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					EAST TENNESSEE STATE UNIVERSITY
     DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC
        MATHES MUSIC BUILDING

       Student Handbook
           2009 - 2010




                                1|Page
                                                          Table of Contents

Welcome ..................................................................................................................................................... page 4
Department of Music Faculty ............................................................................................................. page 5
The Department of Music .................................................................................................................... page 6
Major Fields of Study and Degrees ................................................................................................... page 6
Faculty Advisors ...................................................................................................................................... page 7
Admission and Enrollment Policies ................................................................................................. page 7
East Tennessee State University Academic Proficiency Requirements ............................ page 8
Department of Music Core Requirements for All Music Majors ........................................... page 8
Department of Music – Music Education Requirements
   Instrumental Music Education.................................................................................................... page 9
   Keyboard/Vocal Music education ............................................................................................. page 9
   Vocal Music Education ................................................................................................................ page 10
Department of Music – Music Performance Requirements
   Instrumental Performance ........................................................................................................ page 10
   Keyboard Performance .............................................................................................................. page 10
   Vocal Performance ....................................................................................................................... page 11
Teacher Education Requirements ................................................................................................. page 11
Events ....................................................................................................................................................... page 12
Student Organizations ........................................................................................................................ page 12
Music Scholarships .............................................................................................................................. page 12
Academic Performance Scholarships ........................................................................................... page 13
Public Performance Scholarships .................................................................................................. page 13
Applied Music ........................................................................................................................................ page 13
Jury Exams .............................................................................................................................................. page 14
Performance Requirements ............................................................................................................. page 14
Piano Proficiency ................................................................................................................................. page 15
Sight-Reading Proficiency................................................................................................................. page 15
Independent Musicianship ............................................................................................................... page 15
Ensembles ............................................................................................................................................... page 15
Student Recitals .................................................................................................................................... page 15
Recital Attendance ............................................................................................................................... page 17
Analytical Analysis............................................................................................................................... page 21
Historical Analysis ............................................................................................................................... page 21
Program Notes ...................................................................................................................................... page 23
New Grove Dictionary of Music – Online .................................................................................... page 24
Classical Music Library – Online Listening................................................................................. page 24
Registration ............................................................................................................................................ page 24
Adding a Course .................................................................................................................................... page 24
Dropping a Course ............................................................................................................................... page 25
Late Registration .................................................................................................................................. page 25
Class Load ............................................................................................................................................... page 25
Building Guidelines ............................................................................................................................. page 26
Student Locker Assignment ............................................................................................................. page 26
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Practice Rooms ..................................................................................................................................... page 26
Building Hours ...................................................................................................................................... page 27
Student ID Cards ................................................................................................................................... page 27
Forms ........................................................................................................................................................ page 27
Independent Study .............................................................................................................................. page 28
Change of Major .................................................................................................................................... page 29
Incomplete Grades ............................................................................................................................... page 29
Student-owned Instruments............................................................................................................ page 30
Instruments ............................................................................................................................................ page 30
Applied Music Requirements
    Bassoon ............................................................................................................................................. page 32
    Cello .................................................................................................................................................... page 34
    Clarinet.............................................................................................................................................. page 35
    Double Bass/Electric Bass ......................................................................................................... page 39
    Euphonium ...................................................................................................................................... page 41
    Flute ................................................................................................................................................... page 43
    Guitar ................................................................................................................................................. page 46
    Horn ................................................................................................................................................... page 47
    Oboe ................................................................................................................................................... page 50
    Percussion ....................................................................................................................................... page 53
    Piano .................................................................................................................................................. page 55
    Saxophone........................................................................................................................................ page 56
    Trombone ........................................................................................................................................ page 59
    Trumpet ............................................................................................................................................ page 63
    Tuba ................................................................................................................................................... page 67
    Violin/Viola ..................................................................................................................................... page 69
    Voice ................................................................................................................................................... page 71




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                   East Tennessee State University
                         Department of Music

                                      Welcome

Welcome to East Tennessee State University and the Department of Music. Throughout the
school year you’ll have questions regarding classes, recitals, graduation requirements,
juries, and performance level requirements … just to name a few. The music faculty is
ready and willing to help you every step of the way towards graduation. This handbook
will serve as an aid in answering many of your questions.

Feel free to talk with your faculty advisor anytime. You can schedule an appointment
through the Music Department Main Office, email your advisor for an appointment, or
check your advisor’s door where office hours are posted. You need to meet with your
advisor prior to every semester as you plan your course work for the following semester.
Your advisor will be extremely helpful in keeping you on track.

On behalf of all the faculty and staff … welcome! We wish you the very best as you prepare
for your future careers.


FRANK J. GRZYCH, D.M.A.,
Chair and Professor
Department of Music




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                DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC FACULTY and STAFF

Dr. Mary Dave Blackman ............................................................................... Room 305 – Phone 96948
David Bubsey ..................................................................................................... Room 015 – Phone 94277
Dr. Benjamin Caton.......................................................................................... Room 208 – Phone 94405
Dr. David Champouillon ................................................................................ Room 010 – Phone 96955
Rachel Cole ......................................................................................................... Room 301 – Phone 94278
Thomas Crawford ............................................................................................ Room 202 – Phone 94394
Dr. Alison Deadman......................................................................................... Room 201 – Phone 96432
Cherylonda Fitzgerald .................................................................................... Room 204 – Phone 94270
Dr. Frank Grzych............................................................................................... Room 100 – Phone 94270
Peter Hodges ...................................................................................................... Room 012 – Phone 94394
Dr. Chih-Long Hu .............................................................................................. Room 200 – Phone 95788
Dr. Thomas Jenrette ........................................................................................ Room 210 – Phone 96949
Robert Jeter ........................................................................................................ Room 202 – Phone 94394
Ann Jones............................................................................................................. Room 302 – Phone 94418
Gene Jones........................................................................................................... Room 012 – Phone 94394
Rhonda Mitchell ................................................................................................ Room 012 – Phone 94394
Dr. Maria Niederberger.................................................................................. Room 326 – Phone 95946
Dr. Sunjoo Oh ..................................................................................................... Room 206 – Phone 96943
Rebecca Paluzzi................................................................................................. Room 103 – Phone 96956
Jerilyn Paolini .................................................................................................... Room 302 – Phone 94418
Tara Planeta ....................................................................................................... Room 204 – Phone 94270
Dr. Rande Sanderbeck .................................................................................... Room 019 – Phone 95783
Jimmie Self .......................................................................................................... Room 013 – Phone 94274
Karen Smith ........................................................................................................ Room 300 – Phone 96954
Dr. Aryn Sweeney ............................................................................................. Room 104 – Phone 95787
Martin Walters .................................................................................................. Room 204 – Phone 94270
Dr. Christian Zembower ................................................................................ Room 014 – Phone 94296

Mrs. Patti Marlow – Executive Aide .......................................................... Room 100 – Phone 94270
Mrs. Carol Gatz – Events Coordinator ...................................................... Room 100 – Phone 94276




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                       THE DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC

The Department of Music at East Tennessee State University was established in 1946 and is
both an All Steinway School and a fully accredited member of the National Association of
Schools of Music.

The Department of Music provides specialized training in music to prepare students for
professional work or advanced study, for teaching music in the elementary and secondary
schools, and for general cultural attainment.

The curriculum of the Department of Music is designed to present the learning of music as
an integrated whole. Solo and ensemble performance, theoretical and historical studies,
concert attendance, and electives both within and outside the department are intended to
provide a balanced education.

In addition to training in the various professions of music, the department provides general
music studies and activities for the non-music major, the university, and the community.



               MAJOR FIELDS OF STUDY AND DEGREES

Undergraduate instruction in the department leads to the Bachelor of Music (B.M.) degree
with a specialization in:
    Instrumental Music Education
    Vocal Music Education
    Vocal/Keyboard Music Education
    Instrumental Performance
    Keyboard Performance
    Vocal Performance

Music education students must also complete the core courses required as part of the
professional education program. Students may also pursue a minor in music.

The Department of Music also offers training in the Suzuki method for flute. Courses in this
program meet certification guidelines of the Suzuki Association of the Americas (SAA).

The Department of Music also offers a wide variety of courses for the non-music major.
Any students can enroll in music survey and music fundamentals courses, private lessons
(depending on faculty availability), ensembles, and beginning voice classes.
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                              FACULTY ADVISORS
ETSU requires all students to be advised each semester to help ensure that students
achieve success in completing their degrees in a timely manner. All music majors will be
assigned an academic advisor upon entrance to the degree program. Students should
consult the Music Major Program Guide sheets (found on D2L and in the Department of
Music main office) for specific course requirements required in the Bachelor of Music
degree. All majors must be advised prior to registration each semester. The advisor list is
posted in the Department of Music Main Office. Music education majors should consult an
academic advisor in the College of Education for specific certification requirements.




              ADMISSION AND ENROLLMENT POLICIES

Any student seeking a degree in music at ETSU must first meet the general university
admission requirements. Once that admission is granted, the student must audition for
admission to the music degree program. Auditions are held on selected dates during the
spring, at all orientation sessions, and by appointment. (Visit the Department of Music
website at www.etsu.edu/music for specific information.)

The audition may be performed live or via videotape (if a student lives more than 250 miles
from campus). The audition is approximately 20-30 minutes in length and should
demonstrate the student’s technique and musicianship. The audition is judged by music
department faculty.

If a student meets the audition requirements and is admitted to the program, an academic
advisor will assist the student in determining courses to be taken. Students who do not
meet the audition requirements may register for applied music and for ensembles and may
audition again at a later date. It is not recommended that a student audition more than
twice without being admitted, as the student’s academic progress will be seriously delayed
if a major is not declared by the sophomore year.

Students who leave ETSU for more than a semester will need to follow the audition process
to once again be readmitted in the program. Returning students can contact the primary
applied faculty member to schedule the “return to school” audition. Refer to the
“Department of Music Faculty” section of this handbook or visit www.etsu.edu/music for
applied faculty phone numbers.




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             EAST TENNESSEE STATE UNIVERSITY ACADEMIC
                     PROFICIENCY REQUIREMENTS

Writing Intensive (WI): Students must complete a minimum of four writing-intensive
courses. At least two of these courses must be in the major field of study. At least two of
the four courses must be at the 3000-4000 level.

Oral Communication (OC): Students must complete a minimum of two oral
communication-intensive courses. At least one of these courses must be in the major field
of study.

Information Technology (T): Students must pass the information technology proficiency
exam or successfully complete CSCI 1100 "Using Information Technology" during their first
calendar year prior to accumulating 33 semester credit hours at ETSU. In addition,
students must complete at least one information technology-intensive course in the major
field of study.


            Tennessee Board of Regents General Education Requirements
                                                                    (41-42 credits)
ENGL 1010 - Critical Reading and Expository Writing .............................. 3 credit hours
ENGL 1020 - Critical Thinking and Argumentation ..................................... 3 credit hours
Communication: Oral Communications ........................................................... 3 credit hours
Mathematics ............................................................................................................ 3-4 credit hours
Natural Science .......................................................................................................... 8 credit hours
HIST 2010 - The United States to 1877 ............................................................ 3 credit hours
HIST 2020 - The United States Since 1877 ..................................................... 3 credit hours
Literature ..................................................................................................................... 3 credit hours
Fine Arts ....................................................................................................................... 3 credit hours
Humanities .................................................................................................................. 3 credit hours
Social/Behavioral Sciences ................................................................................... 6 credit hours



                         DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC
                CORE REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL MUSIC MAJORS
MUSC 1410 - Theory I ............................................................................................. 2 credit hours
MUSC 1411 - Aural Skills I ..................................................................................... 1 credit hours
MUSC 1420 - Theory II ............................................................................................ 2 credit hours
MUSC 1421 - Aural Skills II ................................................................................... 1 credit hours
MUSC 2410 - Theory III .......................................................................................... 2 credit hours
MUSC 2411 - Aural Skills III .................................................................................. 1 credit hours

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MUSC 2420 - Theory IV........................................................................................... 2 credit hours
MUSC 2421 - Aural Skills IV .................................................................................. 1 credit hours
MUSC 2540 - Music History I (OC) ..................................................................... 3 credit hours
MUSC 2550 - Music History II .............................................................................. 3 credit hours
MUSC 3540 - Music History III (WI) .................................................................. 3 credit hours
MUSC 3550 - Music History IV (WI) .................................................................. 3 credit hours
MUSC 3570 - Introduction to Conducting ....................................................... 2 credit hours
MUSC 4600 - Orchestration & Arranging......................................................... 2 credit hours



                                   DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC
                               MUSIC EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS
                        Instrumental Music Education Concentration K-12
MUSC 1040 - Class Voice OR two semesters choir ................................... 1-4 credit hours
MUSC 2010 - Class Piano III .................................................................................. 1 credit hours
MUSC 2020 - Class Piano IV .................................................................................. 1 credit hours
MUSC 2600 - String Methods ................................................................................ 2 credit hours
MUSC 2630 - Woodwind Methods...................................................................... 3 credit hours
MUSC 2660 - Brass Methods ................................................................................. 3 credit hours
MUSC 2690 - Percussion Methods...................................................................... 3 credit hours
MUSC 3590 - Instrumental Conducting ............................................................ 2 credit hours
MUSC 4560 - Jazz Pedagogy .................................................................................. 2 credit hours
MUSC 4570 - Marching Band Methods ............................................................. 2 credit hours
MUSC 4571 - Marching Band Internship ......................................................... 1 credit hours
MUSC 4580 - Organization & Administration ................................................ 2 credit hours
MUSC 4590 - Beginning Band/General Music Methods ............................. 3 credit hours
Applied Music ......................................................................................... (minimum 7 semesters)
Major Ensemble ..................................................................................... (minimum 7 semesters)
Electives ...................................................................................................................... 10 credit hours

                                 Vocal Music Education Concentration K-12
MUSC 2010 - Class Piano III .................................................................................. 1 credit hours
MUSC 2020 - Class Piano IV .................................................................................. 1 credit hours
MUSC 2710 - Diction I ............................................................................................. 1 credit hours
MUSC 2720 - Diction II ............................................................................................ 1 credit hours
MUSC 3580 - Choral Conducting ......................................................................... 2 credit hours
MUSC 4510 - Music in Elementary School....................................................... 3 credit hours
MUSC 4520 - Music in Secondary School ......................................................... 3 credit hours
MUSC 4601 - Vocal Pedagogy ............................................................................... 2 credit hours
MUSC 4730 - Choral Literature............................................................................ 2 credit hours
Applied Voice .......................................................................................... (minimum 7 semesters)
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Major Ensemble ..................................................................................... (minimum 7 semesters)
Applied Piano....................................................................................................... (three semesters)
Foreign Language .................................................................................................. (two semesters)
             (French, German or Italian - not same language studied in high school)
Electives ...................................................................................................................... 10 credit hours

                     Keyboard/Vocal Music Education Concentration K-12
MUSC 2710 - Diction I ............................................................................................. 1 credit hours
MUSC 2720 - Diction II ............................................................................................ 1 credit hours
MUSC 3580 - Choral Conducting ......................................................................... 2 credit hours
MUSC 3739 - Piano Literature I ........................................................................... 1 credit hours
MUSC 3740 - Piano Literature II ......................................................................... 1 credit hours
MUSC 4510 - Music in Elementary School....................................................... 3 credit hours
MUSC 4520 - Music in Secondary School ......................................................... 3 credit hours
MUSC 4601 - Vocal Pedagogy ............................................................................... 3 credit hours
MUSC 4617 - Teaching Beginning Piano .......................................................... 3 credit hours
MUSC 4730 - Choral Literature............................................................................ 3 credit hours
Applied Voice .......................................................................................... (minimum 5 semesters)
Ensemble .................................................................................................. (minimum 7 semesters)
Applied Piano.......................................................................................... (minimum 7 semesters)
Electives ...................................................................................................................... 11 credit hours


