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LIFE DOESN T FRIGHTEN ME Open position

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					APPENDIX




   28
                                  LIFE DOESN’T FRIGHTEN ME
                                        By Maya Angelou


Shadows on the wall
Noises down the hall
Life doesn‟t frighten me at all


Bad dogs barking loud
Big ghosts in a cloud
Life doesn‟t frighten me at all


Mean old Mother Goose
Lions on the loose
They don‟t frighten me at all

Dragons breathing flame
On my counterpane
That doesn‟t frighten me at all

I go boo
Make them shoo
I make fun
Way they run
I won‟t cry
So they fly
I just smile
They go wild
Life doesn‟t frighten me at all




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                                                  GLOSSARY
Alignment           Having everything in its proper place

Choreographer       A person who creates or invents a dance

Choreography        The process of creating a dance

Concert             A formal performance of music or dance for an audience.

Costumes            Specific clothes designed for a dance or theater production.

Creative Movement   (See Improvisation)

Dance               Dance is an art form that uses human movement to express thoughts, feelings and ideas.

Directions          Dancers travel through space in various directions, left, right, down, up, and diagonal.

Focus               The ability to concentrate, which includes listening, following directions and completing assigned tasks
                    or combinations in a dance class.

Improvisation       Movement that is made up spontaneously (made up as you go along), ranging from free form to highly
                    structured movements. Also known as movement exploration or Creative Movement

Levels              The levels of movement – High, middle and low

Locomotor           Movement that travels from place to place. Basic locomotor movements are the walk, run, skip,
Movement            jump,hop, leap, slide and gallop. Low- level locomotor movements may be rolling, crawling or creeping.




                                                         30
Non-locomotor   Movement that takes place without traveling. Basic non- locomotor movements
Movement        are bending, stretching, twisting, rising, falling, opening, closing, swinging and shaking.

Parallel        Two lines that never intersect

Pathways        Design in space – circular, curved, straight, zigzag, etc.

Phrase, dance   A movement sentence, a set of movements that have a definite beginning, middle and end.

Posture         The way you stand or sit.

Shapes          The various designs the body can make. Shapes may be curved, angular, twisted, or straight

Technique       A skill used to learn how to dance

Transition      A movement, which is used to connect part of a dance phrase

Warm-up         Simple exercises at the beginning of class, which prepare the dancer‟s body to dance. The warm- up
                raises body temperature, moves the body through full range-of-motion activities, and helps the mind to
                focus on the new movement to be learned.




                                                      31
                                                  STYLES OF DANCE
BALLET               Ballet is like a language, which uses music and dance to tell a story. Ballet has formal positions and its
                     movements are very precise. It began in the European courts of the 16 th and 17th centuries. The French royalty
                     helped develop the art form, which is why ballet words are in French. In 1661, King Louis XIV founded the
                     Academie Royal de Danse (Royal Academy of Dance). The director, Pierre Beauchamp, recorded the steps and
                     positions, including the five positions of the feet, which form the basis of today „s technique. Two very famous
                     ballet choreographers are the late George Balanchine who started the New York City Ballet and Arthur Mitchell
                     who started the Dance Theatre of Harlem.

MODERN DANCE A style of dance started in America less than 100 years ago, which emphasizes freedom of expression. The
             pioneers of modern dance developed styles of dance, which expressed their own personal style and allowed
             them to communicate their own ideas and feelings. Two important American modern dancers were the late
             Martha Graham and the late Alvin Ailey.

TAP DANCE            An American art form, which blends African rhythms with Irish jig dancing. Tap dance uses the feet to execute
                     sounds, creating music o the floor. Tap dancing began in America in the early 1800‟s with “Master Juba” billed
                     as King of all Dancers. Bill “Bojangles” Robinson made tap dance famous with his intricate rhythms on the
                     balls of the feet and his performances in the Shirley Temple movies. Although absent from mainstream dance
                     for awhile, tap is again popular due to dancers such as Gregory Hines and Savion Glover who choreographed
                     and starred in the Broadway hit, “Bring in ‘da Noise, Bring in ‘da Funk”.

JAZZ DANCE           An American born style of dance, which blends influences of many different cultures. Its movements are clean,
                     cool and very energetic. Jazz dance is often associated with musicals, where it can be used to express
                     contemporary urban themes.

AFRICAN DANCE African dance is a part of African everyday lives. It is done to music, usually drumming to convey a certain
              message, meaning and/or purpose. Through dance, Africans show respect for their ancestor, the forces of
              nature, those who have passed on, work, family and community. Body part isolations, flexed feet, strong
              rhythms and a connection to the earth characterize African dance.




