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REPORT OF THE SUPREME KNIGHT

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					REPORT OF THE SUPREME KNIGHT

KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS SUPREME COUNCIL 123RD ANNUAL MEETING AUGUST 2ND, 2005 – CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS

Financial and Fraternal Highlights
For the three years ending Dec. 31, (in millions) LIFE DIVIDENDS ASSETS SURPLUS NEW LIFE INSURANCE-ISSUED LIFE INSURANCE IN FORCE TOTAL REVENUE (excludes annuity deposits) For the three years ending Dec. 31, or June 30, 2005* (actual) 2004 2003 2002 $320 $11,735 $1,529 $6,221 $53,356 $1,522 329 10,947 1,427 5,221 49,112 1,461 302 9,958 1,326 4,484 45,636 1,389

2004

2003

2002

NUMBER OF COUNCILS* 12,767 MEMBERSHIP* 1,703,307 INSURANCE CERTIFICATES IN FORCE 1,571,643 CHARITABLE CONTRIBUTIONS $135,753,039 HOURS OF SERVICE 63,159,359

12,480 1,680,472 1,541,004 130,086,909 61,153,635

12,274 1,660,197 1,515,280 128,554,307 60,821,480

ABOUT THE KNIGHTS

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he Knights of Columbus is the world’s largest Catholic family fraternal service organization, with more than 1.7 million members in more than 12,000 councils throughout the United States, Canada, Mexico, the Philippines, Puerto Rico, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, the Bahamas, the Virgin Islands, Guatemala, Guam and Saipan. The Knights has more than $55 billion of insurance in force on its members. Annually, members at all levels of the organization report raising and contributing to charities of their choosing more than $135 million and volunteering more than 63 million hours of service. Father Michael J. McGivney, a 29-year-old assistant pastor at St. Mary’s Church in New Haven, Conn., founded the Knights of Columbus there in 1882. The name “Knights of Columbus”

was chosen by the founding members to signify that, like knights of old, the group embodied the ideals of spirituality and service to the Catholic Church, their country and those in need. The name was also chosen to emphasize that Catholics had been involved in the discovery, exploration and evangelization of the Americas. Father McGivney’s cause for sainthood is under investigation by the Vatican Congregation for the Causes of Saints. Should he be canonized, he would be the first U.S. born parish priest so honored. The principles of the Knights of Columbus are Charity, Unity, Fraternity and Patriotism. These remain the foundation on which the organization continues to grow. Support for the Catholic Church is a hallmark of Knights of Columbus activities at all levels of the organization.

He Is With Us.

CONTENTS
Introduction and Theme . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Insurance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Information Technology . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Investments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 United in Charity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Knights of Charity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Membership and Council Growth . . 13 Fourth Degree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Church Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Vocations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Solidarity With Our Troops. . . . . . . . 23 The Culture of Life and Strengthening Marriage . . . . . . . . 25 Championing the Dignity of Every Human Person . . . . . . . . . . 27 The New Evangelization . . . . . . . . . . 28 Knights of Columbus Museum . . . . . 30 Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Charitable Contributions . . . . . . . . . 32 Programs and Endowed Funds. . . . . . 39
COVER: THE CRUCIFIXION BY JESUIT FATHER MARKO IVAN RUPNIK AND THE CENTRO ALETTI (HOLY FAMILY CHAPEL, KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS SUPREME COUNCIL OFFICE, NEW HAVEN)

REPORT OF THE SUPREME KNIGHT

My Brother Knights:

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t the end of the Gospel of Matthew the risen Jesus, who will soon ascend to his heavenly kingdom, tells his disciples, “I am with you always.” It is something that we Knights reaffirm every time we greet each other by declaring Vivat Jesus! He lives, and he is with us! As we begin our 123rd annual Supreme Council meeting here in the great city of Chicago, we bear witness to the fact that he is with us in many ways: by the tremendous new records of charitable giving and volunteer service we have accomplished in his name over the past year; by the extraordinary progress we have made in protecting and providing for our families; and by the Eucharistic Congress that will follow our closing session, where we will renew our devotion to the Eucharist, the miraculous moment in which he is truly with us in his Real Presence. This has been a tumultuous year for all of us, with moments of deep sadness and great joy. Four months ago today, we mourned the passing of John Paul the Great. Few popes in the 2,000-year history of the Catholic Church have had so momentous an impact on the church and the world at large as this courageous and holy man. For 27 years, we Knights had the

Pope Benedict XVI received Supreme Knight Anderson and Supreme Chaplain Bishop Lori in audience at the Vatican on July 1. A check for $1.6 million was presented to the Holy Father representing the proceeds from the Vicarius Christi Fund and additional funds for Asian tsunami relief.

wonderful privilege of serving and working with him in many different ways. The Church grew by 45 percent during his papacy, and we grew with it. John Paul survived both Nazi and Soviet totalitarianism to become the pope of peace and reconciliation. I was privileged to represent you at his funeral, and it is hard to describe the mixture of the sense of great loss and the feeling of great pride that all of us felt there in St. Peter’s Square as we bade him farewell. He was a giant of our age, and we will benefit from his legacy for generations to come.

When the time came for the conclave of cardinals to choose John Paul’s successor, they could not have made a better choice. I had the pleasure of representing both the Order and the people of the United States as part of President Bush’s official U.S. delegation to the inaugural Mass for Pope Benedict XVI. He possesses not only a tremendous intellect, but a kind and warm pastor’s heart. He is not only an old friend of the Knights of Columbus, but a long-time neighbor! During the more than two decades that he spent at John Paul’s right hand as prefect of
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the Congregation of the Doctrine of the Faith, he lived in an apartment upstairs from our office in Rome. A few weeks ago, I met with him at the Vatican on your behalf to present him with a check for $1.6 million, which included this year’s earnings from the Order’s Vicarius Christi Fund. I’ll have more to say about that very good meeting in a few minutes. Another milestone occurred earlier this year when our longtime supreme chaplain, Bishop Thomas V. Daily, retired after 18 years of enthusiastic and dedicated service. Bishop Daily now holds the title “Supreme Chaplain Emeritus,” and it’s wonderful, as always, to enjoy his warm and reassuring presence here with us at this year’s convention once again. Our new supreme chaplain, Bishop William Lori, has been a brother Knight for more than 19 years. I had the great pleasure of working with him when he was state chaplain and I was state deputy in the District of Columbia. We are deeply grateful to him for agreeing to become our spiritual leader, following in the footsteps of the Servant of God, Father Michael J. McGivney, the holy priest who founded our Order 123 years ago. I hope you all had an opportunity last night to see the world première performance of He was Our Father: The Story of Father Michael J. McGivney. I want to personally thank Dominican Father Peter Cameron, founder of the Blackfriars Repertory Theater, who agreed to write this play about Father McGivney and arrange for the Blackfriars to produce it for us here in Chicago. I also want to note the presence here at our convention this week of the well-known historian and biographer Douglas Brinkley, who has written a magLEFT: © L’OSSERVATORE ROMANO

nificent new biography of Father McGivney. It will be published by Harper in January, and if it is anywhere near as popular as his most recent best-selling book, The Boys of Pointe du Hoc, millions of Americans will soon know the story of Father McGivney and the Knights. Also early next year, we will publish By Their Works, a great new book by author Steve Singular, featuring profiles of more than 60 Knights of Columbus, some well known and others not as well known. Among the featured brother Knights are Babe Ruth, Sargent Shriver, John F. Kennedy and Vince Lombardi. Every Knight will want to own a copy of this terrific book. The cause for canonization of Father McGivney continues to receive careful consideration in Rome, and we are adding about 400 members a month to the

Father McGivney Guild. Membership now stands at just under 100,000. I hope you’ll continue to encourage every Knight to become a member of the Guild! Joining could not be easier — it takes only a minute or two on the Father McGivney Web site (www.fathermcgivney.org). Think how wonderful it would be if we had 1.7 million prayers every day for Father McGivney’s sainthood. I also want to begin our convention week with hearty congratulations to Knights in Mexico and the Philippines, where they are both celebrating their centennial years in the Order. I had the pleasure of joining in the 100-year celebrations in both Mexico City and Manila, and the fraternal hospitality and enthusiasm I experienced in both cities gives me a great deal of optimism about the future of Columbianism there.

INSURANCE

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hen Father Father McGivney had a McGivney founded pastor’s heart matched with a the Knights, he penchant for practical and wanted local effective action. Under his councils to organize and conduct direction, the Knights of fraternal activities to Columbus replaced the pracbenefit members, the tice of passing the hat to parish and the help a deceased member’s community at large. family with a new strucHe was especially ture that offered life concerned with insurance to its widows and members. The pooling orphans, because he of insurance premiums knew firsthand what at the Supreme Council it meant to lose the created the basis for a Father McGivney father and breadwinner financially sound program, in the family. His own and helped relieve local father died when he was a councils of the burden of young seminarian. For Father supporting its widows and their McGivney, the most important families. fraternal benefit his Knights could As membership grew and provide was financial assistance individual member needs became to members’ families affected by more varied, the Order responded. the death of a breadwinner. Associate (non-insurance)
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members were welcomed, but always with the desire and the objective of transferring them to insurance members at the first opportunity. The availability of insurance was extended to members’ juvenile sons and later to their wives and daughters. New products were designed to make insurance affordable to more members. Our insurance in force has grown continuously for over 60 years, and in recent years, our rate of growth has been nothing short of extraordinary. On May 19, we surpassed the $55 billion mark of insurance in force, and we will pass $57 billion by year end. Ten years ago we had $26.7 billion in force. In other words, our insurance in force has doubled in a single decade! Our net gain over the past year alone amounted to $4.2 billion or 8.6 percent; the largest single year increase in the Order’s history. In 2004 we issued a record $6.2 billion of life insurance, a 19.1 percent increase over last year. A total of 82,265 certificates were sold with a face value of $6,220,721,000. The average size of the new certificate issued was $75,618 compared to $67,631 last year. Our 19.1 percent increase in insurance sales was more than three times the industry’s 6 percent increase last year. An equally important measure of the success of the Order’s insurance program is the amount of insurance that remains in effect year after year. Our persistency rate was 96.5 percent last year, reflecting a lapse ratio of 3.5 percent, which compares most favorably to the industry’s lapse rate of 7.5 percent. In addition to the 82,265 life sales, our field force sold 9,114 annuity contracts and 3,881 long-term care insurance
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INSURANCE IN FORCE
$Billions 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 0 25

53 49 46 43 40
50

NEW INSURANCE ISSUED
$Billions 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 0 2 4

6.2 5.2 4.5 4.3 4.0
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LIFE CERTIFICATES IN FORCE LIFE CERTIFCATES IN FORCE
Millions 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 0 0.4 0.8 1.2

1.57 1.54 1.52 1.49 1.47
1.6
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LIFE INSURANCE PREMIUMS
$Millions 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 0 250 500

814 766 720 680 641
750

LIFE INSURANCE DIVIDENDS
$Millions 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 0 100 200

320 329 302 281 258
300

contracts for a total of 95,260 new certificates. Our number of life certificates in force has gone up every year since 1970. Last year, we had a gain of 30,639 life certificates, bringing the total to 1,571,643, a gain of 2.0 percent. Over the past decade, we gained 291,543 certificates, for a 23 percent increase. The Order ranks first among all fraternal societies in the number of life certificates sold this past year, surpassing the second best by more than 25,000 certificates. Our net gain of 30,639 life certificates is greater than the net gain of all other societies added together.

