update - Gender Equity Commission by xiuliliaofz

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									                          Gender Equity Commission
                              November 2010 Update

I.   Human Resources

       1. Implement a stronger and more comprehensible policy against student and
          faculty/staff consensual relationships.

       Done. The new policy was endorsed by Faculty Assembly in the spring of 2007 and
       subsequently promulgated as University policy.

       2. Include sexual orientation in the institutional anti-discrimination clause.

       Done.

       3. Develop and adopt formal tenure clock extension policy. This policy should be
          consistent with the tenure clock extension policy recommended by AAUP with
          oversight by HRM&D to provide consistent implementation.

       In progress. A new Policy is currently being drafted. The Policy is being reviewed by
       Faculty Affairs Committee of Faculty senate. HRM&D will monitor for consistency.

       4. Adopt an official flextime policy for staff.

       Done.

       5. Develop and adopt a formal policy that offers employees an option for
          teleworking when it is feasible with the operation of their department.

       Done. As with flextime, “teleworking” would have limited availability based on office and
       shift functions. Human Resources consulted with other institutions for best practices. The
       Flexible work schedule policy has been updated and provides managers the option of
       offering teleworking work schedule if feasible.

       6. Extend paid maternity/paternity leave in excess of FMLA to 10 weeks for a child
          entering a family as the result of childbirth or adoption. Develop a process for
          departments to obtain assistance in covering the duties of staff and faculty on
          maternity/paternity leave.

       No action. FMLA provides for up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave with proper physician
       documentation. Butler offers 60 continuous calendar days of full salary so long as the
       person has such physician documentation. Beginning day 61, a person enters short-term
       disability at a pay rate of 60%. These are all dependent on the doctor-diagnosed
       “disability.” Few institutions offer the first 60 continuous calendar days at full pay. In
       addition, coverage during such short-term leave is difficult. It comes down to resources,
       and no changes to our current arrangements are proposed.

       7. Create a dependent care leave to allow employees to take care of ill family
          members.

       Done. This is already covered under FMLA.




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8. Adopt an up-to-date, comprehensive anti-harassment policy and create a
   separate policy addressing consensual relations between faculty/staff and
   students.

Done.

9. Examine alternative ways to report and account for vacation, sick, and personal
   days for staff in order to increase flexibility and the degree of personal choice.

Done. A new web based Time and Attendance software package was implemented in
October 2010. As a result, employees are able to electronically request and view their
vacation, sick and personal leave balances on line. As of this report, finance, human
resources, information technology, advancement, enrollment management and the
president’s office are currently fully utilizing the new Time and Attendance system. By
January 2011 every department will be enrolled in the electronic Time and Attendance
system.

10. More effectively communicate and publicize Butler’s Job Sharing policy.

Done, Policy updates are shared with Staff Assembly, VP and Department Managers.

11. Review current enforcement of the Conflict of Interest policy and explore ways
    to clarify this policy and its application.

Done. The Conflict of Interest policy was reviewed by the Vice Presidents and Senior
Leadership managers, updated and approved by the University Board. HRM&D will
coordinate development for a consistent protocol and oversight by various supervisors.
The policy itself needs broader communication. The policy was shared with the university
community and is also available on the HR Website for review.

12. Update the employee handbook and provide easier access to the policies and
    procedures contained in this document (e.g. on-line handbook).

In process. The employee hand book is in the review process and is expected to be
completed spring 2011, once completed, the employee handbook will be available
electronically on the Website fall 2011, additional staff is required to complete this
project.

13. Facilitate Human Resources Strategy Council’s review, in conjunction with
    Human Resources, Faculty Assembly, Staff Assembly and upper
    administration, of the current procedure for creating and/or changing policies
    in order to clarify the process and improve its efficiency. There should be a
    well-defined process for policy review, and this process should be clearly
    communicated and followed by all stakeholders.

In process. Initial discussions have begun. Policy updates are shared with key
stakeholders holders, approved policies are posted on the HR Website. e.g., Risk
Management Driving, Conflict of Interest, Flexible work schedule. Smoking restrictions on
campus

14. Extend domestic partner benefits to opposite-sex domestic partners.

No action. Domestic partner benefits have been extended to same-sex partners because
there is currently no formal recognition of same-sex unions. Opposite-sex partners have
the option of marriage, and if some form of same-sex union is ever recognized by the
state, that will become a requirement for same-sex couples.



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15. Add long-term care insurance to employees’ benefit choices.

Done. HRM&D introduced this benefit to faculty and staff in Spring 2009. As of this date,
50 faculty and staff have enrolled. LTC insurance is now offered to all eligible new hires.

16. Create a Work/Life balance Web site that provides information and/or links to
    resources that will assist the employee in caring for their families. Such a Web
    site should be developed and maintained by HRM&D.

Done. A Wellness section was added to the HR web page which links to Healthy Horizons
web page. The Wellness information will serve to communicate general and specific
information for the University Community.

17. Develop and offer a quarterly work/life balance lecture series. These lectures
    would ideally be created in conjunction with HRM&D, Faculty Assembly, Staff
    Assembly, Healthy Horizons, and the Counseling and Consultation Center.