                                                                32
                                         BASIC BALLET TERMINOLOGY

Allegro           Quick movements

Arabesque         A poses on one leg with the other leg extended behind and the body forming a graceful curve

Attitude          A pose on one leg with the other leg lifted either backward or forward and bent at the knee

Barre             The handrail used by dancers to help them balance while exercising

Battement         A beating action of the working leg when extended or bent.

Degage            Disengaged. When the foot is pointed in an open position with a fully arched instep.

Derrière          Behind, when a movement is done behind the body

Devant            In front, when a movement is done in front of the body

Développé         Developed. An unfolding movement of the working leg into an open position in the air.

Frappé            Struck

Glissade          A gliding step that can be either jumped or taken smoothly up onto pointe.

Grand Battement   A big and energetic kick of the leg into the air.

Grand Jeté        A big leap with both legs stretched out as if doing a split in midair

Pas de bourreé    A traveling step changing from one foot to the other (step, cross, step)




                                                                33
Passé           Passed. One foot is picked up to form a triangle and passes in back or in front of the supporting leg at the knee.

Petit           Small

Pirouette       A turning step meaning a whirl

Plié            A knee bend

Port de bras    Carriage of the arms, a movement of the arms to and through various positions

Relevé          Raised. A movement in which you rise up on the balls of the feet.

Révérence       A curtsey or bow performed at the end of a class or performance.

Rond de Jambe   A circular movement of the leg

Sauté           Jump

Spotting        A movement of the head when performing turns to keep the dancer from getting dizzy

Tendu           Stretched foot

Turn out        To rotate the thighs, knees and toes away from each other, from the hip socket




                                                            34
                                 FIVE POSITIONS OF THE FEET AND ARMS
Most ballet movements begin and end in one of the five feet and arm positions. It is important for dancers to understand the five
positions, of both the feet and arms and be able to perform them with confidence.

FEET POSITIONS

First position        Stand with your heels touching (kissing) and your legs rotated out from the hip socket

Second position       Place your feet in the same line as first position but separated about shoulder‟s width apart

Third position        Cross one foot halfway in front of the other so that the heel of one foot touches the middle of the other

Fourth position       Place one foot exactly in front of the other with a space between them

Fifth position        Stand with your feel fully crossed and turned out

ARM POSITIONS

First position        Hold your arms in front of you in an oval shape. Curve your fingers so that your hand continues the shape of
                      your arm

Second position       Open your arms wide, keeping them slightly rounded. Be careful not to open past your shoulders.

Third position        Take one arm up and hold it in a graceful curve over your head. Your other arm remains out to the side as in
                      second position.

Fourth position       Curve one arm in front of your while keeping the other arm curved over your head.

Fifth position        Take both arms overhead, curved in an oval shape. The fingers should be slightly in front of your head.




                                                                   35
                                               POSITIONS OF THE BODY
There are eight basic positions of the body the dancer uses to show off the lines of the body. These eight positions are the basis from
which many ballet movements come from. They are designed so the audience will see a clear outline of the body in whatever
direction you are facing. For students in K-8 we will focus on four of these eight positions; Crosié, Ecarté, Effacé and En Face.
(Crosié, Ecarté and Effacé will all be described in the devant/in front position)


Croisé                Crossed – Facing a downstage corner, stretch the leg nearer the audience in front of you. Hold your upstate arm
                      high and your other arm to the side. Look out to the audience and incline the top of your body very slightly
                      back.

Ecarté                Seperated - Facing a downstage corner, extend the leg nearest the audience to second position. Hold your
                      downstage arm up and your other arm to the side. Keep your hips level and incline your body slightly away
                      from the audience.

Effacé                Open or shaded – Facing a downstage corner, extend the leg farthest from the audience in front of you. Hold
                      your downstage arm high in 5th position and your other arm extended to the side in 2nd position. Lean your body
                      slightly back, with your top arm gently framing your face.

En Face               Facing front




                                                                   36
                                STAGE DIRECTIONS

           Stage directions are always from the performers perspective facing the audience



UPSTAGE RIGHT          UPSTAGE CENTER                 UPSTAGE LEFT




CENTER STAGE RIGHT            CENTER STAGE                  CENTER STAGE LEFT




DOWNSTAGE RIGHT               DOWNSTAGE CENTER                     DOWNSTAGE LEFT


                                           AUDIENCE




                                                 37
                                     ELEMENTS OF DANCE

              SPACE                                TIME                 ENERGY



Personal space – The space your      Tempo – how fast or slow the         Sharp
own body takes up                    dance is. Speed
                                                                          Sudden
General space– The space we travel
through as we move around the                                            Smooth
room.
                                                                         Sustained
Levels – High, middle, low
                                                                          Strong
Direction – forward, backward,       Rhythm – pulse, pattern, breath,
sideways, up, down and diagonal      accent                               Light