                                DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC
                          MUSIC PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS
                                  Instrumental Performance Concentration
MUSC 2010 - Class Piano III .................................................................................. 1 credit hours
MUSC 2020 - Class Piano IV .................................................................................. 1 credit hours
MUSC 3420 - Counterpoint ................................................................................... 3 credit hours
MUSC 3590 - Instrumental Conducting ............................................................ 2 credit hours
MUSC 47X0 - Literature in appropriate applied area ................................. 3 credit hours
MUSC 47X1 - Pedagogy in appropriate applied area .................................. 3 credit hours
Applied Music ........................................................................................................... 16 credit hours
Major Ensemble ..................................................................................... (minimum 8 semesters)
Chamber Ensemble .................................................................................................. 4 credit hours
Electives ...................................................................................................................... 10 credit hours
                                             (Electives may not include ensembles)

                                          Piano Performance Concentration
MUSC 3420 - Counterpoint ................................................................................... 3 credit hours
MUSC 3739 - Piano Literature I ........................................................................... 1 credit hours
MUSC 3740 - Piano Literature II ........................................................................ 1 credit hours
MUSC 3741 - Piano Literature III ........................................................................ 1 credit hours
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MUSC 4510 - Music in Elementary School....................................................... 3 credit hours
MUSC 4617 - Teaching beginning Piano .......................................................... 3 credit hours
MUSC 4627 - Teaching Intermediate Piano ................................................... 3 credit hours
MUSC 4637 - Piano Pedagogy Practicum ......................................................... 1 credit hours
Applied Piano............................................................................................................ 16 credit hours
Ensemble .................................................................................................. (minimum 8 semesters)
Music Electives ........................................................................................................... 3 credit hours
Electives ...................................................................................................................... 11 credit hours
                                             (Electives may not include ensembles)

                                          Vocal Performance Concentration
MUSC 2010 - Class Piano III .................................................................................. 1 credit hours
MUSC 2020 - Class Piano IV .................................................................................. 1 credit hours
MUSC 2710 - Diction I ............................................................................................. 1 credit hours
MUSC 2720 - Diction II ............................................................................................ 1 credit hours
MUSC 3420 - Counterpoint ................................................................................... 3 credit hours
MUSC 3580 - Choral Conducting ......................................................................... 2 credit hours
MUSC 4601 - Vocal Pedagogy ............................................................................... 3 credit hours
Applied Music ........................................................................................................... 16 credit hours
Major Ensemble ......................................................................................... minimum 8 semesters
Music Electives ........................................................................................................... 4 credit hours
Electives ........................................................................................................................ 5 credit hours
                                             (Electives may not include ensembles)
Foreign Language .................................................................................................(Two semesters)
             (French, German or Italian – not same language studied in high school)


                           TEACHER EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS
All music education majors must complete these courses to be certified to teach.

EDFN 2100               Orientation to the Profession of Education (1 credit)
EDFN 2300               Foundations of Education (2 credit)
EDFN 3301               Issues in Education (WI) (3 credit)
EDFN 3310               Educational Psychology (3 credit)
SPED 2300               Exceptional Learners (3 credit)
MEDA 3570               Instructional Technology (T) (2 credit)
READ 4437               Reading Instruction in Middle/Secondary School (WI) (3 credits)
CUAI 4580               Student Teaching (OC) (12 credit hours)




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                                       EVENTS

The Department of Music offers a wide variety of recitals, concerts, lectures, and other
programs by students, faculty, and distinguished guest artists. Most of the programs are
free and open to the public. The events schedule can be found at www.etsu.edu/music.



                        STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

The Department of Music encourages participation in music-related student organizations.
These organizations provide social, service and professional opportunities for both music
and non-music majors. The following active chapters are within the Department of Music

      Percussive Arts Society – Dr. Rande Sanderbeck, Advisor
      Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia – Dr. Benjamin Caton, Advisor
      Kappa Kappa Psi – Dr. Christian Zembower, Advisor
      Sigma Alpha Iota – Dr. Alison Deadman, Advisor



                            MUSIC SCHOLARSHIPS

Upon recommendation of the faculty, students may be awarded scholarships for talent in
music. Scholarship auditions are held in February and March each year. Details are
available on the department’s web page. Awards vary in size and include the following:

      Lamar Alexander Scholarship
      Elsie Artz Memorial Scholarship
      Teresa Bowers Scholarship
      Floyd Cramer Scholarship
      Ella V. Ross Scholarship
      Mary Florence and Virgil C. Self Scholarship
      ETSU Band Performance Scholarships
      ETSU Choral Performance Scholarships
      Powell Choral Scholarship
      Richard Compton Memorial Scholarship
      W. G. Patton Scholarship
      Robert LaPella Vocal Scholarship

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      Marie Hutchinson Hunter Piano Scholarship
      Topalian Jazz Scholarship
      Powell Jazz Scholarships

Other awards based on academic excellence and performance ability are also available
from the Department of Music. For more information contact the Chair, ETSU Music
Scholarship Committee.


            ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE SCHOLARSHIPS

The Academic Performance Scholarships are awarded in the amount of $3,000 annually
($1,500 per semester). Recipients must maintain an overall and semester grade point
average of 2.5, pass a minimum of 12 credits per semester, and fulfill a work requirement
in order to keep their APS through future semesters.

Students seeking an APS through the Department of Music must call (423) 439-4270 and
schedule an audition time. APS students must work approximately five hours per week for
a total of 75 hours per semester. For more information regarding Academic Performance
Scholarships should long on to www.etsu.edu/scholarships/academic.asp on the East
Tennessee State University web page.


               PUBLIC PERFORMANCE SCHOLARSHIPS

East Tennessee State University offers Public Performance Scholarships (PPS) to selected
students. These students are required to participate in public performance venues as
determined by the Department of Music. PPS recipients will receive financial support in an
amount equivalent to the out-of-state fee. Students seeking a PPS through the Department
of Music must call (423) 439-4270 and schedule an audition time. For more information
regarding Public Performance Scholarships, log on to
www.etsu.edu/admissions/residency/pps/aspx on the East Tennessee State University
web page.


                                 APPLIED MUSIC

Music education majors must register for a minimum of seven semesters of applied music
(private instruction) in their major area of performance. Performance majors must
register for a minimum or eight semesters. Lessons must be taken with a member of the
department faculty. Students may register for either one (1) or two (2) credit hours per
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semester. Each hour of credit represents a minimum of one (1) half-hour lesson and six
hours of practice per week. A fee of $150 per credit hour is assessed.

Students seeking to study guitar need to contact the Department of Music main office for
more information.

Admission to applied music is by audition only. Non-music majors may register for applied
music when faculty loads permit. All students must have permission from the applied
faculty member to register for lessons.


                                     JURY EXAMS

Applied music classes are structured so student take MUSC 18XX their freshman year and
MUSC 29XX their sophomore year. At the end of the freshman and sophomore years all
students must pass a barrier jury examination in order to advance to MUSC 29XX and/or
upper-division (MUSC 39XX) status. Students failing these juries will be placed on
probationary status and given one semester to raise their performance level to the next
level status. Students failing their second barrier jury examination will be automatically
suspended from the music program.

Jury examinations are held at the end of each semester of applied study for music majors
and minors. The purpose of the jury is to determine student progress in the performance
area, serve as a final exam, and be a benchmark performance allowing the student to
advance to the next level for applied study. Applied study for music majors and minors is
offered at three levels. Students who remain at Level I or Level II after three semesters will
be advised to change to another major. Students who are retained in the music program
are expected to achieve Level III (upper-division standing) during the third year of study,
and a minimum of two semesters of study at Level III must be successfully completed prior
to graduation.


                     PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS

All music majors must perform a solo work in public each semester. Freshman music
majors are expected to perform once during the year. “In public” includes studio class or
recital, department recital, half or full recital, or other public events as approved by the
applied instructor.




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All music majors, regardless of concentration, must perform a 30-minute half recital. Music
performance majors must also perform an hour-long full recital. A student must be
admitted to Level III prior to presenting a half or full recital.

In addition to the performance component of the recital, students must also prepare a
written document demonstrating their understanding of theoretical and historical
constructs related to the music being performed, as well as program notes. Further details
can be found in this student handbook under “Recitals.”


                              PIANO PROFICIENCY

All music majors are required to meet minimum proficiency levels on piano. Beginning
with the first semester of residence, music majors must enroll for piano study, either
through group keyboard classes or through private lessons, every semester until the piano
proficiency examination is passed. Music education majors must pass this examination
prior to student teaching.


                      SIGHT-READING PROFICIENCY

All music majors successfully pass two sight-reading proficiency examinations. The
examination is part of the jury process for advancement from one level to another.
Students advancing to Level II are expected to sight-read at Grade 7 on the Associated
Board scale; students advancing to Level III must sight-read at Grade 8.


                      INDEPENDENT MUSICIANSHIP

All music majors must demonstrate the ability to prepare a new piece of music for
performance without the assistance of a faculty member. This skill must be demonstrated
at the jury during which a student applies for admission to Level III.


                                     ENSEMBLES

Performing experience in ensembles is a vital part of the training of all musicians. Thus, all
music majors are required to participate in a major ensemble every semester of full-time
enrollment. Wind and percussion majors in the music education concentration must be in
band (wind ensemble or concert band) each semester. Performance majors may substitute

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orchestra if they hold a regular, permanent position with the Johnson City Symphony
Orchestra. String majors must enroll for string ensemble unless they hold a regular
position in the Johnson City Symphony. To enroll in an ensemble, students must first meet
with the conductor of that ensemble in order to obtain a permit to register.



                              STUDENT RECITALS
HALF RECITALS
All music majors must perform a half recital (30 minutes of music) prior to graduation.
Admission to Level III is required prior to such a performance. Repertoire for the recital
will be determined in consultation with the applied instructor. Once repertoire is selected
and your instructor feels you are ready to set up a recital, these are the steps to be
followed:

      Select a committee. Your committee must have a minimum of three faculty
       members, one of whom must be your applied instructor. It is recommended that at
       least one of the other members be from the same performance area.
      Select works for your History & Analysis Project (see the Graduation Requirements
       section for details) and begin work on those according to the guidelines provided.
      Download the Recital Application Form from the D2L site.
      Select a date for your recital hearing and for the recital itself.
           o The hearing is a preliminary review of your recital to assess whether you will
               be ready to perform on the scheduled recital date.
           o The hearing must be held at least two weeks prior to the recital date; the
               same committee will review both the hearing and the recital.
           o See the Events Coordinator in the music office to check available dates.
      Complete the appropriate sections of the Recital Application Form and print the
       form for signatures.

At the hearing, you must provide your committee with printed copies of your History &
Analysis Project, as well as copies of all music to be performed. The hearing will be
videotaped for your use in making final preparations for the recital. The committee will
determine whether you will be ready to perform by the scheduled recital date. If the
committee feels you will not be ready, you must conduct a second hearing and reschedule
your recital.

When your hearing is successful, you must provide program information to the Events
Coordinator. A format for the recital program is provided in the Forms section of the D2L
site. You must provide the required information in Microsoft Word (available on all lab and
SmartRoom computers) and submit the file by e-mail to Music Department Events
Coordinator. Program information is due no later than one week prior to the event. A
proof of the program will be given to your instructor for final review.


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The Department of Music will provide the following standard services for recitals held in
Mathes Hall:

      Setup of sound shell
      Chairs, stands and piano (if needed)
      CD recording; one copy is made for the student, one for the faculty member
      Ushers
      Accompanist: two one hour rehearsals ($50 per rehearsal) and the recital
       performance ($100). Any additional rehearsals are paid for by the student.

The Department does not provide:

      Multiple copies of CD recordings. This is a violation of copyright law and our
       ASCAP/BMI contracts.
      Projection or other multimedia services.

Videotaping of recitals is available upon request. Videotapes are in VHS-C format.

Performers are responsible for making arrangements for special set-up or changes in set-
up during the recital. The performer must meet with the assigned stage manager or with
the Events Coordinator at least 24 hours in advance of the event to review stage
management needs.

FULL RECITALS
Performance majors are required to complete a full recital (60 minutes of music) prior to
graduation. Music education majors may elect to do a full recital. Information for the Full
Recital is the same as for Half Recitals, except that the History & Analysis component is
done only for the half recital.

                            RECITAL ATTENDANCE
Music majors must complete a minimum of seven (7) semesters of recital attendance. The
record of that attendance will be maintained in the department office. To receive credit for
attendance, submit the program for the concert (ticket stub if no program was available; if
no tickets were issued, submit a note with the name(s) of the performer(s), date of
performance, location of performance) to the music department office. Be sure to clearly
print your name on the program. If you want the program back after credit is posted, leave
a note to that effect.

Standards for attendance each semester are as follows:

      Students must attend a minimum of twelve (12) acceptable events.
      A minimum of three (3) events must be professional performances. See the list
       below for clarification of professional and non-professional.

                                                                                  17 | P a g e
      At least three (3) of those events must be in a medium outside the student's major
       performance area. For example, voice majors must attend at least three
       instrumental (including piano) concerts.
      A maximum of three (3) events may be elementary or secondary school programs.
      No credit is granted for events in which the student is a performer; the exception
       would be performance on a studio recital or a joint performance by two or more
       ensembles.
      Credit for performances not described below must be approved by the student's
       applied instructor.
      Students who do not attend the required number and type of performances in a
       given semester will receive a grade of Incomplete in their applied lesson until the
       requirement is met.

Professional Performances

      Johnson City Symphony
      Symphony of the Mountains
      Knoxville Symphony
      Other professional orchestras
      Professional choirs/bands (e.g., military ensembles)
      Professional ballets with live musicians
      Professional opera and musical theatre
      Faculty recitals
      Guest artist recitals
      Professional jazz groups

Non-professional Performances

      Community band/choir/orchestra
      Student recitals
      College band/choir/orchestra
      Local private studio recitals
      Community/university musical theatre
      Public school band/choir/orchestra

Unacceptable Performances

      Popular artist concerts, such as rock bands, country singers, etc.
      Church choirs, unless it is a performance of a classical work, such as a Handel
       oratorio or a Bach cantata




                                                                                  18 | P a g e
                            ANALYTICAL ANALYSIS
General Guidelines

      An analytical paper discusses the workings of music itself. It refers to the form,
       harmony and syntax of a musical work.
      An analytical paper needs to take musical style into consideration and might,
       therefore, refer briefly to the historical background of the work in question.
       However, this portion should not exceed one paragraph.

Requirements

      Limit yourself to discussion of one movement.
      The paper should be a minimum of 1,000 words. It may include musical examples
       (on staff lines), a diagram of the movement, and a bibliography. A bibliography is
       necessary if you include ideas and quotes other than your own.
      If you are using musical examples, you may add them as an appendix. In this case,
       number the examples and refer to them in the text.
      In discussions about specific passages, please refer to measure numbers.
      The paper must be typed and should be double-spaced.
      The paper must show the author’s (your) name.
      The title and movement of the work you are discussing must be prominently visible.
       The name of the composer must be listed as well.

Please submit

      The paper
      An annotated score with measure numbers (preferably at each beginning staff
       system)
      A complete chordal analysis

Preparing to Write

      Familiarize yourself with the music. If the work is for solo instrument and
       accompaniment, read through a score that includes all the music. The music itself
       must be firmly embedded in your mind before the analysis begins.
      You may find essays, articles, and quotes on your topic. Read them and take notes
       on useful information. List the sources you have consulted. (Never present the
       ideas and work of other authors as your own.) Plagiarism will result in a failing
       grade for the recital.
      Provide your music with measure numbers and refer to them in your discussion.

Analysis I: Basic Information You Need to Know

      Analyze the chords, taking into consideration that harmonies (keys) will shift.