Sales of our long-term care products remained steady. We issued a record 3,881 new contracts, bringing our total number of contracts in force to 16,033. Our long-term care products are available in both the United States and Canada. Total premium income amounted to $832 million for 2004. This is $52 million or 6.7 percent more than in 2003. Annuity premiums and deposits collected for 2004 were $246 million. Long-term care premiums were $16.9 million, an increase of $3.7 million or 28 percent. In the all-important category

of premium income on individual life certificates, the Order experienced another very good year. Life premiums amounted to an all-time high of $814 million, for an increase of 6.3 percent, or $48 million over the prior year. The 2004 increase over 1994 amounts to $405 million, or a 96 percent increase. Life dividends to living members allocated for 2005 amounted to $320 million. In addition, $2 million of dividends were allocated to holders of certain annuity certificates. Due to the continuing low interest rate environment, the board of directors voted to lower the 2005 dividend scale for the first time in eight years. Even after this adjustment, the Order continues to use an interest rate factor in its dividend formula for unborrowed life insurance funds that is among the highest in the industry. The $320 million in life dividends is more than double the $145 million allocated in 1994, ten years earlier, reflecting an increase of 120 percent. The Order’s generous and equitable dividend policy continues to make Knights of Columbus insurance a most attractive investment for our living families, as well as providing for our bereaved families. This year we paid out $164 million in death benefits to beneficiaries of deceased brother Knights. This money will pay mortgages, health care and college tuitions, helping to make life easier for those left behind. Since our founding, the Order has paid nearly $1.9 billion in death benefits. To our living members and families, the Order has paid over $6.7 billion in maturities, dividends, interest, proceeds of annuities, long-term care benefits and disability waivers. Those are more than numbers on a balance sheet. They represent peace of mind to the
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widows of deceased brother Knights and to elderly people and people with disabilities. Our success in these areas is matched by the recognition we have received from the firms that rate insurance companies. Once again this year, we received the highest possible ratings from both the A. M. Best Company and Standard & Poor’s. We also retained certification for ethical sales practices from the Insurance Marketplace Standards Association (IMSA). We are among only five insurers in North America to have achieved all three of these distinctions. For the 13th consecutive year, Standard & Poor’s has given us its highest rating, AAA (Extremely Strong). S&P cited our very strong earnings performance, high-quality investment portfolio and conservative investment management practices. And for the 30th year in a row, the Knights of Columbus earned the A++ (Superior) rating from A. M. Best. In its report, the independent ratings firm cited our strong market presence in the Catholic community, our continued growth in membership, as well as our consistently profitable operations and exceptionally strong capitalization. This past year we continued to focus on improving how we serve our members and their families. An accelerated benefit option which allows the terminally ill insured to receive, prior to death, a partial distribution from their whole life insurance coverage is now available. Our customer service center staffing was expanded and the Knights of Columbus Web site was enhanced with new features including the membership recruitment video “Why Join?” and the insurance video “Stages of Life.” The key to our success is our
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focus on families — providing high-quality, low-cost protection. Knights of Columbus Insurance has earned its status as the Order’s greatest fraternal benefit. Today, with more than $55 billion of life insurance in force, our 1,400 hard-working general and field agents continue to fulfill our founder’s vision of

protecting Catholic families for generations. Today, the Order’s unique fraternal-insurance programs are needed more than ever. It is up to each of us to demonstrate to every Catholic man that the Knights of Columbus will add both personal and financial value to his life.

I N F O R M AT I O N T E C H N O L O G Y

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e continue forward with the dramatic transformation of our information technology infrastructure, converting our paper insurance files into digital files and improving the utility of our Web site for our council officers, members, agents and guests. A linchpin to this transformation is replacement of our existing insurance administration system and client data base system. Today we are in the midst of integrating the replacement system into our operations. This system will allow us to reduce the time to process requests for information and new insurance. It will also permit us to move forward in the area of e-commerce, including faster communication and service to all of our members. In June, we passed the half way mark in imaging more than 1.8 million insurance files. When we complete the process in 2007, we will have eliminated the need for paper files, and improved member and customer service. Turning to the Internet, this year we completed a new search tool, “Find a Council,” to help members and prospective members locate the nearest councils to them. In response to the volume of inquiries that we are receiving, we have accumulated the e-mail address

for more than 6,000 of our financial secretaries and now forward these inquiries to the local financial secretaries. We also completed two multimedia recruiting pieces. “Why Join?” is designed for membership recruitment, while “Stages of Life” is designed to help the member better understand the role life insurance plays in one’s financial plan. Both of these pieces are presented in English, French and Spanish. Changes were also made to Father McGivney and to the Knights of Columbus Museum sections of the Web site. Our initiative, “Officers Online,” will allow us to send and receive information via the Internet to and from elected state and local officers, district deputies and financial secretaries. In addition, it will bring a number of council member and reporting transactions online. The initial phase of this project, which we have labeled “Reports Online,” will go live in a controlled rollout between now and the end of the year. Our Web site continues to extend our message beyond the realm of our members. The historical documentation of the Knights of Columbus relationship with the papacy, and particularly with John Paul II, is now part of the Library of
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Congress. In the months following the passing of John Paul II, the Father McGivney Web site has become a prime reference point for the public as they search the Internet for details of the process for sainthood.

Today, our Web site provides the latest information about major issues affecting the Catholic community today. Updates are posted weekly and sometimes even daily on topics of legislation, Church affairs and activities of the Order.

INVESTMENTS

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y far, the single largest component of the general account is our bond portfolio, which at yearend 2004 totaled over $10 billion. This well-diversified portfolio provides the major support for our life insurance and annuity products. In the year 2004 alone we made more than $3 billion in new bond investments. Due to the low level of interest rates — lowest since the late 1950s — a significant portion of these funds was invested in lower yielding issues. The average quality rating on these new purchases was AA in keeping with our long tradition of maintaining an investment-grade portfolio of bonds. I am happy to report that our conservative investment selection practices and by actively managing the risk, at year end 2004 only one bond issue was in default. In addition, our investment and legal staff worked hard to achieve nearly full repayment of this bond issue during 2005. At year-end 2004, our U.S. common stock holdings were $318 million. As with all of the Order’s investments, careful attention is given to each company’s lines of business to make certain that its activities are not in violation of Church teachings. Our objective for investing in common stocks is long-term capital appreciation.

The Order’s investment in preferred stocks was $246 million at year end. By investing only in securities with solid credit characteristics, we again minimized our risk as we

improved our earnings. Our Church Loan mortgage loan program for religious institutions, mainly local parishes and schools, continues to expand and equaled $146 million at year end. During 2004, we made 16 new loans commitments totaling $32.4 million. We believe there is great potential to expand our Church Loan program both in the United States and Canada. Gross investment income exceeded $689 million in 2004 for a yield of 6.33 percent. Total cash flow amounted to $2.5 billion, providing the Supreme Council Investment

NET INVESTMENT INCOME
$Millions 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 0 200 400

646 637 618 579 544
600

GAIN FROM OPERATIONS BEFORE DIVIDENDS
$Millions 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 0 100 200 300

393 403 403 378 363
400

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GAIN FROM OPERATIONS AFTER DIVIDENDS
$Millions 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 0 30 60

71 66 86 81 88
90

ASSETS
$Billions 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 0 4 8

11.7 10.9 10.0 9.2 8.6
12

SURPLUS
$Billions 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 0
8

1.53 1.43 1.33 1.31 1.28
0.4 0.8 1.2 1.6

Department with more than $9 million to invest each working day. Total income, excluding annuity deposits of $245 million, amounted to more than $1.5 billion. Based on total income of the largest 1,000 industrial companies, Fortune magazine ranks us the 891st largest. It also ranks us as the 9th largest non-stock life and health insurance company in the United States and the second largest fraternal benefit society. The sources of our $1.5 billion income included: life insurance premiums — $814 million, or 53.5 percent of the total; investment income — $646 million for 42.5 percent; supplemental contracts and other income — $58 million for 3.8 percent; and per capita income — $4 million for 0.2 percent. The expenses associated with issuing new life insurance increased significantly as a result of the extraordinary increase in sales last year. This increase in expenses and the continuing low interest rate environment, decreased earnings for 2004. The gain from operations was $393 million or $10 million less than the previous year. After deducting $322 million in dividends, the gain from operations amounted to $71 million or $5 million more than last year. Including realized capital gains of $90 million, most of which came from the sale of half of our common stock investments, our net gain was $161 million. At year end our assets reached a new all-time high of $11.7 billion, ranking us 72nd by A.M. Best among 1,500 insurance companies in North America. The gain over 2003 amounted to 7.2 percent, or $789 million. Ten years ago, the Order’s assets
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amounted to $5.2 billion. This reflects an increase of 125 percent. As of July 1, 2005, our assets now exceed $12 billion. A. M. Best stated that “The society’s strong statutory gains from operations coupled with realized investment gains have enabled the society to increase its adjusted unassigned funds in recent years allowing the society to maintain its exceptional level of risk-adjusted capitalization.” Standard & Poor’s says that: “The [Order’s] high surplus level provides additional interest earnings, which have allowed it to maintain a high dividend payout ratio.”

The bottom line is simply this: The underlying financial strength of any company is reflected in its capital structure. In this regard, The Knights of Columbus is clearly superior. We have a surplus of $1.53 billion and asset valuation reserves of $131 million, bringing our margin of safety to more than $1.6 billion. Since 1994, our surplus has increased 144 percent. Our solvency ratio (assets compared to liabilities) is 115.0 percent, among the highest in the industry. In short, we are financially strong, with a record of quality management and sound investment second to none.

UNITED IN CHARITY

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ast year the board of directors recommended and delegates to the 2004 annual meeting ratified a plan to grow the Order’s endowment funds through the initiative United in Charity. Many of you received a mailing that introduced this initiative, and the response has been impressive. More than 35,000 members have donated over $1.4 million for this unrestricted endowment. This is a wonderful start, but it will take several years for this fund to reach a level capable of generating earnings to fund the critical charitable objectives of the Order. Why do we create endowment funds? And why should we expand them? An endowment fund allows us to make a lasting impact and to ensure that the long-term goals we champion receive ongoing financial support. United in Charity is by no means our first endowment. Back in 1914, the Order established a restricted endowment benefiting The

Catholic University of America. So we’ve been doing this for a long time. Some funds memorialize our solidarity with the Church and support for religious vocations. The proceeds from more than $16 million of endowment funds support these causes each year. Other funds support the Villa Maria Guadalupe Retreat Center and John Paul II Institute for

been used to establish endowment funds in the Order’s history. The Bishop Thomas V. Daily Vocations Scholarship and the John Paul II Cultural Center funds came as the result of resolutions at Supreme Council annual meetings, and were funded via special per capita assessments. The Pacem in Terris and Vicarius Christi funds, also approved by actions at annual meetings, were generated by allocation from the Supreme Council’s funds. Other funds were established by donations and bequests of members. Today, the Order has more than $54 million in endowed funds, with the earnings from these funds distributed annually to support specific causes. But additional, unrestricted funds are needed today, and will be needed tomorrow, to support other vital causes. Each year, the Order receives special requests from the Church and organizations closely aligned with our mission. The proceeds from an unrestricted endowment fund would help support these important endeavors. Another way for brother Knights to aid United in Charity

More than 35,000 members have donated over $1.4 million for United in Charity — this is a wonderful start
Studies on Marriage and Family, promoting both the sanctity of life and the sanctity of marriage and family. Education and scholarship funds support new generations of Catholic men and women, including dependents of our brother Knights who died in service to our nations and communities. Different approaches have after family insurance needs have been met is by the gifting of life insurance. A number of members have inquired about this and we have already begun to receive insurance gifts. A brochure explaining how to gift life insurance has been developed and the Order is training our agents in the field, who are ready to assist in this effort.
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KNIGHTS OF CHARITY

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hen Pope Benedict XVI delivered his inaugural homily at his installation Mass — an event telecast worldwide thanks to our satellite uplink program — he said, “The Church is alive!” The Church is alive because Jesus lives, and it is this reality that animates the work of the Knights of Columbus. We demonstrate this central belief of our faith chiefly through our volunteer charitable service programs. It is in our works of charity in our parishes, our com-

munities and around the world that we make present to those we help the living presence of Christ. Charity is the animating foundation of our mission as Knights. When we become Knights, we pledge to be at the service of the dignity and the destiny of our neighbor. The Second Vatican Council explains it this way: “The best way to fulfill one’s obligations of justice and love is to contribute to the common good according to one’s means and the needs of society” (Gaudium et Spes, 30).

