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Googling to the Max

VIEWS: 5 PAGES: 55

									Search Smarter
        Improving Your
   Search Engine Strategies.
MVLS Workshop, March 16, 2006

Linda J. Goff, Head of Instructional Services
   California State University, Sacramento

               Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -    1
                  http://library.csus.edu
This presentation was created by
Linda J. Goff, March 16, 2006 for
Mountain Valley Library System.

Some of the content of this
presentation was borrowed with
permission from a presentation by
Patrick Douglas Crispen “Google
201:Advanced Googolgy.” which can
be viewed at: http://netsquirrel.com

               Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -   2
                  http://library.csus.edu
Glossary
   algorithm                       http
   browser                         hypertext link
   cache                           metasearch
   cookies                         invisible Web
   directory path                  phishing
   domain name                     portal sites
   html                            URL


              Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -           3
                 http://library.csus.edu
Reading Parts of the URL
http://library.csus.edu/databases/
  The part before the colon is the access
   method or protocol, (hypertext
   transfer protocol).
  The part after the double slashes is the
   net address or domain name of the
   computer where the resource is
   located.
  The directory path and filename
   come after the next slash.


               Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -   4
                  http://library.csus.edu
Today’s Agenda
 What search engines can & can’t do.
 How search engines think and work.
 Picking the right web search tool.
 Searching techniques & tips.
 Hands-on Exercises.



            Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -   5
               http://library.csus.edu
Today’s Goals – To learn
 How Google and other search engines
  really work.
 About alternatives to Google and
  Yahoo.
 How to construct better searches.
 Explore some of the newest web tools
  and features.


             Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -   6
                http://library.csus.edu
Part 1
                                         Search
What Search                              Engines
Engines Can
and Cannot Do



         Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -             7
            http://library.csus.edu
They can’t do (yet)
 Access the invisible Web (most
  proprietary databases).
 Search the content of pages that
  require interaction (filling out forms).
 Provide human evaluation of content
  (expert pages).



               Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -   8
                  http://library.csus.edu
Expert Pages
Infomine - Scholarly Internet Resource
   Collection http://infomine.ucr.edu/
Librarians’ Internet Index http://lii.org/
The WWW Virtual Library
http://www.vlib.org
CSUS Librarian Guides:
http://library.csus.edu/guides/


              Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -   9
                 http://library.csus.edu
Scholarly Research
 Google Scholar
  http://scholar.google.com/ is
  attempting to remedy this.
 Elsevier has produced “Scirus for
  Scientific Information Only”
  http://www.scirus.com/srsapp/



              Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -   10
                 http://library.csus.edu
Web search tools can now...
   Search multiple search engines.
   Answer natural language questions.
   Rank sites by links made to them.
   Cluster results into categories.
   Limit searches with advanced features.
   Search by file type.
   Or - a combination of the above.

               Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -   11
                  http://library.csus.edu
Natural Language Search
 Type your questions in Natural Language,
  (e.g., http://ask.com, (formerly
  AskJeeves.com).
 Analyzes words, grammar and syntax, and
  uses "templatics" to look for patterns in the
  way questions are asked.
 Ask.com responds with one or more closely
  related questions that it already knows the
  answer to.

                Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -   12
                   http://library.csus.edu
Metasearch engines

 Search simultaneously across multiple
  search engines and displays top sites
  in each:
     Dogpile.com
     Vivisimo.com
     GahooYoogle.com (Yahoo & Google)
     Jux2.com (Yahoo, Google & MSN)


               Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -   13
                  http://library.csus.edu
Part 2
                                          Search
How Search                                Engines
Engines Think
and Work



          Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -             14
             http://library.csus.edu
Writing a Search Statement
 Most users are not aware what
  happens once they type in a string of
  words and push the search button.
 We need to fully understand and
  intelligently perform web searches in
  order to better serve our users.



              Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -   15
                 http://library.csus.edu
       All Search Engines use
      Boolean Search Strategy
       a   AND          b                       a
   family AND violence                              b
           a   OR   c
    family OR domestic                          a
                                                    c
       b   NOT          d
violence NOT sexual abuse
                                                a
                                                    d
                Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -           16
                   http://library.csus.edu
How pages are indexed
 Programs called spiders (a.k.a. robots
  or “bots”) that constantly search the
  Internet looking for new or updated
  Web pages.
 When a spider finds a new or updated
  page, it reads that entire page, reports
  back, and then visits all of the other
  pages to which that new page links.

               Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -   17
                  http://library.csus.edu
Why is this significant?
 Pages with no links are unlikely to
  be indexed.
 Different search engines have
  different algorithms and therefore
  their indexes have different results.
 Let’s look in depth on how the most
  popular search engine (Google)
  actually works.
             Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -   18
                http://library.csus.edu
       Searching
 When you search, you’re actually searching
  Google’s cache of Web pages.
 And because of this, you can search for
  more than text or phrases in the body of a
  Web page.
 Google has some secret, advanced search
  operators that let you search specific parts
  of Web pages or specific types of
  information.
  Source: Google Hacks, p. 5

                          Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -   19
                             http://library.csus.edu
How Google works
 When you search for multiple keywords,
  Google first searches for all of your
  keywords as a phrase.
 So, if your keywords are disney
  fantasyland pirates, any pages on
  which those words appear as a phrase
  receive a score of X.



  Source: http://netsquirrel.com
                       Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -   20
                          http://library.csus.edu
How Google Works - Adjacency
                                       Google then
                                        measures the
                                        adjacency between
                                        your keywords and
                                        gives those pages
                                        a score of Y.
                                       What does this
                                        mean in English?
                                        Well …
   Image source: Google                      Source: Google Hacks, p. 21

                      Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -                        21
                         http://library.csus.edu
How Adjacency Works
A page that says
  “My favorite Disney attraction, outside of
  Fantasyland, is Pirates of the Caribbean”
will receive a higher adjacency score than a page
that says
    “A Walt Disney was a both a genius and a
    taskmaster. The team at WDI spent many
    sleepless nights designing Fantasyland. But
nothing could compare to the amount of
    Imagineering work required to create Pirates
of the Caribbean.”
                                       Source http://netsquirrel.com
                   Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -                 22
                      http://library.csus.edu
How Google Works - Weights
 Then, Google measures the number
  of times your keywords appear on the
  page (the keywords’ “weights”) and
  gives those pages a score of Z.
 A page that has the word disney four
  times, fantasyland three times, and
  pirates seven times would receive a
  higher weights score than a page that
  only has those words once.
                                             Source: Google Hacks, p. 21

             Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -                         23
                http://library.csus.edu
Putting it All Together
 Google takes
     The phrase hits (the Xs),
     The adjacency hits (the Ys),
     The weights hits (the Zs), and
     About 100 other secret variables
 Throws out everything but the top 2,000
 Multiplies each remaining page’s individual
  score by its “PageRank”
 And, finally, displays the top 1,000 in
  order.
                                       Source http://netsquirrel.com
                   Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -                 24
                      http://library.csus.edu
PageRank?
 There is a premise in scholarship
  that the importance of a research
  paper can be judged by the
  number of citations the paper has
  from other research papers.
 Google simply applies this premise
  to the Web: the importance of a
  Web page can be judged by the
  number of hyperlinks pointing to it
  from other pages.
                                             Source: Google Hacks, p. 294

             Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -                          25
                http://library.csus.edu
Also
 Google’s Boolean default is AND.
 The order of your keywords matters.
 Capitalization does not matter.
 Google has a hard limit of 10
  keywords.
 Google ignores a BUNCH of common
  “stop” words.

                                 Source http://netsquirrel.com
             Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -                 26
                http://library.csus.edu
Knowledge is Power
 Those who understand how Google
  works can manipulate the end results.
 When we move into the lab - Type
  “miserable failure” and hit “I’m
  feeling lucky” button.
 This is called Google bombing.



             Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -   27
                http://library.csus.edu
Part 3                                         World
Picking the                                    Wide
                                               Web
Right Search
Engine



               Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -           28
                  http://library.csus.edu
 Google and Yahoo are biggest
 qSearch monitors 1.5
  million English-speakers
  worldwide (1 million in
  the United States) via
  proxy metering. July’06
  to measure searching.




Source:
    http://searchenginewatch.com/reports/article.php/2156431
                          Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -        29
                             http://library.csus.edu
Choose based on your
Information Need
 Try Noodle Tools:
  http://www.noodletools.com/debbie/li
  teracies/information/5locate/adviceen
  gine.html




             Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -   30
                http://library.csus.edu
Google.com is the most popular
 Rankings based on number of links
  made to the sites, so results have
  been “voted on” by these links.
 .edu link counts more than one from
  a .com page.
 Special features include Advanced
  Search, Image, Froogle, Blogger,
  Google Catalogs, Google World etc.

             Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -   31
                http://library.csus.edu
Yahoo.com
 Originated “Directory” format to
  organize sites by subject and
  subheadings.
 Can be personalized: “My Yahoo”.
 Geographic versions “Get Local.”




            Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -   32
               http://library.csus.edu
Vivisimo.com
 Queries one or more web search engines
  (Metasearch).
 Clusters Documents into groups based
  on this information. Try Clusty.com also.
 Groups the documents. Orders the
  groups and the documents within each
  group.
 Displays the hierarchical categories.

               Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -   33
                  http://library.csus.edu
Ask.com
 Supports natural language searches.
 Recently absorbed Teoma.com
 Side bar suggests how to Narrow,
  Expand or find Related sites.




             Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -   34
                http://library.csus.edu
GahooYoogle.com
 Single search box queries both
  Google and Yahoo simultaneously.
 Displays results side-by-side.




             Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -   35
                http://library.csus.edu
Consult the Experts
 Searchenginewatch.com
 Searchengineguide.com
 Noodle.com
 netsquirrel.com
 LLRX.com
 Infotoday.com


             Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -   36
                http://library.csus.edu
Part 4
                                             World
Searching                                    Wide
Techniques                                   Web
and Tips



             Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -           37
                http://library.csus.edu
Command Searching
 Most search engines support these
  commands: plus/AND (+)
  minus/NOT(-) “phrase”
 Some support truncation (*) but not
  Google.
 Most ignore “stop” words (articles,
  conjunctions etc.)


             Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -   38
                http://library.csus.edu
Be as specific as possible
 If you’re planning a trip to Yosemite
  and know you’ll be camping, don’t
  search just Yosemite, instead try:
  +Yosemite +”camping reservation” –hotels
 Now all this can be done better from
  an Advanced Search screen.




               Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -   39
                  http://library.csus.edu
My Favorite Advanced Features
   Limit to domain name.
   Search in Title.
   Search by file type.
   Links – to find pages that link to the
    page.




                Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -   40
                   http://library.csus.edu
Guessing works
 Try typing a domain name into the
  address bar – it’s often quicker than
  using a search engine:

 ibm.com
  Pepsi
  whitehouse


               Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -   41
                  http://library.csus.edu
Use Shortcuts!
 Shortcuts are keywords that will take
  you to specific search features, such
  as maps, calculations, local info,
  airport conditions etc.

http://www.googleguide.com/shortcuts.html
http://tools.search.yahoo.com/shortcuts/index.html




                   Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -     42
                      http://library.csus.edu
Not sure the site is trustworthy?
 Erase the file name to get to the root
  of the URL and then see if you can
  find “About Us” or FAQ that will tell
  you enough to make a judgment.




              Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -   43
                 http://library.csus.edu
Lost a page?
Try the Wayback Machine!
 Internet Archive:
  http://www.archive.org/
 The Wayback Machine searches the
  archive for cached pages of versions
  of older web pages.




              Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -   44
                 http://library.csus.edu
Can you stand to take in any
more information?
 Yes?
 No?




           Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -   45
              http://library.csus.edu
Part 5
                                          Search
Bonus                                     Engines
Section




          Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -             46
             http://library.csus.edu
Google Tools




          Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -   47
             http://library.csus.edu
Google Services




          Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -   48
             http://library.csus.edu
Google Web Search Features




          Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -   49
             http://library.csus.edu
Google Print
                       Google has made deals
                        with publishers to make
                        new books searchable
                        online.
                       Search link to books
                        containing your search
                        terms, as well as other
                        information about the title.
                       Click one of the links under
                        "Buy this Book" and you'll
                        go straight to a bookstore
                        selling that book online.
Image Source:http://msnbc.msn.com/id/9785346/site/newsweek/
                    Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -        50
                       http://library.csus.edu
Google’s Digital Library
 Google has made a deal with large
  libraries to scan thousands of out of
  print library books to put them online.
 Association of American Publishers (AAP),
  has sued in federal court to stop Google.
 Publishers charge that by making electronic
  copies, the search giant is committing
  massive copyright infringement.
 We still recommend using real books!
Source: http://msnbc.msn.com/id/9785346/site/newsweek/
                    Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -        51
                       http://library.csus.edu
Google Labs




          Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -   52
             http://library.csus.edu
RSS or Feeds
 "RSS" may have come from "Really Simply
  Syndication." A feed is simply a way in
  which a reader may subscribe to website
  content, such as a blog or news site.
 You can use Feedster when you are looking
  for timely information from millions of
  news, blog and podcast sources.
  http://www.feedster.com/
 Most feeds are subscription services (you
  must register and login).
               Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -   53
                  http://library.csus.edu
Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -   54
   http://library.csus.edu
This presentation was created by
Linda J. Goff, March 16, 2006 for
Mountain Valley Library System.

Some of the content of this
presentation was borrowed with
permission from a presentation by
Patrick Douglas Crispen “Google
201:Advanced Googolgy.” which can
be viewed at: http://netsquirrel.com

               Linda J. Goff - Spring 2006 -   55
                  http://library.csus.edu

								
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