                                                                                   19 | P a g e
      First find the main sections and establish the overall form of the movement.
      Find the phrases (cadences). Do they follow a four-bar pattern or are they
       irregular? Ask yourself whether cadences are conclusive or inconclusive. Look at
       the harmonic direction of phrases: do they stay in the key or do they introduce a
       modulation? (Does the harmonic direction shift?) Do you discover sequences?
      Examine the melodic lines (bass as well as soprano, sometimes inner voices). Take
       the range into consideration. Discuss expressiveness or mood of the music. Discuss
       prominent (recurring) themes. Is the writing imitative? Does counterpoint come
       into the picture?
      Examine the writing style: is it idiomatic for the instrument(s)/voice(s) in question?
       How does the composer explore the colors and characteristic sounds of the
       instrument(s)/voice(s)?
      If there is a text associated with the music (vocal piece), discuss the relationship of
       the text and music. This may include a correlation of text with certain melodic ideas,
       harmonic shifts and surprises, textures, rhythms, harmonic rhymes, etc.
      The motivic content of a work brings to bear the small details that contribute to the
       overall coherence of a work. Establish melodic, rhythmic, and/or harmonic motives.
       (You may limit your discussion to one or the other, if indicated.)
      Examine the texture of the music and how it changes. Are there textural changes
       that support the structure of the movement?

Analysis II: Getting the Big Picture

      A diagram is a creative representational overview of a movement. Fashion a
       meaningful diagram of the movement you are discussing. It must contain the title of
       the piece and movement and the name of the composer. The diagram should
       represent all major sections (measure numbers and labels). A diagram must also
       refer to harmony. It must show the main key and shifts in harmony (key changes).
      If you are pleased with your diagram, you might add it to your paper. A well-
       conceived diagram is worth hundreds of words.
      Create a framework for your paper. It provides the boundaries of discussion and will
       help you to structure your paper.
      Decide on the points you want to discuss. Create a plan for the discussion.

Writing the Paper
TITLE: Find a title that will engage the reader and refer to the framework of your
discussion.
AUTHOR: List your name below the title
INTRODUCTION: Provide a brief background for the composition. Explain your framework
or idea of discussion.
MAIN BODY: Think of an optimal organization for your discussion. You might discuss the
piece by successive sections of the movement. Your discussion might also be organized by
topics. You might come up with an original plan of your own. The first sentence of each
paragraph must refer to the content and topic of the paragraph. In the course of discussion,
you may refer to the findings of other analysts; however, you must give credit to the
sources. Stay within the topic. You do not have to write about every discovery that you
                                                                                  20 | P a g e
have made.
CONCLUSION: Summarize how your findings support your framework or ideas. Give your
last sentence power. It should convince a reader that you have accomplished a true
understanding of the music.

                            HISTORICAL ANALYSIS
General Guidelines:

      Target audience: your committee
      Finished length of combined papers (historical place and performance practice): c.
       1,000 words

Choose your topic in conjunction with your applied instructor and members of your recital
committee as appropriate (see Writing About Music, pp. 19-23). This may be the work that
you have analyzed for the theoretical analysis or may be a different work selected from
your recital program. You may also elect to look at the historical place of one work and the
performance practice of another.

Things to consider when preparing to discuss the historical place of a work:

      Determine the historical period in which the work was written
      Identify the genre (aria, art song, sonata, concerto, waltz, bagatelle, etc.)
      Find out what was typical at the time for this genre and compare your piece to what
       was typical.
      Do the same thing for the composer. Locate the work within her/his output and
       decide if it is typical or atypical. Support your arguments.
      You should also ask yourself what is important about this work: Is it the only piece
       in the repertoire by this composer for your instrument? Does it display a particular
       technique or show off your instrument to good advantage?

Things to consider when preparing to discuss the performance practice of a work:

      Does the instrument this work was written for differ from your own? If so, how?
      How do these differences affect the way the music might sound or how
       difficult/easy it is to perform?
      Are there any ornaments in your music? How would a performer of the time have
       interpreted them? Would a performer of the time have added ornaments that a
       modern performer chooses not to? (This is especially true for music of the Baroque
       and Classical periods.)
      How are you interpreting articulation (Stravinsky staccato versus Mozart staccato,
       for example) or rubato to reflect the performance tradition of the time in which this
       piece was written?
      Does this piece call for any extended techniques (Sprechstimme, multiphonics, key
       “popping”)? Find out and explain as much as you can about them.

                                                                                 21 | P a g e
Mechanics:

     Type your papers using a word processor, preferably Microsoft Word.
     Place your name clearly on the front page.
     Include the total number of words (not including your bibliography) on the last
      page.
     All direct and indirect quotations must be attributed in footnotes. Plagiarism will
      result in a failing grade for the project.
          o Plagiarism is defined as follows by Henry Campbell Black in Black’s Law
              Dictionary (West Publishing Company, St. Paul, Minnesota, 1968), p. 1308:
              "The act of appropriating the literary composition of another, or parts or
              passages of his writings, or the ideas or language of the same, and passing
              them off as the product of one’s own mind."
          o Please refer to the ETSU student handbook (Spectrum, found online and in
              the back of the ETSU telephone directory) "Academic Misconduct" section
              under "Policies and Regulations." Please also read the section on plagiarism
              in Writing About Music, pp. 23-25.
     Writing About Music (hereafter referred to as WAM) provides you with excellent
      guidelines for this assignment. All students who have taken upper division music
      history should have a copy of this text. There is a reference copy in the library of the
      Writing and Communication Center.
     Gather your materials (see WAM, pp. 24-34). Remember recordings and scores!
      Write out your bibliography.
     Every paper must have a bibliography.
          o This should consist of all the sources you have used to prepare your
              assignment, not merely those from which you have quoted
          o You must have at least four (4) items in your bibliography.
          o Electronic resource: Please annotate every electronic source that you use,
              letting your committee know why you feel this is a trustworthy source, and
              make sure that no more than half your resources are electronic.
          o You may not use ANY general encyclopedias (e.g. Encarta or Encyclopedia
              Britannia).
          o You MAY use specialized music dictionaries and encyclopedias, but no more
              than two of them, and one of these must always be one of the New Grove
              dictionaries in their current edition.
          o You may use as many articles as you like out of any of these specialized music
              dictionaries and encyclopedias, but it will still only count as ONE source. For
              example, you might have used three different articles from the New Grove
              Dictionary of American Music, all of which need to be cited separately in your
              bibliography, but this will only count as ONE source toward your required
              four sources.
          o If you are having problems finding sources, please ask for help!
     Listen to your work, get to know the score, and make sure you understand how the
      piece is put together. Make notes of your own thoughts and questions about the
      work.


                                                                                  22 | P a g e
      Locate your work and composer in his/her historical time period (Baroque,
       Twentieth-century, etc.).
      Critically read the materials you have collected.
      Write a detailed outline (see WAM, pp. 35-38). Revise it. Your introduction should be
       no more than half a page long and should set the scene for the rest of your paper.
       (You should not spend the first three pages writing about the life story of the
       composer!)
      Write a first version (see WAM, pp. 38-43). Remember to include a title that makes
       your reader want to read your paper!
      This would be an excellent time to use the Writing and Communication Center for
       some feedback. Edit and revise your first version (see WAM, pp. 44-48). Remember
       to include footnotes where needed (see WAM, pp. 62-70), musical examples, and
       your bibliography (see WAM, pp. 70-75).

                                PROGRAM NOTES
Program notes must be prepared for all works presented in the recital. These notes will be
included in the printed program for the recital; they may be edited for length for the
program itself.

      Target audience: the general public
      Finished length: 750 words (c. 3 pages)

Before you begin to write about the music:

      Discover all you can about the genres the composers are using. Was the composer
       being innovative? (New Grove is an excellent place to look for reasonably concise
       information on a single genre)
      Look at the music. Analyze it. Make sure you understand the structure of the works
       you wish to write about.
      Decide what you want to teach your audience: good program notes are always
       educational!
      Keep your eyes open for any anecdotes about the composers or works that would
       help bring your program notes to life. Remember, you are writing for a general
       audience, some of whom may never have heard of your composers.
      Can you find out anything about the first performances? (New Grove will give you
       the basics for many works).
      If the works in your program have text, you may wish to include the text and a
       translation, if appropriate; however, this should not appear in the body of the
       program notes (i.e. they may not be counted as part of your 750 words).
      Program notes do not usually have footnotes. The rules about plagiarism still apply,
       however! If you are in doubt, ask.
      There is some excellent information on writing program notes in Writing About
       Music on pages 86-92. Please read the citation.


                                                                                 23 | P a g e
          NEW GROVE DICTIONARY OF MUSIC - ONLINE

You can now access the New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians ONLINE from
anywhere, on or off campus. Go to Sherrod Library’s Home Page – click on “Research
Tools” (top left of the screen) and select “Find Articles.” This takes you to a page where you
can “Browse Databases by Name” – click on “G” and then select “Grove Music Online.” If
you are off campus you will be required to enter your ETSU email name and library card
number.



        CLASSICAL MUSIC LIBRARY - ONLINE LISTENING
You can listen to a large selection of recorded music online. Follow the instruction for the
Grove Music Online, but instead of selecting the letter “G” to browse, select “C” and click on
“Classical Music Library”. This will take you to ETSU’s online music subscription service,
where you can listen to or even download your favorite Classical pieces. (You have to pay
to download, but not to listen.)



                                   REGISTRATION
Registration is the responsibility of the student to register for the appropriate courses each
semester. All students must meet with their advisor prior to registration. It is important
that students stay informed of when particular classes are to be offered so that they can
stay on track with regard to completion of the degree. Advisors exist to guide students, but
ultimately, the student is responsible for making appropriate enrollment decisions.
Advisors within the Department of Music have been assigned to help guide students.
Please refer the “Faculty Advisor” section of the handbook for more information.

                                ADDING A COURSE
The following is per East Tennessee State University Policy: A course(s) may be added
during the late registration/late add period without special permission, unless the course
has reached the established maximum enrollment. To add any class that has reached the
enrollment limit requires permission of the instructor and department chair. After the late
registration/late period, special permission must be obtained from the instructor, the
department chair, the dean, and the registrar. Please go to “Late Registration” in this
student handbook for the proper procedures.




                                                                                   24 | P a g e
                              DROPPING A COURSE
The following is per East Tennessee State University Policy: A course(s) may be
dropped during the first eight calendar weeks of a regular semester.

   Courses dropped during the first two weeks will not appear on the student’s permanent
    record.
   Students who drop a course after the second full week of classes through the eighth
    calendar week will receive the grade of “W”,
   After the eighth week, a student may not drop a course except when verifiable,
    extenuating circumstances can be demonstrated. Verifiable extenuating circumstances
    are reasons beyond the control of the student such as illness or accidental injury. Poor
    performance in a class is not an extenuating circumstance,
   Students seeking permission for late drops must present a petition to the dean of the
    college or school in which they are majoring as of the beginning of the semester.
   If a late drop is approved, the student will receive a grade of “W” (Withdrawn) or “WF”
    (withdrawn-Failing), as assigned by the instructor of the course.

                              LATE REGISTRATION
Is it past the second week of school? Do you still need to add a class? Here’s the process:

       Go to the appropriate dean’s office for your major. In the Arts & Sciences (including
        Music), the dean is in the Academic Resource Center (ARC) in the Culp Center
       Request a late add form. (They will probably go through the process with you.)
       Fill out the appropriate information at the top, including a reason that you are
        adding the course late.
       Get the signature of the instructor for the course you wish to add.
       Get a signature from the chair of the department in which the course is offered.
       Take the signed form back to the dean's office where you originally got it.
       Once it's signed by the dean, take the form to the Office of the Registrar to be
        officially enrolled.



                                     CLASS LOAD
The following is per East Tennessee State University Policy: To be able to graduate in
the tradition four-year time frame, students should plan to take a course load of 15-17
hours per semester. The minimum course load for a full-time enrollment is 12 semester
hours. The maximum course load is 19 semester hours, unless permission for an overload
is approved. Please note that music education students will not graduate in the traditional
four-year (eight-semester) time frame due to teacher licensure requirements.


                                                                                  25 | P a g e
                             BUILDING GUIDLINES
Hours of Operation: Mathes Hall is open to all campus students from 7:00 am until 11:00
pm. Students needing to access the building for practice and/or study purposes can enter
the building using the security doors on either side of Mathes Hall. The code for these
doors can be obtained from your applied instructor. Students wanting to use the practice
rooms will need to have their student ID card encrypted with the proper information.
Please read the “Practice Room” section of this handbook.

Emergencies: In the event of an emergency, Department of Music personnel are
instructed to call the University Police. Students are encouraged to do the same if they
witness suspicious or harmful behavior after Department of Music office hours.

Food/Smoking: Food and drinks are not allowed in practice rooms, rehearsal hall,
classrooms. Please limit food items to the entryways of Mathes Hall. Additionally, ETSU is
a “SMOKE FREE” campus. Smoking is not permitted in any building.

Lockers: Students wishing to use a locker for instrument storage should read the “Student
Locker Assignment” section of this handbook.



                     STUDENT LOCKER ASSIGNMENT
Students wanting to use a music locker in Mathes Hall need to make a request in the
Department of Music Main Office. A student will then be assigned a locker and receive the
locker combination. All lockers must be emptied and cleaned no later than graduation
Saturday.



                                PRACTICE ROOMS
Practice rooms are located on the third floor of Mathes Hall. Four of these rooms are
designed specifically for piano majors and have Steinway Grand pianos. The other practice
rooms are open to all music majors and have a keyboard and computer. The computer has
the necessary software that is used for various music classes (Smartware and Finale).
Students can enter these practice rooms using their student ID cards. However, you must
first do the following:
     Report to the Department of Music Main Office,
     Receive the proper paperwork allowing you access to the practice rooms,
     Take the signed paperwork to the Student ID Office in the Culp Center,
     Present your paperwork to the staff at the Student ID Office,

                                                                                  26 | P a g e
      Your student ID card will then set-up to allow you access to the practice rooms,
      Due to security reasons this will need to be accomplished every semester,

These practice rooms are for the convenience of music students only. It gives music
students a place to study and practice outside of class. After you are finished, keep the
rooms locked and clean for the next music student to use.



                                 BUILDING HOURS

Mathes Hall is unlocked from 7:00 AM until 11:00 PM. In order for students to have a place
to practice in the late evenings and early mornings, Mathes Hall can be accessed through
the two basement doors. These doors have a cyfer lock on them. Student can receive the
code through the Department of Music Main Office or by asking your Applied Music
Professor. Mathes Hall is locked for security reasons and for your safety. Non-music
majors (friends, etc.) are not allowed in Mathes Hall after the building has been secured.



                               STUDENT ID CARDS
Every student will be given a student ID card. This card will allow music majors access to
the practice rooms on the third floor. Each practice room has an ID card lock on the door,
much like a hotel room. Visit the Department of Music Main Office to receive the
paperwork necessary to have the back of your student ID card inscribed for access to the
practice rooms. Once you receive the necessary paperwork you will need to take this
paperwork to the Student ID Office in the Culp Center.


