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Electronic _ Electrical Engineering BEng

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Electronic _ Electrical Engineering BEng Powered By Docstoc
					                            LOUGHBOROUGH UNIVERSITY

                                Programme Specification

                   BEng (Hons) in Electronic and Electrical Engineering


Please note: This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of
the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be
expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning
opportunities that are provided. More detailed information on the learning outcomes,
content and teaching, learning and assessment methods of each module can be found
in Module Specifications and other programme documentation and online at
http://www.lboro.ac.uk/ admin/ar
The accuracy of the information in this document is reviewed by the University and may
be checked by the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education.


Awarding body/institution;             Loughborough University

Department;                            Electronic and Electrical Engineering

Teaching institution (if different);

                                       Institution of Engineering and Technology
Details of accreditation by a
                                       Institute of Measurement and Control
professional/statutory body;
                                       Energy Institute

Name of the final award;               BEng (Hons), BEng (Hons) DIS
                                       Electronic and Electrical Engineering
Programme title;

UCAS code;                             H600 3-year full-time, H604 4-year sandwich

Date at which the programme
specification was written or           August 2009
revised.




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1. Aims of the programme:
  The BEng programme in Electronic and Electrical Engineering aims to provide a high quality
  educational experience that produces graduate engineering practitioners with a strong
  academic background in fundamental electrical, electronic and software engineering
  combined with the analytical, technical and professional skills necessary to operate
  successfully in industry.


2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal
   reference points used to inform programme outcomes:
  UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competence; Engineering Technician, Incorporated
  Engineer and Chartered Engineer Standard, Engineering Council UK, 2008.
  UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competence; The Accreditation of Higher
  Education Programmes, Engineering Council UK, 2008.
  Guidance Note on Academic Accreditation, Engineering Council UK, July 2008
  IET Handbook of Learning Outcomes for BEng and MEng Degree Programmes, August
  2008.
  The framework for higher education qualifications in England, Wales and Northern Ireland,
  The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education, January 2001.
  Subject Benchmark Statement: Engineering, The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher
  Education, 2006.
  Code of practice for the assurance of academic quality and standards in higher education,
  Section 7: Programme design, approval, monitoring and review, The Quality Assurance
  Agency for Higher Education, September 2006.
  The Northern Ireland Credit Accumulation and Transfer System (NICATS); Principles and
  Guidelines.
  Beyond the honours degree classification; The Burgess Group final report, October 2007.
  Proposals for national arrangements for the use of academic credit in higher education in
  England; Final report of the Burgess Group, December 2006.
  Higher education credit framework for England: Guidance on academic credit arrangements
  in higher education in England, Draft for consultation, The Quality Assurance Agency for
  Higher Education, March 2008.
  The report of the IET’s Accreditation Panel, November 2004 (the panel included
  representatives of the InstMC, RAeS and EI).
  Loughborough University’s Learning and Teaching Strategy.


3. Intended Learning Outcomes

 3.1 Knowledge and Understanding:
      On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate a
      knowledge and understanding of:
     (1)   Essential mathematical methods appropriate to electronic and electrical
           engineering
     (2)   Essential principles of engineering and/or systems science appropriate to
           electronic and electrical engineering
     (3)   Basic principles of Information Technology and Communications appropriate to
           electronic and electrical engineering
     (4)   Essential design principles appropriate to relevant components, equipment and
           associated software
     (5)   Characteristics of relevant common engineering materials and components


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    (6)   Management and business practices appropriate to engineering industry
    (7)   Specific codes of practice and regulatory frameworks relevant to electronic and
          electrical engineering
    (8)   Basic operational practices and requirements for safe operation relevant to
          electronic and electrical engineering
    (9)   The professional and ethical responsibilities of engineers

    Teaching, learning and assessment strategies to enable outcomes to be
    achieved and demonstrated:

    Learning and Teaching Methods:
    Knowledge and understanding are acquired continually throughout the programme from
    a combination of lectures, timetabled and ad hoc tutorials, problem solving classes,
    laboratory exercises, coursework exercises and self-study of pre-delivered resources.
    All elements are developed and reinforced throughout the programme, particularly
    through project work undertaken in groups in Parts A and B and individually in Part C of
    the programme.
    Throughout the programme students are encouraged to undertake independent reading
    both to supplement and consolidate what is being taught and to broaden their individual
    knowledge and understanding of the subject.

