; American-Romanticism.pptx - American Romanticism
Documents
Resources
Learning Center
Upload
Plans & pricing Sign in
Sign Out
Your Federal Quarterly Tax Payments are due April 15th Get Help Now >>

American-Romanticism.pptx - American Romanticism

VIEWS: 167 PAGES: 50

  • pg 1
									American Romanticism


   1800-1860
What was Romanticism?
 Although the name may sound a bit lovey-dovey, as an art
  (and literary) movement Romanticism really had nothing
  to do with love or romance.
 It DID have everything to do with emotion, however—
  Romanticism came about in the middle of the 18th
  century as a reaction to classical thoughts and ideas.
  Classicism was orderly, logical, and step-by-step (Age of
  Reason), while Romanticism took a different approach
  by emphasizing emotion and imagination.
Chalk Cliffs on Rügen
(1818), Caspar David
Friedrich
The Haywain by John Constable
"Temeraire" / 1838 William Turner
Julius Polek
    Your Assignment:
 In your textbooks, read pages 162-167
(Stop at The American Novel & the Wilderness Experience)
 Take notes over your reading: 4 Sections
    Think About
    The Romantic Sensibility; Celebrating Imagination
    The City, Grim & Gray
    Romantic Escapism: From Dull Realities to Higher Truths
                  Romanticism

                                          Fireside Poets
       Gothic Literature
                               Transcendentalist
   William Cullen Bryant
Folk Tales      Walt Whitman       The Adventures of
                                   Huckleberry Finn
     Emily Dickenson
  Think About It…
 Charles Brockden Brown, known as the first professional American
  novelist wrote Arthur Mervyn. This novel was much admired and
  was recognized as the first “journey” story. The boy of the story goes
  on a journey from a small farm to the city of Philadelphia where he
  encounters an industrial hell.
 Franklin, as a rationalist, saw the city as a place to succeed and self-
  realization
 Brown, as a romantic, saw the city as a place of shifting morals,
  corruption, & death
 The Characteristics Romantic journey is…
   Goes to the country side which is associated with independence,
    moral clarity, and healthful living
   Sometimes a psychological journey to the country of the
    imagination
   Always a journey away from one thing and to another
The Romantic Sensibility: Celebrating
Imagination
 A name given to those school’s of thought that value feeling
  and intuition over reason.
 Had a strong influence literature, music, and paintings in
  Europe and England
 American romantics valued imagination, individual feelings,
  and wild nature were of greater value than reason, logic, &
  cultivation
The City Grey & Grim
 Between 1820-1840 the population of New York city more
  than doubled
 In the 1830s the first tenements were built
 The city streets were foul with horse droppings, dead
  carcasses, & Cholera was claiming an average of 100 per day
 Violence was a problem because of more than 20,000
  homeless children, street gangs,
Romantic Escapism: From Dull
Realities to Higher Truths
 Romantics wanted to rise above “dull realities” to a realm of
  higher truth.
   Search for exotic settings in the more “natural past
   Tried to reflect on the natural world until dull reality fell away
Romanticism is a direct reaction, or
rebellion, to The Age of Reason:
       Age of Reason                   Romanticism
 Style: Complex,
                              Style: abstract, metaphorical,
  Metaphorical                 & symbolic
 Format: Speeches,
                              Format: poems, short stories,
  Pamphlets, Editorials, &     novels, & essays
  News Articles
                              Purpose: to explore the
 Purpose: To inform &
                               connection between
  persuade                     man/society/nature
Romanticism
 A journey away from corruption of civilization and the limits
  of rational thoughts towards the integrity of nature and the
  freedom of imagination
   Poetry was considered the most sublime embodiment of
    imagination
     Sublime: elevated or lofty in thought, language,
          impressing the mind with a sense of grandeur or power; inspiring awe
   Elements of Romanticism
 Emphasized Emotion & Individual Freedom
 Interested in the Process of Change
 Valued Personal Growth
 Relied on Inner Perception rather then reason or logic (gut
  instinct)
 Employed the following in their stories:
   Imagination               - Nature       - Superstition
National Influences on Romanticism
 1803- Louisiana Purchase
 Anti-slavery & feminist movements began
 War of 1812 firmly established the U.S. as a serious,
  powerful country
The Characteristic Romantic Journey
 Goes to the country side which is associated with
  independence, moral clarity, and healthful living
 Sometimes a psychological journey to the country of the
  imagination
 Always a journey away from one thing and to another
     Your Assignment: due 11/18

 Read the background of
 Washington Irving in your
 textbook on page 174 and
 fill in the information as
 you go.

                        The Devil and Tom Walker
                           By Washington Irving
Folk Tales & Washington Irving
 The youngest son of a hardware importer
 A half-hearted lawyer who enjoyed fictional
  writing much more
 Went to England on family business but
  stayed to be a part of the literary world
 Received his most valuable writing advice
  from an English Romantic novelist Sir
  Walter Scott.
 Scott told Irving to read the German
  Romantics and to find inspiration in folklore
  and legends.
 Irving took the European past and added a
  distinctly American voice and produced one
  wildly popular compilation of stories and
  another very criticized collection that
  prompted Irving to never write fiction again.
The Devil & Tom Walker
 Based on a German folktale
 Focuses on making a deal with the devil
 Teaches a moral lesson about pride, greed,
 & stupidity
Folk Tale & Motif
Folk Tale
 Story that has no known author and was
  originally passed on from one generation to
  another by word of mouth.
Motif
 Reoccurring theme, setting, characters, plot
  etc.
 Archetype: an original or fundamental imaginative
 pattern that is repeated through the ages. An
 archetype can be a plot, an event, a character, a
 setting ,or an object

