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ELDER ABUSE PREVENTION

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ELDER ABUSE PREVENTION Powered By Docstoc
					WELCOME

 NCEA WEBCAST
September 25, 2009
NCEA WEBCAST

   Presented by:
The National Committee for the Prevention of Elder
  Abuse (NCPEA)

   Hosted by:
The National Adult Protective Services Association
(NAPSA )




                                                     2
NATIONAL CENTER ON ELDER ABUSE


      Elder Justice: Community
            Collaborations

            NCEA WEBCAST
          September 25, 2009
For technical assistance during the webcast,
         please call 1-800-939-8761

                                               3
NATIONAL CENTER ON ELDER ABUSE
 www.ncea.aoa.gov/
 NCEA is a funded initiative of the U.S.
  Administration on Aging (AoA)
 AoA + three partner organizations:
     Universityof Delaware Clearinghouse on Abuse
      and Neglect of the Elderly (CANE)
     National Committee for the Prevention of Elder
      Abuse (NCPEA)
     National Adult Protective Services Association
      (NAPSA)
                                                       4
NATIONAL CENTER ON ELDER ABUSE

   The NCEA serves as a national resource center
    dedicated the prevention of elder mistreatment
    through:
     Disseminating   of elder abuse information to
      professionals and the public
     Providing technical assistance on elder abuse

     Providing training resources to states and
      community based organizations
     Synthesizing elder abuse research for the field


                                                        5
                   NAPSA
NATIONAL ADULT PROTECTIVE SERVICES ASSOCIATION
            www.apsnetwork.org




                                                 6
TODAY’S AGENDA

    Introductions and Project Background—Pam Teaster
    Pilot Project Overview—Mary Lynn Kasunic
    Questions
    Feature Coalition 1—Vermont
    Feature Coalition 2—Arizona
    Questions
    Closing—Pam Teaster & Mary Lynn Kasunic
    Questions
    Wrap-Up—Aubrey Grant


                                                        7
                TODAY’S WEBCAST
MODERATOR:
PAM TEASTER—NCPEA PRESIDENT & U OF K PROFESSOR

PRESENTERS:
MARY LYNN KASUNIC—NCPEA BOARD MEMBER
LYNN GOULDING & CHIEF RICHARD LEIGHTON—FEATURE
  COALITION 1
SUE MCCAULEY—FEATURE COALITION 2



                                                 8
PILOT PROJECT OVERVIEW


         Mary Lynn Kasunic, M.S., CPM




                                        9
                         Elder Justice
                     Community Collaborations
                                          An initiative of the
                     National Center on Elder Abuse
                                 and the
           National Committee for the Prevention of Elder Abuse

                        Funded by the Administration on Aging,
                    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

  This project is funded in part by Grant No. 90-AM-3145 from the Administration on Aging, U.S. Department of
 Health and Human Services, through the National Center on Elder Abuse. Grantees undertaking projects under
government sponsorship are encouraged to express freely their findings and conclusions. Therefore, points of view
                  or opinions do not necessarily represent official Administration on Aging policy.
                                                                                                          10
        Pilot Project (2004-2006)
New Local Elder Abuse Prevention Network
               Development

                                      117 Coalitions
                                        Identified




                              Comprehensive Survey Sent
                               57 Networks Responded
       2 Teleconferences on
          “Best Practices”

                                26 “Effective” Coalitions
                                        Identified
                                                            11
     Four Core Elements Identified

4 core elements of effective local elder abuse prevention
          networks emerged from the pilot project:

              Results-Oriented Approach
            Effective Coalition Infrastructure
                 Effective Leadership
            Strong Commitment to Purpose



    6-Step Process to Develop Local Networks           12
Development of New Local Elder Justice
      Community Collaborations
  NCPEA -
    Develops and distributes an RFP to all Area Agencies
     on Aging and Title VI Grantees and to community
     organizations nationwide
    Reviews proposals and selects organizations to receive
     $10,000 grants and network development training

