Lecture Overview Resistance

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Lecture Overview Resistance Powered By Docstoc
					                     Lecture 25: Review
Presentations on Tuesday (7th) – work in project groups, 3 slides total.
If your circuit is already working, demonstrate it after class.
If you need a bit more time, last chance Tuesday (Dec 14th), 2pm in the
lab.

Exam preparation – use assignments, go over the mid-term (solutions
posted on Assignments page). Use this review. Practice with EWB

Can’t review everything – focus on some older stuff today
• Simple circuits: equivalent circuits (work for both AC & DC)
• KCL KVL; mesh or nodal analysis. Works for AC & DC
• Thevenin & Norton circuits
• Transient circuits; capacitors & inductors
• These notes contain (much) more, and will be posted on the web
                                     Simple circuits

• Voltage/Current sources: provide prescribed voltage/current regardless of
load
• Kirchoff's current law: The sum of currents into a node=0
• Kirchoff's Voltage Law: The sum of voltages round a closed loop=0
•Voltage divider:
                        R
                   v1  1 vtotal
                       REQ

•Current divider
                          REQ
                   i1          iS
                          R1
            Circuit analysis method 1:
         Apply element combination rules

  Series resistors



  Parallel resistors




Series voltage sources



Parallel current sources
                                      Mesh Analysis
Example: 2 meshes
       (Mesh is a loop that does not contain other loops)
Step 1: Assign mesh currents clockwise
Step 2: Apply KVL to each mesh
•  The self-resistance is the effective resistance of the resistors in series within
a mesh. The mutual resistance is the resistance that the mesh has in common
with the neighbouring mesh
• To write the mesh equation, evaluate the self-resistance, then multiply by the
mesh current
• Next, subtract the mutual resistance multiplied by the current in the
neighbouring mesh for each neighbour.
• Equate the above result to the driving voltage: taken to be positive if it tends
to push current in the same direction as the assigned mesh current


Mesh1: (R1+R2)I1                  - R2I2     =ε1-ε2
Mesh2:             -R2I1+ (R2+R3)I2          =ε2-ε3

Step 3: solve currents: use substitution or Cramer's rule
                         Cramer's Rule
Step 3: solve currents: use substitution or Cramer's rule
PRACTICE!!! http://www.idomaths.com/simeq.php

   I - I2 - I3 = 0
  4I + 5I2 + 0I3= 3
  0I - 5I2 + 10I3= 0
Mesh Analysis with 3 loops
    Mesh analysis with a current source
    Magnitude of current in mesh containing current source is IS ,
    (although if the current flow is opposite to the assigned current
    direction the value will be negative).




This works only if the current source is not shared by any other mesh
For a shared current source, label it with an unknown voltage.
                                    Example
• In this circuit, find the value of Is that will reduce the voltage across the 4Ω
resistor to zero.
                                     Example
 • In this circuit, find the value of Is that will reduce the voltage across the 4Ω
 resistor to zero.




   Mesh equation:



when 4Ω voltage=0:



 • What if the 2 Ω and the 6 Ω resistors are swapped?
                                Example II
• Which of the two circuits has the larger terminal voltage, A or B?
• Which has the larger current through the 9V battery?
• Practical batteries are modelled as voltage sources in series with a resistor.
                                 Example II
• Which of the two circuits has the larger terminal voltage, A or B?
• Which has the larger current through the 9V battery?
• Practical batteries are modelled as voltage sources in series with a resistor.




 Mesh equations:                           Mesh equations:




i1= current through 9V battery              i1 = current through 9V battery
solve to give i1=0.41A                      solve to give i1= -0.56A
                                Example II
• Which of the two circuits has the larger terminal voltage, A or B?
• Which has the larger current through the 9V battery?
• Practical batteries are modelled as voltage sources in series with a resistor.


     x                                                x
         +                                                   +
                                                    VR
         -                                                   -
             i1                                               - i1
         -
    VR                                                       +
         +
     y                                                   y



i1= current through battery                 i1 = current through battery
solve to give i1=0.41A                      solve to give i1= -0.56A
Thevenin and Norton Equivalent Circuits

                             Any network of sources
                             and resistors will appear
                             to the circuit connected
                   load      to it as a single voltage
                             source and a series
                             resistance