 Mood: the overall feeling or atmosphere of a story
 created by setting, word choice, imagery,
 metaphors, similes, & characterization

 What lesson should we learn from reading this
 story?
Vocabulary: The Devil & Tom Walker
  prevalent adj.: widely existing; frequent.
  stagnant adj.: not flowing or moving.
  precarious adj.: uncertain; insecure; risky.
  impregnable adj.: impossible to capture or enter by force.
  melancholy adj.: sad; gloomy.
  obliterate v.: erase or destroy.
  avarice n.: greed.
  resolute adj.: determined; resolved; unwavering.
  parsimony n .: stinginess.
  superfluous adj.: more than is needed or wanted; useless.
       Elements of Romanticism &
         The Devil & Tom Walker
 Imagination           Nature         Superstition

•The setting of the •Swamp           •The Indian
story                                fort/burial
•The archetype                       ground
characters

Style: symbolic & metaphorical

Purpose: to entertain & explore the connection
between man, nature, & society
How does man affect society in The
     Devil and Tom Walker?


•The greed of “man” initially brought a bubble of
wealth to the city of Boston but when all the
speculators lost their money hard economic
times brought poverty for most.
•Tom affects the citizens of Boston as an usurer.
He took advantage of people’s situations for his
own personal gain.
What lesson is learned from this
 folk tale about pride, greed, &
            stupidity ?


•Greed can be the downfall of many who
live without thought of consequence.
•Tom was stupid to make a deal with the
devil.
William Cullen Bryant
The Father of American Poetry
1794-1878
                   His poems explored the
                    connection between
                    nature & humanity
                   He believed that nature
                    could teach one about
                    life and death
                   Death was Bryant’s
                    favorite topic to write
                    about in poems
 Thanatopsis, Bryant’s most
  famous poem, is about death
 Bryant wrote Thanatopsis at
  the age of 18
 Bryant was an influential
  defender of freedom of
  speech, woman’s rights, and
  the abolition of slavery.
 Bryant was a lawyer
 Poetry was the highest embodiment of the imagination
 Poetry was often contrasted with science
 Science was seen as destroying the very truth it claimed to
  seek
                    Thanatopsis
 Section1: (Narrator Speaking)
• Nature speaks in various ways to those who love
  and commune with her.
• The idea of Nature (presented as a female) is
  eloquent, beautiful, and comforting. (Think
  "Mother Nature")
• When thoughts of your last days scare you, go to
  nature for understanding & comfort.
• Consider the ending line of section 1, "...while all
  around Earth and her waters, and the depths of air
  comes a still voice," what affect does "still voice"
  have?
 Section 2: Nature Speaking
• This section changes the voice
  of the narrator from the poet to
  nature
• Nature essentially states that in
  death the earth reclaims us and
  we mix with the elements.
 Section 3
 Provides elements of comfort from the thoughts
  of death
      - you shall not retire alone
      - your spirit will reside in the earth

 The word “yet” at the start of this section
  denotes a change in the tone from matter-of-fact
  to peaceful and calming

 Notice the two words “retire” and “couch”. These
  two words provide a peaceful, calming tone to
  this section.
 Lines 37-55
• The Earth as a residence


 Lines 55-72
• Again, the word “yet” denotes a change in tone &
 topic

• How life will continue after you are gone but all
 will eventually die

 Section 4
• Instructs us on how we should live
    To A Waterfowl
Stanza 1: Rhetorical Question, “Do you go your own way?” Do you
  do your own thing or are you a follower?
 Notice the ABAB rhyme scheme


Stanza 2: A “hunter” might try to hurt your or get in your way but
  they will not be successful. Metaphorically, the fowler could be
  obstacles in one’s path

Stanza 3: Another Rhetorical Question, “Where do you look to
  land?” What is your goal or final destination?
Stanza 4: Power is capitalized to note that God will “guide
  you” (the bird) through instinct
    That same Power guides people with their intuition,
     which is the voice of God speaking to you
Stanza 5 & 6: Do not stop your goal/destination/ the end
  is near
Stanza 7: Though the image of the bird is no longer in the
  poet’s sight the lesson that the bird inspired will not be
  forgotten.
Stanza 8: The Power that guides birds to the place they are
  suppose to be through instinct will also guide each
  person to the “place” they are suppose to be through
  intuition.
 Comparing Thanatopsis & To A Waterfowl:
 due Wednesday 12/8
1. Note the tone of Thanatopsis: provide 6 specific words
  that overall denote the tone, provide the word/phrase
  and line number.
2. Note the tone of To AWaterfowl: provide 6 specific
  words that overall denote the tone, provide the
  word/phrase and line number.
3. Compare the tone of each poem and the message of
  each poem.
4. In each poem, what inspires the message of each
  poem?
    Theme & Elements of Romanticism
 A message, idea, attitude about a subject in a piece of
  literature that the writer wishes to share with the
  reader.
   Is one complete sentence (only one).
 Emphasized Emotion & Individual Freedom
 Interested in the Process of Change
 Valued Personal Growth
 Relied on Inner Perception rather then reason or
  logic (gut instinct)
 Employed the following in their stories:
   Imagination            - Nature - Superstition
     Inscription For The Entrance To A
                   Wood
 Section One: If you are sick of the world go to
  nature for comfort
 Section Two: All that you found in the world
  will not be in nature and take comfort in
  knowing that those who are guilty will also be
  in misery (Biblical Allusion
 Section Three: Description of Nature, use of
  personification and other lit. techniques to
  create tone

								
To top