                                         FORMS

The following forms can be found in the Department of Music Main Office and online at
D2L:

      Academic Performance Scholarship Appeal Form
      Add/Drop Form
      Advisement Record Form
      Applied Level II Admission Form
      Applied Level III Admission Form
      Audition Report Form
                                                                                   27 | P a g e
      Class Absence Authorization Form
      Curriculum Completion Forms
      Bachelor of Music
          o Instrumental Music Education Major Degree Form
          o Vocal Music Education Major Degree Form
          o Vocal/Keyboard Education Major Degree Form
          o Performance Major Degree Form
          o Minor in Music Form
      Hope Scholarship Eligibility Information Form
      Independent Musician Jury Form
      Independent Study Contract Form
      JURY FORMS
          o Brass Jury Form
          o Percussion Jury Form
          o Piano Jury Form
          o String Jury Form
          o Vocal Jury Form
          o Woodwind Jury Form
      Late Drop Petition Form
      Recital Application Form
      Recital/Concert Scheduling Form
      Request for Taxpayer Identification Substitute W-9 Form
      Room Scheduling Form
      Scholarship Application Form
      Undergraduate Change of Major Form
      Weekly Schedule Form



                             INDEPENDENT STUDY

Students seeking to enroll in an independent study course must first complete an
Independent Study Form (found in the Department of Music Main Office and online at D2L).
The student must then find a faculty member who is willing to teach the requested course.
The student and the faculty member will then come to an agreement regarding course
content, meeting times, and requirements for successful completion. When the faculty
member agrees to teach the requested class, he/she will sign the form and you will then
bring the form to the Department of Music Main Office. The Department of Music will then
request, from the Registrar’s Office, that the class be built in the BANNER system. Once the
Department of Music receives official notification that the class has been built together with
                                                                                    28 | P a g e
the CRN number, the student may then register for the class. NOTE: Classes will only be
built with the signed approval of the instructor. The signed form will then be placed in the
music student’s “music major folder.”


                               CHANGE OF MAJOR

Student are accepted to the Department of Music based on an entrance audition and
interview with the appropriate faculty. Students wishing to change their major are
required to make a Change of Major request in writing using the appropriate form available
in the Department of Music office. That form will then be presented to the Registrar’s
Office.

Students who want to change their major instrument/voice will have to re-audition on the
new instrument/voice for re-acceptance into the Department of Music program. Just
because a student is a current music major does not automatically qualify them for the
Department of Music when they change instrument/voice. The process of acceptance to
the Department of Music will be followed as if the student were new to the university.


                             INCOMPLETE GRADES

The following is per East Tennessee State University Policy: The incomplete grade
indicates that a student was passing the course at the end of the semester, but due to
circumstances beyond the student’s control, was unable to complete a course requirement
such as a term paper, outside reading assignment, project, or an examination. It also
indicates that the student received consent from the instructor to complete the work for
which an “I” grade was given. The “I” grade is not to be used to allow a student to do
additional work to raise a deficient grade or to repeat the course.

Following consultation with the student, the instructor will determine the date by which
the incomplete shall be removed, but in no case will the date exceed one calendar year or
the time of graduation, whichever is earlier. After this period, the incomplete grade
becomes an “F” and is recorded on the student’s academic record. Incomplete grades are
not removed until the new grade is recorded in the Office of the Registrar.




                                                                                  29 | P a g e
                    STUDENT-OWNED INSTRUMENTS
Students are encouraged to insure their personal instruments against theft and damage.


                                  INSTRUMENTS
Students majoring in music should, at this point in time, own a personal instrument.
Should a student need an instrument, a request can be made through either the Band Office
(Room 14 for a wind instrument) or the Strings Office (Room 204 for a string instrument).
Students are responsible for the loss and/or damage of a loaned instrument. In order to
secure an instrument, all students will need to sign a form stating that they are responsible
for the safe keeping and return of the instrument at the end of the semester. The Band
Office and Strings Office will establish deadlines on when school-owned instruments are to
be returned. Students needing a locker to store a school-owned instrument should go to
the “Locker Assignment” section of this student handbook.




                                                                                  30 | P a g e
East Tennessee State University

     Department of Music

 Applied Music Requirements

      Levels I, II, and III



           Bassoon
             Cello
           Clarinet
         Double Bass
         Euphonium
            Flute
            Guitar
            Horn
            Oboe
         Percussion
            Piano
         Saxophone
          Trombone
           Trumpet
            Tuba
         Violin/Viola
            Voice




                                  31 | P a g e
                                East Tennessee State University
                                      Department of Music
                        Proficiency Requirements for Applied Bassoon

                         APPLIED BASSOON LEVEL I – MUSC 1811
              Students should study at this level no more than three semesters.
General factors for evaluation:
 Correct embouchure
 Correct fingerings throughout the full range of the instrument
 Characteristic tone quality in all registers
 Proper playing position
 Articulation: clear attack, staccato, legato, single tongue
 Accurate rhythmic execution
 Ability to read music fluently
 Sight reading

Technique:
 Major scales, full range of instrument (Bb below bass clef staff to Ab1 above middle C) at quarter = 120 in
   eighth notes, memorized
 Basic reed making: adjustments of existing reeds, explanation of entire process
 Knowledge of musical terms occurring in all exercises, etudes, and repertoire

Etudes:
 Weissenborn Method for the Bassoon, up to at least the Milde studies on page 89

Repertoire:
 J.C. Bach, Six Suites
 Elgar, Romance
 Galliard, Sonatas
 Telemann, Sonata in F minor; Sonata in Eb major


                        APPLIED BASSOON LEVEL II – MUSC 2911
            Students should reach this level no later than their fourth semester.
Technique:
 Development of full dynamic range with controlled tone color and dynamics
 Sight-reading
 All major scales and chromatic scale, range of the instrument, in sixteenth notes, quarter = 100
 Major arpeggios, memorized, range of the instrument, at quarter = 120 in eighth notes
 Natural and harmonic minor scales, memorized, range of the instrument, at quarter = 120 in eighth notes
 Range should be from low Bb to C2
 Knowledge of musical terms occurring in all exercises, etudes, and repertoire
 Make at least one working reed without teacher assistance

Etudes:
 Weissenborn Method for the Bassoon, complete
 Milde Concert Studies

Repertoire:
 Bozza, Fantasie

                                                                                                32 | P a g e
    Frackenpohl, Concerto for Bassoon and Band
    Hindemith, Sonata for Bassoon
    Ibert, Carignane
    Gordon Jacob, Four Sketches for Bassoon; Partita
    Phillips, Concert Piece (with band accompaniment)


                       APPLIED BASSOON LEVEL III – MUSC 3911
    Students must reach Level III before presenting their half or full graduation recital.
Technique:
 Development of tone color palette appropriate to styles of music encountered at this level
 Sight-reading
 Melodic minor, pentatonic and blues scales, memorized
 Diminished 7th and minor arpeggios, memorized
 Interval studies, memorized
 Knowledge of musical terms occurring in all exercises, etudes, and repertoire
 Ornamentation and improvisation of cadenza materials
 Reed independence
 Range from low Bb to D2

Etudes:
 Milde Concert Studies, Vols. 1 and 2, complete
 Vaulet, 20 Studies for Bassoon
 Gambaro, 18 Studies

Repertoire:
 Malcolm Arnold, Fantasy
 Bozza, Burlesque
 Hummel, Bassoon Concerto in F major
 Mozart, Concerto, K. 191
 Milde, Concertino
 Osborne, Rhapsody for Bassoon
 Persichetti, Parable
 Petrovic, Passacaglia in Blue
 Pizzi, A Prayer for Simon
 Reicha, Sonata in Bb major
 Rimsky-Korsakov/Waterhouse, Flight of the Bumble Bee
 Saint-Saëns, Sonata for Bassoon
 Weber, Concerto in F major




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  CELLO REQUIREMENTS




                           34 | P a g e
                                 East Tennessee State University
                                       Department of Music
                         Proficiency Requirements for Applied Clarinet

                         APPLIED CLARINET LEVEL I – MUSC 1811
              Students should study at this level no more than three semesters.
Upon completion of study at Level Ine and before passing to level two, students will be required to
demonstrate the following:

Skills:
 Correct embouchure
 Balanced and relaxed playing positions both seated and standing
 Characteristic tone quality throughout the range E to G3
 Correct breathing and breath support
 Articulation – clear attacks
 Correct hand position
 Knowledge of standard fingerings (including standard alternative/chromatic fingerings) from E to G3
 Preparation and performance of repertoire with piano accompaniment
 Knowledge of musical terms occurring in all exercise, etudes, and repertoire


Sight-reading:
 Fluent sight-reading at a level equivalent to the standard set by the Associated Board of the Royal Schools
    of Music grade 7


Scales: [Memorized]
 Demonstrate fluency in the following scales and arpeggios in eighth notes
 Tempo: Minimum of quarter note = 80
 Articulation: Both slurred (legato) and tongued (detached) [Note students are not expected to play
    staccato scales at this level]
 Major scales: All major scales two octaves, E, F, F-sharp and G three octaves
 Minor scales: All minor scales in natural and harmonic forms for two octaves; E, F, F-sharp and G for
    three octaves
 Arpeggios: the common chords of the above keys with the same ranges.
 Chromatic Scale: starting on E, F, F-sharp or G for three octaves

Technique:
The following list gives a sample of the type and difficulty of etudes that a student will work on while studying
at Level I and should be able to demonstrate fluent performance of before advancement to Level II.

   Dubois, Pierre-Max: Sonata Brève for Clarinet solo, 3rd movement, Andante semplice
   Gates, Everrett: Odd Meter Etudes
   Hite, David: Melodious and Progressive Studies
   Rose, C.: Thirty-Two Etudes
   Jettle, Rudolph: Preliminary Studies to the Accomplished Clarinetist, vol. 1 & 3
   Klosé, H: Celebrated Method
   Langenus, G.: Complete Method, vol. 3
   Opperman, Kalman: Modern Daily Studies 3 vols.




                                                                                                   35 | P a g e
Repertoire:
The following list gives a sample of the type and difficulty of repertoire that a student will work on while
studying at Level I and should be able to demonstrate fluent performance of before advancement to Level II.

   Arnold, Malcolm: Sonatina for Clarinet, 2nd movement, Andantino
   Brahms, Johannes: Sonata in E flat, Op. 36, 2nd movement, Appassionato, ma non troppo Allegro.
   Finzi, Gerald: Prelude no. 1 from 5 Bagatelles
   Gade, Niels W.: Allegro vivace: no. 2 from Fantasiestüke, Op. 43
   Hindemith, Paul: Sonata for Clarinet, 1st movement, Mässig bewegt
   Horovitz, Joseph: Sonatina, 2nd movement, Lento, quasi andante
   Krommer: Concerto in E flat, Op. 36, 2nd movement, Adagio.
   Lefèvre: Sonata no. 2 in G minor: 1st movement, Allegro ma non troppo; OR Sonata no. 5 in C minor, 1st
    movement, Allegro ma non troppo.
   Lutoslawski, Witold: Dance Preludes, no. 4, Andante; OR no. 2, Andantino
   Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus: Clarinet Quintet K. 581, 3rd movement - Minuet and Trio 2; OR 2nd
    movement, Larghetto.
   Alan Ridout: Sonatina for Clarinet: 3rd movement
   Saint-Saëns, Camile: Sonata in E flat, Op. 167, 2nd movement, Andante con moto; OR 1st movement,
    Allegretto.
   Schumann, Robert: Fantasiestüke, Op. 73, no. 1
   Weber, Carl Maria von: Grand Duo Concertante Op. 48, 2nd movement, Andante con moto


                       APPLIED CLARINET LEVEL II – MUSC 2911
           Students should reach this level no later than their fourth semester.
Upon completion of study at level two and before passing to Level III students will be required to
demonstrate the following:

Skills:
 Phrasing – phrases should show melodic motion, have clearly defined/audible goals and begin and end
    appropriately
 Embouchure – a flexible embouchure that can accommodate wide musical intervals
 Articulation - clean, clear staccato; ability to vary the length of staccato notes
 Stylistic accuracy – students should be able to demonstrate the basic stylistic differences between music
    written in different time periods (late baroque, Classical, Romantic, Twentieth/Twenty-first century)
 Demonstrate an ability to vary the tone color at will
 Voicing – demonstrate correct voicing throughout the range of the instrument
 Full dynamic range with controlled tone color
 Knowledge of musical terms occurring in all exercise, etudes, and repertoire
 Knowledge of alternate fingerings for the altissimo register that best suit the student’s
    instrument/mouthpiece combination


Sight Reading:
 Fluent sight-reading at a level equivalent to the standard set by the Associated Board of the Royal Schools
    of Music grade 8

Transposition:
 Students will demonstrate the ability to transpose at sight on B-flat clarinet a simple melody written at
   concert pitch.

Scales: [Memorized]
 Develop fluency in the following scales and arpeggios in sixteenth-notes
                                                                                                 36 | P a g e
    Tempo: Minimum of quarter-note = 80
    Articulation: Slurred (legato), articulated (various lengths and articulation patterns)
    All scales as listed for Level I plus
    Minor scales: All melodic minor scales for two octaves those starting on E, F, F-sharp and G for three
     octaves
    Chromatic scales: Two octaves starting on any note; three octaves: starting on E, F, F-sharp and G
    Dominant sevenths: All keys for two octaves; those starting on E, F, F-sharp and G for three octaves
    Diminished sevenths: starting on any note; E-F-sharp (three octaves)

Technical Studies:
The following list gives a sample of the type and difficulty of etudes that a student will work on while studying
at Level II and should be able to demonstrate fluent performance of before advancement to Level III.

    Cavallini, Ernesto: Thirty Caprices
    Jean Jean, Paul: Twenty Melodic and Progressive Etudes
    Perier, A. Thirty Etudes
    Polatschek, Victor: Twelve Etudes
    Rose, C: Forty Études
    Stark, Robert: Twenty-Four Grand Virtuoso Etudes, Op. 51 2 vols.
              o Twenty-Four Studies, Op. 49


Repertoire:
The following list gives a sample of the type and difficulty of repertoire that a student will work on while
studying at level two and should be able to demonstrate fluent performance of before advancement to Level
III.

    Arnold, Malcolm: Sonatina for Clarinet, 1st movement, Allegro con brio
    Bernstein, Leonard: Sonata, 1st movement, Grazioso
    Brahms, Johannes: Sonata in F minor, Op. 120 no. 1, 4th movement, Vivace; OR sonata in E flat, Op. 120,
     no.2, 1st movement, Allegro amabile
    Cooke, Arnold: Sonata in b flat, 1st movement, Allegro moderato; OR 2nd movement, Scherzando; OR 4th
     movement, Molto Vivace
    Crusell, Concerto no. 3 in B flat, Op. 11, 1st movement, Allegro risoluto
    Finzi, Gerald:Fughetto, no. 5 from 5 Bagatelles
    Honegger: Sonatine for Clarinet in A, 1st movement, Modéré; OR 3rd movement, Vif et rythmique
    Krommer, Concerto in E flat, Op. 36, 1st movement, Allegro
    Lutoslawsi, Witold: Dance Preludes: no. 1, Allegro molto
    Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus: Concerto in A, K.622, 1st movement, Alllegro; OR 3rd movement, Rondo
    Poulenc, Francis: Sonata, 3rd movement, Allegro con fuoco; OR 2nd movement, Romanza
    Saint-Saëns, Sonata in E flat, Op. 167: 4th movement, Mollto allegro
    Spohr, Louis: Clarinet Concerto no. 1 in C minor, Op. 26, 3rd movement, Rondo: Vivace
    Stanford, Charles Villiers: Intermezzo no. 3 from 3 Intermezzi Op. 13
    Weber, Carl Maria von: Concerto no. 2 in E flat, Op. 74, 2nd movement, Romanza: Andante (with
     cadenza); OR 7 Variations, Op. 33: Theme and Variations 1, 5, and 7; OR Concertino in E flat, Op. 26
     complete



                      APPLIED CLARINET LEVEL III – MUSC 3911
    Students must reach Level III before presenting their half or full graduation recital.
Students studying at Level III will develop the following:


                                                                                                   37 | P a g e
Skills:
 Further refine musicianship and develop skills to enable the student to prepare music without the aid of
    an instructor
 Further refine knowledge and ability to differentiate and demonstrate different musical styles (historical
    and regional)
 Develop full range of styles and durations of articulation
 Voicing – refine ability to voice large intervals with ease
 Knowledge of musical terms occurring in all exercise, etudes, and repertoire
 Good intonation at all dynamic levels throughout the range of the instrument


Sight Reading:
 Continue to develop sight-reading skills

Transposition:
 Develop fluency in transposing at sight

Scales:
 All scales as listed for level two [memorized] PLUS
    Hite, David (ed.) Foundation Studies from Baermann Book 3, Op. 63 Daily Studies: extended scales, chord
    studies and scales in thirds [may be performed from the music]

Technical Studies:
The following list gives a sample of the type and difficulty of etudes that a student will work on while studying
at Level III.