  Area Agency on Aging, Region One -
    Conducts on-site trainings
    Provides follow-up technical assistance via
     teleconferences                                          13
Development of New Local Elder Justice
      Community Collaborations




       24 new coalitions developed so far
       10-12 more will be created this year   14
Development of New Local Coalitions

 Successful applicants invite community partners to the
  one-day training
 The training is a hands-on, interactive “strategic
  planning” session for the new coalition
 The RESULT of the training session is the creation of a
  Strategic Plan – a roadmap for the new coalition
 Coalition leaders participate in follow-up technical
  assistance teleconferences with the trainers

                                                           15
The Six Steps For Developing Effective
Local Elder Abuse Prevention Networks

 1.   Determine Vision, Mission and Values
 2.   Create a Results-Oriented Approach
 3.   Build an Inclusionary Coalition Membership
 4.   Establish Effective Leadership
 5.   Promote a Strong Commitment to Purpose
 6.   Monitor Performance


                                                   16
Step 1 – Determine Vision, Mission,
         and Values
Vision is the “What?” –

Example:
Vulnerable adults in the Gateway
communities are honored, respected and valued, living
with dignity and freedom from abuse.

                Gateway Regional Elder Abuse Task Force
                (Morehead, KY)
                                                          17
Step 1 – Determine Vision, Mission,
         and Values

Mission is the “How?”
Example:
To create awareness and to respond to elder justice
issues affecting vulnerable adults through enhanced
partnerships, education and advocacy.

                  Coalition for Vulnerable Adults in Brazos
                  Valley (Washington, TX)
                                                              18
Step 1 – Determine Vision, Mission,
         and Values

Values answers the question, “Why?”

Example:
We value the right of every older adult to live free of
the fear of abuse.

                   CAPE: Coastal Alliance for the
                   Protection of Elders (Brunswick, GA)

                                                          19
 Step 2 – Create a Results-Oriented
          Approach

             Keys to Successful Coalitions

 Focused, innovative, culturally competent projects
 Tasks delineated clearly
 Results-oriented work environment
   Public and Professional Education and Awareness
   Advocacy Activities
   Programs and Victim Services
                                                       20
Step 2 – Create a Results-Oriented
         Approach

 Public and Professional Education and Awareness

    -   Publications / Plays and Videos
    -   Speakers Bureaus
    -   Media Campaigns
    -   Elder Abuse Awareness Events
    -   Shred-a-Thons
    -   Train-the-Trainer Programs

                                                    21
 Step 2 – Create a Results-Oriented
          Approach

 Advocacy Activities

    - Legislative advocacy for establishment or
      improvement of elder abuse statutes

    - Advocacy to change policies, procedures and
      practices of law enforcement to improve victim
      services and preserve elder rights


                                                       22
Step 2 – Create a Results-Oriented
         Approach
 Programs and Victim Services

    -   Volunteer Guardianship Program
    -   Bank Reporting Projects
    -   Bridge Room
    -   Support Groups for Victims
    -   Elder Shelters / Emergency & Transitional Housing
    -   APS / AAA Service Coordination Project

                                                      23
 Step 3 – Build an Inclusionary
          Coalition Membership

            Inclusion vs. Exclusion

  Inclusive, diverse and often large memberships
        correlate to very effective networks.
     Many players are needed to address the
         complex issue of elder abuse.
Response to elder abuse must be multi-disciplinary.
                                                      24
    Step 3 – Build an Inclusionary
             Coalition Membership
 Area Agencies on Aging              Social Services
 Adult Protective Services           Long-Term Care Facilities
 Aging Services Providers            Emergency Responders
 Mental Health Organizations         Faith-Based Organizations
 Law Enforcement Agencies            Attorneys/Legal Assistance Providers
 Senior Organizations, i.e. AARP     Citizen Representatives, Age 60+
 Long-Term Care Ombudsmen            Prosecutors
 Medical and Health Care Entities    Financial/Banking Entities
 Domestic Violence Advocates         Elected Officials
                                                                     25
Step 4 – Establish Effective Leadership

 Success in network development is dependent on
  organizational commitment to supply and support
  quality leadership.

