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									HCCS Fall 2006 Enrollment Increase:
Contributing Factors




Prepared for:   HCCS Board of Trustees

Respondent:     Office of Institutional Research
                Dr. Linda Gibbs, Director
                Version 2, January 11, 2007
Overview

Texas community colleges are experiencing an enrollment surge this fall. They are reported to be
growing three times faster than the state’s public universities. General opinion attributes the
community college growth to several common factors, such as affordable tuition cost, increased
Hispanic enrollment, more high school graduates, and a weak economy.


HCCS is part of this upward trend, with Fall 2006 mid-term enrollment increase of 9.01 percent
over the previous Fall (or from 52,443 to estimated 57,168 unduplicated headcount). This report
examines possible contributing factors to our enrollment growth. We will look at factors
considered common to all community colleges and comment on how they contribute to increased
enrollment for our institution. Additionally, we will discuss factors specific to HCCS and its
internal operations and the positive effects we are seeing on our current enrollment. The specific
factors addressed include system-wide focus on increasing participation in targeted programs,
greater public awareness of HCCS, better student return rate, and improving our financial aid
program.




OIR_Fall06 Enrollment Factors_version 2          2
Contributing Factors to Enrollment Growth at HCCS
Common Factors
        ♦ Affordable tuition cost
            Community college tuition is more affordable than that of 4-year public institutions.
            HCCS’ annual tuition and fees cost is $1,176, about one-fifth that of Texas
            universities, which at $5,940 is well above the national average. Increasingly,
            students choose community colleges as their entryway to higher education.


        ♦ Increased Hispanic enrollment
            An increasing number of Hispanic students attend community colleges. Statewide,
            Hispanics make up 61% of the enrollment growth. This Fall, as in the previous Fall,
            Hispanic students account for 31% of HCCS’ overall student body and are our largest
            ethnic group. Hispanic students represent 9% of HCCS’ growth in Fall 2006.
            Houston continues to be a destination for international migration, and Harris County
            alone accounts for 27.6% of Texas’ international migration since the 2000 census.
            HCCS can expect continued growth in its Hispanic enrollment.


        ♦ More high school graduates
            As the population grows, more students are moved through our school system. Thus,
            as the number of high school graduates increases, so does the number of prospective
            students for community colleges. In HCCS’ service area, there were 9,508 high
            school graduates in 2005. Data available from the Texas Education Agency indicate
            that 19% (or 1,807) of the high school graduates from HISD chose to enroll at HCCS.
            From 2002 to 2005 the number of graduates in HCCS’ service area increased by 5%.
            HISD alone increased its graduates by 7% over the same period. Since then, focused
            involvement in the high schools and mutually beneficial partnerships with public
            schools have certainly contributed to HCCS’ rise in enrollment.


        ♦ Weak economy
            Participation at community colleges may be affected by the Texas economy. Houston is
            beginning to see the national slowdown spillover to the local economy. Year-over-year
            job growth in Houston is running about 2.5%, off its high last fall of about 3.5%. The
            decrease in employment growth is believed to be one indication of a slower expansion
            of Houston businesses and Houston economy. One explanation for the slowdown is a


OIR_Fall06 Enrollment Factors_version 2         3
            shortage of skills. Labor shortages include professional and craft workers, as well as
            entry-level workers. A weak economy pushes people back to school. In keeping with
            this perspective on the Houston economy as expressed in an article by the Federal
            Reserve Bank of Dallas, the need to train additional employees and develop new skills
            may well be a contributing factor to HCCS’ recent enrollment growth.



HCCS-Specific Factors
        Prior to the 2005-2006 academic year, HCCS administration identified issues critical to
        the growth and improvement of the institution. These issues became strategic priorities
        for planning and budgeting. It is reasonable to assume that the alignment of goals across
        the organization and appropriation of funds in support of those goals is having a positive
        impact on enrollment growth. Current planning priorities and goals focus on growth of
        targeted programs, increased recruitment and retention, improved student support
        services including financial aid, quality program offerings, and better customer service.


        ♦ Increased enrollment in targeted programs
            In keeping with ongoing efforts to Close the Gaps in Participation, HCCS has
            targeted programs and developed strategies for growth. Among those targeted over
            the past several years are Dual Credit, Distance Education, Workforce and Corporate
            Training and Continuing Education.


            Dual credit enrollments are up almost 50%, with much of the growth in Southeast
            College. Tactics for increasing participation in dual credit include expanding course
            offerings, adding new partnerships, and improving promotional efforts. In addition to
            contributing to our current enrollment increase, the dual credit program could well
            affect enrollment positively over time. For example, our reports show that more than
            50% of HCCS’ 2001 dual credit cohort returned to HCCS by 2005 and enrolled in a
            total of 5,067 college- level courses. See Tab 1.