   Caravan, Ronald: Preliminary Exercises and Études in Contemporary Techniques for Clarinet
   Cavallini, Ernesto: Thirty Caprices
   Jean, Paul: Twenty Melodic and Progressive Etudes
   Jettle, Rudolph: The Accomplished Clarinettist, vol. 1
   Stravinsky, Igor: No. 3 from 3 Pieces for Clarinet Solo
   Perier, A. Thirty Etudes
   Polatschek, Victor: Twelve Etudes
   Rose, C: Forty Études
   Stark, Robert: Twenty-Four Grand Virtuoso Etudes, Op. 51 2 vols.
   Twenty-Four Studies, Op. 49
   Uhl, Alfred: Forty-Eight Etudes. 2 vols.


Repertoire:
 This will be selected by the instructor to make sure that the student has had studied sonatas, concertos,
   occasional pieces and solo repertoire from all periods.




                                                                                                   38 | P a g e
                               East Tennessee State University
                                     Department of Music
                   Proficiency Requirements for Double Bass/Electric Bass

Enclosed are the basic requirements for advancement through levels one, two and three of Applied
String/Electric Bass.

Since this course is inclusive of students studying both double bass and/or electric bass, there are some
requirements that may not apply, depending upon the student’s particular instrument and their emphasis on
jazz or orchestral performance. Therefore, modification to the requirements for advancing to the next level
for some students will be at the discretion of the instructor and the String Division.



               APPLIED DOUBLE BASS/ELECTRIC BASS LEVEL I – MUSC 1811
              Students should study at this level no more than three semesters.

Technique
Demonstrate ability to properly hold the instrument including good posture, left and right hand position.
Should be able to use the bow for scales using proper technique for either German or French bow, one note
per bow.

Scales
Should be able to play all major and minor scales using correct fingering and positions, one octave.

Repertoire
Demonstrate ability to play etudes and solos through 3 rd position.

Sight Reading
Should be able to slowly sight read basic rhythms through 3rd position.

              APPLIED DOUBLE BASS/ELECTRIC BASS LEVEL II – MUSC 2911
            Students should reach this level no later than their fourth semester.

Technique
Demonstrate good left hand position through 5th position. Show ability to use dynamics effectively. Bowing
and pizzicato should be comfortable and produce a good tone.

Scales
Should be able to play all major and minor scales using correct fingering and positions, up to two octaves as
attainable through 5th position. Should be able to play major, dominant and minor 7 th arpeggios.

Repertoire
Demonstrate ability to play etudes and solos of medium complexity using the bow and pizzicato through 5th
position.

Jazz



                                                                                                  39 | P a g e
Should understand concepts for typical Latin and Swing bass lines and demonstrate the ability to perform up
to medium tempos. Should have the ability to improvise using correct scales and chordal structures over
simple jazz arrangements.

           APPLIED DOUBLE BASS/ELECTRIC BASS LEVEL III – MUSC 3911
  Students must reach Level III before presenting their half or full graduation recital.

Technique
Demonstrate good left hand position through thumb position. Show continued use of proper dynamics and
tone. Should be able to bow across strings effectively with good tone.

Scales
Should be able to play all major and minor scales using correct fingering and position, two octaves as
attainable through thumb position. Should be able to play whole tones and diminished scales one octave.
Should be able to play diminished, half-diminished and major 7th arpeggios.

Sight Reading
Should be able to sight read complex rhythms using all position except thumb.

Jazz
Should demonstrate the ability to walk a complex bass line at any tempo. Should have a good grasp of a
variety of Latin rhythms. Should be able to improvise over more complex changes at faster tempos.




                                                                                               40 | P a g e
                                East Tennessee State University
                                      Department of Music
                       Proficiency Requirements for Applied Euphonium

The purpose of this course is to increase each student’s technical facility, musical awareness, and
performance capabilities through concentrated applied study. After an initial evaluation of each student, the
instructor will assign appropriate materials for study. Grading will be based on the student’s progress with
respect to Department of Music guidelines for degree programs and levels of study. A letter grade will be
given at each lesson and used to compute the overall daily average of the student. Students are encouraged to
inquire about the status of their grades at any time. Attendance and punctuality to lessons with a
professional quality instrument in good working order is mandatory. More than one absence will
automatically reduce the final grade (i.e. B to B-). More than six absences will result in failure of the course. If
a student must miss a lesson due to an official university function or illness, the student must let the
instructor know before the scheduled lesson and a make-up lesson will be scheduled when possible.

Level I students will develop all major scales and arpeggios two octaves. Special emphasis will be given to
embouchure, breath support, articulation, playing position, and all basic performance technique. Level II
students will develop all three forms of minor scales and arpeggios two octaves. Level I and II students will
study stylistic performance technique, tone production and intonation, while expanding their range and
dynamic control through etude and literature study. Development of sight-reading skills will also be
emphasized. Level III students will continue to expand their repertoire of solo literature in preparation for
their senior recital and also study orchestral and band excerpts. Euphonium students at all levels must be
proficient in both bass clef and tenor clef. Other clefs will be studied as literature demands.

Participation in university ensembles is encouraged. Performance in one student recital each semester is
mandatory for all applied majors (performance in the weekly master class may suffice with approval of the
instructor) and encouraged for non-majors. All majors and students moving to the next level must perform
on a jury at the end of the semester, which shall encompass 30% of the semester grade. Required junior and
senior recitals featuring approved standard literature can serve as juries during the semester in which they
are performed with approval of the instructor and the department chairperson. In addition, all majors must
attend the required number of recitals as set forth in department policy as well as all brass faculty and brass
student recitals. Failure to comply with recital attendance policy will result in an Incomplete for the semester
until those requirements are met.

                        APPLIED EUPHONIUM LEVEL I – MUSC 1811
              Students should study at this level no more than three semesters.
                                        CORE STUDY MATERIALS
Arban                     Complete Method for Trb/Euphonium         Encore
Bordogni/Rochut                  Melodious Etudes Bk I                     Fischer
Dufresne/Voisen                  Sight-Reading Studies in Bass Clef                Colin

                        APPLIED EUPHONIUM LEVEL II – MUSC 2911
             Students should reach this level no later than their fourth semester.
                                          CORE STUDY MATERIALS
Arban                     Complete Method for Trb/Euphonium        Encore
Bordogni/Rochut                   Melodious Etudes Bk I                    Fischer
Dufresne/Voisen                   Sight-Reading Studies in Bass Clef               Colin
O. Blume/Fink             36 Studies for Trb. W/F Attach.          Fischer
Tyrrell                   40 Progressive Studies                   Boosey & Hawkes

                           APPLIED EUPHONIUM LEVEL III – MUSC 3911

                                                                                                      41 | P a g e
  Students must reach Level III before presenting their half or full graduation recital.
                                    CORE STUDY MATERIALS
Arban               Complete Method for Trb/Euphonium          Encore
Bordogni/Rochut             Melodious Etudes Bk I                      Fischer
Dufresne/Voisen             Sight-Reading Studies in Bass Clef                 Colin
O. Blume/Fink       36 Studies for Trb. W/F Attach.            Fischer
Tyrrell             40 Progressive Studies                     Boosey & Hawkes
Bowman/Werden       Orchestral & Band Excerpts                 Cimarron




                                                                                       42 | P a g e
                                  East Tennessee State University
                                        Department of Music
                            Proficiency Requirements for Applied Flute

                          APPLIED FLUTE LEVEL I – MUSC 1811
              Students should study at this level no more than three semesters.
In order to pass from Level I to Level II, students must demonstrate the following in their juries:

General factors for evaluation
• Correct embouchure
 Correct fingerings throughout the full range of the instrument
 Characteristic tone quality in all registers
 Proper playing position
 Articulation: clear attack, staccato, legato, single tongue.
 Accurate rhythmic execution
 Ability to read music fluently
 Sight-reading

Technique
 Major and minor scales (natural and harmonic forms), full range of instrument (three octaves) at quarter
   = 80 in sixteenth notes, using the following articulation patterns:
   (1) all tongued
   (2) all slurred
   (3) four slurred
   (4) slur two-tongue two
   (5) slur two-slur two
   (6) slur three- tongue one
   (7) tongue one- slur three
   (8) tongue one-slur two-tongue one
 Working knowledge of major and minor key signatures
 Knowledge of musical terms occurring in all exercises, etudes, and repertoire

Etudes:
 Taffanel & Gaubert, Daily Exercises for Flute, Numbers 4, 5
 Marcel Moyse, Daily Exercises for Flute
 A Trevor Wye Practice Book, Volume 2, Technique: Major Daily 1-2; Scale exercises
 Gilliam & McCaskill, Indispensable Scales, Exercises and Etudes for the Developing Flutist
 Marcel Moyse, De la Sonorite


                        APPLIED BASSOON LEVEL II – MUSC 2911
            Students should reach this level no later than their fourth semester.

Music minors must successfully complete at least one semester of study at this level in order to complete the
Applied Music requirements for their minor.

Technique
 Development of the full dynamic range with controlled tone color and dynamics
 Articulation: double tongue, triple tongue, flutter tongue
 Sight-reading
 Major and harmonic minor extended scales in sixteenth notes, quarter = 92 minimum tempo
 Melodic minor with all Level I articulation patterns and tempi requirements
                                                                                                      43 | P a g e
    Whole tone scales in sixteenth notes, at quarter = 80, two octaves, built on each note of the flute, low Bb
     through 3rd line D
    Knowledge of music terms, occurring in all exercises, etudes, and repertoire
    Major, minor, augmented, diminished, and seventh chords

Etudes
 Taffanel & Gaubert, Daily Exercises for Flute, Nos. 4, 5, 12-15
 Marcel Moyse, Daily Exercises for Flute, major and minor scales, thirds
 A Trevor Wye Practice Book, Volume 2: Technique, Major Daily 1-2; Scale exercises, Machavellian
   Exercises 1&2, Sequences
 Gilliam & McCaskill, Indispensable Scales, Exercises and Etudes for the Developing Flutist, Complete
 Marcel Moyse, De la Sonorite
 Walfrid Kujala, The Flutist’s Vade Mecum, core, whole tone scales
 Berbiguier, Eighteen Etudes for Flute

                         APPLIED FLUTE LEVEL III – MUSC 3911
    Students must reach Level III before presenting their half or full graduation recital.

Technique:
 Development of tone color palette appropriate to styles of music encountered at this level
 Articulation: double tongue, triple tongue, flutter tongue
 Sight-reading
 Major, minor and whole tone extended scales (Gilbert) in sixteenth notes, quarter = 80 minimum tempo
 Knowledge of musical terms occurring in all exercises, etudes, and repertoire
 Intervals (Moyse…)
 Major, minor, augmented, diminished, and seventh chords

Etudes:
 Geoffrey Gilbert, Technical Flexibility
 Geoffrey Gilbert, Sequences
 Taffanel & Gaubert, Daily Exercises for Flute, Nos. 4, 5,
 Marcel Moyse, Daily Exercises for Flute
 Marcel Moyse, De la Sonorite, Complete
 Walfrid Kujala, The Flutist’s Vade Mecum, core, whole tone scales, pentatonic scales, scale and interval
   exercises
 Andersen, Etudes, Op. 15 (Schirmer)
 Robert Dick, Flying Lessons

Repertoire:
Students will complete the following distribution of repertoire/style periods in the course of these three
levels:

Baroque
 Sonatas
    German Baroque
    French Baroque
 Suite or Concerto

Classical
 Sonata
 Mozart Concerto
 Concerto


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Romantic
 Salon piece
 Theme and Variations

Impressionistic
 Two pieces

20th century
 Avant garde
 Neo-classic sonata
 Major work by American composer
 Two French concours pieces
 Unaccompanied piece

Orchestral excerpts
Minimum of four for education majors and six for performance majors, taken from current list of excerpts
most frequently occurring on United States orchestral auditions




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 GUITAR REQUIREMENTS




                           46 | P a g e
                                 East Tennessee State University
                                       Department of Music
                           Proficiency Requirements for Applied Horn

                           APPLIED HORN LEVEL I – MUSC 1811
              Students should study at this level no more than three semesters.
General factors for evaluation:
 Centered tone in normal playing range
 Correct embouchure
 Control of intonation (F to Bb sides)
 Correct fingerings throughout the full range of the instrument
 Characteristic tone quality in all registers
 Proper playing position
 Articulation: clear attack, staccato, legato, single tongue, slur
 Accurate rhythmic execution
 Ability to read music fluently
 Sight reading

Technique:
 Major scales, full range of instrument, at quarter = 120 in eighth notes, memorized
 Knowledge of musical terms occurring in all exercises, etudes, and repertoire

Etudes:
 Gower-Voxman, Advanced Method, Vols. 1 and 2
 Franz-Gebhardt, Complete Method for French Horn
 Irons, Exercises and Duets
 Little, Embouchure Builder
 Pottag, Daily Exercises
 Perrini, 13 Studies in Breath Control and Articulation
 Maxime-Alphonse, 200 Etudes Nouvelles, Vol. 1, II
 Pares, Daily Exercises and Scales
 Pottag-Andraud, Selected Melodious, Progressive & Technical Studies for French Horn, Book 1
 Muller-Pottag, 22 Etudes for Horn
 Frehse, 34 Etuden für Tiefes Horn
 Kopprasch, 60 Selected Studies, Book 1
 Pottag, Preparatory Melodies
 Pottag, French Horn Passages, Books 1 and 2
 Vanderwoude, Pre-virtuoso Studies
 Concone-Sawyer, Lyrical Studies
 F. Strauss, Concert Studies
 Franz, Etudes and Concert Etudes for Horn

Repertoire:
 Selected Duets for French Horn, Vols. 1 and 2
 Voxman, Concert and Contest Collection
 Canteloube, et al., Contemporary French Recital Pieces
 Akimenko, Melody
 Busser, Concert Piece in D, Op. 39
 Corelli, Sonata in F major; Sonata in G minor
 Gabellos, Fantaisie
 Mozart, Concerto No. 3, K. 447; Concerto in D major

                                                                                                47 | P a g e
   Pessard, In the Forest, Op. 130
   De Lamarter, Ballad
   Goddard, Berceuse
   Glazounow, Reverie, Op. 24
   Gliere, Nocturne
   Mozart, Romance, K. 441
   Scriabin, Romance
   Tcherepnin, Melodie d’Amour



                          APPLIED HORN LEVEL II – MUSC 2911
            Students should reach this level no later than their fourth semester.