Pathway- curved, straight, zigzag                                       Free-flow

Focus – single focus, multi- focus                                      Bound-flow




                                                    38
                          FAMOUS DANCERS & CHOREOGRAPHERS
1. Ailey, Alvin                               27. Humphrey, Doris
2. Allen, Debbie                              28. Jamison, Judith
3. Anderson, Lauren                           29. Joffrey, Robert
4. Astaire, Fred                              30. Johnson, Virginia
5. Baker, Josephine                           31. Kelly, Gene
6. Balanchine, George                         32. Kirkland, Gelsey
7. Baryshnikov, Mikhail                       33. Limon, Jose
8. Beatty, Tally                              34. Lopez, Lourdes
9. Benjamin, Fred                             35. Luigi
10. Brown, Buster                             36. Maclaine, Shirley
11. Butler, Jean                              37. Makarova, Natalia
12. Cunningham, Merce                         38. McBride, Patricia
13. D‟ambois, Jacques                         39. Mckayle, Donald
14. Diaghilev, Serge                          40. Mitchell, Arthur
15. Duncan, Isadora                           41. Mitchell, Deborah
16. Dunham, Katherine                         42. Nijinski, Vaslaw
17. Fagan, Garth                              43. Nureyev, Rudolph,
18. Farrell, Suzanne                          44. Pavolva, Anna
19. Fatima                                    45. Perez, Rosie
20. Feld, Elliot                              46. Pioone, Giuseppe
21. Glover, Savion                            47. Primus, Pearl
22. Graham, Martha                            48. Robbins, Jerome
23. Gregory, Cynthia                          49. Robinson, Bill “Bojangles”
24. Hines, Gregory                            50. Taylor, Paul
25. Holm, Hanya                               51. Tharp, Twyla
26. Horton, Lester                            52. Zollar, Jo Willa



                                         39
                Movement Word Wall


1. Applaud    26. Hop                51. Skip
2. Bend       27. Jab                52. Slash
3. Blow       28. Jump               53. Slide
4. Bounce     29. Kick               54. Slither
5. Burst      30. Leap               55. Sneak
6. Chop       31. Lift               56. Soar
7. Contract   32. Lunge              57. Spin
8. Crawl      33. Melt               58. Stamp
9. Creep      34. Poke               59. Stretch
10. Curl      35. Pounce             60. Sway
11. Dab       36. Prance             61. Swing
12. Dart      37. Press              62. Swirl
13. Dash      38. Pull               63. Tap
14. Dodge     39. Punch              64. Tip-toe
15. Explode   40. Push               65. Totter
16. Fall      41. Rise               66. Turn
17. Flee      42. Rock               67. Twist
18. Flick     43. Roll               68. Twitch
19. Float     44. Run                69. Waddle
20. Flutter   45. Shake              70. Wobble
21. Fly       46. Shiver             71. Walk
22. Gallop    47. Shrink             72. Waltz
23. Gather    48. Shuffle            73. Whirl
24. Glide     49. Sink               74. Wiggle
25. Grow      50. Skate              75. Wring




                            40
                              First position feet
Stand with your heels touching (kissing) and your legs rotated out from the hip socket




                                                  41
                                Second position feet
Place your feet in the same line as first position but separated about shoulder‟s width apart




                                                      42
              Third position feet
Cross one foot halfway in front of the other so that the
   Heel of one foot touches the middle of the other




                                    43
                    Fourth position feet
Place one foot exactly in front of the other with a space between them




                                         44
           Fifth position feet
Stand with your feet fully crossed and turned out




                             45
                    First position arms
          Hold your arms in front of you in an oval shape.
Curve your fingers so that your hand continues the shape of your arm




                                     46
                   Second position arms
       Open your arms wide, keeping them slightly rounded.
             Be careful not to open past your shoulders
Curve your fingers so that your hand continues the shape of your arm




                                       47
                    Third position arms
  Take one arm up and hold it in a graceful curve over your head.
    Your other arm remains out to the side as in second position.
Curve your fingers so that your hand continues the shape of your arm




                                         48
                         Fourth position arms
Curve one arm in front of your while keeping the other arm curved over your head




                                             49
                    Fifth position arms
        Take both arms overhead, curved in an oval shape.
        The fingers should be slightly in front of your head.
Curve your fingers so that your hand continues the shape of your arm




                                       50

				
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