                          vTH= open circuit voltage at
                          terminal (a.k.a. port)

                load      RTH= Resistance of the
                          network as seen from port
                          (Vm’s, In’s set to zero)
Thevenin and Norton Equivalent Circuits
                                          Any network of sources
                                          and resistors will appear
                                          to the circuit connected
                                          to it as a single current
                                          source and a parallel
                                          resistance




   How do we calculate RT, VT, iN, RN ?
               Calculation of RT and RN
 • RT=RN ; same calculation
 • Set all sources to zero (‘kill’ the sources)
    – Short voltage sources
    – Open Current sources
• Calculate equivalent resistance seen by the load
                  Calculation of VT
• Remove the load and calculate the open circuit voltage




• The Thevenin equivalent is then VT in series with RT
                                 Example
• Find the Thevenin equivalent
                                 Example
• Find the Thevenin equivalent
                                 Example
• Find the Thevenin equivalent




           Y
                    X
                                  X

                                  Y
                            AC circuit elements
                              1   V V1  V2  V3 1    1   1
• Capacitors in series:                             
                             Ceq q        q       C1 C2 C3
                                  q q q q
• Capacitors in parallel:    Ceq   1 2 3  C1  C2  C3
                                  V     V
• Capacitive impedance: ZC=1/jωC


• Inductors in series:           Leq  L1  L2  L3
                                  1  1 1   1
• Inductors in parallel:
                                      
                                 Leq L1 L2 L3

• Inductive impedance: ZL= jωL

• Circuit analysis tools for DC circuits work on AC circuits, but replace resistance
with complex impedance
                    AC circuit analysis example




If V1=10cos(1000t) (volts) and V2=5cos(1000t) (volts), what is the current through the capacitor?
                               AC circuit analysis example




     If V1=10cos(1000t) (volts) and V2=5cos(1000t) (volts), what is the current through the capacitor?
     Mesh 1: (100+ZC)I1-ZCI2=V1
     Mesh 2:         -ZcI1+(Zc+ZL)I2=-V2
                                                     1            1
                                             ZC                           100 j
                                                    jC j  1000  10 5
                                             Z L  jL  1000  0.1  j  100 j

              10 100 j                                            100  100 j   10
              5   0                500 j                            100 j      5         500  500 j  1000 j
    I1                                   0.05 j         I2                                                   0.05  0.05 j
           100  100 j 100 j       10000                          100  100 j 100 j              10000
             100 j       0                                          100 j       0


IC(jω)=I1(jω)-I2(jω)=0.05j+0.05+0.05j=0.05+0.1j
φ=tan-1(0.1/0.05) = 63 degrees
A=√(0.052+0.12)=0.11
IC(jω)=0.1163
iC(t)=0.11cos(1000t+63)
                   Charging a capacitor




                                                    0.37




Time constant τ=RC. Time needed to charge capacitor to 63% of full charge

Larger RC means the capacitor takes longer to charge
Larger R implies smaller current flow
The larger C is, the more charge the capacitor can hold.

Solution is only true for simple circuit with resistor and capacitor in
series, but more complicated circuits can be reduced to this using
Thevenin's Theorem
                               Example
A battery with an emf of 1.5V and an internal resistance of 0.6Ω is used to
charge a 5F capacitor when a switch is closed. How long does it take to reach
a voltage across the capacitor of 1V?




                       5F
                               Example
A battery with an emf of 1.5V and an internal resistance of 0.6Ω is used to
charge a 5F capacitor when a switch is closed. How long does it take to reach
a voltage across the capacitor of 1V?




                       5F
                               Example
How long does it take if we attach an additional battery with an emf of 9V and
an internal resistance of 18Ω as shown?




                                 5F
                               Example
How long does it take if we attach an additional battery with an emf of 9V and
an internal resistance of 18Ω as shown?