Technique:
 Development of full dynamic range with controlled tone color and dynamics
 Sight-reading
 All major scales and chromatic scale, range of the instrument, in sixteenth notes, quarter = 100
 Major arpeggios, memorized, range of the instrument, at quarter = 120 in eighth notes
 Natural and harmonic minor scales, memorized, range of the instrument, at quarter = 120 in eighth notes
 Knowledge of musical terms occurring in all exercises, etudes, and repertoire

Etudes:
 Franz-Gebhardt, Complete Method for French Horn
 Singer-Ballou, Embouchure Building
 Pottag, Daily Exercises
 Maxime-Alphonse, 200 Etudes Nouvelles, Vols. III, IV
 Pottag-Andraud, Selected Melodious, Progressive & Technical Studies for French Horn, Book 2
 Kopprasch, 60 Selected Studies, Book 2
 Muller-Pottag, 22 Etudes for Horn
 Frehse, 34 Etuden für Tiefes Horn
 Belloli, Eight Etudes
 Kling, 40 Characteristic Studies
 Pottag, French Horn Passages, Books 2 and 3
 Vanderwoude, Advanced Virtuoso Studies
 Moore, Operatic French Horn Passages
 Franz, Etudes and Concert Etudes for Horn

Repertoire:
 Selected Duets for French Horn, Vol. 2
 Beethoven, Concerto for Horn in F, Op. 17
 Cohen, Fantasy in F major
 Desportes, Ballade Normande
 Goedicke, Concerto
 Haydn, Concerto for French Horn, No. 2




                                                                                                48 | P a g e
                       APPLIED HORN LEVEL III – MUSC 3911
  Students must reach Level III before presenting their half or full graduation recital.
Technique:
 Sight-reading
 Melodic minor scales, memorized
 Diminished 7th and minor arpeggios, memorized
 Knowledge of musical terms occurring in all exercises, etudes, and repertoire

Etudes:
 Franz-Gebhardt, Complete Method for French Horn
 Singer-Ballou, Embouchure Building
 Pottag, Daily Exercises
 Maxime-Alphonse, 200 Etudes Nouvelles, Vols. V-VI
 Pottag-Andraud, Selected Melodious, Progressive & Technical Studies for French Horn, Book 2
 Kopprasch, 60 Selected Studies, Book 2
 Belloli, 12 Etudes
 Kling, 40 Characteristic Studies
 Pottag, French Horn Passages, Book 3
 Vanderwoude, Advanced Virtuoso Studies
 Moore, Operatic French Horn Passages
 Gallay, Thirty Etudes
 Schuller, Studies for Unaccompanied Horn

Repertoire:
 Selected Duets for French Horn, Vol. 2
 Lamy, Cantabile et Scherzo
 Mozart, Horn Concerto, K. 495
 Presle, Le Reve du Jeune Faon (1949)
 Saint-Saëns, Morceau de Concert, Op. 94
 Sansone, Concertino
 F. Strauss, Concerto, Op. 8
 Bozza, En Foret
 Donato, Sonata for Horn and Piano
 Hindemith, Sonata for Horn and Piano




                                                                                                49 | P a g e
                                 East Tennessee State University
                                       Department of Music
                           Proficiency Requirements for Applied Oboe

General factors for evaluation:
 Correct embouchure
 Correct fingerings throughout the full range of the instrument
 Characteristic tone quality in all registers
 Proper playing position
 Articulation: clear attack, staccato, legato, single tongue
 Accurate rhythmic execution
 Ability to read music fluently
 Sight reading

                           APPLIED OBOE LEVEL I – MUSC 1801
              Students should study at this level no more than three semesters

Upon completion of study at Level I, students should be able to demonstrate the following

Melodic
 Rudimentary vibrato
 Demonstrate correct use of embouchure, air, and support
 Illustrate basic phrasing and expression, focusing on the correct interpretation of dynamic and
   articulation markings

Technique
 Major scales, harmonic and melodic minor scales full range of instrument (Bb below C1 to E3) at quarter
   = 90 in eighth notes, memorized
 Sight reading
 Knowledge of musical terms occurring in all exercises, etudes, and repertoire

Reed Making
 Basic reed making: explanation of entire process, wrapping, sharpening, proper knife technique

Etudes
The following list gives a sample of the type and difficulty of etudes that a student will work on while studying
at Level I and should be able to demonstrate fluent performance of before advancement to Level II
 Barrett – 40 Progressive Melodies, Articulation Studies (Boosey/Hawkes)
 Dedondue – 24 Etudes Melodiques (Leduc)

Repertoire
 Baroque – Concert Album (Editions Musicus)
 A. Andraud – 15 Grand Solos (Andraud)
 Jay Arnold – Oboe Solos (Amsco Music Pub.)
 W. Barlow – Winter’s Passed (Eastman School of Music)
 Bellini – Concerto in B flat (Schott)
 Cimerosa – Concerto (Boosey/Hawkes)
 Dittersdorf – Concerto in G minor (Baritkopf)
 Donizetti – Sonata (Peters)
 Handel – Three Authentic Sonatas (Peters)
 Handel – Concerto in G minor (Berenreiter)
 Haydn – Concerto in C (Breitkoft)
 Jacob – Sonatina (Oxford)
                                                                                                   50 | P a g e
    Marcello – Concerto in D (Musica Rara)
    Telemann – Sonata in A minor (Leduc)
    Telemann – Concerto in F minor, E minor (Andraud)

                           APPLIED OBOE LEVEL II – MUSC 2911
             Students should reach this level no later than their fourth semester.
Upon Completion of study at Level II, students should be able to demonstrate the following:

Melodic
 Demonstrate an expanded expressive range and phrasing concepts
    Full dynamic range
    Long melodic lines
 A mature vibrato is expected, completely integrated into tone

Technique
 Major scales, harmonic and melodic minor scales full range of instrument (Range should be from Bb
   below middle C to F#3), in sixteenth notes, quarter = 100
 Major, minor arpeggios, dimished and dominant seventh chords memorized, range of the instrument, at
   triplet/sixteenth = 100 in eighth notes
 Sight-reading
 Knowledge of musical terms occurring in all exercises, etudes, and repertoire

Reed Making
 Make at least one working reed without teacher assistance

Etudes
The following list gives a sample of the type and difficulty of etudes that a student will work on while studying
at Level II and should be able to demonstrate fluent performance of before advancement to Level III

    Barrett – Grande Studies (Southern)
    Ferling – 48 Famous Studies (Southern)
    Singer – Book 3 Terorico Practico (Ricordi)
    Vade mecum – Pages 1-80 (Southern)

Repertoire:
The following list gives a sample of the type and difficulty of etudes that a student will work on while studying
at Level II and should be able to demonstrate fluent performance of before advancement to Level III

    Britten – Six Metamorphosis (Boosey & Hawkes)
    Hindemith – Sonata (Associated)
    Saint-Saens – Sonata (Durand)
    Bach – Cantatas 12, 21, 56, 82, and 202 (Bach/Rothwell)
    Bach – Sonata in g minor “little” (Peters)
    Debussy – Syrinx (Jobert)
    Hummel – Introduction, Theme and Allegro (Musica Rara)
    Neilson – Fantasy Pieces (Wilhelm Hansen Ed.)
    Piston – Suite (Schirmer)
    Vivaldi – Concertos in a minor, F Major (Ricordi)

                         APPLIED OBOE LEVEL III – MUSC 3911
    Students must reach Level III before presenting their half or full graduation recital.


                                                                                                   51 | P a g e
Students studying at Level III will develop the following:

Melodic
 Demonstrate a mature tone and vibrato which is varied and expressive
 Development of tone color palette appropriate to different stylistic/nationalistic periods and
   performance practices

Technique
 Ornamentation and improvisation of cadenza materials
 Range from Bb to F#3
 Master all major/minor scales, arpeggios, diminished chords, and scales in thirds at a rapid pace (quarter
   note = 120)
 Knowledge of musical terms occurring in all exercises, etudes, and repertoire

Reed Making
 Reed independence

Etudes
The following list gives a sample of the type and difficulty of etudes that a student will work on while studying
at Level III.
 Prestini – 30 Studies (Edizioni Bongiovanni)
 Salviani – Studies Vol. (Ricordi)
 Singer – Book 3-6 Terorico Practico (Ricordi)


Repertoire:
The following list gives a sample of the type and difficulty of repertoire that a student will work on while
studying at Level III.
 Bach – Sonata in G minor “big” (Peters)
 Mozart – Concerto (Barenreiter)
 Poulenc – Sonata (Chester)
 Bach – Cantatas 156, 187, Christmas and Easter Oratorio, St. Matthews Passion Obligattos
    (Bach/Rothwell)
 CPE Bach – Sonata in G minor (Breitkopf)
 Jacob – 7 Bagatelles (Oxford)
 Debussy/Lucarelli – Album of Five Pieces (International)
 Ibert – Escales (Leduc)
 Paladilhe – Solo de Concert (Master Music Pub.)
 Alan Richardson – French Suite (Oxford)
 Telemann – Fantasies (Schirmer)
 Vivaldi – Sonata in C minor (Schott)




                                                                                                    52 | P a g e
                                East Tennessee State University
                                      Department of Music
                       Proficiency Requirements for Applied Percussion

                        APPLIED PERCUSSION LEVEL I – MUSC 1851
              Students should study at this level no more than three semesters.

This class is for non-majors and entry-level percussion majors. A variety of technical exercises for each
instrument will be learned, including all major scales, all natural and harmonic minor scales and four-mallet
exercises for keyboard percussion, a variety of etudes for snare drum (including knowledge of the basic
rudiments), and timpani tuning and technique. Multiple percussion development will also begin, including
development of drum set skills. Techniques for accessory percussion instruments will also be explained and
developed.

Texts may include:
Marimba: Technique through Music – Mark Ford
Percussion Keyboard Technic- McMillan
Modern Method for Timpani- Goodman
Assorted Snare drum texts- depending on background
Four-Way Coordination - Sanderbeck
Creative Coordination for the Performing Drummer- Copeland
Selected solo works chosen by the instructor will also be analyzed and prepared.
Jury performance material will be selected by the instructor.




                    APPLIED PERCUSSION LEVEL II – MUSIC 2951
  Students should reach this level no later than the beginning of their fourth semester
Requirements for Level II include demonstration of knowledge of major and minor (natural and harmonic)
scales playing sixteenth-notes at a minimum of quarter-note equals sixty, as well as technical advancement on
four-mallet technique, including prepared material that may be taken from the suggestions below. The jury
performance material will be selected by the instructor. The quality of the performance is more important
than the selections that are performed. Students must demonstrate their well-rounded performance abilities,
even though all percussionists have varied strengths.

Keyboard Percussion
Pieces to be chosen from composers such as Mitchell Peters, Albeniz, Bach, Brown, Chopin, Ford, Gaetano,
Gomez, Houllif, Larrick, Musser, Pimentel, Pitfield, Rosauro, Stout and others with permission from the
instructor.

Timpani
Examples of works could be John Beck’s Sonata for Timpani, Vic Firth solo etudes, or other pieces at the
intermediate level. Appropriate solos and etudes will also be selected by the instructor.

Snare Drum and Multiple Percussion
This level will include pieces taken from Mitchell Peters Advanced Snare Drum Studies, Cirone’s Portraits in
Rhythm and selected rudimental solos. Multiple percussion solos, and other pieces for snare drum, will be
chosen by the instructor.

Drumset



                                                                                                  53 | P a g e
In this level the student will continue to develop coordination skills. Continued technical and musical
development will allow the student to be more creative with their approach to playing in assorted styles,
including fill and solo ideas. Transcribing will also play an important role at this level.



                   APPLIED PERCUSSION LEVEL III – MUSC 3951
  Students must reach Level III before presenting their half or full graduation recital

Advancement to Level III requires two additional applied faculty members at the jury. Each candidate must
demonstrate a high level of technical and musical ability as a well-rounded percussionist. Literature will be
chosen that displays the strengths of each performer while also demonstrating well-rounded ability as a
percussionist. The difficulty of each work is not as important as the musical presentation. Appropriate
literature will be selected by the instructor for each area.

Keyboard Percussion
Recommended literature could be: Kieko Abe selections, Leyenda by Albeniz, multi-movement works by
Bach,Burritt or other pieces with similar technical and musical demands. Other recommended composers
would include Diemer, Druckman, Ervin, Ford, Gomez, Gronemeier, Helble, Molenhof, Musser, Saindon,
Samuels, Smadbeck, Steiner, Stensgaard, Stevens, Stout, Tanaka, and Ukena. Selected works could also include
concertos written for keyboard instruments, including selected transcriptions. Other pieces may be chosen by
the instructor.

Timpani
Works could be selected from composers such as William Cahn, Elliott Carter, Joseph Aiello, Ameele, Beck,
Bergamo, Fink, Helble, Houllif, Jones, Kraft, Leonard, Mancini, Williams and others with the permission of the
instructor.

Snare Drum and Multiple Percussion
Composers could include Abel, Beck, Cirone, Colgrass, Fink, Gauger, Gauthreaux, Goldenberg, Houllif, LaRosa,
Markovich, Pratt, Smith, Whaley, Wilcoxon. Other approved solos can be performed. Multiple percussion solos
should be selected from composers such as Delecluse, Foss, Milhaud, Ott, Udow, Bergamo, Bump, Cage, Fink,
Frazeur, Gibson, Houllif, Kraft, LaRosa, Rolnick, Rosauro, Serry, Stockhausen, Tagawa, Stout, Whaley, Xenakis.

Drumset
This level will include knowledge of practical styles, performing in assorted musical situations, and study and
performance of appropriate transcriptions.

It is important to note that the information for each level suggests method books, etudes and pieces to
demonstrate technical and musical ability as a well-rounded percussionist. The technical and musical
level of each performance is more important than the choice of literature.




                                                                                                  54 | P a g e
                                East Tennessee State University
                                      Department of Music
                          Proficiency Requirements for Applied Piano

                          APPLIED PIANO LEVEL I – MUSC 1801
              Students should study at this level no more than three semesters.

Repertoire:
 J. S. Bach Two-Voice Inventions
 Easier sonatas of Haydn and Mozart
 Pieces of the level of difficulty of the Chopin preludes and waltzes
 Easier Brahms Intermezzi
 Easier modern pieces such as Persichetti Four Arabesques Op. 141, Shostakovich Three Fantastic Dances,
   Tcherepnin Bagatelles Op. 5, or Robert Starer Sketches in Color Set II.

Technique:
 All major and minor scales in eighth notes, MM q=126
 Large chords and inversions
 Major, minor, dominant 7th and diminished 7th arpeggios


                        APPLIED PIANO LEVEL II – MUSC 2901
  Students should reach this level no later than the beginning of their fourth semester
Repertoire:
 J. S. Bach Sinfonias and French Suites
 Sonatas of Mozart, Haydn, and Beethoven
 Romantic works such as Brahms Capricci, Chopin Nocturnes, Schumann Op. 12 #4 or his Arabesque Op.
   18, Schubert Impromptus
 Modern works such as Debussy Preludes, Dello Joio Suite for Piano, Muczynski Six Preludes Op. 6, and
   Ginastera Danzas Argentinas, selected pieces by Bartok and Prokofiev, Pinto Scenas Infantis, Griffes Lake
   at Evening Op. 5 #1

Technique:
All scales and arpeggios in triplets and sixteenth notes MM q=88


                      APPLIED PIANO LEVEL III – MUSC 3901
  Students must reach Level III before presenting their half or full graduation recital
Repertoire:
 J. S. Bach Well-Tempered Clavier
 A Mozart or Beethoven concerto
 Easier Chopin etudes
 Debussy Children's Corner or Pour le Piano
 Modern pieces such as Dello Joio Third Sonatas or Persichetti Sonata #3

Technique:
All scales and arpeggios in triplets and sixteenth notes, MM q=100




                                                                                                55 | P a g e
                                East Tennessee State University
                                      Department of Music
                       Proficiency Requirements for Applied Saxophone

                        APPLIED SAXOPHONE LEVEL I – MUSC 1811
              Students should study at this level no more than three semesters.
NOTE: The following list includes representative materials at each level; chamber music is not listed but may
be assigned.

Students who are interested in jazz styles and jazz improvisation are encouraged to develop strong music
theory skills, to listen to music in jazz style, and to quickly assimilate the minimum technical and tonal
requirements for each level of study. Appropriate jazz study materials will be assigned.