CONTRIBUTIONS
$Millions 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 0 30 60 90

136 130 129 126 116
120

VOLUNTEER HOURS
Millions 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 0
10

63 61 61 59 57
20 40 60

The care and concern we Knights show for those in need is, increasingly, a hallmark of our Order. Year after year, our works of charity increase and our financial contributions grow, leaving no doubt that “He Is With Us.” This past year was the Order’s greatest, according to our annual Survey of Fraternal Activity. In 2004, the Knights of Columbus set new records for charitable giving and volunteer hours. Total contributions to charity at all levels climbed to $135,735,039, exceeding 2003’s total by more than $5 million. This figure includes $26.3 million in contributions by the Supreme Council; $11,611,596 by state councils; and $97,753,348 in donations from local councils, assemblies and Squires circles. In 2004 we also volunteered a record 63,159,359 hours of service. This is up from 61 million hours in 2003. These totals are based on responses from 75 percent of all our units. Currently we are giving a less than complete picture of who we are as Knights and what we accomplish for the good of society. It is our goal to have 100 percent reporting on the 2005 fraternal survey. This goal is important for several reasons. Most critical now is a staff recommendation before the U.S. Congress to repeal the tax-exempt status of fraternal organizations like the Knights of Columbus. Needless to say, this would have a serious negative impact on us and on the charitable work of the Order. We have been working very hard on this issue, meeting with key senators about the value of our charitable work to our communities and the nation. I believe that the tide is turning in our favor on this, but we cannot afford to take any chances. We have already asked
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brother Knights who are represented by members of the Senate Finance and House Ways and Means Committees to contact their members of Congress on this issue, and if it appears necessary, we will broaden that effort and ask every U.S. Knight to contact his senators and representatives. Our proven record of volunteerism and outreach makes us leaders in our communities and in our nations. As leaders, we deserve to have our voice heard on this issue. The fraternal survey also captured these vital statistics about our service in 2004: SERVICE TO THE CHURCH 28.2 million hours
SERVICE TO THE COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY (in millions) Elderly. . . . . . . . . . . . $2,126,928 People with Physical Disabilities . . . . . . 2,676,109 Special Olympics . . . . 2,383,421 People with Intellectual Disabilities . . . . . . 15,174,452 Human Needs. . . . . . . 6,265,599 Pro-Life Programs . . . . 4,321,836 Victims of Disaster . . . 2,221,171 Hospitals/ Institutions . . . . . . 1,876,466 Health/Service Organizations . . . . 2,471,287 Community Projects . . . . . . . . . 5,875,652 Miscellaneous . . . . . . . 3,964,153 TOTAL COMMUNITY $49,357,074 YOUTH (in millions) Columbian Squires . . . $629,886 Scouting . . . . . . . . . . . 1,206,699 Youth Groups . . . . . . . 2,798,138 Youth Welfare/ Services . . . . . . . . . 1,536,865 Athletics. . . . . . . . . . . 1,871,980 Scholarships/ Education . . . . . . . 6,032,610 Miscellaneous . . . . . . 2,072,584 TOTAL YOUTH $16,148,762

16.7 million hours SERVICE TO YOUTH 8.2 million hours MISCELLANEOUS SERVICE 9.8 million According to Independent Sector, the value of each volunteer hour in 2004 was more than $17. Our volunteer hours are worth more than $1 billion, using this measure. That is a tremendous record, and one that we should highlight. Of the $109,364,944 total charitable disbursements by state and local units, gifts were made in the following categories: CHURCH (in millions) Church Facilities . . . $16,678,228 Catholic Schools . . . . . 9,578,274 Religious Education . . 3,456,393 Seminarians/RSVP . . . 4,881,560 Seminaries . . . . . . . . . 1,663,306 Vocations Projects. . . . 1,839,231 Miscellaneous . . . . . . . 5,762,116 TOTAL CHURCH $43,859,108

should have broad appeal. Customized soccer balls with our emblem on them have been made and are available, along with all of the reporting forms, publicity guides and award certificates councils will need to conduct this program. We know that this program will become as popular as our Free Throw Championship, which this year had nearly 200,000 youngsters participating in competitions sponsored by more than 3,000 councils. We introduced new promotional items, such as K of C regulation-size basketballs, miniature glow-in-the-dark balls, and miniature basketball and backboard sets. These items were well received and helped increase participation from youth and Knights. In 2004, we also reported the following: HOURS OF FRATERNAL SERVICE 9,388,709 VISITS TO THE SICK AND BEREAVED 6,038,382 MEETINGS 287,420 BLOOD DONORS 407,746

While our Church and community outreach increased from 2003 to 2004, our youth disbursements dropped slightly. This is the second year in a row that this has occurred. I am happy to announce a new youth athletic program that will show the Knights of Columbus is interested in youth. This fall we will kick off our Knights of Columbus Soccer Challenge. Open to all boys and girls ages 10 to14, the Knights of Columbus Soccer Challenge

Let us redouble our efforts to have our Order connected to the life of the Church at every level
These expressions of our fraternal brotherhood are just as important as our gifts of money and service. In 2004, we also reported $114 million in fraternal benefit costs. This is the amount spent by our Order at every level of the organization to promote, support and grow the Knights of Columbus. Included in this figure are expenditures for Columbia magazine, support of membership operations, leadership training programs and promotional campaigns. Nearly one-third of all jurisdictions, or 21 state councils, had 100 percent of their councils submit the fraternal survey, and 29 state councils had 100 percent reporting from Fourth Degree assemblies. The average Orderwide per-member contribution in 2004
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was $80.45, up $3 from 2003. Brother Knights in British Columbia reported the highest per-member contribution at $262.40. Ten jurisdictions reported average per-member contributions of $100 or more. More than half of all jurisdictions reported total gifts of more than $1 million. Leading jurisdictions were: ONTARIO $7,655,212 CALIFORNIA $6,572,879 QUEBEC $5,752,883 ILLINOIS $5,595,344 FLORIDA $5,555,056

TEXAS $5,513,976 MICHIGAN $5,268,878 NEW JERSEY $4,049,657 MINNESOTA $3,395,356 OHIO $3,353,995 These are fantastic records, but we can do more. In the months ahead let us redouble our efforts to have our Order connected to the life of the Church at the parish level, in our schools and our parish outreach projects. Every practical Catholic ought to see a potential home in the Knights of Columbus, if not yet a home then a hand reaching out to help them.
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MEMBERSHIP AND COUNCIL GROWTH

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hen it comes to membership, we have just completed a spectacular year! Our net gain of 22,835 is the highest net gain in 24 years! It also happens to be 32nd consecutive year that we’ve posted a net gain in membership. Those are great accomplishments, and I want you all to know how proud I am of the recruitment you’ve done. And although all of our new members are special to us, there is one who is really special. It’s a pleasure today to welcome to our convention our 1.7 millionth member. Jerry Kissel joined Immaculate Conception Council 13681 in Springfield, Mo., in April. He was recruited by Grand Knight Dr. James Shelley. Both men are being presented with specially engraved gold cufflinks to mark this historic event. I know you all join me in congratulating Dr. Shelley and Brother Kissell. I also want to congratulate every Knight who recruited a new member over the past year. Official recognition of the 1.7 millionth member can obviously go to only one person, but many thousands of Knights did a terrific job of recruiting to help get us there. To all of you who helped us reach this milestone, I say: Well done! As of June 30, membership in the Knights stood at 1,703,307.

MEMBERSHIP
Fraternal Year - Ended June 30, 2005
Millions 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 0 0.6 1.2

1.70 1.68 1.66 1.65 1.63
1.8

MEMBERSHIP GROWTH
Fraternal Year - Ended June 30, 2005
Thousands 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 0 4 8 12

23 20 12 16 14
16 20 24

552,142 are insurance members. From July 1, 2004 to June 30,

It is not an unrealistic goal to aim for 10 percent growth; that is 170,000 new members in 2005
This is an all-time high. Of those 1,703,307 members, 1,151,165 are associate members and 2005, we recruited 72,378 new Knights. There were 14,837 former members who became

active. Suspensions and withdrawals totaled 35,140, a slight increase from last year’s 35,104. We note with sadness that 27,622 brother Knights died this past fraternal year. Their service to our Order is remembered each morning at a Mass offered for them, their deceased spouses and our deceased Columbian Squires at St. Mary’s Church in New Haven. Membership must continue to
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be our number one priority. We are showing solid and steady growth, but we all know what opportunities for growth are out there just waiting for us to take up the challenge. From my first day in office as supreme knight, I have said that we have a moral obligation to offer every eligible Catholic man the experience of a lifetime through membership in the Knights. We’re on the right path, but a lot of work lies ahead. It is not an unrealistic goal to aim for 10 percent growth every year. That is 170,000 new members for 2006. Let that be the statistic I report to you in 2006. This past fraternal year showed that we really do have the potential for unstoppable growth. The Catholic Church continues to grow in every jurisdiction where we have a presence, and that provides us a great opportunity to grow the Order. Our goal is to persuade every eligible Catholic man to become a brother Knight! New council development also remained strong this fraternal year. As of June 30, we had 12,767 councils on the books, up from 12,480 at the start of the fraternal year. This is a record high for us. Of those,

285 were new councils and eight were reinstated. We also merged six councils this year for a net gain of 287, up from 206 in 200405. Parish round tables continue to be an important way for us to have a K of C presence in those parishes and missions that have not grown enough yet to sustain a council. This year we had 3,196 round tables, bringing us closer to Father McGivney’s vision of

are working. Our new recruitment and promotional materials are among many tools that are available to you. But they are not a substitute for the impact that each of us has when we go up to that man at Church or at work, in our family or in our neighborhood, and ask, “Would you be interested in joining the Knights of Columbus?” Our Columbian Squires

We are closer to Father McGivney’s vision of the Knights of Columbus in every parish
the Knights of Columbus in every parish. Our goal — our destiny! — is to have the Knights of Columbus so connected to the life of the Church today that wherever a Catholic man and his family goes, he will find our fraternal brotherhood waiting to offer him the experience of a lifetime as a Knight. The programs we have developed, such as the membership blitz program in October and April, and the Shining Armor Award incentive, program also grew in 2004-05. We added 117 circles, resulting in a total of 1,339 circles, our highest ever. As of June 30, membership stood at 22,551 Squires. Our youth programs also include sponsorship of Boy Scout troops. Last year, councils in the United States sponsored 32,752 Scouts in 1,270 troops. In Canada, the figures were 83 units with 1,753 Scouts. Squires and Scouts count on the Knights for leadership and guidance. We must not let them down. And when they turn 18, they must be the first to be asked: “Would you be interested in joining the Knights of Columbus?”

COUNCILS
Fraternal Year - Ended June 30, 2005
Thousands 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 0
14

12.8 12.5 12.3 12.1 11.9
3 6 9 12
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FOURTH DEGREE

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he last book Pope John Paul II published before his death, Memory and Identity, provides insights into history, philosophy and theology by one of the giant Catholic intellectuals of all time. These insights are particularly important in understanding the future work of the Knights of Columbus, especially our Fourth Degree. Consider, for example, what the pope writes about “the moral value of patriotism”: “Whereas nationalism involves recognizing and pursuing the good of one’s nation alone, without regard for the rights of others, patriotism, on the other hand, is a love for one’s native land that accords rights to all other nations equal to those claimed for one’s own. Patriotism, in other words, leads to a properly ordered social love.” John Paul explains with amazing clarity how it is that the Order’s dedication to the principle of patriotism, when understood in light of our other principles of charity, unity and fraternity, strengthen one’s love of country. It is this same dedication that has enabled our own Fourth Degree to grow in all the countries in which we are active while maintaining an equally strong fraternal solidarity that transcends national borders. As of June 30, membership in the Fourth Degree stood at 292,289. This represents an increase of 5,659 from the level one year earlier. During the 2004-05 Columbian year, 279 exemplifications were held. The average number of candidates was 54. The Order

instituted 69 new assemblies this year, an increase of 14 over 200304. The total number of assemblies stands at 2,599 in 115 districts and 20 provinces. Surely our promotion of programs that are unique to the Fourth Degree is one reason why

more men are “going for the Fourth.” Our “Serving Those Who Served” program remembers and pays tribute to veterans of all wars. Many Fourth Degree Knights have become a regular, steady source of volunteers at veterans hospitals across the U.S., and our effort was praised and used as the example of “how to” at a recent National Veterans Affairs meeting in Scottsdale, Ariz. Our immediate goal is to grow the Fourth Degree to 300,000 Sir Knights. I know you will join with me in realizing this goal by Dec. 31, 2005. Sadly, we live in a time Knights of Columbus at the third National Eucharistic when too few Congress in Warsaw, Poland, June 2005.