Done. Human Resources in conjunction with Staff Assembly has offered several
seminars, such as credit management, first time home buyer options, The Personal and
Professional Development Committee of Staff Assembly piloted a series of lectures in the
Spring of 2009 that focused on financial management during tough economic times,
stress management, and healthy eating. HRM&D, the Counseling Center, Aramark and
external resources collaborated on this series. The committee continues to explore other
topics for presentation during AY 2009-2010.

18. Develop compensatory time policies for all full-time exempt employees who
    work extended or weekend days.

Done. By definition, full-time exempt employees are responsible for performing duties
that entail work over extended and weekend days. While arrangements for compensatory
time off are made on a case-by-case basis where assigned tasks go beyond one’s
customary range of duties, salaried employees are expected to work beyond the 8 to 5
day.

19. Examine ways to reward long-term employees (over 12-15 years) once they
    have reached the maximum amount in vacation days.

Done. This would represent a change to the university’s benefit package and would likely
come at the expense of salary increases and other benefits currently provided.

20. Make gender and racial diversity a priority in search processes and hold deans
    and vice presidents accountable for increasing diversity and gender in
    departments where they are under-represented. HRM&D should monitor this
    compliance.

Done. New Administrative Guidelines for Faculty Hiring was developed and implemented
for 2010 – 2011. The guidelines include a focus on and a commitment to diversify the
candidate pool and hiring. All full time positions which are advertised must include
diversity language which reflects our commitment to diversity. Vacant position postings
are monitored and reviewed by the Provost’s Office. Results are monitored by HRM&D.,

21. Departments should perform annual internal analysis of both gender and racial
    diversity and report findings as part of their annual reports as well as document
    efforts to bring more proportional representation of these groups into their




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    areas. This information should be monitored by the Vice-presidents and
    HRM&D.

Done. HRM&D has developed a protocol for reporting hiring data to departments.
Hiring data is discussed with managers and VPs on a regular basis, departmental
demographics as well as the overall faculty and staff demographics are discussed with
the Vice Presidents. This discussion is part of the overall compensation review.

22. HRM&D should enhance the orientation of new staff to acquaint them with
    Butler culture, institutional values, procedures, policies, and structure. HRM&D
    should also explore the implementation of a mentoring program to increase
    staff retention.

Done. A new Employee On boarding process has been implemented. An orientation
check list was developed and shared with all managers. The new orientation program
outline and policy is available on the HR website. The orientation communicates and
defines “Butler culture” and “institutional values”. A mentoring program, run by Staff
Assembly has been tried and died for a lack of mentors.

23. HRM&D should develop a required seminar series for new academic and
    administrative department chairs. Particular attention should be given to
    diversity issues, performance appraisals, and creating an environment that
    supports all employees.

Done. A new Supervisor Leadership Seminar series was developed and communicated
to senior management. Beginning January 2011, the first class of 15 managers will
participate in the Supervisory Leadership class. Each participant was recommend by
their division Vice President. . The Butler Leadership Development program for emerging
leaders was also developed by one of the Strategic Plan Work Groups. An
announcement regarding the selection criteria for the Butler Leadership Development
Program will be released by the strategic plan work group that is responsible for the BLD
initiative.

24. HRM&D and the Provost Office should develop a seminar series for faculty who
    are interested in becoming department chairs and assistant deans. Women and
    minority faculty should be encouraged to participate in the series.

Done. The Associate Provosts in conjunction with HR will develop a plan. HRM&D could
provide input, but leadership would need to come from the Provost’s Advisory Council.
The Associate Provost has developed a series of seminars to support faculty
development

25. Search committees in all colleges and divisions, particularly for tenure-track
    faculty and high-level staff, should use sourcing methods suggested as best
    practices by the American Association of Colleges and Universities.
     1. Use telephone calls, personalized letters, personalized emails and face-to-
        face meetings with colleagues who might refer potential applicants.
     2. Approach potential candidates at professional meetings. Keep a list of
        presenters and program participants who may have credentials and skills
        that would be an asset to Butler. Converse with them to find out more
        about their interests and aspirations.
     3. Consult with diverse faculty and staff members on campus about outreach
        activities.
     4. Contact professional organizations that are for underrepresented groups.
     5. Contact traditional professional organizations that have affiliated groups
        for women, minorities and other underrepresented groups.



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    6. Network actively with a wide variety of colleagues. They often “know
        someone who knows someone” who may be a viable candidate. Cultivate
        the network, even if not actively seeking candidates at the time.
    7. Pay attention to language used in ads and position descriptions to ensure
        that it is inclusive and stresses Butler’s commitment to diversity. In the
        position description, stress that candidates should be able to demonstrate
        their personal commitment to diversity through on-the-job and/or
        community-related activities.
    8. Ensure that there is diversity on search committees. Community/business
        leaders can be a resource if representation is not available on campus and
        can provide a fresh perspective. Faculty representation on dean and vice
        president search committees should be elected by faculty rather than
        appointed by the dean or provost.
    9. Ensure that questions asked during interviews and campus visits are legal,
        ethical and appropriate. The same questions should be asked of all
        candidates for the same position.
    10. Continue to stress Butler’s commitment to diversity throughout the entire
        hiring process.
    11. Involve HRM&D in the search process, to provide technical assistance for
        the steps listed above.
    12. Administrative Guidelines for Faculty Hiring articulate recommendations for
        increasing diversity within in the candidate pool.