Basics:
 Long tones
 Reed work
 Embouchure and air
 Vibrato
 Mouthpiece and instrument evaluation
 Tuning
 Sight reading

Technique:
 Teal, Saxophonist's Workbook, major and minor scales (pp. 20-22), memorized, and major and minor
   arpeggios (p. 36), memorized

Methods and Studies:
 Teal, Saxophonist's Workbook
 Klose, 25 Daily Exercises for Saxophone
 Hite, Melodious and Progressive Studies for Saxophone
 Voxman, Selected Studies
 Berbiguier, 18 Exercises
 Gates, Odd Meter Etudes

Repertoire:
 Ward, An Abstract
 Badings, Cavatina
 Barat, Elegie
 Lantier, Sicilienne
 Leclair/Mule, Gigue
 Bozza, Aria
 Maurice, Tableau du Provence, II, III
 Eccles, Sonata
 Benson, Farewell
 Lantier, Euskaldunak
 Reed, Ballade
 Britten, Six Metamorphoses (after Ovid), I, II, IV (use oboe music)
 Rueff, Chanson et Passapied
 Teal, Solos for the Alto Saaxophone Player
 Teal, Program Music for the Alto Saxophone
 Heiden, Sonata
 Hindemith, Sonate
                                                                                                 56 | P a g e
    Couf, Introduction, Dance & Furioso

                        APPLIED SAXOPHONE LEVEL II – MUSC 2911
             Students should reach this level no later than their fourth semester.

Basics
 Long tones
 Reed work
 Vibrato studies
 Altissimo studies
 Tuning
 Sight-reading

Technique:
 Teal, Saxophonist's Workbook, dominant 7th chords, diminished chords (p. 37), major and minor scales in
   thirds (pp. 23-27)

Etudes:
 Teal, Saxophonist's Workbook
 Berbiguier, 18 Exercises
 Schmitt, 10 Contemporary Etudes
 Rousseau, Saxophone High Tones
 Voxman, Selected Studies
 Gates, Odd Meter Etudes
 Voisin, Develop Sight Reading
 Ferling, 48 Famous Studies

Repertoire:
 Turkin, Sonata
 Couf, Introduction, Dance and Furioso
 Heiden, Sonata
 Russell, Particles
 Ravel/Mule, Piece en forme de Habanera
 Badings, La Malinconia
 Schuman/Hemke, Three Romances
 Platti/Hervig, Sonata No. 5
 Van Delden, Sonatina, Op. 36
 Maurice, Tableau du Provence, I, IV
 Handel/Mule, Sonata No. 4
 Hindemith, Sonate
 Creston, Sonata
 Dressel, Bagatelle


                     APPLIED SAXOPHONE LEVEL III – MUSC 3911
    Students must reach Level III before presenting their half or full graduation recital.
Technique:
 Londeix, Les Gammes, major and minor scales in fourths and sixths

Etudes:
 Londeix, Les Gammes
 Soussman, Trente Grands Exercises, Vols. I, II

                                                                                             57 | P a g e
   Voisin, Develop Sight Reading
   Ferling, 48 Etudes (oboe book)
   Rousseau, Saxophone High Tones
   Diemente, Mirrors IV
   Bozza, Douze Etudes Caprices
   Karg-Elert, 25 Capricen und 1 Sonata, Op. 53
   Mule, 53 Etudes
   Massis, Six Etudes Caprices

Repertoire:
 Koechlin, Etudes Pour Saxophone Alto et Piano
 Debussy/Londeix, Syrinx
 Hartley, Duo
 Creston, Sonata
 Husa, Elegie et Rondeau
 Benson, Aeolian Song
 Bach/Mule, 6th Sonate
 Glazunov, Concerto in Eb
 Maurice, Tableau du Provence
 Galante, Shu Gath Manna
 Tuthill, Sonata
 Despalj, Concerto
 Dressel, Partita
 Leinert, Sonate
 Bassett, Music
 Dahl, Concerto
 Desenclos, Prelude, Cadence et Finale
 Ibert, Concertino da Camera
 Schmitt, Legende, Op. 66
 Hartley, Concerto
 Bonneau, Caprice en Forme de Valse
 Creston, Concerto, Op. 26
 Denisov, Sonate
 Husa, Concerto
 Jan Bach, My Very First Solo




                                                   58 | P a g e
                                East Tennessee State University
                                      Department of Music
                       Proficiency Requirements for Applied Trombone

                        APPLIED TROMBONE LEVEL I – MUSC 1811
              Students should study at this level no more than three semesters.
Warm-up Exercises and Daily Routine
 A daily routine will be established consisting of exercises emphasizing the fundamentals of trombone
   performance (e.g. breathing, tone production, lip flexibility, tonguing, range, and valve positions). These
   exercises will include the Remington long tone and lip slur exercises as well as selected exercises by
   others, including Milt Stevens, Scott Hartman, and Ben van Dijk.

Scales
 First semester – all major scales at least two octaves
 Second semester – all major scales in thirds at least two octaves

In the beginning, tone production and intonation are of the utmost importance. Scales will be played as
slowly as needed to assure this foundation before progressing toward proficiency in scales at faster tempos.
Afterwards, the student must be able to play scales proficiently (with good tone quality, intonation, and
articulation) at a minimum speed of mm quarter = 60 (quarter = 72 or higher preferred), in the rhythmic
pattern of one eighth note followed by six sixteenth notes. The eighth note on the tonic will be used as a
guide-post note to mark each octave.

Legato Technique (A minimum of 7 etudes must be completed in each semester).
 Tenor trombone – Melodious Etudes for Trombone, vol. 1 by Bordogni, ed. Rochut.
 Bass trombone - Vocalises Complete by Bordogni, ed. Jacobs.

Detached technique (A minimum of 7 etudes must be completed in each semester).
 Tenor trombone – 40 Progressive Studies by Tyrell.
 Bass trombone – 70 Progressive Studies for Modern Bass Trombone by Gillis.

Clef Studies
 Tenor trombone - Introductory Studies in Tenor & Alto Clef, “Before Blazhevich” by Edwards
    o First Semester – tenor clef (pp. 1-31)
    o Second Semester – alto clef (pp. 39-56)
    o Depending on the student’s proficiency in clefs prior to this level, clef studies may begin with Studies
        in Clef by Blazhevich. See Level II requirements

   Bass trombone.
    o First Semester – transposing down an octave
    o Second Semester - tenor clef, Introductory Studies in Tenor & Alto Clef, “Before Blazhevich” by
        Edwards (pp. 1-31); then, pages 37 and 38 on reading bass clef as tenor clef down an octave

Orchestral Excerpts
 These are optional for Level I, but required if the student is playing in orchestra. See requirements for
   Level III

Sight Reading
 Each lesson will include one selection from Developing Sight Reading by Dufresne (Voisin) or some other
    appropriate source for sight reading.

Jury


                                                                                                  59 | P a g e
    The student will complete a jury each semester before the brass faculty committee. The jury will be
     comprised of scales, a prepared piece (or pieces) demonstrating both legato and detached technique, and
     sight reading.
    If the student is in the second semester and applying for advancement to Level II, he/she must
     successfully play the Level II sight reading piece.


                       APPLIED TROMBONE LEVEL II – MUSC 2911
            Students should reach this level no later than their fourth semester.
Warm-up Exercises and Daily Routine
 The daily routine established at Level I will be enhanced with further exercises, and will be flexible in
    order to add or substitute exercises that will address particular needs of the student (e.g. range, multiple
    tonguing, etc.)
Scales
 First semester – all minor scales (all 3 forms) at least two octaves
 Second semester – all minor scales (all 3 forms) in thirds at least two octaves

The student must play scales proficiently (with good tone quality, intonation, and articulation) at a minimum
speed of mm quarter = 60 (quarter = 72 or higher preferred), in the rhythmic pattern of one eighth note
followed by six sixteenth notes. The eighth note on the tonic will be used as a guide-post note to mark each
octave.

Legato Technique (A minimum of 7 etudes must be completed in each semester)
 Tenor trombone – Melodious Etudes for Trombone, vol. 2 by Bordogni, ed. Rochut
 Bass trombone – Vocalises Complete by Bordogni, ed. Jacobs

Detached technique (A minimum of 7 etudes must be completed in each semester)
 Tenor trombone – Sixty Selected Studies for Trombone, vol. 1 by Kopprasch
 Bass trombone – 20 Studies for Bass Trombone by K. Stephanovsky

Clef Studies
 Clef Studies for Trombone by Blazhevich. A minimum of 3 etudes must be completed in each semester,
    beginning with no. 37 and must include no. 46.

Orchestral Excerpts
 These are optional for Level II, but required if the student is playing in orchestra. See requirements for
   Level III.

Sight Reading
 Each lesson will include one selection from Developing Sight Reading by Dufresne (Voisin), School of Sight
    Reading and Style by André Lafosse, or some other appropriate source for sight reading.

Jury
 The student will complete a jury each semester before the brass faculty committee. The jury will be
    comprised of scales, a prepared piece (or pieces) demonstrating both legato and detached technique, and
    sight reading.
 If the student is in the second semester and applying for advancement to Level III, he/she must
    successfully play the Level III sight reading piece.




                      APPLIED TROMBONE LEVEL III – MUSC 3911
    Students must reach Level III before presenting their half or full graduation recital.
                                                                                60 | P a g e
Warm-up exercises and exercises on fundamentals.
 The daily routine will continue to be enhanced and tailored to the student

Scales
 First semester – blues and pentatonic scales
 Second semester – whole-tone, octatonic and diminished scales

Solo Literature for Recital
The emphasis at Level III is preparation for the student’s recital(s). A solo from each of the following
historical styles must be selected; however, the student is not limited to only those solos listed. This list only
comprises a sampling of some of the most representative pieces from the trombone solo repertoire.

Tenor trombone.
  Baroque or Classical.
   o Galliard Sonatas (I-VI)
   o Marcello Sonatas (A minor and F major)
   o Telemann Sonata in F minor
   o J.S. Bach Sonatas (I-VI) for solo cello

   Romantic.1
    o Morceau Symphonique by Guillmant
    o Concerto by Rimsky-Korsakov
    o Andante et Allegro by J. Ed. Barat
    o Concertino by David
    o Cavatine by Saint-Saens
    o Concerto by Jacob
    o Arthur Pryor solos (e.g. Blue Bell of Scotland or Thoughts of Love)

   20th-Century.
    o Sonata by Hindemith
    o Sonata by Šulek
    o Sonata by White
    o Sonatina by Serocki
    o Concertino by Larsson
    o Elegy for Mippy II by Bernstein
    o Sequenza V by Berio

Bass trombone.
 Baroque or Classical.
   o Galliard Sonatas (I-VI), ed. Marx
   o J.S. Bach Sonatas (I-VI) for solo cello

   Romantic.2
    o Concerto No. 1 by Lebedev
    o Concerto for tuba by Vaughn Williams
    o Hosanna by Liszt

   20th-Centruy.
    o Allegro et Finale by Bozza

1
  Although some of these solos were composed in the 20 th-Century, they were written primarily in the Romantic
style.
2
  Solo repertoire for the bass trombone is virtually nonexistent before the 20 th-Century. However, some bass
trombone solos composed in the 20th-century were written primarily in a Romantic style.
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    o   Concerto by Christopher Brubeck
    o   Concerto by Ewazen
    o   Concerto by Spillman
    o   Concerto by George
    o   Drei Liechte Stueche by Hindemith
    o   Fantasie Concertante by Casterede

                     An ensemble piece is optional

Orchestral Excerpts
Tenor Trombone.
 Required excerpts.
   o Requiem by Mozart – the tenor trombone solo from the opening of the Tuba mirum.
   o Bolero by Ravel – first entrance of solo and third entrance of solo continuing until the conclusion of
       the piece.

   Other excerpts may include.
    o From the Damnation of Faust by Berlioz – the “Hungarian March”.
    o From Die Walkürie by Wagner “The Ride of the Walküries”– the minor and major “rides.”
    o From William Tell by Rossini - Overture.
    o Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks by R. Strauss.

Bass Trombone.
 Required excerpts.
   o From Symphony No. 9 by Beethoven – bass trombone w/ chorus in the fourth movement.
   o From Symphony in d minor by Franck – two excerpts.
        Movement I., Lento.
        Movement III. Tempo 1 Allegro non troppo (Bass trombonist’s “Bolero.”)
   o From The Creation by Haydn – No. 26.


   Other excerpts may include.
    o From the Damnation of Faust by Berlioz – the “Hungarian March”.
    o From Die Walkürie by Wagner “The Ride of the Walküries”– the minor and major “rides.”
    o From William Tell by Rossini - Overture.
    o Ein Heldenleben by R. Strauss.
    o Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks by R. Strauss.

Sight Reading
 Each lesson will include one selection from Developing Sight Reading by Dufresne (Voisin), School of Sight
    Reading and Style by André Lafosse, or some other appropriate source for sight reading.

Jury
 The student will complete a jury each semester before the brass faculty committee. The jury will be
    comprised of scales, a prepared piece (usually, a solo the student is preparing for his/her recital)
    demonstrating both legato and detached technique, and sight reading.
 No jury is required in the semester of a recital. In lieu of the jury, a recital hearing must be passed by a
    majority vote of the selected recital committee.




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                                 East Tennessee State University
                                       Department of Music
                         Proficiency Requirements for Applied Trumpet

                         APPLIED TRUMPET LEVEL I – MUSC 1811
              Students should study at this level no more than three semesters.

This level is designed for the acquirement of sound fundamentals, breathing techniques, range, technical
dexterity, and introduction to transposition. It is expected that all of the following methods will be played at a
tempo appropriate to this level while stressing musicality and cleanliness. See attached scale/arpeggio
syllabus for expected forms and tempos.

Scales/Arpeggios:         1st Semester-All major scales in seconds, two octaves, memorized
                                   All major arpeggios, one octave, memorized
                          2nd Semester-All major scales in thirds, two octaves, memorized
                                   All major arpeggios, Arban’s page 142, memorized
                          3rd Semester-All requirements as above
Tone Production:          Daily warm-up routine and range building, from the following;
                                   Schlossberg, Daily Drills and Technical Studies, pg. 1-9
                                   Stamp, Warm-Ups & Studies
                                   Cichowicz/Jacobs, Flow Studies
Technical Studies:        Clarke, Technical Studies for the Trumpet, not including etudes
                          Arban, Complete Conservatory Method for Trumpet
Etudes:                   Arban, 14 Characteristic Studies
Transposition:            Caffarelli, 100 Melodic Studies
                                   1st Semester, C - diatonic and chromatic
                                   2nd Semester, Ab - diatonic and chromatic
Sightreading:             Selected by instructor from duet books
                          Graded Trumpet Sight-Reading Grades 1-8 (Guildhall School)
Jury:                     Arban, 14 Characteristic Studies,
                                   1st semester, #1-7 (one selected by instructor)
                                   2nd semester, # 8-14 (one selected by instructor)
                          Concone, Lyrical study selected by instructor
                          Scales/Arpeggios, selected by brass faculty from above requirements per semester,
                          memorized
                          Transposition sight-reading
                          Sight-reading, Specimen Sight-Reading Tests for Trumpet (Associated Board of
                                   Royal Schools of Music) Grades 1-5 and Grades 6-8
Advancement:              Arban's, 14 Characteristic Studies, selected by instructor
                          Concone, lyrical study selected by instructor
                          Scales/Arpeggios, all above requirements
                          Transposition/Sight Reading, all above requirements
                          Clarke, all studies


                        APPLIED TRUMPET LEVEL II – MUSC 2911
            Students should reach this level no later than their fourth semester.

This level is designed for the continuing refinement of Level I sound fundamentals, breathing techniques,
range, technical dexterity, and introduction to transposition. The focus is shifted away from technical studies
to musicianship through the focus on etudes. It is expected that all of the following methods will be played at
minimum 80% of the marked tempo while stressing musicality and cleanliness. See attached scale/arpeggio
syllabus for expected forms and tempos.