            Distance Education (duplicated) enrollments have increased about 22% (or 1,228
            students) over Fall 2005. See Tab 2. While there are a number of factors that are
            believed to contribute to growth of this program, key among those are the following:




OIR_Fall06 Enrollment Factors_version 2          4
                    Quality-oriented distance education services—the program has its own
                    student services counselors.
                    Better screening of students—helps to ensure that students have the
                    aptitude to learn via distance education; also an online self-assessment tool
                    (SOS) helps students decide if they are likely to succeed in distance education.
                    Online orientation prior to start of classes—provides information to
                    students to facilitate and familiarize them with course requirements, content,
                    and procedures.
                    Another factor that is greatly influencing the growth of distance education is
                    the changing profile of our students. Many are employed, have family
                    obligations or children for whom they are responsible, and other personal
                    issues that place serious limitations on their time. Distance education is
                    becoming more and more popular as an alternative to traditional classroom
                    learning because it is more convenient for many students. Interestingly
                    enough, 90% of HCCS’ distance education students are local and many of
                    those are also enrolled in on-campus classes.


            With the implementation of the Cluster Initiative and energy and health partnerships,
            Workforce and Corporate Training and Continuing Education programs are
            experiencing a boost in enrollment. From Fall 2005 to Fall 2006, Workforce
            programs increased overall by 10.7% (from 23,883 students in Fall 05 to 26,424 in
            Fall 06). There are, however, an outstanding number of programs that have more
            than doubled in enrollment over last fall: Criminal Justice and Law Enforcement
            increased 59%, Fire Protection 72.9%, Health Professions and Related Sciences
            107%, Process Technology 56.4%, Machining 64.4%, and Manufacturing
            Engineering Technology 61.8%, and Digital Gaming and Simulation 78.9%. In
            summary, our program growth reflects a need for trained employees in the following
            occupations: Health Sciences, Manufacturing Trades, Public Service, Engineering-
            Related Technologies, Process Technology for the Energy area, and the game
            industry sector of Information Technology. See Tab 3.


        ♦ Increased recruitment and retention
            Significant emphasis is being given to student recruitment and retention. Along with
            the system-wide Enrollment Management Plan, each college is using tactics



OIR_Fall06 Enrollment Factors_version 2            5
            particular to their area of service and community needs. A portion of the enrollment
            growth might well be attributed to successful attempts of the individual colleges to
            recruit new students and retain students from one term to the next.


            Persistence of first-time-in-college-at-HCCS students has been tracked for many
            years, but with particular emphasis since 2002. Along with tracking, interventions
            have been planned and carried out to help students succeed. The cohorts tracked
            reflect a general increase in year- to-year persistence, from 44.7% (or 3,911 students)
            for the Fall 2002 Cohort to 50.5% (estimated/or 4,166 students) for the Fall 2005
            cohort. Retention, because we are so large, is a significant indicator that HCCS’
            efforts have produced positive results. Increased persistence–the more students we
            keep in school–ultimately affects enrollment positively. See Tab 4.


            Another factor affecting persistence is student engagement, or the amount of time
            and energy that students invest in meaningful education practices. Generally students
            who are more engaged and more satisfied in their educational experience persist
            toward completion of their goals. One way of capturing our students’ perceptions of
            HCCS is through participating in the Community College Survey of Student
            Engagement (CCSSE). This survey is designed to focus on institutional practices and
            student behaviors that promote student engagement--active and collaborative
            learning, student effort, academic challenge, student-faculty interaction, and support
            for learners. Analysis of our survey results and benchmark scores for the past four
            years reveal a trend of improving effectiveness in our educational practices. The
            results of the Spring 2006 survey demonstrate a high level of student satisfaction, and
            HCCS exceeded its own targets and those of its peer group on CCSSE’s five
            indicators. See Tab 5.


        ♦ Increased availability of Financial Aid
            The availability of financial aid influences students’ decisions to enter or return to
            HCCS. Student friendly improvements in financial aid processes are helping more of
            our students to take advantage of financial aid. The total number of financial aid
            students is steadily increasing, with an estimated 16,221 students expected to accept
            awards in 2006-2007. This would represent a 13% increase over the number of award
            recipients for 2005-2006 (14,327). Proportionally, the African American and



OIR_Fall06 Enrollment Factors_version 2          6
            Hispanic ethnic groups account for more than 50% of the awards accepted annually.
            Tracking of selected cohorts shows a steadily increasing number of first-time-in-
            college-at-HCCS students, and approximately 38% of these students are financial aid
            recipients. See Tab 6.


        ♦ Greater public awareness of HCCS
            The combination of aggressive funding from the System and Workforce, the
            introduction of a new marketing campaign concept Own Your Tomorrow, better
            coordination with college Public Relations Directors, and a new direction for the
            Communications Department significantly impacted the increased enrollment.
            An analysis prepared by the HCCS Communications Department indicates the
            following contributing factors related to effective marketing and enrollment growth:
                    Improved faculty recruitment efforts
                    Feedback indicates that the advertising campaign featuring successful
                    graduates and faculty contributed to the pride of faculty by having many of
                    their own featured. Faculty are our best “recruiters” since they have the
                    closest contact with students.