Catholics are prepared to speak up for what they believe and what the Church teaches; those who do get the media’s attention often promote their own beliefs and teachings and not those of the Church. Fourth Degree Knights, indeed all Knights, work to keep God in the civic arena. Worth noting is the role of many Knights and color corps members in efforts by the group called the Moses Project to place statues depicting the 10 Commandments in public spaces. A hearty thank you must also be extended to the Fourth Degree Knights who took part in the 100th anniversary events in both Mexico and the Philippines this year. Additionally, our Canadian Sir Knights made strong showings at rallies in Ottawa and across that country prior to Parliament’s vote to allow same-sex marriage. At the invitation of Cardinal Jozef Glemp of Warsaw, Poland, I was honored to lead a delegation of six Fourth Degree Knights, including Supreme Master Joseph P. Schultz, at the third National Eucharistic Congress in Warsaw, June 18-19. We took part in an outdoor eucharistic procession

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Fourth Degree Knights lead the procession of the Blessed Sacrament through the streets of Warsaw.

with Cardinal Glemp and related school districts in the God” and all, at every step of the events. Sacramento area. way. The families and the When we met last August, we In May of this year, seven Supreme Council are being reprethought the issue of keeping the brother Knights and their sented by The Becket Fund for words “under God” in the Pledge families in Sacramento, Calif., Religious Liberty, a public interof Allegiance had been resolved along with the Supreme Council, est law firm in Washington that once and for all. The Supreme asked the federal court in specializes in cases involving the Court had just thrown out the Sacramento for permission to free exercise of religion. plaintiff’s lawsuit challenging the intervene in the new lawsuit. I want to offer special thanks constitutionality to the seven of the words Knights and We will do everything possible to ensure “under God” in their families the pledge, on who have agreed that the words ‘under God’ remain in grounds that he to make this the Pledge of Allegiance did not have significant custody of the personal child on whose commitment, behalf he filed the action. And I am happy to report to you and to Supreme Master Joe Unfortunately, in January of that two weeks ago, Judge Schultz, who played a very this year the plaintiff was back, Lawrence Karlton granted our important role in organizing the joined in his new lawsuit by motion. So this time, when the effort. eight co-plaintiffs, just to make case works its way back to the During the months to come, sure there was no question about Supreme Court, the Knights of we will do everything possible to standing. He sued the U.S. Columbus will be right there in ensure that the words “under Congress, the United States, the the courtroom with the plaintiff, God” remain in the pledge, state of California and five defending the pledge, “under where they belong.
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CHURCH ACTIVITIES

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mosaic designs make this one of teaching during our time, the he visual backdrop of the most beautiful new chapels Second Vatican Council’s this year’s Supreme Convention is the front to be found anywhere, and I hope Pastoral Constitution on the you will come by for daily Mass Church in the Modern World wall mosaic from our or just a quiet prayer the next (Gaudium et Spes). Every newly redesigned Holy Family time you are in New Haven. baptized person is called into a Chapel. The new chapel, Father Rupnik and his new relationship with God, designed and created by Father community of European artists becoming a son or daughter of Marko Rupnik, the priest and and craftsmen spent weeks at God, calling God “Father.” We artist who created the headquarters installing these are called to love and serve him Redemptoris Mater chapel in the works of art, having designed alone. Our love and concern for Vatican for Pope John Paul II, them and prepared them in Rome others flows from our love of was dedicated by Bishop Lori God. at a Mass The laity has a celebrated As Knights we are privileged among many unique vocation to during the seek first the state deputies’ Catholic lay organizations to collaborate as kingdom of God meeting in and then to engage June. In addiclosely as we do with the Church in the affairs of tion to the the world and depiction of direct them according to God’s the Crucifixion on the front wall, last year. They have created a masterpiece for us, and we are will. As Knights we are priviother life-size mosaics show the very grateful. leged among many Catholic lay Wedding Feast at Cana, the This year marks the 40th organizations to collaborate as Nativity and the Archangels anniversary of one of the most closely as we do with the Gabriel and Raphael. The vivid important advances in Church Church, with the pope and the colors, master craftsmanship and
Supreme Chaplain Bishop Lori blesses the altar of the renovated Holy Family Chapel featuring new mosaics depicting events from Christ’s life.

supreme knight’s annual report x

President George Bush greets Archbishop James Harvey, head of papal protocol, as Past Supreme Knight Virgil C. Dechant looks on prior to John Paul’s funeral Mass. Dechant served as an escort for visiting heads of state in his role as Gentleman of Honor of His Holiness.

Vatican, with our bishops and their programs, and with our priests, sisters, and religious men and women. A report of the Order’s Church Activities in 2004 must begin by recounting the final days and funeral of Pope John Paul II and the election and installation of Pope Benedict XVI. Every Knight should be proud that our longtime financial support of the Pontifical Council for Social Communications helped make it possible for billions of persons worldwide to watch these historic events. These telecasts were seen in formerly Communist countries, throughout the Middle East and in several mission countries.

The official U.S. delegation to Pope Benedict’s installation Mass included Maryland Lt. Gov. Michael Steele, Supreme Knight Anderson and Florida Gov. Jeb Bush. Both Steele and Bush are Knights.
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‘Seek new ways of being a leaven of the Gospel in the world and a spiritual force for the renewal of the Church in holiness, unity and truth’
— Pope John Paul II to the Knights of Columbus, October 2003

Thanks to you, at least 124 TV networks in 75 countries and were able to utilize satellite feeds from Rome and televise Pope Benedict’s first Mass as pope, and viewers in at least 84 countries watching a total of 155 television networks were able to watch the telecast of John Paul’s funeral. We thank Archbishop John P. Foley, president of the Pontifical Council for Social Communications, and our brother Knight, for providing commentary for these telecasts and for noting the role of the Knights of Columbus in making them possible. The Church, the world and the Knights of Columbus will benefit greatly from Pope John Paul’s legacy for years to come. Annually from the start of his pontificate, Pope John Paul addressed our Supreme Council meetings. He knew firsthand of our support for him and his mission: our Vicarius Christi fund, our restoration of St. Peter’s Basilica and the creation or enlargement of chapels in the grottoes there; our involvement in World Youth Day; our efforts to promote religious vocations, and our programs to build a lasting Culture of Life. Our Order gained much from his pontificate — much, much more than what we gave to the Vatican in support of the various apostolates of the pope. The spiritual benefits we received by taking part in such momentous events as the Jubilee Year, the Year of the Rosary, Divine Mercy and the current Year of the Eucharist can never be counted. The heroic witness to the Gospel John Paul provided in his travels to more than a hundred countries and his proclamation of a new springtime of evangelization will continue to inspire all of us throughout our lives. But John Paul’s most important legacy for the Order is what
LEFT TOP: AP PHOTO/L’OSSERVATORE ROMANO BOTTOM: CNS PHOTO BY NANCY WIECHEC POPE: GABRIEL BOUYS/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

he taught us about the mission of the Knights of Columbus in the third Christian millennium. At what would be the last audience granted to our Order’s Board of Directors, in October 2003, Pope John Paul told us we must “seek new ways of being a leaven of the Gospel in the world and a spiritual force for the renewal of the Church in holiness, unity and truth.” Do this, John Paul said, “in fidelity to the vision of Father Michael McGivney.” Few popes in the 2,000-year history of the Church have had so momentous an impact on the Church and the world as the man many now call John Paul the Great. The Knights of Columbus had the privilege of supporting him in so many ways over the past 27 years. The greatest tribute we can pay him is by living up to the potential he saw in us and in our founder, and by being equally loyal and energetic in the service of his successor, Pope Benedict XVI. On July 1, the first day of this new fraternal year, Pope Benedict received our supreme chaplain, Bishop Lori, and me in audience at the Vatican. The Knights of Columbus was privileged to work with Cardinal Ratzinger over the past 20 years, so our audience with him now, as Pope Benedict, was much more than a “get-acquainted” meeting. The Holy Father was very interested in our plans for the future, and he was very knowledgeable about the work we do and the importance of our support of the Church. On your behalf, I expressed the Order’s enthusiasm for his papacy and our willingness to support him as he guides the Catholic Church into the 21st century with vigor, faith and holiness. That support will be demonstrated in a tangible way later this month when we send a
supreme knight’s annual report 1 9

delegation of college Knights to celebrate with him at World Youth Day in Cologne. We are also funding performance during World Youth Day of John Paul’s play, The Jeweler’s Shop, by a group of actors who are students at the Pontifical John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and the Family in Washington, D.C., which we support. During this past year we also provided financial assistance to several Vatican congregations and projects associated with the Holy See. Among those receiving support from the Knights of Columbus were: the Pontifical Council for the Family, the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, St. Peter’s Basilica for restoration of grottoes and frescoes there, and the youth athletic fields in Rome we have operated since the end of World War I. On a historical note, it was Pope Benedict XV who first invited the Knights of Columbus to Rome, in the aftermath of World War I. In an audience granted the Knights 85 years ago this month, he thanked the Order for its war relief efforts and asked us to use our resources to combat anti-Catholic groups then active in Rome, especially those that were targeting youth. Other contributions worth noting here are gifts to the Patriarchate of Venice to promote the preservation of Christian communities in countries with Muslim majorities; a $100,000 grant to help rebuild Catholic churches damaged by suicide bombers in Baghdad; and the annual proceeds from our $2 million Pacem in Terris Fund to the Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem, His Beatitude Michel Sabbah, for educational programs for Christians in the Holy Land. At the conclusion of this meeting we will convene our third Knights of Columbus
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Deputy Supreme Knight Jean Migneault and Supreme Knight Anderson with Cardinal Marc Ouellet of Quebec after announcing the Order’s $1 million pledge of support for the 49th international Eucharistic Congress to be held in Quebec in 2008. At the 48th international Eucharistic Congress in Guadalajara, Mexico, in October 2004. Cardinal Franciszek Marcharski of Krakow elevates the chalice during a Mass at the Basilica of the Divine Mercy during the board’s October 2004 pilgrimage to Poland.

Eucharistic Congress. This twoday meeting of worship, spiritual talks, opportunities for private devotion and a culminating public eucharistic procession will show that we Knights of Columbus are also Knights of the Eucharist. And in close cooperation with our brother Knight, Cardinal Marc Ouellet, we have pledged $1 million to support the 49th international Eucharistic Congress to be held in Quebec in June of 2008. Cardinal Ouellet has extended an invitation to all Quebec Knights to help prepare for this historic event and to volunteer for the variety of tasks associated with the congress. I know our Quebec Knights will respond warmly to Cardinal Ouellet’s offer. Last September, we provided support to the Congregation of Major Superiors of Women Religious for its two-day eucharistic congress at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, D.C. Fourth Degree Knights from the area took part in opening and closing Masses, and eucharistic processions. Knights from the district, including many college Knights, served as ushers, volunteer drivers and as chaperones for many of the youth groups who took part in the congress and in all-night adoration. Another important event last
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fall was the pilgrimage of your board of directors to Poland, where we had the privilege of participating in a Mass on the feast of St. Faustina at the Basilica of the Divine Mercy near Krakow. We also had the opportunity to visit a number of other places in the Krakow area that were central to the life of Karol Wojtyla, from his birthplace in Wadowice to the Basilica of Jasna Gora, where he served as cardinal archbishop before becoming Pope John Paul II. Last October the Knights of Columbus took part in the International Eucharistic Congress held in Guadalajara, Mexico. Mexico Knights were among the more than 1.5 million people who took part in a procession of the Blessed Sacrament through the streets of Guadalajara. Fourth Degree Knights provided an escort for the monumental monstrance. Thousands of the faithful packed city plazas for nighttime Benediction. The intense eucharistic devotion shown by the Mexican people was inspiring. On Dec. 8, we marked the 150th anniversary of the proclamation of the Immaculate Conception by presenting an award to the winner of our essay contest on “Devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary and Growth in Christian Life.” The winner was Theresa Little, a homeschooled senior from the Diocese of Bismark, N.D., who traveled to Washington with her family for the solemn liturgy on the feast of the Immaculate Conception. Also in December, I accepted two very special awards on your behalf. The Center for ChristianJewish Understanding of Sacred Heart University presented its Nostra Aetate award to the Knights of Columbus for our “many contributions to interreligious understanding.” We also
ABOVE: CNS PHOTO BY ALESSIA GIULIANI/CATHOLIC PRESS PHOTO

Supreme Knight Anderson with Vatican officials at last fall’s release of the “Compendium of Social Doctrine of the Church.” Shown at right is Cardinal Renato R. Martino, president of the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace, which oversaw the book’s publication. The supreme knight is a consultor to the Vatican body.

received the “Living Stones” award from the Holy Land Christian Ecumenical Foundation for our support for peace initiatives in the Holy Land, and for the Christian community there.

