International Schools are located. These areas
have changed dramatically over the last few years. A great number of hou ses with
gardens have been demolished to make room for apartment buildings. The result is
that more and more advisers will be settled in apartments – often provided with nice
balconies. It has to be stressed though that construction work is going on all over
Dhaka resulting in both noise and dust pollution.

Air pollution is an increasing problem but the GOB is taking the matter seriously and
has e.g. banned all two-stroke baby taxies and introduced environmentally safe baby
taxies.

Outside Dhaka, accommodation is less luxurious than in Dhaka but it is easier to find
a house with a garden.

In many cases incoming advisers can move into the apartment/house of the outgoing
adviser. When this is not the case the Embassy will advise the incoming adviser
before he or she starts house hunting. Once the adviser has found an acceptable
unfurnished apartment or house, the Embassy will decide on its suitability, will
negotiate with the landlord as the Embassy will sign the contract of lease and pay the
monthly rent plus an advance if required. Before the contract is signed between the
Embassy and your landlord, be sure that all the adjustments, changes and verbal


                                                                                      29
agreements are mentioned in the contract. In case you want to bring your pets, make
sure that the landlord / flat committee agrees with that. Note that if stated that pets
are allowed this will not automatically apply for dogs.

Until accommodation is found, the adviser will reside in a guesthouse at the duty
station. Danida operates Guest Houses in both Noakhali and Patuakhali where there
has been a concentration of projects. Rates are typical Tk1600 per night for a single
room and Tk2000 per night for a double room. Meals need to be ordered.

The adviser pays all bills for water, electricity, gas and telephone. It is the
responsibility of the adviser to make sure that the bills are received within a
reasonable timeframe – if this is not the case, the Embassy should be informed.

If the accommodation is not connected to the local water supply, a deep tube well
has to be dug to avoid drinking arsenic contaminated shallow tube well water.
Expenses will be borne by the Embassy upon prior permission.

All apartments or houses are normally newly painted when the adviser moves in and
will be repainted every second or third year after the rainy season – according to the
lease agreement. Maintenance and regular painting or white washing are normally
specified in the lease agreement. Very often, electric wiring is not properly done.
Make sure that the wiring used is not too thi n, that the zero lines are not fused, and
that the air conditioners are connected to thick wiring.

Small repairs up to 2.000 taka are reimbursed by the Embassy. Larger repair works
have to be negotiated with the landlord. If the landlord does not agree to pay for the
repairs the Embassy will negotiate with the landlord.

The adviser can ask for improvements of the house and the Embassy will consider
each case carefully and try to negotiate with the landlord or pay for the improvement.


8.2    RESIDENTIAL STAFF

Most advisers find it helpful to have somebody in the house to help with washing,
ironing, shopping etc. and most choose to hire bearers and/or a cook. If you have
small children, you might want an ayah to help you – and should you have a garden, a
gardener could be necessary. Finally, many opt to have a driver instead of trying to
cope on their own with the often intense and chaotic traffic in Dhaka – and
dangerous traffic on the roads outside Dhaka.

The current salaries can be obtained from your colleagues or from DAA-B. The
salaries outside Dhaka tend to be lower than in Dhaka.




                                                                                      30
It is expected that a festival bonus for either Christmas (for Christians), Durga Puja
(for Hindus) or Eid (for Muslims) – depending on religion – be given (one month
salary per year).

Most employers supply money for sets of uniforms per year and/or umbrella – and
will help with medical expenses.

For those living in houses, the Embassy strongly recommends a night guard. The
Embassy reimburses the monthly salary for one night guard (t he maximum amount
can be obtained from the Embassy).


9 SCHOOLING FACILITIES

American International school: http://www.ais-dhaka.net/

International School Dhaka- Bangladesh: http://www.isdbd.org/

Grace International School: http://www.graceinternationalschool.org/




10 DUTY STATIONS OUTSIDE DHAKA

10.1   COMMON ISSUES FOR THE TOWNS OF THE COSTAL AREAS
       WHERE DANIDA IS WORKING, NOAKHALI, PATUAKHALI AND
       BAGUNA.

Climate
The climate is similar to the rest of the country, near to the sea humidity may be a little
higher and the temperatures are a little higher to the south.

Supplies
Basic daily necessities, like bread, milk (straight from the cow), butter, bottled water, meat
(beef, chicken (local and hybrid), mutton and fish are usually available. Vegetables are
available although the variety is not so wide. Some vegetables (like tomatoes, carrots,
cauliflower) are brought from Dhaka during some months because the time of availability is
shorter outside Dhaka.

Disease
Need for vaccinations is the same as for the rest of the country. Malaria and dengue are very
rare in the coastal zone. Probably the few cases were contracted elsewhere. In general the
coastal zone is rather healthy since there is no pollution like in Dhaka.

Medical facilities
Every major town has a government hospital and several private hospitals/clinics. Most


                                                                                           31
problems can be solved here. X-ray, caesarean, everything is possible but when time is
available it is preferable to go to Dhaka or out of the country. Medicines are widely available
without prescription.