Done. Currently one HRM&D staff member assists search committees in an effort to
achieve items 1-12. Additional staffing would be required to be more effective.

26. Butler should create a process that mirrors the Equal Employment Opportunity
    Commission (EEOC) process of broadening the applicant pool and tracking for
    gender and ethnicity.

Done. This is currently a legal minefield, where efforts to engage in affirmative action
have been construed as discriminatory. It would be more effective to concentrate on
diversifying the candidates for interviews and on-campus visits rather than trying to track
race and gender of the applicant pool. That information can only be obtained on a
voluntary basis, and past attempts to get applicants to return cards indicating gender and
racial background had a very low response rate. The University is not legally obligated to
mirror the EECO process.

27. Tie professional development of staff and faculty to performance goals.

Done. Butler now ties performance evaluations to salary, but not all supervisors make
performance goals a part of the evaluation process. One cannot fairly mandate
professional development as a performance goal if there are not programs and resources
to support it.

28. Ensure that continuing education (staff development) is given high priority by
    department heads.

Done. This will require financial and staff resources for training and development. A
working committee will be assigned the task of identifying and implementing professional
development for staff as a result of the 2009-2014 Strategic Plan, “Dare to Make a
Difference (Priority 6). The required funds to support staff development has been
discussed and submitted to the Strategic Implementation Plan Leadership Committee.

29. HRM&D staff should implement a staff development training program that is
    open to all and promotes:



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    1.   personal development
    2.   employment law issues
    3.   skill building
    4.   career advancement
    5.   diversity

Done. Diversity training has been offered to staff and faculty members of COE. Current
staffing levels in HRM&D preclude immediate action on this item. Brown bag series of
seminars also been presented under the auspices of Staff Assembly. E.g. FMLA,
management of finances, improvement of credit scores. Employment law updates have
also been presented.

30. Resources should be available for opportunities for faculty and staff to take
    advantage of professional training sessions both within and outside the
    University.

Done . Resources currently exist in many areas of the University. Additional resources
for this purpose must be measured against other priorities. The Provost and members of
PAC have developed a budget to support faculty development.

31. Continue to use institutional climate surveys to measure progress on climate
    and retention issues. The Commission recommends that a climate study be
    completed and monitored every 3-4 years.

Done. HRM&D will look for leadership from Staff Assembly and the Provost’s Advisory
Council. The University participated in the 2010 Great Colleges to Work For survey. The
results of the survey will be shared with the strategic plan work group.

32. HRM&D should implement and monitor the job classification and salary
    administration program to ensure internal equity and to be consistent with the
    recommendations of the Compensation Study of 2005-07 by Fox, Lawson and
    Associates.

Done. Compensation study completed and implemented. Final report from Fox, Lawson
submitted.

33. Further study is needed to understand incidents of isolation and lack of
    inclusion in decision making.

Done. Further discussion will be needed to get a clearer understanding of what is
intended.

34. Establish more proportional representation of men in clerical positions closer
    to national averages, as reported by the U.S. Department of Education.

Done. The University’s employment hiring policy guidelines require selection of the best
qualified candidates regardless of race, gender, age, and sexual orientation. The pool of
local male applicants is quite small, and achieving male representation in clerical ranks at
the national average may be impossible to achieve. The University’s recruitment efforts
will continue to focus and support hiring of qualified candidates for positions for which
they are best qualified. Recruitment efforts include advertisement outreach to historically
underrepresented minorities. (Job openings are shared with social agencies that serve
specific populations)

35. Establish proportional representation whereby women directors and other
    leadership positions reflect the proportion of women in lower classification



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        levels. Set staffing goals to expand opportunities for women in director
        positions and above, including recruiting and hiring practices as well as
        training and staff development to facilitate promotion through staff ranks.

   Done. Proportional representation and quotas of this kind would be discriminatory.
   However, the University has established search guidelines to ensure a diverse pool and
   selection of candidates. Lisa Walton or Jonathan Small meets with internal search
   committees to review search requirements and guidelines. Due to our ongoing focused
   recruitment efforts, qualified women candidates area regularly included and selected in
   the applicant pool for management level and above positions.

   36. Expand ethnic diversity of staff within departments outside of Service
       Maintenance (housekeeping and grounds).

    Done. A guide for employment interviews has been developed. Faculty searches
committees and hiring managers for managerial staff searches reviews the current
established hiring guidelines with an appropriate HR Manager. The Human Resources
manager regularly discusses the strategic and practical benefits of development of a diverse
pool of candidates. However, as with all hires, final hiring decisions are reflective of the hiring
department and manager. Emphasis on diversity recruitment will continue for faculty and
staff searches.


   37. HRM&D or Institutional Research should be charged with collecting and
       reporting a similar staff profile as the faculty profile data provided in the
       Institutional Data Profile.

   In process. Staff, time, and resources will have to be found.

   38. Gender-related diversity training is needed for top administrators on the Butler
       campus.

   Done. To be continued on an ongoing basis. Why would this be limited to top
   administrators? Training is not limited to top administrators.