                    Media campaign published via the Internet
                    The 2006 media campaign featuring TV commercials and print ads was
                    available for viewing on the Web for the first time. A student survey, also
                    placed on the Web, generated 900 responses and a wealth of solid marketing
                    information, indicating a strong response to the advertising campaign.


                    Broadcast distribution of workforce program flyers
                    A total of 880,000 flyers featuring our exemplary workforce programs were
                    distributed in the community.


        In summary, enrollment levels are not explainable by one or two factors, but by the
        complex interactions among many variables, both internal and external. Such “self
        examinations” as this study can contribute to HCCS’ efforts to go from “Good to Great.”




OIR_Fall06 Enrollment Factors_version 2         7
List of Sources for Enrollment Report



Texas Community Colleges See Enrollment Surge, AACRAO, Heather Zimar, November 1, 2006


Houston Update, September 22, 2006, Institute for Regional Forecasting


Post-Census Population Change, Greater Houston Partnership, March 2006


Houston Business—A Perspective on the Houston Economy, September 2006, Federal Reserve Bank of
    Dallas, Houston Branch


Memorandum on Progress of Dual Credit Students at HCCS, HCCS Office of Institutional Research,
    November 15, 2006


HCCS Duplicated SCH Enrollment by Program and College, Office of Vice Chancellor for Instruction,
    Fall 2006


Year-to-Year Persistence for 4 AtD Cohorts, HCCS Office of Institutional Research, October 2006


AtD & CCSSE Scoring High in 2006, HCCS Office of Institutional Research, October 2006


Students Accepting Financial Aid Awards by Ethnicity – Annual, HCCS Office of Institutional Research,
    November 15, 2006


Impact of Marketing Campaign, HCCS Office of Communications, November 17, 2006




OIR_Fall06 Enrollment Factors_version 2       8
  Houston Community College System                                                                                    Office of Institutional Research




                                                Dual Credit Enrollment Trends by Ethnicity (Fall Semester)

                                1,300
                                                                             1,186                                             1,160
                                                                                                                                                      1,190
                                        1,007                                                              1,057
           Number of Students




                                1,000


                                                                                                                                                      789
                                 700

                                                                                                                               651
                                                                                                                                                      544
                                                                             289                263                           493
                                 400
                                        345                                                     233
                                                                             221
                                        201                                                                                    192
                                        170                                                               157                                           196
                                 100                                         183

                                                Fall 01              Fall 02                    Fall 03                   Fall 04             Fall 05

                                                          African American           Hispanic         Caucasian              Asian/Pacific Islander




Dual Credit Enrollment Trends by Ethnicity
                                                                                                                                % Change       5 year

                                                  Fall 01        Fall 02           Fall 03      Fall 04            Fall 05      from Fall04   % Change

African American                                     170           221               233           493              544              10.3%     220.0%

Hispanic                                             345           289               263           651              789              21.2%     128.7%

Caucasian                                           1,007         1,186             1,057         1,160             1,190            2.6%      18.2%

Asian/Pacific Islander                               201           183               157           192              196              2.1%      -2.5%

Other*                                               133            5                111           266              364              36.8%     173.7%

Total                                               1,856         1,884             1,821         2,762             3,083            11.6%     66.1%




Note:
* Other includes American Indian/Alaska Native, Nonresident Alien, and Unknown (Ethnicity not Specified).
** Total may include some duplication among colleges.
Source: HCCS OIR DataMarts File Fall 2001 (HCOIR11e_021e), 2002 (HCOIR11e_031e), 2003 (HCOIR11e_041e),
2004 (HCOIR11e_051e) & 2005 (HCOIR11e_052e).



TP: Tri-Semesterly_Standard_Trend_Report_01-04-2006.                                   Page 1 of 1
   Houston Community College System                                                                               Office of Institutional Research




                                                      Unduplicated Enrollment by Ethnicity - All Students
                                                   Distance Education Enrollments by Ethnicity - Duplicated

                                 5,000
                                 8,000

                                                                                                                                              4,191
                                                                                                                           3,281
            Number of Students
           Number of Students




                                                                                                          3,065                               3,339
                                                                                      2,666
                                                                    2,233                                                  3,083              2,794
                                                                                                          2,948
                                 2,500

                                                                                      2,219                                2,208
                                         1,752                      1,963             1,382
                                                                                                          1,810
                                         1,352                      1,187                                                                     1,411
                                                                                                                           1,148
                                         821                                                              1,016
                                                                    747               923
                                         552
                                                                                                                                              4,191
                                 4,000
                                    0
                                                 Fall
                                               Fall 01   01     Fall
                                                               Fall 02 02      Fall
                                                                              Fall 0303               Fall 04
                                                                                                      Fall 04          Fall05
                                                                                                                       Fall 05        Fall 06*
                                                                                                                                      Fall 06*

                                            Caucasian
                                          Caucasian                African American
                                                                 African American                  Hispanic
                                                                                                 Hispanic                 Asian/Pacific Islander
                                                                                                                        Asian/Pacific Islander