 84% of survey respondents indicated their networks
  have a lead agency



                                                    26
Step 4 – Establish Effective
Leadership

         Coalition Co-Chairs

         Committees

         Committee Co-Chairs



                                27
      Step 4 – Establish Effective
              Leadership
            Examples of Committees
•   Public and Professional Education & Awareness
•   Speakers Bureau
•   Faith-Based Community Outreach
•   Advocacy
•   Financial Exploitation
•   MDTs / F.A.S.T. (Financial Abuse Specialist Team)
•   Bank Reporting Project
•   Victim Assistance
•   Fatality Review
•   Mandated Reporters
•   Research
•   Membership                                          28
Step 5 – Promote a Strong Commitment
         to Purpose
       Effective coalitions have:
         – Committed members
         – Shared visions and goals
         – Participatory decision-making
         – Cohesive, cooperative and trusting
           environments

                                                29
Step 5 – Promote a Strong Commitment
         to Purpose

  Frequency of Meetings:
    – 65% of very effective coalitions meet monthly
    – 69% of less effective coalitions meet less than monthly

  Good Attendance:
           (More than half of members attending meetings)
    – 58% of very effective coalitions report good attendance
    – 14% of less effective coalitions report good attendance

  Commit to meet on a regular basis.

                                                                            30
                  (Results from NCPEA’s Identification of Best Practices)
  Step 6 – Monitor Performance




  Track measurable outcomes for the coalition
  Monitor the “health” of the coalition
“Each organization must create and communicate performance
          measures that reflect its unique strategy.”
            – Dr. Robert S. Kaplan, Harvard Business School
                                                              31
         Step 6 – Monitor Performance
              Examples of Outcome Measures

 130% increase in elder abuse cases reported

 25% improvement in knowledge about elder abuse and
  late-life domestic violence

 Increase in APS investigation rate from 78% to 92.5%

 Decrease in recidivism rate for APS clients from 26% to 4.7%,
  due to APS Service Coordination

 >90% of DOVES clients achieve self-sufficiency within 2 years   32
 Step 6 – Monitor Performance

      Check the “Health” of the Coalition

 Do members attend meetings and serve on committees?

 Are members encouraged to participate in discussions?

 Are decisions made by consensus?

 Is there a sense of cohesiveness?

 Is there trust and openness?

 Are conflicts addressed and resolved?
                                                          33
QUESTIONS?




             34
             FEATURE COALITION 1:
               NORTHEAST KINGDOM
  VULNERABLE ADULT ACTION COALITION

CALEDONIA/SOUTHERN ESSEX COUNTIES,
                          VERMONT


                         Lynn Goulding, MSW
                       Chief Richard Leighton




                                                35
      Northeast Kingdom
Vulnerable Adult Action Coalition
Caledonia/Southern Essex Counties, Vermont

                            Lead Agency:
   Area Agency on Aging for Northeastern Vermont

                    Coalition Chairpersons

 Chief Richard Leighton             Lynn Goulding, MSW
St. Johnsbury Police Department   Area Agency on Aging NE Vermont




                                                                    36
 Our Mission

To identify, prevent and respond to the
 abuse, neglect, or exploitation of elders
 and vulnerable adults wherever it may
occur by fostering community awareness
    through education and advocacy.



                                             37
       Values

   We value safety, integrity, self-determination through traditional and
    cultural diversity by serving with empathy and compassion without
    judgment.

   We are committed as a team to educate ourselves and the community
    we serve.

   We value the right for all vulnerable adults to live with respect, dignity,
    safety and without fear in their own homes.