   39. Resources should be made available to assist in a campus culture change that
       embraces all aspects of diversity. Diversity/sensitivity training for all staff and
       faculty should include race, gender and sexual orientation. The objectives of
       this facilitated instruction would be to:
        1. Mitigate the climate conditions that currently exist in some portions of the
            University that engender discrimination, lack of diversified opinion, and
            tolerance of condescending comments and behavior.
        2. Inform, educate and clarify the University’s position on gender and ethnic
            diversity
        3. Allow for all people to feel welcome and comfortable at the University,
            regardless of gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation

   Done. Diversity training has been offered to every segment of the University, Training will
   continue for faculty and staff. Considerable resources are needed here. To carry this out
   requires a university-wide focus with the involvement of every employee.

   40. The University should move away from the notion of the “Butler family” (which
       has connotations of paternalism) to “Butler community.”

   Done. The PR department is aware of the need to utilize the “Butler Community” instead
   of” Butler Family” The use of “Butler Community” are the preferred words of reference.



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             41. Create more avenues for communication and interaction between faculty, staff,
                 administration, and the Board of Trustees:
                 1. need programs to increase understanding/appreciation/respect of different
                     offices and roles of staff;
                 2. foster an atmosphere where faculty and staff see their roles as interactive
                     and equally valuable to the University

             In process. Staff Assembly attempts to create such programs has suffered from lack of
             attendance. The Chair of the Board of Trustees has indicated a desire for a higher
             Trustee profile on campus.

             42. Improving interactions between faculty and staff by creating reciprocal
                 representation in faculty/staff assembly.

      Done. Faculty Senate and Staff Assembly are in discussions. A market research survey was
      conducted as part of a class project. Recommendations from the survey included suggestions on
      how faculty senate and staff assembly can work on mutual points of interest. The leadership of
      faculty senate and staff assembly have established lines of open communication. Both leaders
      are in contact with the Exectuive Director of Human Resources.


II.       Academic Affairs

             43. Each department and college should examine its curriculum and advising
                 practices to determine if it is creating a climate and offering classes that are
                 welcoming to both male and female students.

             Done. Interdisciplinary Major in Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies starts fall 2010.
             Ongoing advisor training underway.

             44. The College of Business Administration should examine its climate,
                 environment and scholarship program in relation to attracting qualified female
                 students to all of the departments.

             Done. Protocols are in place to attract qualified female students and faculty.

             45. The College of Business Administration should make a concerted effort to hire
                 a higher percentage of female faculty in academic areas where they are
                 unrepresented.

             Done. Data has been obtained on gender composition of the faculty and protocols are in
             place to encourage diversity of applicants..

             46. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences should examine its hiring processes
                 and recruit female faculty in Physics and Computer Science in order to improve
                 the climate for women in these departments. The College should also examine
                 female and male percentages in the other departments to determine if both
                 males and females are represented equitably.

             Done. Protocols are in place to attract a diverse candidate pool.

             47. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences should examine ways to improve
                 student retention, particularly among the first year students.




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Done. The Associate Provost will continue to obtain data on an ongoing basis for LAS, as
well as the other five colleges. Deans will continue to implement intervention strategies.

48. The campus Retention Committee should examine policies, protocols, and
    programs that could assist the University in retaining a higher percentage of
    male students.

In process. The Associate Provosts generate retention data by gender and the Retention
Committee has discussed initiatives targeted at male students.. By the same token,
Butler’s current 87% current retention rate from freshman to sophomore year places it
among the top 5% of master’s comprehensive universities.

49. Examine faculty advising load and distribute advisees equitably among faculty
    in each college.

In process. This is a complicated issue for the Provost’s Advisory Council to address in
collaboration with faculty groups like the Faculty Affairs Committee and the Faculty
Senate.

50. Attempt to reach the recommended number of 20 advisees per faculty member.

No action. Students and advisors are matched for major course of study. While it is
desirable to seek equitable loads by college, it is not possible to balance advising loads
across the University.

51. Standardize the education and support of faculty academic advisors.

In process. The Associate Provosts will obtain data as to training by college and by the
Learning Resource Center. The data obtained will be compared for differences and best
practices identified.

52. We recommend all departments examine their hiring practices to determine if
    male and female students receive equitable consideration and compensation in
    on-campus employment positions.

In process. The Associate Provosts will obtain comparative payroll data by gender across
each college to ascertain if there is a disparity.

53. Faculty and Career Planning and Development staff need to structure more
    opportunities to explore career aspirations with female students, in particular
    concerning post-graduate education.

Done. The new CHASE office and Internship and Career Services ensure female
students explore career opportunities and have ample support for application to post-
graduate education.

54. The Center for Career Planning and Development needs to conduct research as
    to the gender inequities in hiring practices among companies and
    organizations that hire Butler graduates.

Contingent. The Associate Provosts will meet with Career Services staff to discuss this
matter, but the cost of researching the hiring practices of outside companies and
organizations may not result in much influence by Butler on their practices.

55. Student Affairs and the Retention Committee need to examine issues related to
    campus involvement by both men and women and the retention of students as



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    participation in co-curricular activities can develop leadership skills in students
    and help to retain students on campus.

In process. Dean Irene Stevens serves on the University Retention Committee and will
recommend this topic be addressed within this standing committee. She will also work
with the Office of Programs for Leadership and Service Education and seek to identify
areas where supplemental leadership programming is needed and develop a strategy for
offering these services.