Security
In general the coastal towns are safe, social control is stronger in smaller communities.
Foreigners are treated with respect and have little to fear from thieves. With the recent
developments it is however better to be prepared. All present advisers have guards, usually 1
during the day and 1-2 for the night.

Electricity
There are usually some power cuts every day, totaling 3-4 hours. At times power is off all
day. The embassy provides a generator for the advisers outside Dhaka. The generator is
powerful enough to run all appliances except the ACs.

Private transport
In town distances are small and rickshaws are widely available. A private car is convenient,
but rarely needed in town where distances are short and roads are narrow and crowded.

Telecommunication
Telecommunication has recently improved and now digital lines are available for local as well
as international calls. Dial-up Internet connections are available with local calls so email and
Internet access are reasonably easy and economic. However, the connections can be unstable
and it is obviously slow to receive and send large attached files [HD]. In 2002 the Grameen
Phone mobile telephone network has also reached all three towns. A satellite phone,
provided by the embassy, is available in all three towns in the event that all other systems
fail.

Children education
English-medium schools may be available in theory but mostly only Bangla is spoken and
the level of English is very rudimentary. Kindergarten starts at 4 years; there are no
playgroups.

If possible the children can receive classes from one of the parents. Danida provides a
honorarium for this, and all school materials are also reimbursed. School packages including
teacher manuals are available by mail order in different languages, for example in English
from: www.calvertschool.com.

Besides school, children can do other activities. Classes are available in most towns in music
(traditional music of songs accompanied by the harmonium), traditional dance, and art.
Private teachers will charge about 60-100 taka per hour.
Some sport clubs are usually available in badminton, table tennis, karate, and scouting.

Household staff
Experienced household staff has to be recruited from Dhaka unless by chance old staff from
another Danida adviser is available. Staff recruited from Dhaka is more expensive and they
may be quite unhappy out of Dhaka if they leave behind their family. On the Job Training of
staff from the town will take longer, but gives better results in the long run.


                                                                                               32
10.2    BAGUNA

Barguna is a small town and the district capital south from Barisal and west from Patuakhali,
located in the middle of the delta region, close to the mangrove forests. Barguna can be
reached directly by launch from Dhaka. When traveling by car, the journey takes around 10
hours, as you have to cross five rivers by ferry. The town consists of one major street, where
most government buildings are situated, a lively market and some small neighborhoods.

10.3    NOAKHALI

Often nowadays called Maijdee Court, as the old Noakhali disappeared in the Meghna River,
Noakhali is an old stronghold of Danida. Noakhali has seen many foreigners and a good
number of NGOs and aid organisations. Maijdee (actually there are three different centres in
the elongated Noakhali town) has approximately 100,000 inhabitants and lies about 4 -5
hours by car southeast from Dhaka on the way from Comilla to the Bay of Bengal. Noakhali
is the terminal of the railway branch line Dhaka-Noakhali. Around the 6th and 7th century
AD, Noakhali had quite a number of Buddhist monasteries and a large Buddhist settlement;
not much of this can be found nowadays, however. Another more recent historical footnote
was the visit of Mahatma Gandhi during the communal violence of the 1940s. The ashram at
which he stayed still exists.

The town is 1.5 hours drive from Comilla, with its Buddhist era monuments and World War
II cemetery. A golf course is available in the cantonment. There are modest sports facilities
at the Government Officers‟ club. Cable telephone is available from local sub-contractors,
but normally there are only four English language channels: BBC World, Star Movies,
Discovery and, with luck, a sports channel. The sub-contractors do not have their own
generator, so that reception disappears with power cuts.

There is no beach resort in Noakhali, although the estuary has potential for picnics. T he
offshore island of Hatiya in the Meghna estuary has a small deer sanctuary at Nijhum Deep.
Fresh crab can be obtained very cheaply from here and Danida has promoted freshwater
prawn culture in the area.

Noakhali is known as a conservative area, particularly in relation to dress codes, and the local
community tends to be known for its strong independent streak. South of the town is a large
expanse of recently settled land known as charlands, which until recently was the focus of
banditry. However, these problems are now largely under control. The town itself is
peaceful.

At present there are 4 advisors resident in Noakhali and because of the association with
Danida, there are quite a number of decent, if ageing, houses available for rent. Most are
now connected to the Danida-supported urban water supply system, but do have back-up
wells. Electricity has become increasingly erratic with the national supply problems, while it
is a difficult and lengthy process to get a land telephone line.




                                                                                             33
10.4    PATUAKHALI

Patuakhali is a small town of approx. 60,000 inhabitants. It is the Patuakhali district capital
and is situated three ferries south from Barisal. It is surrounded by rivers, which form the
mouth of the Ganges.

In town some areas flood (water depth one foot at the most) during spring tide. Danida is
constructing a drainage system, which may solve this in future.

Housing
Most houses in Patuakhali are tin shed houses, a frame of wood covered with metal sheets.
The number of brick houses is increasing. 4-5 different houses have been occupied
continuously by advisers since 1997 and are usually handed over from one adviser to the
next. The houses have all facilities, materials used are basic but for local standards the houses
are very good. Owners are usually not interested to invest in house improvements but give the
occupant the freedom to improve at own cost.