Distance Education Enrollments by Ethnicity - Duplicated
                                                                                                                                     % Change          6 year

                                                   Fall 01     Fall 02      Fall 03         Fall 04       Fall 05      Fall 06*     from Fall05       % Change

Caucasian                                            1,752      2,233        2,666            3,065         3,083        3,339         8.3%            90.6%

African American                                     1,352      1,963        2,219            2,948         3,281        4,191        27.7%            210.0%

Hispanic                                                 821    1,187        1,382            1,810         2,208        2,794        26.5%            240.3%

Asian/Pacific Islander                                   552     747         923              1,016         1,148        1,411        22.9%            155.6%

Others**                                                 109     198         224              288            359          572         59.3%            424.8%

Total                                                4,586      6,328        7,414            9,127        10,079        12,307       22.1%            168.4%




Note:
* As of Mid Term
** Other includes American Indian/Alaska Native and Unknown (Ethnicity not Specified).
Source: FMR(Fiscal Management Report)_hcoir1433L_021e, 031e, 041e, 051e, 061e, and 071m.




TP: Standard_Trend_Report_11-15-2006.xls.                                       Page 1 of 1
                                                                                                Houston Community College
                                                                                     Duplicated SCH Enrollment by Program and College

                                                  Central                    Coleman                 Northeast               Northwest                 Southeast               Southwest             System
  Hub                                                           %                        %                        %                        %                        %                        %       Total Total
 College               Program            Fall 05* Fall 06   Increase Fall 05 Fall 06 Increase Fall 05 Fall 06 Increase Fall 05 Fall 06 Increase Fall 05 Fall 06 Increase Fall 05 Fall 06 Increase Fall 05 Fall 06 % Increase
SWC        Accounting                           346   410         18.5      0      0          0     72     62      -13.8   495     518        4.6   118     158       33.9 1307 1366             4.5  2338   2514          7.5
CEC        Air Conditioning/Refrigeration       393   370        -5.85      0      0          0      0       0          0     0       0         0      0       0          0  134       62     -53.7    527    432          -18
NWC        Arranging Comp. & Production           6      0        -100      0      0          0      0       0          0    20       7       -65      0       0          0     0       0          0    26       7         -73
HSC        Associate Degree Nursing               0      0            0 1281 1234          -3.7      0       0          0     0       0         0      0       0          0     0       0          0  1281   1234         -3.7
NWC        Audio & Recording Technology           0      0            0     0      0          0      0       0          0  924     917       -0.8      0       0          0     0       0          0   924    917         -0.8
NEC        Automotive Mechanics                   0      0            0     0      0          0   754    735         -2.5     0       0         0      0       0          0     0       0          0   754    735         -2.5
SCH        Biotechnology                          0      0            0     0      0          0     35     41       17.1      0       0         0      0       0          0     0       0          0    35      41        17.1
SWC        Broadcast Technology                   0      0            0     0      0          0      0       0          0     0       0         0      0       0          0    80      67     -16.3     80      67       -16.3
CEC        Construction Technology              139   116        -16.5      0      0          0      0       0          0     0       0         0      0       0          0     0       0          0   139    116        -16.5
NEC        Business Administration              267   337         26.2      0      0          0   547    731        33.6   311     245      -21.2   105       79     -24.8   222     252       13.5   1452   1644         13.2
SEC        Business Technology                  559   607           8.6     0      0          0   221    391        76.9   113       77     -31.9   336     290      -13.7   578     753       30.3   1807   2118         17.2
HSC        Cardiovascular Technology              0      0            0    76     89       17.1      0       0          0     0       0         0      0       0          0     0       0          0    76      89        17.1
NEC        Chemical Laboratory Tech               0      0            0     0      0          0     63     33      -47.6      0       0         0      0       0          0     0       0          0    63      33       -47.6
CEC        Child Development                    437   416            -5     0      0          0     39     64       64.1   148     125      -15.5     42      44        4.7  177     197       11.3    843    846          0.4
CEC        Machining                            208   342         64.4      0      0          0      0       0          0     0       0         0      0       0          0     0       0          0   208    342         64.4
CEC        Manufacturing Engineering Tec        131   207            58     0      0          0      0       5       100      0       0         0      0       0          0     0       0          0   131    212         61.8
NWC        Commercial Music                       0      0            0     0      0          0     11       0      -100     60      57        -5      0       0          0     0       0          0    71      57       -19.7
SWC        Computer Science Technolog           317   280        -11.7      0      0          0     23     45       95.7   250     352       40.8     94    105       11.7   870     742      -14.7   1555   1524           -2
NWC        Cosmetology                          304   323           6.2     0      0          0   147    181        23.1   260     209      -19.6      0       0          0     0       0          0   711    713          0.3
NEC        Criminal Justice, Law Enforce         48     57        18.8      0       0         0   241    589         144   112       97     -13.4     25      23         -8    96      64     -33.3    522    830           59
CEC        Culinary Arts                        538   529          -1.7     0      0          0      0       0          0     0       0         0      0       0          0     0       0          0   538    529        -0.17
HSC        Dental Assisting                       0      0            0  104    106         1.9      0       0          0     0       0         0      0       0          0     0       0          0   104    106          1.9
HSC        Diagnostic Medical Sonography          0      0            0    95   101         6.3      0       0          0     0       0         0      0       0          0     0       0          0    95    101          6.3
NEC        Diesel Mechanics                       0      0            0     0      0          0     74     54         -27     0       0         0      0       0          0     0       0          0    74      54         -27
SWC        Digital Communication                  0      0            0     0      0          0      0       0          0    12      14      16.6      0       0          0  627     676         7.8   639    690            8
SWC        Digital Gaming & Simulation            0      0            0     0      0          0      0       0          0     0       0         0      0       0          0    38      68      78.9     38      68        78.9
CEC        Drafting/Design Technology            41     50           22     0       0         0   239    326        26.7     65      86      32.3     12      50       317   129     137         6.2   486    649         33.5
NEC        Electronic Engineering Tech          243   189           -22     0      0          0     57   100        75.4     71      69      -2.8      0      24       100      0       5       100    371    387          4.3
HSC        Emergency Medical Technician           0      0            0 1175 1250           6.4      0       0          0     0       0         0      0       0          0     0       0          0  1175   1250          6.4
CEC        Fashion Design                       437   489         11.9      0      0          0      0       0          0     0       0         0      0       0          0     0       0          0   437    489         11.9
CEC        Fashion Merchandising                151   190         25.8      0      0          0      0       0          0     0       0         0      0       0          0     0       0          0   151    190         25.8
CEC        Financial Management                  91   107         17.6      0      0          0      0       0          0     0       0         0      0       0          0     0       0          0    91    107         17.6
NEC        Fire Protection Technology             0      0            0     0      0          0   399    690        72.9      0       0         0      0       0          0     0       0          0   399    690         72.9
SWC        Geographic Information Science         0      0            0     0       0         0      0       0          0     0       0         0      0       0          0    36      24     -33.3     36      24       -33.3
                                                                                             Houston Community College
                                                                                  Duplicated SCH Enrollment by Program and College