56. Departments and Colleges should review and update all procedures and
    policies that deal with salary and compensation to ensure that any
    gender/ethnicity/sexual bias in these areas is eliminated. Where legitimate
    differences are found, they must be conveyed to the appropriate individual(s)
    so as to limit the perception that differences are due to gender/ethnicity/sexual
    orientation only. This is particularly important in the academic departments
    where African American and Hispanic American faculty report significant
    discriminatory salary behaviors. It also important to communicate to all parties
    the procedures of analysis and how corrective measures are to be
    implemented.

Done. The Fox, Lawson Faculty Compensation study revealed no disparities based on
race. Efforts are ongoing to ensure that gender and race should not result in salary
disparities.

57. Departments and Colleges should review and update all procedures and
    policies that deal with promotion and performance/evaluation to assure any
    gender/ethnicity/sexual orientation bias is removed. Where legitimate
    differences are found, they must be conveyed to the appropriate individual(s)
    so as to limit the perception that differences are due to gender/ethnicity/sexual
    orientation only. This is particularly important in the academic departments
    where Hispanic American faculty report significant discriminatory promotional
    behaviors. It is important to establish clear and concise communication lines
    with all involved individuals so as to remove doubt and skepticism regarding
    the policies.

Done. The University level Tenure and Promotion Committee has been reactivated. This
committee reviews the Tenure and Promotion processes in each college and ensures (1)
standard levels of rigor and (2) appropriate processes have been followed on each
individual case.

58. Departments and Colleges review and update all procedures and policies that
    deal with the assignment and scheduling of work/jobs, the assignment of
    space, facilities, and other resources to assure that any gender/ethnicity/sexual
    orientation/disability bias is removed. Where legitimate differences are found,
    they must be conveyed to the appropriate individual(s) so as to limit the
    perception that differences are due to gender/ethnicity/sexual orientation, or
    disability.

Done. There is no current evidence showing differences in work schedules and facilities
assignment due to gender, ethnic, or sexual orientation.

59. Each college should develop a mentoring program for new faculty and a
    seminar series to acquaint faculty with Butler culture, institutional values,
    procedures, policies, and structure.




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Done. In addition, a University mentoring program was launched fall 2010 for all new
tenure-line faculty as a complement to the college- specific mentoring programs.

60. HRM&D should develop a required seminar series for new academic and
    administrative department chairs. Particular attention should be given to
    diversity issues, performance appraisals, and creating an environment that
    supports all employees.

Done. Series has been developed, see # 61.

61. HRM&D and the Provost Office should develop a seminar series for faculty who
    are interested in becoming department chairs and assistant deans. Women and
    minority faculty should be encouraged to participate in the series.

Done. Funding has been made available for all faculty who are new department or
program Chairs to attend national training workshops on academic leadership. In addition,
Leadership Butler will commence in Spring 2011.

62. The Provost’s Office should develop a series of on-going seminars for faculty
    that address policy and developmental needs.

Done. For the second year, Associate Provost Laura Behling is offering a faculty seminar
series. The comprehensive faculty development program aims to address the needs and
interests of all faculty in professional areas and has been in place since fall of 2009. This
initiative is ongoing.

63. Search committees in all colleges and divisions, particularly for tenure-track
    faculty and high-level staff, should use sourcing methods suggested as best
    practices by the American Association of Colleges and Universities.
     1. Use telephone calls, personalized letters, personalized emails and face-to-
        face meetings with colleagues who might refer potential applicants.
     2. Approach potential candidates at professional meetings. Keep a list of
        presenters and program participants who may have credentials and skills
        that would be an asset to Butler. Converse with them to find out more
        about their interests and aspirations.
     3. Consult with diverse faculty and staff members on campus about outreach
        activities.
     4. Contact professional organizations that are for underrepresented groups.
     5. Contact traditional professional organizations that have affiliated groups
        for women, minorities and other underrepresented groups.
     6. Network actively with a wide variety of colleagues. They often “know
        someone who knows someone” who may be a viable candidate. Cultivate
        the network, even if not actively seeking candidates at the time.
     7. Pay attention to language used in ads and position descriptions to ensure
        that it is inclusive and stresses Butler’s commitment to diversity. In the
        position description, stress that candidates should be able to demonstrate
        their personal commitment to diversity through on-the-job and/or
        community-related activities.
     8. Ensure that there is diversity on search committees. Community/business
        leaders can be a resource if representation is not available on campus and
        can provide a fresh perspective. Faculty representation on dean and vice
        president search committees should be elected by faculty rather than
        appointed by the dean or provost.
     9. Ensure that questions asked during interviews and campus visits are legal,
        ethical and appropriate. The same questions should be asked of all
        candidates for the same position.



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    10. Continue to stress Butler’s commitment to diversity throughout the entire
        hiring process.
    11. Involve HRM&D in the search process, to provide technical assistance for
        the steps listed above.

Done. Currently one HRM&D staff member assists search committees in an effort to
achieve items 1-10. Additional staffing would be required to be more effective.

64. Develop and implement a comprehensive workload study that is monitored on
    a regular basis.

Contingent. Before developing processes to determine workload, the term will need to be
defined. This is a task for the Provost’s Advisory Council in collaboration with the Faculty
Affairs Committee.