    Assessment:
    Knowledge and understanding are tested and assessed throughout the programme
    using a combination of unseen written examinations, unseen multiple-choice
    examinations, written examinations based on previewed material, open-book written
    examinations based on laboratory exercises, viva-voce examinations on laboratory
    exercises, viva-voce examinations on project work, computer aided assessments,
    unseen coursework tests, open-book coursework tests, coursework assignments,
    design studies, essays and reports, laboratory logbooks, laboratory formal reports,
    project reports and/or papers, project logbooks, oral presentations, visual presentations
    and work placement reports.

3.2 Skills and other attributes:

    a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:
    On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:
    (1)   Apply standard mathematical and/or computer based methods for modelling and
          analysing practical and hypothetical engineering problems
    (2)   Model and analyse routine engineering systems, processes, components and
          products
    (3)   Develop solutions to practical engineering problems
    (4)   Integrate, evaluate and use information, data and ideas from a range of sources
    (5)   Develop systems, processes, components or products by integrating ideas from a
          range of existing sources

    Teaching, learning and assessment strategies to enable outcomes to be
    achieved and demonstrated:

    Learning and Teaching Methods:
    Cognitive skills are acquired continually throughout the programme from a combination
    of lectures, timetabled and ad hoc tutorials, problem solving classes, laboratory
    exercises, coursework exercises and self-study of pre-delivered resources. All elements
    are developed and reinforced throughout the programme, particularly through project
    work undertaken in groups in Parts A and B and individually in Part C of the programme.




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Throughout the programme students are encouraged to undertake independent reading
both to supplement and consolidate what is being taught and to help develop cognitive
skills.

Assessment:
Cognitive skills are tested and assessed throughout the programme using a combination
of unseen written examinations, unseen multiple-choice examinations, written
examinations based on previewed material, open-book written examinations based on
laboratory exercises, viva-voce examinations on laboratory exercises, viva-voce
examinations on project work, computer aided assessments, unseen coursework tests,
open-book coursework tests, coursework assignments, design studies, essays and
reports, laboratory logbooks, laboratory formal reports, project reports and/or papers,
project logbooks, oral presentations, visual presentations and work placement reports.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:
On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:
(1)   Use appropriate mathematical methods for modelling and analysing pertinent
      engineering problems
(2)   Use relevant test and measurement equipment
(3)   Execute safely conventional experimental laboratory work
(4)   Use computational tools and packages (including programming languages where
      appropriate) in familiar situations
(5)   Design, and where appropriate construct, systems, components or processes
(6)   Undertake routine testing of design ideas in the laboratory or by simulation, and
      analyse and comment on the results
(7)   Search for and retrieve information, ideas and data from a variety of sources
(8)   Manage a project
(9)   Produce technical reports, papers, diagrams and drawings

Teaching, learning and assessment strategies to enable outcomes to be
achieved and demonstrated:

Learning and Teaching Methods:
Practical skills are acquired continually throughout the programme from a combination
of problem solving classes and laboratory exercises. All elements are developed and
reinforced throughout the programme, particularly through project work undertaken in
groups in Parts A and B and individually in Part C of the programme.

Assessment:
Practical skills are tested and assessed throughout the programme using a combination
of coursework assignments, design studies, laboratory logbooks, project reports and/or
papers, project logbooks and work placement reports.

c. Key/transferable skills:
On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:
(1)   Manipulate, sort and present data in standard forms
(2)   Select and analyse appropriate evidence to solve engineering problems
(3)   Work with limited or contradictory information in the solution of familiar problems
(4)   Use an engineering and/or systems approach to the solution of problems
(5)   Be creative in problem solving
(6)   Work effectively as part of a team
(7)   Use information and communications technology



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      (8)    Manage time and resources
      (9)    Use appropriate management tools
      (10)   Communicate effectively orally, visually and in writing
      (11)   Learn effectively and continuously in a variety of environments

      Teaching, learning and assessment strategies to enable outcomes to be
      achieved and demonstrated:

      Learning and Teaching Methods:
      Key and transferable skills are acquired continually throughout the programme from a
      combination of lectures, problem solving classes, laboratory exercises, coursework
      exercises and self-study of pre-delivered resources. All elements are developed and
      reinforced throughout the programme, particularly through project work undertaken in
      groups in Parts A and B and individually in Part C of the programme.

      Assessment:
      Key and transferable skills are tested and assessed throughout the programme using a
      combination of unseen written examinations, written examinations based on previewed
      material, open-book written examinations based on laboratory exercises, viva-voce
      examinations on laboratory exercises, viva-voce examinations on project work,
      coursework assignments, design studies, essays and reports, laboratory logbooks,
      laboratory formal reports, project reports and/or papers, project logbooks, oral
      presentations, visual presentations and work placement reports.