                                                  Central                  Coleman                Northeast               Northwest                Southeast               Southwest             System

                                                                %                       %                       %                       %                       %                       %
 College               Program            Fall 05    Fall 06 Increas Fall 05 Fall 06 Increas Fall 05 Fall 06 Increas Fall 05 Fall 06 Increas Fall 05 Fall 06 Increas Fall 05 Fall 06 Increas Fall 05 Fall 06 % Increase
HSC        Health Information Tech.                0       0         0  136    140                 0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0        0    136     140          3.7
HSC        Health Professions & Related S          0      27      100   126    168       33.3      0       8      100      0      28      100      0       0         0     0      30      100    126     261         107
HSC        Histologic Technology                   0       0         0    37     36      -2.7      0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0        0     37      36         -2.7
NWC        Horticulture                            0       0         0     0      0         0      0       0         0    76      97     27.6      0       0         0     0       0        0     76      97        27.6
CEC        Hotel/Restaurant Management          216     251      16.2      0      0         0      0       0         0     0       0         0     0      18      100      0       0        0    216     269        24.5
HSC        Human Services                          0       0         0  234    218       -6.8      0       8      100      0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0        0    234     226         -3.4
CEC        Industrial Electricity               235     227      -3.4      0      0         0      0       3      100      0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0        0    235     230         -2.1
CEC        Interior Design                      267     292        9.4     0      0         0      0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0        0    267     292          9.4
HSC        Interpreting/Transliterating            0       0         0  118    153       29.7      0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0        0    118     153        29.7
CEC        Legal Assistant                      205     275         34     0      0         0      0       0         0     0       0         0    12       0     -100      9       0     -100    226     275        21.7
CEC        Manufacturing Process/Machine        208     342         64     0      0         0      0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0        0    208     342           64
NEC        Marketing                              59      79     33.9      0       0        0     77     84        9.1    26      32        23     0       0         0     6       4    -33.3    168     199        18.5
HSC        Medical Assistant                       0       0         0  213    333       56.3      0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0        0    213     333        56.3
HSC        Medical Laboratory                      0       0         0  111    130       17.1      0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0        0    111     130        17.1
HSC        Nuclear Medicine Technology             0       0         0  146    141       -3.4      0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0        0    146     141         -3.4
HSC        Occupational Therapy Assistant          0       0         0  108    120       11.1      0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0        0    108     120        11.1
HSC        Pharmacy Technician                     0       0         0  160    214       33.8      0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0        0    160     214        33.8
CEC        Photography                          134     106     -20.9      0      0         0      0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0        0    134     106       -20.9
CEC        Physical Fitness Technology            63      53    -15.9      0      0         0      0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0        0     63      53       -15.9
HSC        Physical Therapy Assistant              0       0         0  254    269        5.9      0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0        0    254     269          5.9
SCH        Process Technology                      0       0         0     0      0         0     39     61      56.4      0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0        0     39      61        56.4
NEC        Public Administration                   0       0         0     0      0         0      5       0     -100      0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0        0      5       0        -100
HSC        Radiography                             0       0         0  315    343        8.9      0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0        0    315     343          8.9
SWC        Real Estate                             0       0         0     0       0        0     11     41       273      0       0         0    91    110      20.9   716     811      13.3    818     962        17.6
HSC        Respiratory Therapist                   0       0         0  189    207        9.5      0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0        0    189     207          9.5
HSC        Surgical Technology                     0       0         0  173    187        8.1      0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0        0    173     187          8.1
CEC        Travel and Tourism                     81      66    -18.5      0      0         0      0       0         0     0      10      100      0       0         0     0       0        0     81      76         -2.9
NWC        Veterinary Paramedic                    0       0         0     0      0         0      0       0         0  131     161      22.9      0       0         0     0       0        0    131     161        22.9
HSC        Vocational Nursing                      0       0         0  574    583        1.6      0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0        0    574     583        1.57
CEC        Welding                              145     153        5.5     0      0         0      0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0         0     0       0        0    145     153          5.5
           Fall 05 = End of Term               6269 6890           9.9 5625 6022          7.1 3054 4252          39.2 3074 3101            0.9  835     901        7.9 5025 5258          5.2 23883 26424           10.7
           Fall 06 = Middle of Term
                      Cohort Year to Year Persistence Rate (%) Trends
60

