The_Da_Vinci_Code__DVD__Review

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					Title:
The Da Vinci Code (DVD) Review

Word Count:
574

Summary:
The Da Vinci Code as a novel is an
international bestselling phenomeno
n, but The Da Vinci Code as a movie
 is bound to be long forgotten by y
ear_s end. Directed by Ron Howard,
the Hollywood veteran behind such m
emorable films as A Beautiful Mind
and Cinderella Man, this adaptation
 of Dan Brown_s religious thriller
is 149 minutes of monotonous exposi
tion and tedious European spy thril
ler clichés. What makes Dan Brown_s
 novels so popular is the narrative
 background
Keywords: on such subje...
da vinci code dvd review

Article Body:
The Da Vinci Code as a novel is an
international bestselling phenomeno
n, but The Da Vinci Code as a movie
  is bound to be long forgotten by y
ear_s end. Directed by Ron Howard,
the Hollywood veteran behind such m
emorable films as A Beautiful Mind
and Cinderella Man, this adaptation
  of Dan Brown_s religious thriller
is 149 minutes of monotonous exposi
tion and tedious European spy thril
ler clichés. What makes Dan Brown_s
  novels so popular is the narrative
  background on such subjects as cry
ptography, secret societies, religi
ous orders, and alternative history
. But it_s difficult to translate s
uch ideas to the big screen, and it
_s here that The Da Vinci Code fail
s as a commercial thriller. Entire
scenes are composed of lectures on
the history of Christianity and the
  life of Leonardo Da Vinci. Michael
  Crichton has a similar style of wr
iting that focuses on scientific br
eakthroughs and cutting-edge techno
logy, but his novels adapt better t
o the big screen. Whereas Jurassic
Park briefly lectured audiences on
the inner-workings of DNA, then qui
ckly jumped to two hours of dinosau
rs terrorizing people, The Da Vinci
  Code keeps explaining, hypothesizi
ng, and lecturing only to leave its
 audience hanging. The ideas are in
triguing, but they make for a far b
etter novel than silver screen bloc
kbuster. Minus the interesting conj
ecture, the film is nothing more th
an a poorly written 1970s drugstore
 spy thriller&

Tom Hanks plays the lead role of Ro
bert Langdon, a Harvard professor o
f religious symbology lecturing in
Paris. When Jacques Sauniere (Jean-
Pierre Marielle), curator of the Lo
uvre, is found murdered and strange
ly positioned in his famous museum,
 local authorities initially consul
t Langdon for his expertise. But th
e professor soon learns from Saunie
re_s granddaughter, government cryp
tologist Sophie Neveu (Audrey Tauto
u), that he and the prime suspect a
re one and the same. Creating a div
ersion for the police, the two disc
over a hidden trail of clues create
d by Sauniere in the moments before
 his death, clues that just might l
ead them to most elusive treasure i
n human history _ the Holy Grail. W
ith InterPol hot on their trail, an
d the true murderer still at large,
 Langdon and Neveu enlist the help
of Grail historian Leigh Teabing (I
an McKellen) to teach them the hist
ory of the Grail_s protectors, The
Priory of Scion, and to help them u
ncover the endless clues that promi
se to unravel a 2,000 year mystery&

Despite the remarks of most critics
, Tom Hanks_ performance is not atr
ocious. Although his character is b
land at best, he wasn_t given much
with which to work. Robert Langdon_
s lack of development is more attri
butable to poorly written dialogue
and poor choices in direction. Ron
Howard tries to cover up some of th
e excessive dialogue with visual im
ages, but narrative is still narrat
ive even with flashback sequences.
Audrey Tautou delivers her lines we
ll, but suffers from the same const
raints as her Academy Award-winning
  screen partner. The only shining p
erformance is provided by Ian McKel
len as the eccentric and charming G
rail expert, Leigh Teabing. Some of
  his one-liners add a bit of comic
relief, but they_re only band-aids
on the gushing head wound that is t
his film. In the end, The Da Vinci
Code is a lesson on the distinction
 between two differing mediums. Mov
ies haven_t replaced books, or vice
-versa, for a reason. Sometimes, it
_s just better to read the book. In
 the case of The Da Vinci Code, thi
s is one of those moments...

				
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posted:12/27/2010
language:English
pages:5
Monika Kamal Monika Kamal Jesus http://ineed4u.blogspot.com/
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