                                 5F    RTH=0.58 Ohm
                                       i= 0.40 A
                                       VTH=1.74 V




                                                     Time to 1V= 2.5 seconds
                                         5F
                                Op Amps
Remember the Golden Rules:
1) iin=0: no current flows into the opamp.
2) v+=v-

These are only valid when there is negative feedback

In many circuits, one input to the opamp is connected to ground, so v+=v-=0



  A simple example:
Op Amp circuits


                             Summing
          Inverting          Amplifier
          Amplifier

           vout   R
                 F
           vS     RS
                                                         R       R               R      
                                                 vout   F vS1  F vS 2  ..... F vSN 
                                                         R
                                                          S1     RS 2            RSN   




        Non-Inverting
                                 Differential
        Amplifier
        vout     R               Amplifier
              1 F
         vS       RS             R2
                        vout       (v2  v1 )
                                 R1
   Integrator                              Differentiator




                         t                                               dvS
                   1                                 vout (t )   RF CS
   vout (t )  
                 RS CF   v
                         
                              S   (t )dt                                  dt
And two without negative feedback:
     Comparator                                             Schmitt Trigger
                                Example
What does this circuit do? Derive an expression for the gain and give the
circuit a suitable name.

                      i2                          i1  i2  0
                           R2                     v1  v     vout  v 
            i1                                             
      R1                                             R1          R2

       R1
                                                  v1  v   (vout  v  )
                                      R1=R2
                                                  vout  2v   v1
                 R2
                                                  v  v
                                                       R2
                                       voltage    v          v2  v 
                                       divider        R1  R2
                                                       1
                                                  v  v2
                                                        2
                                                  vout  v2  v1
                              Example
Design an opamp circuit to convert the triangular waveform v1 in the following
figure into the square wave v0 shown. Use a 0.1μF capacitor. (Hint: first
quantitatively determine the mathematical expression of v0 in terms of v1)




                            v0 is v1 differentiated
                                          dv1
                               vo   K
                                          dt
    Simple Filter analysis: Which of the following is a
                     low-pass filter?
•What happens to the output voltage when ω→0 (DC condition)?
     •In DC circuits, capacitors are open, inductors are shorts.
•or when ω→∞
     •At very high frequencies, capacitors are shorts, inductors are open




  Answer: (c)
   For a more quantitative solution, find the
          complex transfer function:
                                                       Vo ( j )
                                          H V ( j ) 
                                                       Vi ( j )
                                                           ZC
                                          Vo ( j )              Vi ( j )
                                                         ZC  Z R
                                                            1
                                                               j C
                                          H V ( j ) 
                                                          1       R
 • RC low-pass filter: preserves lower                      j C
 frequencies, attenuates frequencies
                                                 1                 1             e j0
 above the 3dB cutoff frequency                                            j tan 1 RC 
 ω0=1/RC.                                   1  jRC      1  (RC) e      2              1
                      1
              0                                  1         j tan 1 RC
                     RC                                  e
                                              1  (RC) 2
                  X 
                 X 
X dB  20 log 10     
                  0
                          (For voltage)             1                j tan 1  / 0
                                                               e
X dB  20 log 10
                   1
                       3dB                  1  (RC)     2

                    2
                                        Example
Design a high-pass RC filter with a 3dB frequency cutoff of 80Hz using a
capacitor of 2μF




               Vout      R                  1
H V ( j )                        
               Vin    R 1              1 j
                             j C           RC
            1
H 
        1 1
             (RC) 2
0  1 / RC
R  1 /(2 80  2  106 )
R  980
Active Filters



            Vout   Z
                  F
            VS     ZS




             Vout     Z
                   1 F
             VS       ZS
                                     Example
Given an input signal Vi=10mV(sin10t+sin10,000t), design a circuit such that the
output signal is VO= -100mV(sin10t). The high frequency component of the
output signal must be <1% of the low frequency part.

So, we want a circuit which amplifies the voltage, but only at low frequencies:
need an active filter.

                   Vout   Z
       A( j )          F
                   VS     ZS
        1   1      1
             
       Z F RF   1
                  jC F
                  RF
      ZF 
             1  j RF C F
                        RF / RS
       A( j )  
                     1  j RF C F
                                       Example
Given an input signal Vi=10mV(sin10t+sin10,000t), design a circuit such that the
output signal is VO= -100mV(sin10t). The high frequency component of the
output signal must be <1% of the low frequency part.