               50.5

50
                   48.2
     47.8


40          44.7
                                  32.8

                           31.0          31.3
30

                                  29.5
                                                              21.0
20                                                20.5

                                                          19.1               14.5
10
                                                                                    12.8
                                                                                               9.0

0
      One Yr Later            2 Yrs Later               3 Yrs Later           4 Yrs Later   5 yrs Later

                          Fall 2002         Fall 2003            Fall 2004      Fall 2005
  Houston
 Community




                                           CCSSE 2006
  College
   System


                                                                                                                              Spring 2006
                                                                                                                             Survey Results
                                                                                                                            Published by the Office of
                                                                                                                              Institutional Research
                                                                                                                                 September 2006




    INSIDE THIS ISSUE:                     Using Results to inform decision making
                                           and target institutional improvements
                                           This Community College Sur-
                                           The story can fit 175-225            catalog, you is referred to as
                                                                                This cohort will find many pub-     port , and CCSSE data can be
HCCS Benchmarks                      2     vey of
                                           words.Student Engagement             lications that match the style of
                                                                                the 2006 CCSSE Cohort               used to make informed deci-
Exceed Peers                               (CCSSE) provides information         your newsletter.
                                                                                throughout all reports and          sions about how to improve
                                           about effective a newsletter
                                           The purpose ofeducational is         documentation. This new ap-         our unique institution.
Selected Findings                    2     to provide community informa-
                                           practice in specialized colleges     Next, establish how total
                                                                                proach increases themuch time
                                           tion assists institutions in using
                                           and to a targeted audience.          and money you can spend stu-
                                                                                number of institutions and on       CCSSE findings can be used to
                                           that information be a great
                                           Newsletters can to promote           your contributing to the na-
                                                                                dentsnewsletter. These factors      profile students, answer ques-
Student Services                     3     way to market in student learn-
                                           improvements your product            will help determine how fre-
                                                                                tional dataset, which in turn       tions pertaining to student
by Use, Satisfac-                          or service, and also create
                                           ing and persistence. CCSSE’s         quently you publish the news-
                                                                                increases the reliability of the    goals, persistence, student en-
tion, and Impor-                           credibility and build your or-
                                           goal is to provide member col-       letter and its length. It’s rec-
                                                                                overall results. In addition, the   gagement in the classroom, and
tance                                      ganization’s identity among
                                           leges with results that can be       ommended that you publish
                                                                                three-year cohort approach          satisfaction with support ser-
                                           peers, members, employees, or
                                           used to inform decision making       your newsletter at least any
                                                                                minimizes the impact, in quar-      vices, as well as identify issues
HCCS All Student                     3     vendors.
Profile                                    and target institutional im-         terly year, of participation a
                                                                                given so that it’s consideredby     for focus groups.
                                           provements. Student engage-          consistent source of informa-
                                                                                statewide consortia. (Overview
                                           First, determine the audience
HCCS Population                      4     of the or the amount of time
                                           ment, newsletter. This could         tion. Your 2006 CCSSE Cohort
                                                                                of National customers or em-
Data                                       andanyone who might benefit
                                           be energy that students invest
                                                                                ployees will look
                                                                                Survey Results) forward to its
                                           in meaningful educational prac-      arrival.
                                           from the information it con-         Houston Community College
                                           tices, is the underlying founda-
                                           tains, for example, employees
                                           tion for CCSSE’s work. CCSSE’s       System is among the 447 insti-
                                           or people interested in pur-         tutions across 46 states partici-
                                           chasing a product the Commu-