Recreation
There are usually 3-4 advisers living in Patuakhali, some with family, and visiting each other
is the main pastime outside the house.
Table tennis and darts are simple sports that can be played in the garden. Charcoal can be
found in Bauphal town so barbeque is possible.
Patuakhali has a local cable TV supplier with some English language channels like BBC,
ESPN and National Geographic as well as Indian and Bangla channels.

Patuakhali has a gymnasium with 2 badminton courts, usually people play on a first come
first serve basis, Danida staff usually tries to play from 18.00 to 19.00.
The officers club has one tennis court; here (government) hierarchy determines who plays.

Kuakata beach is at almost three hours drive (including 3 ferries). In 2005 when the new
road is ready it will be easier to go here. The facilities are still very basic; the beach is greyish,
and the water muddy.


11      TERMINATION OF CONTRACT

11.1    LEAVE BALANCE

Leave should be taken within the period of service. Only in very special cases and upon prior
application and approval by the Embassy (and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs) cash
compensation for accumulated holiday can be considered at the expiry of the contract.


11.2    SETTLEMENT OF PRIVATE DEBTS

All debts should be settled before departure. The Embassy is not responsible for closing e -
mail accounts, telephone lines etc. and requests the advisers to make sure that all cheques


                                                                                                    34
have been cashed in the bank before closing of bank accounts. Furthermore, all debts
regarding the apartment/house – water, electricity and gas – should be settled and original
vouchers should be handed over to the Embassy.

11.3     FINAL REPORT AND WELFARE REPORT

The adviser‟s Final Report and Welfare Report should be prepared in time for comments
during the debriefing at the Danish Embassy prior to the departure from Bangladesh. The
reports will be forwarded to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Copenhagen – and used for a
possible final debriefing there.
ANNEX I : THE CLOSING DAYS OF THE DANISH EMBASSY - 2006

Sunday                 1 January                 New Year‟s Day

Wednesday              11 January                Eid-Ul-Azha

Tuesday                21 February               Martyr‟s Day

Sunday                 26 March                  Independence Day

Thursday               13 April                  Easter

Sunday                 16 April                  Easter Sunday

Monday                 17 April                  Easter Monday

Thursday               11 May                    Buddha Purnima

Monday                 5 June                    DK Constitution Day

Monday                 2 October                 Durga Puja

Wednesday              25 October                Eid-Ul-fitr*

Tuesday                7 November                National Revolution Day

Sunday                 24 December               Christmas

Monday                 25 December               Christmas Day

Tuesday                26 December               Boxing Day


* Subject to the appearance of the moon.




                                                                                              35
ANNEX II: TRYG UDLANDS-SERVICE

  Klausdalsbrovej 601

  DK-2750 Ballerup

  Denmark

  Telephone: 0045 44 20 26 78

  Telefax. 0045 44 20 67 70

  Contact persons:

  Birgit Sørensen. Tel. 0045 44 20 26 13 – email: birgit.hoelstad.soerensen@tryg.dk

  Jannie Refsgaard. –Tel. 0045 44 20 26 14 – email: jannie.refsgaard@tryg.dk

  Stina Jensen. Tel. 0045 44 20 26 15 – email: stina.jensen@tryg.dk

  Lars Westerberg. Tel. 0045 44 20 26 16 – email: lars.westerberg@tryg.dk




ANNEX III: USEFULL LINKS



                                                                                 36
1. Country strategy:
    http://amg.um.dk/en/menu/PoliciesAndStrategies/CountryRegionalStrategies/Progra
   mmeCountries/Bangladesh.htm
2. Danida annual report: http://www.danida-publikationer.dk/PUBL.asp?page=publ&objno=250003103
3. Accommodation: http://www.bangladesh.net/travel/travel_main_04.htm#accommodation
4. Interesting Articles: http://www.bangladesh.net/article_bangladesh/article_bangladesh.htm
5. Introduction to Bangladesh: http://www.betelco.com/bd/bdsintro/bdsintro.html
6. Maps of Bangladesh: http://worldatlas.com/webimage/countrys/asia/bd.htm
7. Bangladesh Government: http://www.bangladeshgov.org/
8. Bangladesh Parliament: http://www.parliamentofbangladesh.org/
9. Banks of Bangladesh: http://www.onlinebangladesh.net/banks.htm
10. Important Telephone numbers: http://www.infobangladesh.com/telephone/
11. Bangladesh Online: http://www.onlinebangladesh.net/
12. Foreign Missions: http://www.onlinebangladesh.net/foreign%20missions.htm
13. Biman Bangladesh: http://www.bangladeshonline.com/biman/
14. High Commission: http://www.onlinebangladesh.net/High%20Commision,%20dhaka.htm
15. Shopping: http://shop.bangladesh.net/
16. Travel: http://www.bangladesh.net/travel/index.htm
17. Taxi/Cab Services: http://www.bangladesh.net/travel/travel_taxicab.htm



ANNEX IV: READING LIST

   1. Lonely Planet:
      http://www.lonelyplanet.com/worldguide/destinations/asia/bangladesh/
   2. De 6 årstider, af Filip Engsig-Karup




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