So, we want a circuit which amplifies the voltage, but only at low frequencies:
need an active filter.
                               Low frequency ω1:
                               Want a gain of 10
          Vout    ZF                                         V       R
A( j )                     ω1RFCF<<1 so         A( j )  out  F  10
          VS      ZS           set RS=1kΩ                     VS     RS
 1      1       1              set RF=10kΩ
             
ZF       RF       1
                      jC F           High frequency ω2:
              RF                      Low frequency gain=10,
ZF 
         1  j RF C F                so for <1%, need
                                      high frequency gain <1/10
                 RF / RS
A( j )  
              1  j RF C F


                      Check low frequency:
Combinational logic design steps:


   1. Derive the Truth Table
   2. Fill the Karnaugh map
   3. Use the map to find the logic
   4. Implement the logic in a circuit
   Another Example: 7 segment displays




                          Karnaugh Map for "a"
Truth Table




                        "x" represents a "don't care"
                        condition - the value can be
                        either 0 or 1
          • Box the ones for sum-of-products

This subcube: B                    This subcube: A·C




This subcube: D                    This subcube: A'·C'
• Realization (sum-of-products) is B+D+ A·C+ A'·C'
        Sequential logic design steps:
1. List the states - assign each state a symbol
2. Draw the finite state diagram (Moore - states inside
   nodes)
3. Derive the symbolic state transition table
4. Assign each state a binary code (also each output,
   if more than one)
5. Derive the actual state transition table
6. Write out the Karnaugh map for each "next state"
   and output(s)
7. Solve the maps to find the logic
8. Implement the logic in a circuit
3-bit binary up-counter:
 List the states: 0 to 7




                                              Derive the symbolic transition table
     Draw the finite state diagram
                                                  current state    next state
         001
          1          010
                      2           011
                                  3               0    000          001     1
                                                  1    001          010     2
                                                  2    010          011     3
000            3-bit up-counter         100
                                         4
 0                                                3    011          100     4
                                                  4    100          101     5
         111
          7          110
                      6           101
                                  5               5    101          110     6
                                                  6    110          111     7
                                                  7    111          000     0
                                           Derive the actual state transition table
  Assign the states a binary code
                                                current state     next state
      001         010          011              0    000           001     1
                                                1    001           010     2
                                                2    010           011     3
000         3-bit up-counter         100
                                                3    011           100     4
                                                4    100           101     5
      111         110          101              5    101           110     6
                                                6    110           111     7
                                                7    111           000     0
     Derive the actual state transition table


                current              next                      Solve the maps
            C3    C2   C1       N3   N2     N1
            0     0    0        0    0      1                                   notation to show
                                                                                function representing
            0     0    1        0    1      0
                                                                                input to D-FF
            0     1    0        0    1      1
            0     1    1        1    0      0                 N1 := C1'
            1     0    0        1    0      1                 N2 := C1C2' + C1'C2
            1     0    1        1    1      0                    := C1 xor C2
                                                              N3 := C1C2C3' + C1'C3 + C2'C3
            1     1    0        1    1      1
                                                                 := C1C2C3' + (C1' + C2')C3
            1     1    1        0    0      0                    := C1C2C3' + (C1C2)'C3
                                                                 := (C1C2) xor C3
 Karnaugh maps for each "next state":
N3                         C3
  C3C2     00 01       11 10              N2                   C3          N1                 C3
 C1
       0    0    0     1        1                0   1    1       0             1    1    1    1

 C1 1       0    1     0        1           C1 1     0    0       1         C1 0     0    0    0

                                                         C2                              C2
                  C2
                                       Implement the logic: each state bit
         current           next        requires one memory element
       C3   C2   C1   N3   N2     N1   (flipflop)
       0    0    0    0    0      1
       0    0    1    0    1      0
       0    1    0    0    1      1
       0    1    1    1    0      0
       1    0    0    1    0      1
       1    0    1    1    1      0
       1    1    0    1    1      1
       1    1    1    0    0      0


N1 := C1'
N2 := C1C2' + C1'C2
   := C1 xor C2
N3 := C1C2C3' + C1'C3 + C2'C3
   := C1C2C3' + (C1' + C2')C3
   := (C1C2) xor C3

				
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Description: Lecture Overview Resistance