                                           survey instrument,or request-
                                           nity your service. Report            pating in CCSSE between 2004
                                           ing College Student                  and 2006, and thus is in the
                                           (CCSR), is designed to capture
                                           You can compile a mailing list
                                           student engagement as a meas-        three-year cohort. HCCS is
                                           ure of institutional quality. cus-
                                           from business reply cards,           also a member of the Hispanic-
                                           tomer information sheets,            Serving Institutions/Hispanic
                                           Beginning this year, CCSSE will
                                           business cards collected at          Association of Colleges and
 Special points of interest:
                                           trade shows, or cohort of par-
                                           use a three-year membership          Universities Consortium (HIS/
 • 94% of student respondents would        ticipating colleges (2004 pur-
                                           lists. You might consider            HACU) . This common inter-
   recommend HCCS to a friend or           chasing mailing all from a
                                           througha2006) in list of its data    est consortium collaborated
                                           analyses, including the compu-
                                           company.                             to add questions to the Com-        Using results improves student
   family member                           tation of benchmark scores.          munity College Student Re-          success
                                           I
 • HCCS exceeds set targets for all five
   student engagement benchmarks
                                           CCSSE Benchmarks as Key Performance Indicators
 • HCCS exceeds benchmark scores of
   peer groups
                                           HCCS’ Key Performance Indi-          ance targets for 2006— to           oped at the various levels of
 • HCCS has no survey items that fall      cators (KPIs) include the five       exceed the CCSSE Standard           the organization, would
   below the mean in comparison with       CCSSE benchmarks for effec-          Mean of 50 and to achieve a         sharpen the focus on engage-
   other extra-large colleges              tive educational practice—           Score of 52 on all five bench-      ment items that are important
                                           active and collaborative             marks.                              aspects of the student experi-
 • The frequency of career counseling      learning, student effort,                                                ence.
                                           academic challenge, stu-             Along with target setting, for
   at HCCS is significantly more than                                           the same period HCCS out-
                                           dent-faculty interaction,                                                The 2006 CCSSE results show
   the 2006 Cohort mean.                   and support for learners.            lined strategies to increase        that HCCS exceeded annual
                                                                                student engagement in all pro-      KPI targets for all five student
                                           Using 2005 CCSSE results as          grams and services. Opera-          engagement benchmarks.
                                           baselines, HCCS set perform-         tional plans, which are devel-
         HCCS Benchmarks Exceed Peers
         According to 2006 CCSSE responses,          HCCS’ score for Academic Challenge                                        There is room for improvement in Ac-
         students at HCCS indicate that the in-      is four points above last year and our                                    tive & Collaborative Learning, which is
         stitution is improving in most areas of     area of highest performance. Also                                         slightly above the mean and, again, our
         the student experience. The chart on        Student-Faculty Interaction has im-                                       lowest benchmark score. *Data was weighted
         the right compares HCCS benchmark           proved significantly from 49.7 to 52.6.                                   according to the full-time/part-time population data from
                                                                                                                               IPEDS
         scores with other extra-large colleges .
         HCCS’ scores on all five bench-
         marks for effective educational                                                        HCCS Benchmark Comparison
         practice exceed those of its peers.
                                                                           55
         Benchmark scores are standardized so                                                                            HCCS 2006
                                                                           54
         that the mean—the average of all par-
         ticipating institutions— is always 50.                            53



                                                         Benchmark Score
         Reports for 2006 show that HCCS is                                52
         performing above the mean in all areas,                                                                  HCCS 2005
                                                                           51                                                                             Mean
         compared with last year, when we
                                                                           50
         scored at or slightly below the mean in
         four areas.                                                       49
                                                                           48
         Equally important, in 2006 HCCS ex-                                                                                     Ex-Large
                                                                           47
         ceeds its benchmarks of the previous                                                                                    Colleges*
                                                                           46
         year.
                                                                           45
                                                                                  Active &       Student Effort    Academic     Student-Faculty     Support for
                                                                                Collaborative                      Challenge      Interaction        Learners
                                                                                  Learning