Working for justice and peace is working for charity; it is an essential part of our work as Knights
A highlight of my service as consultor to the Vatican’s Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace was the publication in March of the Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church, which the council prepared. Working for justice and peace is working for charity. It is an essential part of our work as Knights. The Compendium is a valuable new tool for us, as we continue the work that has always been at the heart of our lives as Knights of Columbus. The Pontifical

Council for Justice and Peace has pledged to make this collection of the Church’s social teaching as widely known as possible, and the Knights of Columbus will do its part to see that this is accomplished. The cause for canonization of Blessed Teresa of Calcutta continues to enjoy both spiritual and material support from the Knights. We have already printed an estimated 2 million pieces of Blessed Teresa devotional materials, including prayer cards and a novena prayer booklet, which are being distributed by Mother’s sisters worldwide. Millions more pieces of literature have been prepared in five languages for distribution at World Youth Day in Cologne. Bishop Lori and I were in Rome June 28 for the Mass at which the cause for beatification of John Paul II was officially opened by the Archdiocese of Rome. We are distributing a card with the official prayer for his beatification at this convention and encourage Knights to take copies of this card back to their councils and include this prayer at meetings and other council functions.
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V O C AT I O N S

F

ather McGivney’s dream was to have a council in every parish. We have always seen this as a membership and new council development goal. But having a Knights of Columbus presence in every parish can also have a positive effect on our efforts to renew the Church with new vocations to the priesthood and religious life. There is no better expression of this than our Refund Support Vocations Program (RSVP), which gives seminarians and postulants a connection to the Knights, a connection that can last a lifetime. Through RSVP, councils, assemblies and Squires circles “adopt” one or more seminarians or postulants and provide them with financial assistance and moral support. Qualifying councils and assemblies receive a $100 refund for every $500 donated, up to a limit of $2,000 donated to an individual, while the refund for Squires is $20 for every $100 donated. In the Philippines and Mexico, councils and assemblies receive the equivalent in local currency of $50 for every $250 donated. RSVP money is used by seminarians and those in religious formation for tuition and books, car insurance and maintenance, travel during vacations, emergency expenditures and other living expenses. Knights provide more than financial support. Members write letters to students, sponsor dinners for them, invite them to join the Order and, most importantly, pray for vocations. For 2003-04, for the first time ever, financial help from councils to future priests, sisters and brothers, exceeded $2.5 million.

Local units participating in the RSVP reported raising and donating $2,505,036 directly to qualified applicants. A total of 4,469 seminarians and postulants received RSVP support from 2,533 units. Since the program’s start in 1981, more than $32 million has been raised and contributed. Over that same time period, nearly 4,400 seminarians and postulants have been helped. Says one recent recipient and newly ordained priest from Saskatchewan: “Through the spiritual life and fraternal aspects of the Knights, I know I have a firm foundation of support that I can count on all throughout my priesthood.” In addition to the Refund Support Vocations Program, the Order annually awards dozens of new $2,500 scholarships and renews several more from our Father Michael J. McGivney Scholarships Fund and our Bishop Thomas V. Daily Vocations Scholarships Fund. In each program, preference is given to members or sons of members. Grants are renewable annually for up to four years. The Father McGivney scholarships are awarded on the basis of need, while the Bishop Daily scholarships are merit-based. For the 2004-05 academic year, 35 new Father McGivney scholarships were awarded to 29 U.S. and six Canadian seminarians in major schools of theology. In addition to the new scholarships, 61 were renewed. Bishop Daily awards were given to 10 U.S. and three Canadian seminarians. An additional 25 scholarships were renewed. Of the new recipients, more than half of them are Knights or sons of Knights. Since these programs

began nearly $4 million has been awarded. One recipient is Steve Zehler, who is studying for the Diocese of St. Augustine at St. Vincent de Paul Regional Seminary in Boynton Beach, Fla. Brother Zehler is a member of Father Murphy Council 5535 in Jacksonville Beach, Fla., and can explain far better than I can the value of the Knights of Columbus in his life — above and beyond the scholarship he received from us. Brother Zehler writes: “My affiliation with the Knights goes back to my childhood when my father first became a brother Knight. Now I am proud to be a brother Knight. The Knights have contributed to countless people and ministries. Last year I was blessed to participate in the annual Tootsie Roll drive to aid the mentally challenged. During the Tootsie Roll drive, I was amazed at how many men and women came up to me and said words like, ‘I’m pleased to donate to the Knights of Columbus — they helped my family when in need.’” Additional vocations-related projects in 2004 that deserve mention include: funding to the Bishops’ Conference of Cuba for a seminary there; assistance for the construction of a house of discernment for women religious in Brazil; financial help with renovations for the Polish Pontifical Institute in Rome, and for new construction of a seminary in Tlalpan, Mexico. We also provided financial support for an international meeting of priests convened in Rome by the Vatican’s Congregation for the Clergy, and contributed to the U.S.-based Institute for Priestly Formation and Institute on Religious Life. When we were in Guadalajara for the eucharistic congress last October, we were told that in that diocese alone there are more
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than 900 seminarians. One reason for this, as it was explained to us, is the focus on eucharistic adoration and devotion in parishes throughout the diocese. Many of you may recall some pertinent words from Pope Benedict XVI in his inaugural homily in April, when he urged each of us to “let Christ enter fully into our lives” and “open ourselves totally to him.” Doing so, he said, opens doors. “When we give ourselves to him, we receive a hundredfold in return.” That should be the guiding spirit of our vocations program. “Yes,” Pope Benedict said. “Open, open wide the doors to Christ — and you will find true life.” While the focus of our voca-

tions programs is on increasing the call to the priesthood and religious life, we know and value every vocation authentically answered: Toward that end, we continue to produce new video programs that describe the many vocations to which we are called. Our Vocation to Marriage film, released last November, has received a number of awards for excellence, including the prestigious Cine Golden Eagle, one of the first major awards won by Hollywood filmmakers Steven Spielberg and George Lucas, and by documentary filmmaker Ken Burns. The Knights’ video was produced for us by Lumen Catechetical Consultants Inc., a nonprofit organization based in Silver Spring, Md.

In addition, The Vocation to Marriage won an Award of Excellence in the Accolade Competition, which honors “outstanding craft and creativity in film, video, television and commercials.” It was also a winner of an Award of Distinction in the Videographer Awards 2005 competition. The Videographer Awards is an “international awards organization that helps set standards for the video production industry.” Our film on The Vocation to the Priesthood, released in 2003, has also received industry accolades. So, too, we believe, will the productions in the works on the vocation to religious life and the vocation to the laity.

SOLIDARITY WITH OUR TROOPS

E

arlier this summer, I thin. Only 8 percent of U.S. Seeking Christ.” It is a peer-toreceived an e-mail note military chaplains are Catholic, peer ministry program in which from Father Joe Coffey, but 28 percent of active duty pergroups of young Catholics in the one of more than a sonnel — some 375,000 soldiers, armed services can work together thousand Catholic priests who sailors, marines and airmen — to strengthen their faith, even as serve as chaplains to our men are Catholic. they cope with the stresses of and women in the armed forces. This year, we’re helping them combat, the horrors of war, or Father Coffey serves aboard the in a variety of ways, including simply being far away from home USS George Washington, a providing financial support for a for the first time in their lives. Nimitz-class aircraft carrier, and new program called “Catholics Archbishop Edwin F. O’Brien, he wrote to express his who heads the Military thanks to all of you for Archdiocese, also hopes what he called “your that the new program will incredibly generous help encourage some new support of our Military vocations to the priesthood Archdiocese. I am a from among these men in Fourth Degree Knight, the armed forces. and I have always been In Washington, D.C., amazed at the incrediwe are also providing ble generosity of the financial support for a Knights of Columbus. building that will become Thank you and God both the new headquarters bless you all.” for the Military Father Coffey and Archdiocese, and a his fellow chaplains in residence for bishops and the Archdiocese for Members of Father John A. Donnelly Council 6658 in priests working there. A Copperas Cove, Texas, hold a copy of “Armed with the the Military Services, total of $1.1 million will Faith” in Iraq, February 2004. USA are spread pretty come from earnings from
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the Knights of Columbus Military Vicariate Fund. Additional funds will come from our Church Loan Program. We have also printed another 100,000 copies of our special Catholic handbook of prayers for the military, called Armed with the Faith. That brings the total number printed so far to 300,000, and we will soon be printing 50,000 Spanish-language versions of the book. We’re also making plans to produce a version for the families of our soldiers back home. The Knights of Columbus have been serving the spiritual and social needs of the armed forces ever since 1916, and we regard it as one of our highest and most important priorities. Over the past year, many Knights have given the last full measure of devotion to their country and their fellow man. Please join me in standing while the names of our brother Knights who have made the ultimate sacrifice in the war against terrorism since last year’s Supreme Convention are read: U.S. Army Private First Class Raymond Faulstich, Jr., a Squire from Leonardstown, Md.; Army National Guard Specialist

FAULSTICH

LUTTERS

MERVILLE

MORTON

PETSCHE

SEESAN

Derrick J. Lutters, a member of Council 1993 in Burlington, Colo.; U.S. Army Specialist Christopher A Merville, a member of Council 4227 in Albuquerque, N.M.; U.S. Army Sergeant Benjamin C. Morton, a member of Council 1862 in

Wright, Kan.; U.S. Marine Corps Lance Corporal Neil D. Petsche, a member of Council 4776 in Lena, Ill.; and U.S. Army 1st Lieutenant Aaron N. Seesan, a member of Council 9666 in Kings Point, N.Y.

Members of Msgr. Frank J. Howard Council 6648 in Havelock, N.C., in Afghanistan, March 2005.

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THE CULTURE OF LIFE AND STRENGTHENING MARRIAGE

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n our ongoing effort to build a Culture of Life, there is good news, and there is some that’s not so good. The news from Villa Maria Guadalupe is always good. The international pro-life retreat center we opened last year and now operate in conjunction with

Stamford, cleaning, painting, pulling up old rugs, sanding wood floors and moving furniture. During the June meeting of state deputies in New Haven, the wives spent a day at the center, and were thoroughly impressed with the facility and with the Sisters of Life. Villa

Bishop Lori blesses the Sisters of Life gathered in front of Villa Maria Guadalupe.

the wonderful Sisters of Life has really come to life since its formal dedication last October. This year, the sisters have hosted a wide variety of groups on retreat, including the Communion and Liberation Movement from Italy, a group of young adults known as Women Affirming Life, a chastity retreat for junior high school students, a women’s day of recollection on the dignity and vocation of women, and an Oratory of Divine Love retreat with Fr. Benedict Groeschel. Connecticut Knights have been spending many weekends at the center in

Maria is going to play an increasingly important role in the worldwide pro-life movement for many years to come. We Knights of Columbus have been at the forefront of the battle against abortion, and on behalf of creating a Culture of Life, for 32 years. There have been disappointments and setbacks during the past three decades, and most of them have come from court decisions, beginning with the most notorious one of all — Roe v. Wade — and continuing through a series of decisions that have upheld it and even expanded upon it.