   We value the cooperative efforts of agencies as well as individuals to
    protect and serve those that can not protect themselves.

                                                                              38
       Purpose of the Coalition
   To provide a forum for the exchange of information between
    providers that will lead to a coordinated community response.

   To educate the public and other services providers about
    issues related to the abuse, neglect, and exploitation of
    vulnerable adults.

   To advocate on behalf of elders and disabled adults.

   To serve as an entity for future grant funding opportunities.


                                                                    39
      Accomplishments
   Development/adoption of strategic plan
   Public service announcement
   Rack card
   Elder abuse presentations
   Outreach to senior centers/senior meal programs
   World Elder Abuse Awareness Day event
   Radio interview with coalition co-chairs
   Press releases
                                                      40
  Coalition - Work Products


 Public Service
 Announcement
by Chief Richard Leighton &
      Lynn Goulding




                              41
Coalition – Work Products




                      The Dance® was written by
                      Mary Lynn Kasunic and
                      Sue Beastall and was
                      produced by Direct Current
                      Productions, and was
                      funded in part by the U.S.
                      Department of Health and
                      Human Services,
                      Administration of Children
                      and Families
                                                   42
     World Elder Abuse Awareness Day
               June 15, 2009
Hosted by the NEK Vulnerable Adult Action Coalition




                                                      43
Challenges

    Lack of Funding
    Time Constraints
    Data Collection




                        44
      NEK Vulnerable Adult Action Coalition Members

   Ken Gordon and Lynn Goulding, Area Agency on Aging for Northeastern Vermont
   Chief Richard Leighton, St. Johnsbury Police Department
   Sheriff Mike Bergeron and Sgt. William O’Hare, Caledonia County Sheriff’s Department
   Sheriff Steve Gadapee, Essex County Sheriff’s Department
   Officer Mike Gero, Hardwick Police Department
   Lt. Timothy Clouatre, Vermont State Police
   Jim Rice, Adult Protective Services
   Ed Wheelock, Gilman Senior Center
   Zoë Gascon, Umbrella Advocacy Program
   Dixie McFarland, Northeast Kingdom Human Services
   Cindy Santaw-Brown, Darling Inn Senior Meal Program
   Pauline Sylvain, Caledonia-Essex Area Ambulance Service (CALEX)




                                                                                      45
          NEK Coalition Members (continued)


   Dinah Yessne, St. Johnsbury Community Justice Center
   Greg MacDonald, Agency of Human Services
   Susan Carr, Caledonia County State’s Attorney Office
   Lisa Warren, Caledonia County State’s Attorney Office
   Rita Laferriere, Caledonia Home Health and Hospice
   Deborah Wallens-Matte, Modern Woodman Insurance
   Lisa Sweeny, Riverside Life Enrichment Center
   Connie Canario, Northeastern Vermont Regional Hospital
   Judge Toby Balivet, Caledonia County Probate Court
   Tina Wood, Vermont Protection and Advocacy
   Anne Cosgrove, Vermont Department of Corrections
   Patricia Mitchell, Elizabeth H. Brown Humane Society
   Alice Nicholson, Long Term Care Ombudsman Program
   Anne Stacey, Anne’s Helping Hands
   A.W.A.R.E. – Domestic Violence Organization


                                                             46
    Contact Information
                  Lynn Goulding
Area Agency on Aging for Northeastern Vermont
         481 Summer Street, Suite 101
            St. Johnsbury, VT 05819
                  802-748-5182
             lgoulding@nevaaa.org

               Chief Richard Leighton
       St. Johnsbury Police Department
           1187 Main Street, Suite 1
            St. Johnsbury, VT 05819
                  802-748-2314
               rleighto@dps.vt.us
                                                47
              FEATURE COALITION 2:
PREVENTION OF ELDER ABUSE COALITION
                             (PEAC)