4. Programme structures and requirements, levels, modules, credits and
   awards:
  The BEng programme in Electronic and Electrical Engineering is offered as a full-time
  course of three years or four years if taken with the optional industrial training year, which
  can lead to the additional award of Diploma in Industrial Studies (DIS).
  Full details can be found in the Programme Regulations at:
  http://www.lboro.ac.uk/admin/ar/lps/progreg/year/0910/docs/Electronic%20&%20Electrical%
  20Engineering%20BEng.doc

5. Criteria for admission to the programme:
  Candidates must satisfy the general requirements of the University, which can be found at:
      http://www.lboro.ac.uk/admin/ar/admissions/pgt/student/entrance/index.htm
  and of the Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, which can be found in the
  Undergraduate Prospectus at:
      http://www.lboro.ac.uk/prospectus/ug/courses/dept/el/eee/index.htm
  English language requirements are specified by the University’s general entrance
  requirements and can be found at:
      http://www.lboro.ac.uk/prospectus/international/englishlang.htm

6. Information about assessment:
  Candidates must satisfy the requirements set out in the University’s Senate Regulation XX
  and meet the following specific requirements:
      In order to progress from Part A to Part B and Part B to Part C candidates must obtain in
      each Part at least 40% in modules totalling 100 credits, no module marks less than 20%
      and an overall average mark of at least 40%.
      To be eligible for the award of Bachelor of Engineering, candidates must obtain in
      Part C at least 40% in modules totalling 100 credits, which must include a major
      individual project module, and no module marks less than 20%.


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   Candidates who do not satisfy these requirements have the right to undergo reassessment
   on one occasion only in any modules that have prevented progression or the award of a
   degree. This reassessment may usually be undertaken in the University’s Special
   Assessment Period (SAP) before the start of the next academic year. However, some
   modules are not available in SAP and must be undertaken in the following academic year,
   optionally with or without attendance. Any student who obtains 40% in modules totalling less
   than 60 credits in any one Part is not eligible for reassessment in the SAP.
   Candidates who undergo reassessment in the final year may not satisfy the requirements
   specified by the relevant accrediting Institutions.
   For full details of the requirements for progression and award refer to the programme
   regulations.

7. What makes the programme distinctive:
   The BEng programme in Electronic and Electrical Engineering is distinctive because it is
   designed to allow the maximum possible freedom in the choice of subject matter whilst still
   allowing the possibility of some specialisation.
   The programme is unusual in the University in that all of its teaching is extended over the
   whole academic year so that there are no compulsory examinations at the end of the first
   semester. In addition, the extensive use of 15-credit modules allows more in-depth study in
   a particular subject but does not overly restrict the range of subject matter that can be
   studied. The programme, particularly in the final year, encourages personal development by
   giving as much freedom as possible to the student to control their own learning.
   Significant sections of the taught material and project work are informed by research in the
   Department. In addition, staff are involved in pedagogic research, which influences the
   delivery and assessment methods used.
   The programme is accredited by the Institution of Engineering and Technology, the Institute
   of Measurement and Control and the Energy Institute. Other programmes in the Department
   are also accredited by the Royal Aeronautical Society and the Institution of Mechanical
   Engineers. The accreditation of the programme is affected by individual institutions’
   requirements for programme content.

8. Particular support for learning:
   Information about the Careers Centre, IT Services, the Counselling Service, the Disabilities
   and Additional Needs Service, the Engineering Education Centre, the English Language
   Support Service, the Library, the Mathematics Learning Support Centre and Staff
   Development can be found at:
      http://www.lboro.ac.uk/admin/ar/templates/notes/lps/
   Well-established links with industry offer the possibility in all the programmes offered by the
   Department of taking a one-year industrial placement after successful completion of the
   second year. This gives students the opportunity of gaining relevant practical experience in
   an engineering environment and forms the major part of the requirement for the award of
   the Diploma in Industrial Studies (DIS).
   The Department assists all those wishing to find a placement by arranging interviews, visits
   and by circulating relevant information. An Industrial Liaison Tutor is available to assist in
   this process by maintaining links with industry and holding regular seminars/tutorials where
   relevant issues can be raised. Work permits can usually be obtained through the
   Department for those students needing them.
   More information can be found at:
      http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/el/programmes/company-placements.html

9. Methods for evaluating and improving the quality and standards of
   learning:
   Information about the University’s formal quality management processes can be found at:


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http://www.lboro.ac.uk/admin/ar/templates/notes/lps/




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