In 1973, the Supreme Court created out of whole cloth a “right” to extinguish the life of an innocent unborn child, and in the process seized for itself a power that no one has a right to exercise. And at every turn, relying on Roe, courts at all levels have refused to allow any law that would limit abortions, even up to and including a ban on the gruesome and sickening procedure called partial birth abortion. Last year, Mississippi adopted a law limiting abortions after the first trimester. Two months ago, a federal judge struck it down. In 2003, Virginia adopted a law banning partial birth abortion. Two months ago, a federal appeals court struck it down. Earlier this year, Idaho adopted a law requiring parental consent for women under 18 seeking an abortion. Last month, a federal court struck it down. In 2003, the U. S. Congress passed and President Bush signed a federal partial birth abortion ban. Last month, a federal appeals court struck it down. That court, the Eighth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, included this explanation for the action that it took: “Neither we, nor Congress, are free to disagree with the Supreme Court’s determination.” My brother Knights, we remain free to disagree, and since we are holding this year’s convention in Illinois, I think it appropriate to quote Abraham Lincoln. As he took the oath of office in March of 1861, the first shots of the Civil War were just a few weeks away. In his inaugural address, Lincoln referred to that other awful Supreme Court decision in our history, Dred Scott, in which the justices decided that blacks did not have
supreme knight’s annual report 2 5

constitutional rights, and which pushed the nation into war. Said Lincoln: “If the policy of the Government upon vital questions affecting the whole people is to be irrevocably fixed by decisions of the Supreme Court…the people will have ceased to be their own rulers.” More than 40 million unborn children have been aborted over the past three decades because six judges would rather cling to the disastrous legal precedent than reverse it. Now, for the first time in 11 years, there is a vacancy on the U.S. Supreme Court. Justice O’Connor, who has resigned, was invariably among those who voted to uphold Roe v. Wade. Her departure provides an opportunity to reinforce the voices on the court who believe, as Justice Scalia put it in Planned Parenthood v. Casey in 1992, that “We should get out of this area, where we have no right to be, and where we do neither ourselves nor the country any good by remaining.” And as the U.S. bishops’ conference put it in 2000, “the court’s abortion decisions deserve only to be condemned, repudiated and ultimately reversed.” President Bush has nominated Judge John G. Roberts to take Justice O’Connor’s place on the Supreme Court. When he announced his choice two weeks ago, the president reminded us that he had searched for “a person of superb credentials and the highest integrity; a person who will faithfully apply the Constitution and keep our founding promise of equal justice under law.” In John Roberts, Mr. Bush has nominated a man who has all of those qualifications. I am not saying all this because it happens that John Roberts and I served together in the White House in the 1980s. I
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Thousands of Canadians, including many Knights and young people, took part in the National March for Life in Canada in Ottawa, May 12. Fourth Degree Knights led the march to Parliament.

say it because if I were to bring to the court a matter of life and death, I could not hope to find a judge who is more fair and compassionate than John Roberts. Judge Roberts deserves a fair and expeditious hearing and a straight up-or-down vote in the U.S. Senate. And most importantly of all, neither he nor any other nominee to the Supreme Court should be blocked because he refuses to submit to a pro-abortion litmus test! It is also worth remembering that although no other issue carries the same life-or-death weight as abortion does, the Supreme Court will also be deciding other

people of Massachusetts by a state supreme court ruling that can only be described as bizarre. But it has given judges in other states who have the same activist bent just enough ammunition to start doing damage elsewhere. In May, a San Francisco judge ruled that California’s ban on same-sex marriage was unconstitutional. And even more troubling, a federal judge in Nebraska has struck down that state’s constitutional amendment defining marriage as being between a man and a woman. Earlier this year, we strongly supported the successful drive, led by Archbishop Joseph Naumann of Kansas City, to pass a state constitutional amendment protecting marriage in Kansas, and last year we joined the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops in backing the Federal Marriage Amendment. This year, we have worked closely with the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops in opposing legislation in Parliament that would legalize same-sex marriage throughout Canada. There, too, the courts have been a serious problem. Courts in eight of the ten provinces of Canada had already used a bizarre interpretation of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms to overturn the definition of marriage as between a man and a woman, giving lots of momentum to the drive to legalize same-sex marriage in Ottawa. Canadian Knights distributed 2 million postcards to

No other issue carries the same life-or-death weight as abortion does
issues that have great importance to us as Knights and as faithful Catholic citizens. A tremendous struggle is going on in the courts over same-sex “marriage,” which has already been imposed on the citizens throughout Canada, who mailed them to their members of Parliament, expressing their support for traditional marriage. But a majority of the MPs ignored them, just as legislators
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Knights and pro-life supporters at this year’s March for Life in Washington.

in our own home state of Connecticut ignored the 100,000 signatures on a petition opposing same-sex civil unions that were gathered by Connecticut Knights. They also ignored the strong opposition expressed by our supreme chaplain, Bishop Lori,

and Archbishop Henry Mansell of Hartford. Father McGivney would have been shocked had he known that a century after our founding, his Knights would find themselves having to fight in the courts and the legislatures to protect inno-

cent human life and traditional marriage against the onslaughts of an out-of-control judiciary and an increasingly secular and indifferent society. We pledge to do everything in our power to end abortion and protect innocent life.

C H A M P I O N I N G T H E D I G N I T Y O F E V E RY P E R S O N

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he support provided by the Knights of Columbus for people with intellectual and physical disabilities is legendary. Over the past 30 years, we have raised and donated more than $382 million to programs for people with intellectual and physical disabilities. Among the larger gifts of time and money we make annually is to Special Olympics and other programs for people with intellectual and/or physical disabilities. Combined gifts in these categories totaled more than $17 million in 2004. Earlier this year we announced a new partnership with Special Olympics. We have committed $1 million over the next four years to grow the programs of Special Olympics in North America. We have pledged more volunteers for state and local games, and will work with Special Olympics North America to expand its programs to countries currently underserved by it. This partnership includes a

working with Special Olympics to establish similar programs in other jurisdictions of the Order in the Caribbean and the Philippines. Our commitment to Special Olympics and to hundreds of grassroots programs for people with intellectual and physical disabilities is an expression of our belief in the intrinsic worth of every human being. In April of this year, we gave our highest honor, the Gaudium et Spes Award, to Jean Vanier, the founder of l’Arche, a network of faithbased communities that care for people with developmental disabilities in a community setting. Jean Vanier founded the first l’Arche community in Toronto in 1969, and today there are 26 Jean Vanier, founder of l’Arche, received the communities throughOrder’s highest honor, the Gaudium et Spes Award, out Canada, serving for his dedication to people with developmental nearly 500 people with disabilities. direct investment in the growth of Special Olympics Mexico. At the Mexico Knights’ centennial convention in April, a $50,000 grant from the Knights of Columbus was given to Special Olympics officials and athletes. The grant is earmarked for uniforms, sports equipment and to cover some of the costs of organizing games. We are
supreme knight’s annual report 27

disabilities. It has also expanded around the world, and there are now more than 120 l’Arche communities in 30 countries on six continents. Jean exemplifies the

call to self-giving and Christcentered community involvement that is a central theme in Gaudium et Spes, and his life and dedication are an inspiration to

all of us who devote so much time and effort to helping the disabled through our own councils and in our own communities.

T H E N E W E VA N G E L I Z AT I O N

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he importance of evangelization and effectively communicating the Gospel message in light of changing technology were the subject of Pope John Paul II’s last apostolic letter, released in January. “Do not be afraid of new technologies!” Pope John Paul II wrote. “These rank ‘among the marvelous things’ — inter mirifica — which God has placed at our disposal to discover, to use and to make known the truth, also the truth about our dignity and about our destiny as his children, heirs of his eternal Kingdom.” Published, in part, to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Second Vatican Council’s document, Inter Mirifica (Decree on the Means of Social Communications), John Paul’s last apostolic letter has much to say to the Church and to the Knights of Columbus about the new evangelization and communications media. Because of our size, our global outreach and our resources, the Knights of Columbus has the potential and the capability to reach people everywhere. We already communicate our message via Columbia magazine, our Web site, and our promotional, leadership training and membership materials in the major languages of our members: English, French and Spanish. This Year of the Eucharist should impel us to move forward even more boldly in our
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communications and evangelization initiatives. And who better than the Blessed Virgin Mary, who gave us the Word of life, to guide us. Since February, the Order has been encouraging a Marian prayer program dedicated to Our Lady of Bai Dau, a special intercessor with Vietnamese Catholics. Many Catholics fleeing Vietnam after the fall of Saigon 30 years ago called upon Our Lady of Bai Dau to help them as they fled their homeland. A statue of Our Lady of Bai Dau, a gift to the Knights from the bishops of Vietnam, is traveling to Vietnamese parishes throughout the United States and Canada. The statue is accompanied by Fourth Degree Knights at each stop, and local Knights have been on hand to spread the word about our Order to participants. This program is scheduled to continue into 2006. Later this year, we will begin a tour in Mexico of the relics of the Mexican saints of the Knights of Columbus. A reliquary in

the shape of a cross with the relics of Sts. Rodrigo Aguilar Aleman, José María Robles Hurtado, Miguel de la Mora de la Mora, Mateo Correa Magallanes, Pedro de Jésus Maldonado Lucero and Luis Batiz Sainz — all murdered during the persecution of the Church in Mexico during the 1920s — will travel throughout Mexico beginning in September, and then continue through the United States in 2006. It is our hope that more Mexicans and more Americans will become acquainted both with these heroic figures and with the Knights of Columbus. These two programs are responses to a reality in the Church and in North America that we must address, and that is immigration. Hispanic and Asian immigrants are increasing significantly faster than the overall population. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, in the United States, for example, Hispanics are increasing Reliquary of the Mexican almost four saints. times as fast the total population, and Asian
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Americans are increasing at nearly twice the national average. The Knights of Columbus was founded by the sons of immigrants who were looking for Fireworks celebrate an organization 100 years of Columbianism where their in Mexico during the Catholic faith centennial convention in Mexico City in May. would be affirmed and their love for their adopted homeland would be alike will discover many new insights to our faith in a series on appreciated. Today’s immigrants the Public Broadcasting Service are, I believe, looking for the same thing. It is up to us to show television network supported by the Knights. Burt Wolf’s “Travels them that they are welcome in and Traditions” series features the Knights of Columbus, and many of the world’s most signifithat their hopes and dreams for themselves and their families can cant Catholic shrines, including Our Lady of Guadalupe in be realized in the Knights. Mexico, Our Lady of Now is the time for us to Czestochowa in Poland and Our decide that we are going to be Lady of Lourdes in France. faithful to Father McGivney’s We also collaborated with him vision and help the immigrants on a program entitled Vatican in our communities. We need to City and the Papacy, which aired recruit those men who are eligible to join, and for those who on many PBS stations in the weeks immediately following are not eligible, we need to reach out to them and their families by John Paul’s death. One of the most vital evangetutoring them in English, helping lization programs today is them become citizens and Mother Angelica’s Eternal Word providing other services. Television Network. ETWN is Already many Knights are celebrating its 25th anniversary involved in these kinds of this year, and we can proudly say programs. Earlier this year we announced a collaborative project that from the very beginning, the Knights of Columbus has been a with CLINIC, the Catholic Legal supporter. In EWTN’s early days, Immigration Network. CLINIC representatives are recruiting and Knights conducted petition drives to prove to cable providers training Knights to help immithat there was a market for a grants become U.S. citizens. Catholic TV network. Our Already, Knights have volunsupreme chaplain emeritus, teered at U.S. citizenship swearBishop Thomas Daily, has served ing-in ceremonies. In Canada, on the network’s board of direcKnights for many years have tors. For many years we have been involved in citizenship provided grant funding to EWTN training programs. In fact, in the to underwrite its telecasts from 1920s our Canadian brothers the National Shrine in organized a nationwide program Washington and of the meetings to aid immigrants. of the U.S. Conference of Catholics and non-Catholics

Catholic Bishops. We congratulate Mother Angelica, her sisters and the staff of EWTN on their anniversary and wish them many more years of success in their ministry. We’re also encouraged that so many Canadian Knights are supporting Salt + Light Television, where Basilian Father Thomas Rosica and his colleagues have built an impressive Catholic cable network that now stretches throughout the country. It is an institution that offers a great deal of promise for the future of evangelization. Another exciting venture is our support for the Instituto Fe y Vida (Institute for Faith and Life), a Catholic formation program founded in 1994 to serve the fast-growing young Hispanic population in the United States. A new young adult study Bible in Spanish has recently been published by Fe y Vida, with our financial support. It will be distributed widely and is sure to become a valuable means for the evangelization and catechesis of the next generation of Spanishspeaking Catholics in the Americas. Of course, our flagship evangelization program continues to be our Catholic Information Service (CIS). For more than 50 years, the CIS has distributed booklets about the Catholic faith, enrolled people in both an online and traditional correspondence course on faith formation, and published new titles of importance to the Church and Catholics. In sponsoring this program, the
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Supreme Knight Anderson and NCEA President Michael J. Guerra hold an oversized check representing the Order’s latest financial commitment to Catholic schools.