            YAVAPAI COUNTY, ARIZONA




                            Sue McCauley




                                           48
Lead Agency: Northern Arizona Council of Governments Area Agency on Aging

                                                                            49
Yavapai County, Arizona




                          50
             Demographics
 8125 square miles, just smaller than the size of the
  state of New Jersey
 Approximately 240,000 people
 Two primary population centers divided by mountain
  range
 Many isolated rural communities
 Considered prime area to retire to
 27.4% of population 45-64 years of age (2000)
 22% of population 65 years or older (2000)

                                                         51
 NCPEA Grant
 November 2008
 32 Attendees
 Strategic Plan Developed




                             52
             VISION
A community where vulnerable older
adults are valued and protected from
abuse, neglect and exploitation




                                       53
              MISSION
To eliminate abuse and exploitation of
vulnerable adults through prevention,
identification, education, and intervention
in a collaborative community effort.




                                          54
 10 Sub-Committees Formed
 Financial Abuse      Community Resources
 Gatekeeper Education  Speakers Bureau
 Mental Health        Multi-Disciplinary Team
 Fund Development     Legislative
 Media/PR             Elder Abuse



                                           55
29 Project Ideas Developed
   Brochure & Marketing Materials
   Website Development
   Community Education
   Develop Protocols for Abuse Investigations
   Education of Law Enforcement, including
    Prosecutors
   Resource Directory
   Legislative Advocacy
   Crisis Housing

                                                 56
Current Membership
 More than 60 active members from:
  Area Agency on Aging
  Adult Protective Services
  Public & Private Fiduciaries
  Private & Government Agencies
  Law Enforcement & Fire Department
  Bank Representatives & Financial Planners
  Community Volunteers
  Physicians & Hospice Workers
  Private & County Attorneys
  Trauma Intervention Program
  Alzheimer’s Association
  County Assessor’s Office

                                              57
           Accomplishments
 Caregiver Training
 Law Enforcement Training
 Booth at Senior Health Fair and County Fair
 Bank Employee Training Video Produced with
  Assistance of County Attorney and Distributed to Banks
 Website Designed and On-Line
 Brochure Developed
 Multi-Disciplinary Team Reviewing Cases


                                                     58
         Accomplishments
 Investment Scams Training for the Public
 Rubber Jar Grippers with Logo Purchased and Being
  Distributed
 Program Being Developed to Train 24 Community
  Members Who Will Each Train 3 Friends to Recognize
  and Avoid Scams & ID Theft, To Be Presented Quarterly
 Gatekeeper Training Being Developed
 Monthly Meetings Attended by 35-45 Members
 Speakers Bureau with Speakers Available on Many
  Topics

                                                   59
60
61
             Challenges
 Maintaining membership from Law
  Enforcement
 Maintaining membership from faith-based
  organizations
 Maintaining funding
 Attracting members from the entire county,
  especially remote rural areas

                                           62
63
QUESTIONS?




             64
           CLOSING




           Pam Teaster, Ph.D.
Mary Lynn Kasunic, M.S., CPM




                                65
QUESTIONS?




             66
WRAP-UP




      67
ELDER JUSTICE
COMMUNITY COLLABORATIONS
  NCPEA Contacts:
         Pamela Teaster, Project Director
            Phone: 859-257-1450, ext. 80196
             E-mail: pteaster@email.uky.edu


       Mary Lynn Kasunic, Program Coordinator
                 Phone: 602-264-2255
               E-mail: kasunic@msn.com

                                                68
FOR MORE INFORMATION

   Feature Coalition 1:
     Lynn Goulding: 802-748-5182 or
      lgoulding@nevaaa.org
     Chief Richard Leighton: 802-748-2314 or
      rleighto@dps.state.vt.us
   Feature Coalition 2:
       Sue McCauley: 928-649-3763 or
        smccauley@nacog.org
   NAPSA:
       Aubrey Grant: 217-523-4431 x 5 or
        aubrey.grant@apsnetwork.org
                                                69
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                                                  70
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