65. Tie professional development of staff and faculty to performance goals.

Contingent. Butler now ties performance evaluations to salary, but not all supervisors
make performance goals a part of the evaluation process. One cannot fairly mandate
professional development as a performance goal if there are not programs and resources
to support it.

66. Resources should be available for opportunities for faculty and staff to take
    advantage of professional training sessions both within and outside the
    University.

In process. Resources currently exist in many areas of the University. Additional
resources for this purpose must be measured against other priorities.


67. The Deans need to ensure that all tenure-track faculty clearly understand the
    tenure process. Other universities report that underrepresented groups
    (women and people of color) frequently do not receive the same level of
    mentoring and guidance through the tenure process that majority group
    members do (Wilson, 2006).

Done. Deans work deliberately with each tenure-track faculty member to ensure they
understand performance expectations. The two and four year reviews finalize this
process.

68. Continue to use institutional climate surveys to measure progress on climate
    and retention issues. The Commission recommends that a climate study be
    completed and monitored every 3-4 years.

Done. The University now participates in the Chronicle of Higher Education’s “Best
Places to Work” study.

69. Develop and adopt a formal tenure clock extension process. This policy should,
    at a minimum, be consistent with the tenure clock extension policies in place at
    our peer institutions and AAUP recommendations in terms of coverage, terms,
    and approval process.

In process. The new Tenure Cock Extension policy is currently under review by the
Faculty Affairs Committee. Committee Chair, Paul Hanson, reports that he believes the
policy will be forwarded to the Senate soon.




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          70. Further study is needed to understand incidents of isolation and lack of
              inclusion in decision making.

          Done. For example, deliberate action has been taken to involve faculty and staff in
          strategic planning, master planning and comprehensive program assessment.

          71. Focus efforts on retaining women faculty and in particular women faculty of
              color. Women are comparable in number to men at Butler but are not moving
              up through the ranks into full professor status or department heads. Additional
              effort to mentor female faculty is warranted for successful progress through
              the promotion process.

          In process. Recent reports show increased women in senior professor ranks. However,
          we have very few women of color in the senior professor ranks.

          72. In order to ultimately attract, retain and promote more women faculty at Butler
              University, more women are needed in the leadership ranks. To combat the
              issue of a lack of female role models, mentors or champions of gender equity,
              University leadership should consider the following:
               1. Revision of tenure-track policies, which would include and allow for tenure
                   clock stopping for maternity leave, adoption leave, medical leave.
               2. Required training for all University Deans to ensure that the policies (and
                   revisions therein) are understood and consistently applied to all potential
                   candidates in the future.
               3. Hire and/or promote female leaders to address the lack of female role
                   models and mentoring currently noted in the University faculty and staff
                   ranks. Candidates should be offered fast-track access to positions by
                   identifying individuals who possess the desired qualifications.

          Done. Female leaders in place. Deans appropriately trained. Tenure clock extension
          policy under review by Faculty Affairs.

          73. Create more avenues for communication and interaction between faculty, staff,
              administration, and the Board of Trustees:
              1. need programs to increase understanding/appreciation/respect of different
                  offices and roles of staff;
              2. foster an atmosphere where faculty and staff see their roles as interactive
                  and equally valuable to the University

          Done. For example the President and Provost attend Faculty Senate meetings and meet
          with Chair and Vice Chair monthly; Senate Chair attends Board meetings. Board
          members will host Faculty Senate for lunch in December.


          74. Improving interactions between faculty and staff by creating reciprocal
              representation in faculty/staff assembly

          Done: Staff Assembly Chair attends Faculty Senate meetings and Faculty Senate Chair
          attends Staff Assembly.




III.   Enrollment




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75. Ensure that the criteria for students admitted during the summer is the same as
    new students admitted earlier in the process.

Done. As is common with the vast majority of colleges and universities, it has been the
practice of Butler University to admit students during the summer. In general, these
students were admitted because the University had space, was in need of students, and
as noted in the narrative of the Report, “tend to be admitted based on a particular talent or
skill they possess (JCFA or athletes).”

Nationally, top students generally apply earlier in the year than their lower-achieving
friends. It is also true that nationally, men apply to college later in the year than women
do.

At Butler, the number of students admitted during the summer is very small – less than
one half of one percent. For example in 2009, at a time when we had reason to be
concerned about enrollment, only 18 of 4,928 admitted students were offered admission
during the summer.

While the students admitted during the summer presented credentials that were slightly
lower than the average of their earlier-applying classmates, they were still well within the
normal range of accepted students.
                                                                                          st
In the future, it is our hope and plan to ensure that the fall class is filled by the May 1
Candidates Reply Date, and to continue to limit the admission of students during the
summer. However, when there is need, we reserve the right to accept all admissible
students to help ensure that the University meets its financial goals.

76. Given the significant amount of attrition during the first year, Admissions and
    the University should look at the manner in which Butler is being portrayed to
    ensure that the marketing messages are consistent with campus reality.

Done, but always in progress. Retaining students is one of the primary concerns of the
Dare to Make A Difference strategic plan, the Enrollment Division and the University as a
whole. Equally important is the accurate portrayal of the University because it helps lead
to student persistence.

While it may be possible to mislead a naïve student during the college search process
and convince that student to enroll, over the long run this makes the work of the
Enrollment Division – and the University – more difficult. As such, we work to portray the
University only in ways that help the right students enroll – and graduate.