Order is performing a highly essential service to the Church. Our booklets correct false notions about the Church and its teachings. Our Internet booklets and catechetical course reach people around the world.

Thus far in 2005, the Catholic Information Service has distributed 50,000 booklets and enrolled approximately 1,500 people in the faith formation course. By the end of the year, the popular Luke E. Hart series written by

Peter Kreeft and based on the Catechism of the Catholic Church will be available in Spanish. CIS staff is also developing materials for use with engaged couples who are preparing for marriage in the Catholic Church. And in the broader world of Catholic education, the Order made a major commitment this year to find ways to strengthen inner-city Catholic schools in the United States. Over the next three years, we will provide $300,000 from the Father Michael J. McGivney Memorial Fund to find ways to strengthen the solvency of these schools and give future generations the chance to get a quality education. Forty-four percent of all the Catholic schools in America are in urban areas, and the academic excellence and moral education they provide is often the only source of hope and opportunity for millions of inner-city children. We are proud to be working with the National Catholic Educational Association in this critical effort.

KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS MUSEUM

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he Knights of Columbus Museum has enjoyed a surge of visitors this year, prompted by strong interest in our current featured exhibit, “Images of Faith and Art from Mexico.” This collection of 48 paintings and other works of art never before seen in the United States includes 35 paintings on loan from the magnificent Metropolitan Cathedral and from several museums, all in Mexico City. There was also a tremendous increase in visitors to the museum immediately following the
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death of Pope John Paul II, when we were able to display a number of artifacts from his papacy, and got lots of local and regional television coverage. And during the Christmas season last year, our show on “Jerusalem and the Holy Land Rediscovered” was very popular.

“First Appearance of Our Lady of Guadalupe to St. Juan Diego,” Anonymous, circa 1675-1700 (oil on canvas). Knights of Columbus Religious Heritage Art Collection.
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‘HE IS WITH US’

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Philippine forces fighting their he challenges that we face in the 21st century terrorist comrades on Mindanao are different from those and elsewhere. It would be all too easy to that faced our shrink from confronting these brother Knights in decades past. new challenges, to decide that it We no longer face the deep, is easier to go along in a society grinding poverty of the Great that prefers to look the other way Depression, or the threat to our when 1.3 million lives are lost to freedom posed by Hitler or abortion each year; to pretend Stalin. The raw bigotry of the not to see the poor and needy in Ku Klux Klan in the United our midst; or to sit on our hands States in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and the bloody persecution of Catholics in Mexico in the 1920s are long gone. But they have given way to a world in which judges and legislators in During the Philippines’ Canada can force centennial convention, a wreath was laid at a an unwilling socimonument to Dr. José ety to accept Rizal, a national hero in same-sex “marthe independence cause. riage,” and where United Nations when judges and legislators Population Fund officials can undermine the institution of the exert unrelenting pressure on family with same-sex countries like the Philippines to “marriage.” allow abortion. The world of But we Knights have never 2005 is a place where abortion retreated from challenges like rights groups oppose a nominee these, because “He Is With Us.” for the U.S. Supreme Court He calls us to care for the less because he’s a faithful Catholic, fortunate, to love our fellow men and where poverty still afflicts and to care for our families. millions of people around the And he never leaves us without globe. the graces we need to respond to It’s a world in which courts his call. declare unconstitutional laws The world of 2005 is a place designed to limit abortion, even a where there are so many who law barring barbaric partial-birth need our help. It might be a abortions. It’s a world where frightened, unwed mother being terrorism threatens people pressured to have an abortion. everywhere, and where brother It might be a wounded soldier Knights are among the millions back from Iraq who is struggling of U.S. soldiers confronting a to recover. It might be a priest vicious enemy in Iraq and serving a desperately poor parish, Afghanistan, and among

where the needs are great and the resources are few. It might be a brother Knight who has fallen on hard times and needs help with a few bills. It might be a Special Olympics athlete, whose outlook on life could be transformed if only someone like you offers a hand and a little encouragement. It might be a young man or woman considering a vocation, who need your prayers and perhaps some financial help along the way. It might be a friend who has fallen away from the Church, and needs a friendly nudge from you to begin his journey back home. We are all on a journey, of course. It is a journey which began when we were baptized, and for all of us here today, that journey took on an extra measure of fulfillment when we joined the Knights of Columbus. In a few days, our journey will include our third Eucharistic Congress here in Chicago. Recently, when Pope Benedict XVI spoke to those attending the Italian National Eucharistic Congress, he said that “the Eucharistic bread is a need of a Christian,” because in it, we “find the necessary energy for [our] journey. The Lord does not leave us alone on this journey,” the Holy Father said. “He is with us.” There is much to be done, and because “He Is With Us,” we can do it. Vivat Jesus!
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CHARITABLE CONTRIBUTIONS 2004

Church
VATICAN

Apostolic Nunciature USA — Support of its papal mission . . . . . . . . . . . $ 20,504 Catholic Committee for Cultural Collaboration, Rome. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18,000 Congregation for the Clergy, Vatican — International meeting of priests. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50,000 Permanent Observer Mission of the Holy See to the United Nations . . . . 300,000 Pope John Paul II — Vicarius Christi Fund . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,600,000 Reverenda Fabbrica di San Pietro/St. Peter’s Basilica — Renovations of mosaics and frescoes in grottoes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300,000 Vatican Television Center, Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50,000 TOTAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 2,338,504
CONFERENCES OF BISHOPS

Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops — Bishop de Laval Fund . . . . $ 53,462 Catholic Bishops’ Conference of Cuba . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10,000 Seminary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500,000 Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53,904 Priests’ Hospitalization Benefits Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20,000 National Catholic Bioethics Center, Philadelphia — Bishops’ workshop on medical-moral issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 230,000 National Certification Program in Bioethics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250,000 U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Committee on the Diaconate — Conference on the diaconate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56,000 TOTAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1,173,366
DIOCESES • PARISHES • CLERGY

F

Archdiocese for the Military Services, USA . . . . . . . . . — 300,000 copies of Armed with the Faith prayer books and rosaries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ Archdiocese of Baghdad, Iraq — Repair of churches damaged in bombings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Archdiocese of Nassau, Bahamas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Clergy Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Diocese of Alexandria, La. — Former Supreme Chaplain Bishop Charles P. Greco memorial organ, St. Francis Xavier Cathedral . . . . . . Diocese of Bridgeport, Conn. — Renovations, St. Augustine Cathedral. . . Renovations (Fourth Degree Fund). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Diocese of Worcester, Mass. — Catholic men’s conference . . . . . . . . . . . . Dioceses (various) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Historic Sites Fund — Increase in endowment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Holy Name Cathedral, Chicago . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Immaculate Conception Church, Waterbury, Conn. — Renovations . . . . .
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316,603 100,000 10,000 248,062 145,000 250,000 250,000 15,000 145,000 50,000 2,000 285,000
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Mortgage interest relief given to various U.S. Catholic institutions . . . . . 1,520 Other amounts to parishes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7,704 St. Mary’s Church, New Haven — Stipend for daily Mass for deceased members, deceased wives of members and deceased Squires . . . . . . . . 3,650 Renovations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14,091 Ukrainian Catholic Diocese of Stamford, Conn. — Eucharistic Marian Congress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25,000 TOTAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,868,630
OTHER RELIGIOUS

Apostles of the Sacred Heart of Jesus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ Council of Major Superiors of Religious Women . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ecumenical Sisters of Our Lady of Guadalupe — Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Institute for Priestly Formation — Fargo, N.D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Institute on Religious Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Missionaries of Charity — Support of apostolate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monastery of the Glorious Cross, Branford, Conn. — Bell tower. . . . . . . . National Catholic Council on Alcoholism. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ojca Swietego Jana Pawla II — Wadowice, Poland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . St. Aloysius Seminary, Cameroon, Africa — Sister Louise Finn . . . . . . . . St. Dominic’s Monastery, Washington, D.C. — New monastery . . . . . . . . Sisters Minor of Mary Immaculate, Waterbury, Conn. — Support of apostolate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TOTAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ TOTAL CHURCH GRANTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $

30,000 18,000 20,000 5,000 10,000 8,225 130,000 30,000 5,000 32,000 30,000 2,000 320,225 5,700,725

Programs
MARIAN DEVOTION

Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception, Washington, D.C. — Ushers’ ministry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ Luke E. Hart Fund . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TOTAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $
FAMILY LIFE

11,000 70,000 81,000

F

Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Catholic Organization for Life and Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 144,420 Institute for Marriage and Public Policy, Washington, D.C.. . . . . . . . . . . . 39,000 Knights of Columbus Family Life Bureau — Pontifical John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and Family at The Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800,753 Massachusetts State Council — Matching grant for campaign to defend traditional definition of marriage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25,000 Mexico Bishops’ Conference — World Congress of the Family (Familias y Sociedad A.C.) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50,000 Pontifical Council for the Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65,000 TOTAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1,124,173
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PRO-LIFE

Americans United for Life, Chicago — Legislation to protect rights of pro-life medical personnel and institutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 100,000 Birthright . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30,000 Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25,000 Federalist Society for Law and Public Policy Studies, Washington, D.C. — Judicial confirmation process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40,000 Human Life Foundation, New York . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25,000 Grants provided to various state councils for Culture of Life projects . . . . 10,060 International Congress for the Family, Lublin, Poland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10,000 Life Athletes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200,000 Life Haven Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,250 March for Life, Canada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6,250 March for Life Education and Defense Fund, U.S. — Sponsorship of annual student essay contest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10,000 Mary and Joseph’s Place, North Haven, Conn. — Crisis pregnancy center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,000 National Life Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30,000 National Office of Post-Abortion Reconciliation and Healing, Milwaukee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50,000 National Right to Life Education Trust Fund . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5,000 Nurturing Network, Boise, Idaho . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10,000 Susan B. Anthony List, Alexandria, Va., — Support of pro-life activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100,000 U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ — Pro-life education and information campaign . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 480,201 Villa Maria Guadalupe Retreat Center, Stamford, Conn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100,000 TOTAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1,234,761
VOCATIONS

American College, Louvain — Scholarships and general aid (Bishop Charles P. Greco American College Fund) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 20,052 Bishop Thomas V. Daily Scholarship Fund — Scholarships granted. . . . . . 97,500 Canadian Pontifical College, Rome (Father Michael J. McGivney Fund) . . 39,403 Congregación de las Hermanas, Cochabamba, Bolivia — Construction of formation house. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000 Hispanic Seminary of Our Lady of Guadalupe, Tlalpan, Mexico . . . . . . . . 100,000 Knights of Columbus Vocations Scholarships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 230,000 Philippine Scholarships (Father McGivney Fund for Advanced Studies for Priests from the Philippines; study at the Pontifical Philippines College, Rome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17,111 Polish Pontifical Institute, Rome — Renovations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50,000 Pontifical Mexican College, Rome (Our Lady of Guadalupe Fund) . . . . . . 45,500 Pontifical North American College, Rome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9,800 Pontifical North American College, Rome — Scholarships and general support (Count Enrico P. Galeazzi Fund) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140,000 Promotional support of vocations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154,170
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Refund Support Vocations Program — Refunds to Knights of Columbus units for grants to individual seminarians . . . . . . . . . . . . 498,112 TOTAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1,402,648
EVANGELIZATION

F

Apostleship of the Sea, Florida —Port Chaplains Program. . . . . . . . . . . . $ 4,500 Blackfriars Repertory Theater, Yonkers, N.Y. — Dramatic portrayal of Father Michael J. McGivney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25,000 Catholic Information Service, administrative support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197,415 Catholic Information Service, supported by per capita levy (Catholic Advertising Fund) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,425,467 Catholic Information Service (Catholic Advertising Fund) . . . . . . . . . . . . 615,000 Catholic Press Association . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5,000 Center for Christian-Jewish Understanding, Sacred Heart University, Fairfield, Conn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50,000 Center for Dialogue and Prayer, Auschwitz, Poland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500,000 Diocese of Pittsburgh, Pa. — Concert for Peace and Reconciliation . . . . . 741,786 EWTN (Eternal Word Television Network), Birmingham, Ala. — Telecasts from the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception and U.S. bishops’ meetings . . . . . . . . . . . . 250,000 Father Thomas M. Conway Chaplains Memorial Fund, Buffalo, N.Y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10,000 Instituto Fe y Vida, Stockton, Calif. — Spanish young adult Bible . . . . . . 293,000 International Center for Study and Research at the Studium Generale Marcianum, Patriarchate of Venice — Promotion of preservation of Christian communities in countries with Muslim majorities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61,650 Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem — Proceeds of Pacem in Terris Fund. . . . . . . 120,000 Partners in Evangelization, Ijamsville, Md. — Prison ministry . . . . . . . . . 5,000 Pontifical Council for the Promotion of Christian Unity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15,000 Pontifical Council for Social Communications — Uplink project televising papal Midnight Mass and Easter triduum services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165,968 United Catholic Music and Video Association, Donnellson, Iowa. . . . . . . 30,000 TOTAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 4,514,786 TOTAL PROGRAMS GRANTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 8,357,368
TOTAL CHURCH AND PROGRAMS GRANTS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 14,058,093

F

Community • Educational • Cultural
COMMUNITY PROJECTS

Archdiocese of Hartford, Conn., Office of Urban Affairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ Office for Black Catholic Ministries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arte Inc., New Haven . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Branford (Conn.) Police Benevolent Association. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Broadway Community Soup Kitchen, New Haven. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Caring Cuisine, Meals for people with AIDS, New Haven. . . . . . . . . . . . .

