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basic rifle marksmanship training Position

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basic rifle marksmanship training Position

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									                   Sergeant’s
                   Time
                   Training.Com



Sergeant’s Time Training.COM
Basic Rifle Marksmanship



 RIFLE                              RIFLE




     Sergeant’s Time Training.COM
Firing a rifle, and hitting your target with any certainty, is a
SKILL that needs to be learned. One thing that you must
remember is that it is a SKILL. You have to learn the skill and
then practice the SKILL like you learned. No one is born with a
natural ability to shoot well. You either learned before you came
into the military, or you were taught by the military.




   Sergeant’s Time Training.COM
 BASIC RIFLE MARSKMASHIP


• MECHANICAL ZERO
• STEADY POSITIONING
• 25 METER RANGE
 – ZERO
 – QUALIFICATION



  Sergeant’s Time Training.COM
      MECHANICAL ZERO

Mechanically zeroing the weapon is only necessary when the
weapon zero is questionable, the weapon is newly assigned
to the unit, or the weapon sights have been serviced. If
necessary, the soldier should
mechanically zero the weapon as follows:




  Sergeant’s Time Training.COM
      MECHANICAL ZERO




Adjust the front sight post (1) up or down until the base of the
front sight post is flush
with the front sight post housing (2).



 Sergeant’s Time Training.COM
            MECHANICAL ZERO




Adjust the elevation knob (3) counterclockwise, as viewed from above,
until the rear
sight assembly (4) rests flush with the carrying handle and the 8/3
marking is aligned with
the index line on the left side of the carrying handle.



        Sergeant’s Time Training.COM
           MECHANICAL ZERO




Position the apertures (5) so the unmarked aperture is up and the 0-200
meter
aperture is down. Rotate the windage knob (6) to align the index mark on
the 0-200 meter
aperture with the long center index line on the rear sight assembly.



      Sergeant’s Time Training.COM
STEADY FIRING POSITION
 THE FOUR FUNDAMENTALS


                 Steady Position


                       Aiming

                  Breath Control


                 Trigger Squeeze




 Sergeant’s Time Training.COM
             Steady Position

    When the Soldier
approaches the firing line,
   he should assume a
comfortable, steady firing
  position. The time and
 supervision each soldier
 has on the firing line are
          limited.

   Sergeant’s Time Training.COM
            STEADY POSITION
                Non-firing Handgrip

The rifle hand guard rests on the heel of the hand
   in the V formed by the thumb and fingers.
     The grip of the non-firing hand is light.




  Sergeant’s Time Training.COM
                STEADY POSITION
               Rifle Butt Position

The butt of the rifle is placed in the pocket of
              the firing shoulder.
 This reduces the effect of recoil and helps
          ensure a steady position.




Sergeant’s Time Training.COM
                    STEADY POSITION

                    Firing Handgrip

   The firing hand grasps the pistol grip so it fits
   the V formed by the thumb and forefinger. The
forefinger is placed on the trigger so the lay of the
rifle is not disturbed when the trigger is squeezed.




   Sergeant’s Time Training.COM
                    STEADY POSITION
                Cheek-to-Stock Weld

  The stock weld should provide a natural line of
sight through the center of the rear sight aperture
    to the front sight post and on to the target




  Sergeant’s Time Training.COM
                   STEADY POSITION
             Firing Elbow Placement

    The firing elbow is important in providing
    balance. Its exact location depends on the
firing/fighting position used. Placement should
         allow shoulders to remain level.




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                         AIMING

Having mastered the task of holding the rifle steady, the soldier
must align
the rifle with the target in exactly the same way for each firing.
The firer is the final judge as
to where his eye is focused.




    Sergeant’s Time Training.COM
                AIMING
Rifle Sight Alignment.

 Alignment of the rifle with the target is critical. It involves placing
the tip of the front sight post
in the center of the rear sight aperture




   Sergeant’s Time Training.COM
Rifle Sight Alignment. Alignment of the rifle with the target is critical. It
involves
placing the tip of the front sight post in the center of the rear sight
aperture. Any alignment error between the front and rear sights
repeats itself for every 1/2 meter the bullet travels.




  Sergeant’s Time Training.COM
        AIMING TRANSITION RANGE




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      BREATHING




 Breathing can be more directly
  controlled than your heart rate.
Controlled wrong it can lead to even
           worse results.

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      BREATHING




 PREFERED METHOD




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             BREATHING




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       BREATHING
       HEART RATE




Heartbeat can't be stopped, but you can slow it down.




Sergeant’s Time Training.COM
      TRIGGER SQUEZE

A novice firer can learn to place the rifle
in a steady position and to correctly aim
at the target if he follows the basic
principles. If the trigger is not properly
squeezed, the rifle will be misaligned
with the target at the moment of firing.


 Sergeant’s Time Training.COM
    Place trigger between first joint
    and end of finger
    Pull trigger straight to the rear
    Do not anticipate round firing
    Do not jerk trigger




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Trigger squeeze is important for two reasons:
First, any sudden movement of the finger on the
trigger can disturb the lay of the rifle and cause the
shot to miss the target.




      Sergeant’s Time Training.COM
Second,
the precise instant of firing should be a surprise to the soldier.
The soldier’s natural reflex to compensate for the noise and slight
punch in the shoulder can cause him to miss the target if he
knows the exact instant the rifle will fire.




    Sergeant’s Time Training.COM
25 METER QUALIFICATION
        RANGE




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                               3




1                        5




                     4



                                   2


Sergeant’s Time Training.COM
     25 METER ZERO
Shooting well is 50% Physical and 50% Mental. Learn both aspects
and you'll be a much better shooter. Shooting "well" only has a few
basic steps. Learn these steps and you will be a much better
shooter.




   Sergeant’s Time Training.COM
25 METER QUALIFICATION




 Sergeant’s Time Training.COM
    25 METER QUALIFICATION

The firer will be given two 20-round magazines to engage the 10 silhouettes on
the target.
20 Rounds will be fired on the Prone supported.(120 sec)
20 rounds will be fired on the Prone unsupported.(120 sec)




        Sergeant’s Time Training.COM
      25 METER QUALIFICATION



EXPERT               SHARP               MARKSMAN   BOLO
                     SHOOTER


38 - 40              33 - 37             26 - 32    0 - 25




          Sergeant’s Time Training.COM
It's not hard...really. Basic Rifle Marksmanship in the Military
is really not that difficult.




Sergeant’s Time Training.COM
Confidence is a big key. The 50% of shooting that is mental
is mostly about confidence.




Sergeant’s Time Training.COM
In The End you will shoot as well as you think you will
shoot.




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        QUESTIONS???




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