A look at first-year retention statistics is instructive. At institutions with which the
University’s competes, our rate of retention is already strong. According to the 2010 US
News and World Report college edition (for statistics on the classes entering from 2004
through 2007), Butler retained 87% of freshmen to the sophomore year. Here is a
sampling of how we compared with some of our competing institutions:

         DePauw           90%               Loyola (IL)               84%
         Indiana U.       88%               U. Evansville             81%
         Drake            86%               Ball State U.             76%
         Purdue U.        85%               U. Indianapolis           73%
         Valparaiso       84%

The same is true when comparing the Butler to the 146 universities in the Midwest
Masters University category, where we tied for fourth in freshman-to-sophomore
retention; nationally Butler tied for 29th out 572 master’s comprehensive universities.



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         Finally, according to the Butler Retention Committee, there are three primary reasons
         that students most often cite when they leave (not including students who are asked to
         leave for academic reasons):

             1. Changed major to a program not offered at Butler (nursing, art, physical therapy,
                athletic training, interior design, etc.);
             2. Personal reasons, such as a significant other who attends another institution, or
                to be closer to home;
             3. Financial reasons.

         While our retention numbers are already strong, we will strive to be better. Over the past
         few years, we have seen an increase in retention, and hopefully we will continue to see
         increases in our four-year average.


IV.   Student Affairs

         77. Institute a weekly clinic to provide reproductive and sexual health services to
             students who need them.

         Done. The Health Center opened the Women's and Men's Health Clinic on September 7,
         2007. This was the result of two years of collaboration among President Bobby Fong, the
         Council on Presidential Affairs, the Health Center, and Student Affairs. The program is
         currently meeting all expectations on anticipated usage on a weekly basis.

         With the third party billing program in place for AY 2009-10, Health Services now has a
         full-time physician, Dr. Maria Fletcher. Physician services will be expanded this year by
         offering appointments throughout the week instead of one session on Friday mornings.
         This provides more flexibility in meeting patients’ needs.


         78. Provide additional education to students about appropriate behavior and the
             institutional values of respecting individuals and diversity beyond race and
             ethnicity.

         Done. The Campus Climate Advisory Committee was formed in 2008 and charged with
         assessing campus climate, engendering positive improvements within the university and
         exhibiting a commitment to promoting positive change within the campus environment
         and culture.


         79. Explore services to assist victims of sexual assault and harassment and
             promote the services to students.

         Done. Dean Irene Stevens convened a workgroup in 2007 that reviewed sexual assault
         policies and procedures. In preparation for Fall 2008, the part-time peer education staff
         position was changed to a full time Coordinator of Health Education and Outreach
         Programs. A sexual assault and survivor webpage has been developed as part of the
         health education website (www.butler.edu/healtheducation)

         During AY 2008-09, a $2000 grant sponsored “Be Aware Because You Care,” a sexual
         assault awareness program which was attended by 280 students; provided wallet cards
         that were distributed to all incoming first-year students, to Greek houses, and to parents
         and students during Welcome Week; and funded bathroom clings for male and female
         restrooms across campus, Collegian advertisements for the Victim Advocate program,



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and posters for all campus buildings to promote the Victim Advocate program and raise
awareness about sexual assault.

The Victim Advocate program includes 5 staff and faculty as trained victim advocates
with 24-hour on-call availability. The Victim Advocate program is instrumental in
connecting victims to a newly created Sexual Assault Support Group (started in Spring
2009) within Counseling and Consultation Services.

Relationships have been forged with St. Vincent & Methodist’s Centers of Hope. These
Centers of Hope share contact information with Butler student victims about the B.U.
Victim Advocate program in an effort to encourage ongoing support for students who
have not reached out to anyone on campus prior to visiting the hospital after a sexual
assault.


80. Revise the Top 20 Student Leadership Awards criteria and selection process to
    more accurately reflect the gender composition of the student body and its
    leaders.

Done. The Offices of Alumni and Parent Programs and Student Affairs evaluated data
over two years where selection committees did not consider gender in the selection
processes. Study of the selection process revealed that more men than women were
designated as potential candidates for the top 20 student awards. The current system
recognizes both men and women on an equivalent basis.

81. Student Affairs staff should conduct programs related to self-esteem and self-
    image to follow up on the discrepancies between female and male students in
    regard to career aspirations and confidence.

Done. A work group comprised of Counseling Center, Internship and Career Planning,
and Learning Resource Center staff has been established to offer ongoing programs.

82. Student Affairs and the Retention Committee need to examine issues related to
    campus involvement by both men and women and the retention of students as
    participation in co-curricular activities can develop leadership skills in students
    and help to retain students on campus.

In process. The Campus Retention Committee has expressed interest in retention based
on gender. In addition, the Office of Programs for Leadership and Service Education
(PuLSE) has inaugurated a Legacy Leadership Program for Fall 2009 that will focus on
different student populations (e.g., men, women, multicultural students) and examine how
leadership development applies to each population. Each session will include a keynote
address and the possibility of a workshop or master class to follow. Sessions will be
inspired by current events and will feature speakers of interest to students.

83. Resident Assistants in University Housing (RA) should receive mandatory
    “Safe Space” training. Faculty and staff should be encouraged to participate in
    Safe Space training to fully understand the complex issues faced by students.
    At least four or five staff/faculty in each College should be recognized as Safe
    Space representatives.