2,500 2,000 10,000 1,000 2,000 1,500

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Catholic Charity League, New Haven . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christian Community Action Soup Kitchen, New Haven . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christopher Fund — Matching funds from Supreme Council . . . . . . . . . . Columbus House homeless shelter, New Haven . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Community Mediation Inc., New Haven. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Connecticut Foodbank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Daily Bread, Meals for people with AIDS, New Haven . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disaster Relief Dominican Republic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Haiti . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jamaica. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nebraska . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ontario. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . East Haven (Conn.) Police Union . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Easter Seals Rehabilitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elm City Congregations Organized, New Haven — Affordable housing . . Fellowship of Catholic Scholars, Washington, D.C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hospital of St. Raphael, Father Michael J. McGivney Center for Cancer Care, New Haven . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Human Adventure Corp., Uniformed Firefighters’ Association Widows and Children’s Fund, New York . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Immanuel Baptist Church, Shelter and soup kitchen, New Haven . . . . . . International Festival of Arts & Ideas, New Haven . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Morality in Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . National Catholic Office for Persons with Disabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . National Catholic Office for the Deaf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . National Catholic Prayer Breakfast, Washington, D.C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . National Catholic Rural Life Conference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Haven NAACP Freedom Fund . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other amounts including community-based organizations . . . . . . . . . . . . Our Lady of Good Counsel, Kampala, Uganda — Shoes for orphans . . . . . Regional Workforce Development Board/Private Industry Council, New Haven — Summer works projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . St. Luke’s Lunch for Women and Children, New Haven . . . . . . . . . . . . . . St. Ann Christian Union soup kitchen, Hamden, Conn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Salvation Army, New Haven. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . United Way — Corporate gift . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wheelchair Foundation, Danville, Calif. — Wheelchairs, various countries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TOTAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $
EDUCATIONAL

3,700 2,000 98,866 2,250 1,000 10,248 1,500 10,000 22,005 10,000 10,000 5,000 9,352 1,500 5,000 12,000 3,000 2,200 16,500 1,750 5,000 50,000 100,000 15,000 20,000 10,000 1,500 131,235 5,000 5,000 2,000 4,000 2,000 142,700 150,000 890,306

Albertus Magnus College, Hamden, Conn.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 20,000 Archbishop’s Scholarship Fund, Archdiocese of Hartford. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,500 Beckett Fund for Religious Liberties, Washington, D.C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257,500 Black Catholic Education Foundation — Scholarships. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25,000
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Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Committee for National System of Residential Schools for Native Children . . . . . 100,000 Catholic Legal Immigration Network. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120,000 Christendom College, Front Royal, Va. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,875 Connecticut Hospice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,050 Diocese of Lake Charles, La. — Catholic high school . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50,000 Diocese of Sioux Falls, S.D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000 Fond Cititas Lateran — Web site development for scholars . . . . . . . . . . . . 50,000 Lauralton Hall High School, Milford, Conn. (New Haven Catholic High School Fund) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11,967 Mexico Bishops’ Conference — National Crusade for Literacy Education/Episcopal Commission Secretariat for Education and Culture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10,000 National Catholic Educational Association — Father Michael J. McGivney Fund for New Initiatives in Catholic Education . . . . . . . . . 70,000 Administration of fund . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22,000 Neighborhood Music School, New Haven . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000 New Haven Chorale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5,000 New Haven Free Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000 Notre Dame High School, West Haven, Conn. (New Haven Catholic High School Fund) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12,567 Pontifical Institute for Medieval Studies, Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13,790 Pontifical Missionary Library, Urban University, Rome — Computerization of catalog system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 306,000 Pope John Paul II Cultural Center, Washington, D.C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153,275 Printing costs — Educational program pamphlets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122,995 SGU Gear Up, Mission, S.D. — Native American cultural exchange program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,218 Sacred Heart Academy, Hamden, Conn. (New Haven Catholic High School Fund) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13,667 St. Joseph High School, Chamberlain, S.D.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,338 South Dakota State Council — Grant provided in connection with public education referendum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5,000 The Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50,000 The Catholic University of America Columbus School of Law (Bicentennial of the U.S. Hierarchy Fund) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140,000 Various Catholic schools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,321 TOTAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1,576,063
CULTURAL

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Conserv Art, New Haven . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 8,720 Daughters of Isabella, Augusta, Maine — Publishing history of organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10,000 Knights of Columbus Museum, New Haven . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5,806,595 Points of Light — President’s Volunteer Action Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 320,000 TOTAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 6,145,315 TOTAL COMMUNITY/EDUCATIONAL/CULTURAL GRANTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 8,611,684
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Youth
Boy Scouts of America, Connecticut Yankee Council . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1,500 Catholic Campus Ministry Association — Outreach to young adults, Dayton, Ohio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10,000 Columbian Squires — Official youth organization. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 318,279 Junior Achievement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,000 Leadership, Education and Athletics (LEAP), New Haven . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,000 New Haven Police Athletic League . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,500 New Haven Road Race . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,800 Rome Youth Centers (Italian Welfare Fund) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 871,591 Renovations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 458,490 TOTAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1,668,160
TOTAL YOUTH GRANTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1,668,160

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Council
Arthur F. and Anna Battista Scholarship Fund . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 79,389 Frank L. Goularte Scholarship Fund — Increase in fund . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,500 Bishop Greco Fellowships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,500 Anthony Labella Scholarship Fund . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12,000 Francis P. Matthew and John E. Swift Educational Trust Fund . . . . . . . . . 206,503 John W. McDevitt Scholarship Fund (Fourth Degree Fund) . . . . . . . . . . . . 198,000 Pontifical John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and Family at the Catholic University of America — Scholarship granted . . . . . . . . . 9,000 Member Fraternal Benefits Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 883,013 Mexico Scholarships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6,400 Other Scholarship Funds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19,500 Percy Johnson Scholarships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20,250 Philippines Scholarships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9,353 Pro Deo and Pro Patria Scholarships. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 411,750 Puerto Rico Scholarships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8,000 The Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C. — Four fellowships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180,000 TOTAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 2,050,158 TOTAL COUNCIL GRANTS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 2,050,158
GRAND TOTAL OF ALL CONTRIBUTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $26,388,095 TOTAL STATE/LOCAL UNITS CONTRIBUTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109,364,954 TOTAL CONTRIBUTIONS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $135,753,039 TOTAL HOURS OF VOLUNTEER SERVICE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63,159,359 SUPREME COUNCIL PUBLICATIONS (COLUMBIA AND OTHERS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 5,375,478 GENERAL SUPPORT OF MEMBERSHIP OPERATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31,749,494 TOTAL GENERAL SUPPORT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 37,124,972
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PROGRAMS AND ENDOWED FUNDS

Vocation Endowment Funds
FUND
Bishop Thomas V. Daily Vocations Scholarship Fund Bishop Charles P. Greco American College Fund (Louvain, Belgium) Count Enrico P. Galeazzi Fund for North American College in Rome Father McGivney Fund for Advanced Studies for Priests in Puerto Rico Father Michael J. McGivney Fund for Advanced Studies by Priests from the Philippines Father Michael J. McGivney Fund for Advanced Studies for Priests in Canada (Pontifical Canadian College in Rome) Father Michael J. McGivney Vocations Scholarship Fund Father Michael J. McGivney Vocations Scholarship Fund (Canada) Knights of Columbus Vocations Fund (Canada/Refund Support Vocations Program) Knights of Columbus Vocations Fund (RSVP) Our Lady of Guadalupe Fund—Advanced Studies for Priests in Mexico (Pontifical Mexican College in Rome) TOTAL VOCATION ENDOWMENT FUNDS

CURENT YEAR CORPUS
$1,500,000 400,000 2,000,000 125,000

CURRENT YEAR DONATION
$103,750 18,550 140,000 –

CUMULATIVE DONATIONS
$447,500 405,842 2,831,688 7,860

400,000

17,111

286,978

600,000 5,000,000 800,000

39,403 195,000 35,000

599,724 2,748,829 393,000

625,000 4,000,000

28,900 469,212

381,200 6,040,342

700,000 $16,150,000

45,500 $1,092,426

430,203 $14,533,166

Education Funds
Albertus Magnus College Fund Arthur F. and Anna Battista Scholarship Fund Bicentennial of the U.S. Hierarchy Fund Bishop Charles P. Greco Graduate Fellowship Trust The Catholic University of America Fellowships Estate of Anthony LaBella Fund $250,000 1,584,495 2,000,000 105,000 500,000 202,234 $17,500 79,389 140,000 2,500 180,000 12,000 $142,059 403,359 2,197,619 59,582 1,336,395 33,750

s u p r e m e k n i g h t ’ s a n n u a l r e p o r t 39

Estate of Percy Johnson Scholarship Fund Father McGivney Memorial Fund for New Initiatives in Catholic Education Fourth Degree Pro Deo and Pro Patria (Canada) Scholarship Fund Fourth Degree Pro Deo and Pro Patria Scholarship Fund Francis P. Matthews and John E. Swift Educational Trust Fund Frank L. Goularte Scholarship Fund John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and Family Fellowship Fund John W. McDevitt (Fourth Degree) Scholarship Fund Mexico Scholarships New Haven Area Catholic High Schools Fund Philippines Scholarships Pontifical Institute for Medieval Studies Fund Puerto Rico Scholarships Virgil C. and Ann Dechant Scholarship Fund TOTAL EDUCATION FUNDS

353,000 1,177,000 1,000,000 3,000,000 1,086,810 100,000 206,370 3,124,604 500,000 250,000 368,083 $15,807,596

20,250 70,000 67,500 335,250 206,503 4,500 9,000 198,000 6,400 35,000 6,500 13,790 8,000 19,500 $1,431,582

262,500 2,434,444 691,378 5,065,176 3,897,299 8,250 37,350 839,250 63,145 493,354 97,841 150,871 73,000 76,500 $18,363,122

Miscellaneous Funds
Bishop de Laval Fund Catholic Initiatives in Canada Fund Available for Distribution Christopher Fund Fourth Degree Fund for Religious Liberties Historic Sites Fund Italian Welfare Fund Luke E. Hart Memorial Fund for the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception Military Vicariate Fund Available for Distribution Pacem in Terris Fund Pope John Paul II Cultural Center Fund Vicarius Christi Fund TOTAL MISCELLANEOUS FUNDS $1,000,000 150,000 13,524,009 1,000,000 8,864 3,155,882 $53,462 20,993 748,402 61,148 1,171,591 $1,205,376 16,800 249,924 6,362,743 798,685 2,112,881 15,913,959

1,000,000 900,000 2,000,000 2,655,221 20,000,000 $45,746,473

70,000 117,903 120,000 153,275 1,600,000 $4,116,774

1,290,900 1,024,964 1,192,410 340,000 600,737 38,315,000 $69,424,379

FUND CORPUS CURRENT YEAR DONATION TOTAL CUMULATIVE DONATIONS TO DATE

$77,704,069 $6,640,782 $102,320,667

40

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Cover: Mosaic from Holy Family Chapel Supreme Council Office-New Haven, CT


				
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