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Scales/Arpeggios:        1st Semester-All minor scales in seconds, two octaves, memorized
                                  All minor arpeggios, one octave, memorized
                         2nd Semester-All minor scales in thirds, two octaves, memorized
                                  All minor arpeggios, Arban’s page 143, memorized
                         3rd Semester-All requirements as above
Tone Production:         Daily warm-up routine and range building, from the following
                                  Schlossberg, Daily Drills and Technical Studies, pg. 13-47
                                  Stamp, Warm-Ups & Studies
                                  Cichowicz/Jacobs, Flow Studies
Technical Studies:       Clarke, Technical Studies for the Trumpet, including etudes
                         Goldman, Exercises for Double and Triple Tonguing
Etudes:                  To be selected from the following
                                  Bousquet, 36 Celebrated Studies
                                  Clodomir, Etudes Characteristiques
                                  Clodomir, 20 Studies
                                  Concone, The Complete Solfeggi
                                  Kopprasch, 60 Selected Studies, Volume 1 and 2
Transposition:           Caffarelli, 100 Melodic Studies
                                  1st Semester, D - diatonic and chromatic
                                  2nd Semester, Eb/E - diatonic and chromatic
Sightreading:            Selected by instructor from duet books
                         Graded Trumpet Sight-Reading Grades 1-8 (Guildhall School)
Jury:                    Scales/Arpeggios, selected by brass faculty from above
                               requirements per semester, memorized
                         Transposition sight-reading
                         Sigh-treading, Specimen Sight-Reading Tests for Trumpet (Associated Board of
                                  Royal Schools of Music) Grades 1-5 and Grades 6-8
Advancement:             Two etudes, one lyrical and one technical
                         Scales/Arpeggios, all above requirements
                         Transposition/Sight Reading, all above requirements
                         Clarke, all studies and etudes


                     APPLIED TRUMPET LEVEL III – MUSC 3911
  Students must reach Level III before presenting their half or full graduation recital.

This level is designed for the continuing refinement of Level I sound fundamentals, breathing techniques,
range, technical dexterity, and introduction to transposition. The focus is shifted towards recital preparation
through the introduction of the various pitched trumpets (C, B flat/A piccolo, and E flat) and literature
selection/preparation. It is expected that all of the following methods will be played at minimum 80% of the
marked tempo while stressing musicality and cleanliness. See attached scale/arpeggio syllabus for expected
forms and tempos.

Scales/Arpeggios:        1st Semester-All diminished/chromatic scales/major pentatonic/
                                  whole tone scales and arpeggios, two octaves, memorized
                         2nd Semester-Williams, Method of Scales
                         3rd Semester- Williams, Method of Scales
Tone Production:         Daily warm-up routine and range building, from the following;
                                  Schlossberg, Daily Drills and Technical Studies, pg. 13-47
                                  Stamp, Warm-Ups & Studies
                                  Cichowicz/Jacobs, Flow Studies
Technical Studies:       Clarke, Technical Studies for the Trumpet (in minor/diminished/
                                  augmented)
                         Williams, The Secret of Technique Preservation
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                         Goldman, 240 Double and Triple Tonguing Exercises
Etudes:                  To be selected from the following:
                                  Brandt, Orchestral Etudes
                                  Charlier, Etudes Transcendantes
                                  Hering, 23 Orchestral Etudes
                                  Reynolds, 48 Etudes
                                  Smith, Top Tones
C/Eb/Piccolo:            Primary for performance majors
                                  Bitsch, Vingt Etudes
                                  Broiles, Etudes & Duets for E-flat Trumpet
                                  Webster, Method for Piccolo Trumpet, Vol.1 &2
Transposition:           Caffarelli, 100 Melodic Studies
                         Hering, The Orchestral Trumpeter
                         Sachse, 100 Studies
                         Bordogni, Vingt-Quatre Vocalises
Sightreading:            Selected by instructor from duet books
                         Graded Trumpet Sight-Reading Grades 1-8 (Guildhall School)
Jury:                    Scales/Arpeggios, 4 each, selected by brass faculty from above
                               requirements per semester, memorized
                         Transposition/Sight-reading, Specimen Sight-Reading Tests for Trumpet
                                  (Associated Board of Royal Schools of Music) Grades 1-5 and Grades 6-8
Advancement:             See recital hearing guidelines

                                              Recital Guidelines
Trumpet majors, whether music education or performance degree, will appoint a recital committee approved
by the applied instructor. This committee will consist of a minimum of three music faculty, which will include
the entire applied brass faculty, and one non-brass music faculty. A hearing will be performed for the
committee no sooner than one month before the recital. At this time, the committee will issue one of three
recommendations: recital performance, replaying of hearing in two weeks, or failure/rescheduling of recital.


Junior Recital:          The junior recital (1/2) will be thirty minutes in length. It will consist of literature
                         that meets the expectations of the performance degree with final approval of the
                         applied instructor. It is highly recommended that the recital be in conjunction with
                         another player in order to have ample rest and variation. Literature will consist of
                         one movement (if a multi-movement work) or entire piece from each of the
                         following categories of the literature list: concerto/sonata, cornet solo, and
                         trumpet/brass ensemble. All stylistic periods (Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and
                         20th century) will be represented. All pitched trumpets (C, B flat/A piccolo, and E
                         flat) will be performed on.
Senior Recital:          The senior recital will be thirty minutes in length (1/2) for the music education
                         degree and one hour in length (full) for the performance degree. Music education
                         recital adheres to the requirements of the junior recital. Music education degree
                         candidates are recommended to schedule their recital in conjunction with another
                         player. The recital will consist of literature appropriate to the skill level expected
                         for the music education degree or performance degree with final approval of the
                         applied instructor. Literature will consist of one full piece from each category of the
                         literature list. All stylistic periods (Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and 20 th century)
                         will be represented. All pitched trumpets (C, B flat/A piccolo, and E flat) will be
                         performed on.
Literature:              Examples of accepted literature, but not limited to:
                                  Standard concerto or sonata examples
                                          (Haydn, Hummel, Arutunian) Concerto
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        (Hindemith, Kennan, Stevens)Sonata
Cornet solo examples
        Herbert L. Clarke, any
C/Eb/Piccolo trumpet examples
        Sachse, Concertino (E flat or Piccolo)
        Torelli, Sinfonia Con Tromba (Piccolo)
        Purcell, Sonata (Piccolo)
        (Vivaldi, Manfredini, Tartini, Telemann), Concerto
Trumpet choir or brass ensemble examples
        Arnold, Hoffnung Overture
        Ewald, Quintet No.1-4
20th Century examples
        Tomasi, Concerto
        Goedicke, Concert Etude
        Charlier, Solo Du Concours




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                                  East Tennessee State University
                                        Department of Music
                            Proficiency Requirements for Applied Tuba

The purpose of this course is to increase each student’s technical facility, musical awareness, and
performance capabilities through concentrated applied study. After an initial evaluation of each student, the
instructor will assign appropriate materials for study. Grading will be based on the student’s progress with
respect to Department of Music guidelines for degree programs and levels of study. A letter grade will be
given at each lesson and used to compute the overall daily average of the student. Students are encouraged to
inquire about the status of their grades at any time. Attendance and punctuality to lessons with a
professional quality instrument in good working order is mandatory. More than one absence will
automatically reduce the final grade (i.e. B to B-). More than six absences will result in failure of the course. If
a student must miss a lesson due to an official university function or illness, the student must let the
instructor know before the scheduled lesson and a make-up lesson will be scheduled when possible.

Level I students will develop all major scales and arpeggios two octaves. Special emphasis will be given to
embouchure, breath support, articulation, playing position, and all basic performance technique. Level II
students will develop all three forms of minor scales and arpeggios two octaves. Level I and II students will
study stylistic performance technique, tone production and intonation, while expanding their range and
dynamic control through etude and literature study. Development of sight-reading skills will also be
emphasized. Level III students will continue to expand their repertoire of solo literature in preparation for
their senior recital and also study orchestral and band excerpts. Tuba students at all levels must be proficient
in both bass clef and tenor clef. Other clefs will be studied as literature demands.

Participation in university ensembles is encouraged. Performance in one student recital each semester is
mandatory for all applied majors (performance in the weekly master class may suffice with approval of the
instructor) and encouraged for non-majors. All majors and students moving to the next level must perform
on a jury at the end of the semester, which shall encompass 30% of the semester grade. Required junior and
senior recitals featuring approved standard literature can serve as juries during the semester in which they
are performed with approval of the instructor and the department chairperson. In addition, all majors must
attend the required number of recitals as set forth in department policy as well as all brass faculty and brass
student recitals. Failure to comply with recital attendance policy will result in an Incomplete for the semester
until those requirements are met.


                           APPLIED TUBA LEVEL I – MUSC 1811
              Students should study at this level no more than three semesters.

                                          CORE STUDY MATERIALS
Kuehn                     60 Musical Studies for Tuba Bk I   Southern
Tyrrell                   Studies for Bass Tuba              Boosey & Hawkes


                           APPLIED TUBA LEVEL II – MUSC 2911
             Students should reach this level no later than their fourth semester.

                                          CORE STUDY MATERIALS
Kuehn                     60 Musical Studies for Tuba Bk I   Southern
Tyrrell                   Studies for Bass Tuba              Boosey & Hawkes
Arban                     Complete Method for Tuba           Encore
Bordogni                  43 Bel Canto Studies for Tuba      King


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                       APPLIED TUBA LEVEL III – MUSC 3911
  Students must reach Level III before presenting their half or full graduation recital.

                                    CORE STUDY MATERIALS
Kuehn               60 Musical Studies for Tuba Bk I   Southern
Tyrrell             Studies for Bass Tuba              Boosey & Hawkes
Arban               Complete Method for Tuba           Encore
Bordogni            43 Bel Canto Studies for Tuba      King

                                             LEVEL III
Morris              Intro to Orchestral Excerpts              Shawnee




                                                                               68 | P a g e
                               East Tennessee State University
                                     Department of Music
                      Proficiency Requirements for Applied Violin/Viola

                       APPLIED VIOLIN/VIOLA LEVEL I – MUSC 1811
              Students should study at this level no more than three semesters.

Skills:
Students should demonstrate proper basic physical setup, allowably with some adjustments needed. This
includes holding the violin/viola up with head and neck muscles keeping left hand free. Correct left hand
alignment with rounded fingers (fingernails kept short). Bow hold and arm should also have rounded fingers,
and bowing should be straight with capabilities of producing piano and forte dynamics. Rudimentary vibrato
should also be in place, as well as shifting.

Technique:
 Articulation including legato, staccato, slurs, and any mixture therein should be comfortable to the
   student.
 1st position should feel quite comfortable, and 3rd position should also be used

Scales:
 All one octave major and minor scales/arpeggios
 All major and minor 2 octave scales/arpeggios going up through 3 rd position
 1, 2, 3, and 4 notes per bow

Repertoire:
 Students should be between the levels of 3 and 5 in the Suzuki Books, or equivalent
 Vivaldi concerti, Handel Sonatas, or equivalent

Etudes and Sight-reading
 Students are studying basic etudes, such as early Kreutzer
 Students can sight-read slowly through 3rd position

                      APPLIED VIOLIN/VIOLA LEVEL II – MUSC 2911
            Students should reach this level no later than their fourth semester.

Skills:
Physical setup should feel more relaxed and in control than Level I. Bow fingers and arm should begin to
move with ease in creating a nice warm and even tone, as well as a straighter bow alignment. A fuller range
of dynamics will be possible, ranging from pp to ff. Vibrato should be more natural and even. Shifting is more
relaxed and quick. Intonation will be improved from Level I.

Technique:
 Adding to Level 1 articulations, spiccato and brush strokes are now being learned and refined.
 2nd and 4th positions should now be used
 Students will demonstrate more extended usage of the length and different sections of the bow

Scales:

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    All 2 octave and minor scales/arpeggios going up through 4th position
    1 to 6 notes per bow

Repertoire:
 Students should be between the levels of 6 and 8 in the Suzuki Books, or equivalent
 Mozart Sonatas or equivalent
 Viotti concerto, Haydn concerti, and Telemann concerto (viola)

Etudes and Sight-Reading:
 Students should be studying middle Kreutzer etudes, or early Kayser
 Sight-reading skills should extend up through 4th position


                     APPLIED VIOLIN/VIOLA LEVEL III – MUSC 3911
    Students must reach Level III before presenting their half or full graduation recital.

Skills:
Physical setup is relaxed, appropriate, and proficient. Bow hand and arm are operating with smooth control
and ease, using the entire length of the bow, or sections within. Tone is warm and even, and entire dynamic
range is being executed. Vibrato has settled into a nice speed and width, and is also being varied according to
the piece. Shifting is smooth, comfortable, and lands correctly. Intonation is excellent, with the students
listening and correcting themselves.

Technique:
 Adding onto Level 2 articulations, sautille is now learned, and the ability to quickly change to any other
   articulation
 Students are capable of learning all position necessary involved in repertoire

Scales
 All 3 octave major and minor scales/arpeggios
 1 to 12 notes per bow

Repertoire
 Mozart Concerti, Bruch Concerto, Mendelssohn Concerto
 Beethoven Sonatas, later Mozart Sonatas, or equivalent
 Solo Bach

Etudes and Sight-reading
 Students should be capable of studying all Kreutzer etudes, and early Gavinies, or equivalent
 Sight-reading skills should be include anything within reason if played slowly




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                                 East Tennessee State University
                                       Department of Music
                           Proficiency Requirements for Applied Voice
General factors for evaluation:
 Accuracy of presenting correct pitches, rhythms, and diction
 Appropriate musical phrasing, tempo, and styles
 Clarity of tone and intonation
 Understanding of the meaning of the text (word-by-word translation)
 Comfortable physical presence
 Continuous focus performance, even in the event of mistakes
 Genuine emotional involvement with the text
 Expressive and sincere communication
 Well-prepared ensemble between the singer and the pianist

Transfer students. All transfer students must register for Level I during their first semester at ETSU. The
jury at the end of the first semester will be used to determine appropriate placement.

                          APPLIED VOICE LEVEL I – MUSC 1841
              Students should study at this level no more than three semesters
Techniques:
 Proper posture
 Efficient breath management
 Balanced phonation
 Coordinated onset and release
 Elimination of wrong muscle tension
 Formation of vowels

Repertoire:
 Introduction to songs in foreign languages (Italian and German)
 Three to five selections should be presented at the jury.
 Selections presented must include at least two languages


                        APPLIED VOICE LEVEL II – MUSC 2941
  Students should reach this level no later than the beginning of their fourth semester

Prerequisites:
 At least two semesters of private voice lessons at Level I
 Pass the barrier jury (four selections/two languages)
 For Vocal Performance majors, the barrier jury to Level II also determines continuation in the
   performance curriculum

Techniques:
 Continuation of all above techniques
 Agility
 Resonance balance
 Unifying of registers

Repertoire:
 Introduction to French songs, opera or oratorio arias, and repertoire with melisma.
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    Four to six selections should be presented at the jury
    Selections presented must include at least three languages and contrasting styles


                         APLIED VOICE LEVEL III – MUSC 3941
    Students must reach Level III before presenting their half or full graduation recital

Prerequisites:
 At least two semesters of private voice lessons at Level II
 MUSC 2710, Diction I, and MUSC 2720, Diction II
 MUSC 4601, Vocal Pedagogy
 Pass the barrier jury (six selections/three languages)

Technique:
 Continuation of all above techniques
 Communication

Repertoire:
 Introduction to recitative and to contemporary repertoire.
 Six to eight selections should be presented at the jury; one of the selections is to be prepared
   independently.
 Selections presented must include three languages and contrasting styles


Recital Repertoire:
 Half Recital: Repertoire should present a minimum of three languages, and should include historical
   styles from the Baroque period through the contemporary period. Recital should contain mostly art song
   repertory and should not contain more than two selections of either arias from oratorio/opera or songs
   from musical theatre.
 Full Recital: Repertoire should present a minimum of four languages, and should include historical styles
   from the Baroque period through the contemporary period. Recital should contain mostly art song
   repertory, and it should not contain more than four selections of either arias from oratorio/opera or
   songs from musical theatre.

Recital Hearing:
All students must pass a recital hearing at least two weeks before the scheduled recital.
During the recital hearing, the student should present a typed recital program, and prepare to sing any songs
in the program from memory. Word-by-word translation will be requested during the hearing.




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