Done. Karla Cunningham, Director of Residence Life, arranged for “Safe Space” training
of RA training in early August 2007 before the opening of the residence halls for students
for the 2007-08 academic year. Student Affairs reviewed the current composition of
faculty and staff who have undergone Safe Space training and where they are located on
campus. Student Affairs will review opportunities for identifying additional faculty and staff



                                     16
        in this role where gaps may exist. Safe Space Training has continued for RAs annually
        since 2007. Fifteen JCFA college and staff participated in Safe Space Training during
        Spring semester 2009.

        84. Adopt a gender neutral policy for upper-class apartment housing.

        No action. Informal proposals from Student Life to entertain such an option have been
        discouraged because housing arrangements are seen by families as lifestyle
        endorsements. The University is not prepared to endorse gender neutral housing as a
        matter of formal policy.

        85. Allow domestic partners of the same gender to live in on-campus apartments
            with employed residence life staff and Faculty-In-Residence.

        Done.    This policy was adopted in the summer of 2008.

        86. Continue to use institutional climate surveys to measure progress on climate
            and retention issues. The Commission recommends that a climate study be
            completed and monitored every 3-4 years.

        Done. Student Life administers an annual survey to seniors that probes climate issues.
        Students not returning to the University before graduation go through an exit interview
        process overseen by Academic Affairs.


V.   Athletics

        87. The Athletic Faculty Advisory Committee, in conjunction with Business Office
            personnel, should conduct a review of the team budgets, team promotion and
            marketing strategies, and coaches’ salaries within the Athletic Department to
            determine if there are gender inequities in coaches’ salaries and team
            operations.

        Done. There is no Athletic Faculty Advisory Committee (see last item below). The
        Gender Equity Commission was advised to refer to Butler’s EADA federal reporting of
        information for all information on expenditures with regard to male and female equity in
        athletics. As Butler’s Title IX administrator, Executive Director of Human Resources and
        Chief Diversity Officer, Jonathan Small is the main contact person for issues related to
        gender equity


        88. The lower level women’s team locker rooms must be renovated.

        Done This project has been completed.

        89. The softball field needs basic improvements to bring it to a minimum standard
            of other college softball fields.

        Done. Improvements to the field itself included leveling the infield and replacing the soil,
        increasing the distance between home plate and the backstop, and expanding the playing
        field to allow for 215’ to the centerfield fence, In addition, the old outfield fencing was
        replaced with a new 8’ fence, a storage shed was erected, the foul poles were replaced, a
        flag pole was put up, an outfield fence windscreen was installed, the dugouts were
        repainted, and a portable restroom and a portable hand washing station were added,
        Finally, an indoor hitting facility for softball, baseball, and golf was completed this
        summer.



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              90. The Athletic Advisory Committee needs to have oversight responsibilities and
                  be representative of faculty and staff that reflect the gender balance on
                  campus.

              Done The Faculty Athletic Committee was once a committee of the Faculty Assembly.
              Sometime around 2000 it dropped off the Assembly committee charts. For two years
              there was no committee activity. Prior to the 2002-2003 NCAA Self-Study, Joe Kirsch
              and John Parry went before the Faculty Assembly and proposed a new committee called
              the Athletic Advisory Council (AAC) with a new membership model that would include
              members who were not faculty. It was approved by Faculty Assembly and was used
              heavily during the NCAA Self-Study. The membership included faculty representation
              from each college, two coaches, two student-athletes, the Faculty Athletic Representative,
              the Athletic Director, the Senior Woman Administrator, and one representative from
              Student Affairs.

              Currently, the Athletic Advisory Council monitors and reviews all matters of academic
              concern as they relate to athletics, including policies for practice and missed class time,
              competition schedules, travel plans, and graduation rates. Additionally, the Athletic
              Advisory Council serves as an avenue for any student-athlete to submit a complaint
              regarding minority and/or gender equity issues, perceived discriminatory behavior, and/or
              for obtaining a release from an athletic program in order to transfer to another institution.
              Recourse by a student-athlete to the Council comes only discussions with the appropriate
              Student-Athlete Advisory Committee team representative, head coach, and/or athletic
              department administrator results in an unsatisfactory response.

              Given the functions of the Council, it is not anticipated that its composition will be
              mandated to reflect the gender balance on campus or that it would assume oversight
              responsibilities rather than advisory duties. In accordance with NCAA regulations, the
              president of the University has ultimate oversight responsibilities for the Department of
              Athletics.


   VI.    Physical Plant and Operations

              91. Offer free feminine hygiene products in all ADA accessible restrooms in each
                  academic and/or office building on campus.

              Done. Feminine hygiene products are stocked in all academic building restrooms.

              92. Allocate at least one centrally located room in every academic/office building
                  for a lactation room.

              Done. An inquiry to HRM&D indicated that there are fewer than ten nursing mothers on
              campus at any one time. Designating a room in every academic/office building is
              impractical at a time when office space is limited. Rather than a lactation room in each
              building, we have located a lactation room in the HRC and stipulated that arrangements
              can be made for employees to use their own offices for lactation if there is sufficient
              privacy.



Created 9/10/07 Updated 08/28/09 Updated 11/09/10




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