         Selected Findings
         Many crucial questions that HCCS            Student Effort                                                            Student-Faculty Interaction
         needs answered—What are our stu-            Students own behaviors contribute signifi-                                The more contact students have with their
         dents’ goals? What issues keep our stu-     cantly to their learning and the likelihood                               teachers, the more likely they are to learn
         dents from persisting? How effectively      that they will successfully attain their edu-                             effectively and to persist toward achieve-
         are we engaging students in the class-      cational goals.                                                           ment of their educational goals.
         room? — can be answered by investi-
         gating the percentage of student re-        Frequency of student respondents who                                      Frequency of student respondents who
         sponses to specific survey items. In        often or very often—                                                      often or very often—
         the following paragraphs, HCCS fre-         ◊ worked on a paper or project that                                       ◊ used email to communicate with an
         quencies for CCSSE 2006 are given             required integrating ideas or infor-                                      instructor—46%
         for selected survey items listed under        mation from various sources—62%                                         ◊ discussed grades or assignments with
         the benchmark to which the item             ◊ prepared two or more drafts of a                                          instructor—43%
         contributes.                                  paper or assignment before turning it
                                                                                                                               Support for Learners
         Active & Collaborative Learning               in—55%
                                                                                                                               Students perform better and are more
         Students learn more when they are ac-       Academic Challenge                                                        satisfied at colleges that are committed to
         tively involved in their education and      Challenging intellectual and creative work                                their success and cultivate positive working
         have opportunities to think about and       is central to student learning and collegiate                             and social relationships among different
         apply what they are learning in different   quality.                                                                  groups on campus.
         settings.
                                                     Frequency of student respondents who                                      Frequency of student respondents who
         Frequency of student respondents            answered quite a bit or very much                                         answered quite a bit or very much
         who often or very often—                    that coursework at HCCS empha-                                            that HCCS emphasizes —
         ◊ asked questions in class or contrib-      sizes—                                                                    ◊ providing the support you need to
           uted to class discussions—60%             ◊ analyzing the basic elements of an                                        help you succeed at HCCS—67%
         ◊ tutored or taught other students             idea, experience, or theory—71%                                        ◊ providing the financial support you
           (paid or voluntary)—10%                   ◊ synthesizing and organizing ideas,                                        need to afford your education—39%
         ◊ discussed ideas from your readings           information, or experiences in new                                     ◊ encouraging contact among students
           or classes with others outside of            ways—64%                                                                 from different economic, social, and
           class (students, family members,          ◊ using information you have read or                                        racial or ethnic backgrounds—60%
           coworkers, etc.)—45%                         heard to perform a new skill—59%

Page 2
                                                                                                                                                                            CCSSE 2006
SPRING 2006 SURVEY RESULTS
                                                                                                                                                   Page 3



Student Services by Use, Satisfaction, and Importance
for All Students (weighted data*)
The table on the right displays use, sat-   rate as important are computer labs               dents with disabilities are among the
isfaction, and importance of a number       and academic advising/planning. While             least used and least important services,
of key academic and student support         skills labs (writing, math, etc.) are third       according to 2006 results.
services. The first column reports the      highest in use and user satisfaction,
percentage of students who say that         importance to students is less than ca-           *Data was weighted according to the full-
they used the service either Sometimes      reer counseling and computer labs.                time/part-time population data from IPEDS
or Often; the second column shows the       Although career counseling, is impor-
percentage of student users who re-         tant to 83%,
port they are Somewhat or Very Satisfied    less than 40%
                                                                 Student Services                                 User        Impor-
with the service; and the third column      use the service                                             Use
                                                                                                               Satisfaction tance
reports the percentage of students who      with any fre-
rate the service as Somewhat or Very        quency.      Simi-     Academic advising /planning         50%         84%          88%
Important.                                  larly, while 76%       Career counseling                   38%         82%          83%
                                            find financial aid     Job placement assistance            13%         68%          62%
The services highlighted in purple in       advising some-         Peer or other tutoring              33%         81%          73%
each column are the three highest rat-      what or very           Skills labs (writing, math, etc.) 42%           85%          74%
ings in that area, and the services high-   important, us-         Child care                           6%         74%          45%
lighted in rust are among the lowest        age is 41%. Job
                                                                   Financial aid advising              41%         78%          76%
rated in each area.                         placement assis-
                                            tance,       child     Computer lab                        66%         88%          83%
The services HCCS students most of-         care, and ser-         Student organizations               17%         77%          60%
ten use, express satisfaction with, and     vices to stu-          Transfer credit assistance          29%         79%          73%
                                                                   Services to students with dis-
                                                                                                       10%         73%          57%
                                                                   abilities



HCCS All Student Profile

An analysis of HCCS student respon-         a student profile that is slightly more                   When compared with the 2006 CCSSE
dents to CCSSE can be used to present       descriptive in some respects than the                     Cohort survey respondents,
                                            general profile, i.e. first-generation                    HCC mirrors that population in gen-
  Gender                                    status and educational attainment.                        der and has somewhat similar charac-
            Male                40%                                                                   teristics for age and educational attain-
           Female               60%                                                                   ment. However, HCCS’ student popu-
  Age                                                                                                 lation differs considerably in race/
            18-21               25%            First Generation                          44% -        ethnicity, especially in the following
            22-39               61%            Status                                     48%         groups: White, Non-Hispanic; Black or
                                               Educational Attain-                                    African American, Non-Hispanic; Asian
           40-over              13%                                                                   American or Pacific Islander. While
  Racial Identification                        ment
                                                                                                      our White population is about half that
     Am Indian or Other                                  None                              2%
                                 0%                                                                   of other extra-large colleges, percent-
          Native Am                              HS Diploma or GED                         68%        ages are
     Asian, Asian Am or                          Vocational/technical                                 significantly
                                12%                                                        10%        higher for
       Pacific Islander                                certificate
      African American,                          Associate degree or                                  other              58% of our students started
                                25%                                                        20%        groups
        Non- Hispanic                                    higher
                                                                                                      (Asian and
                                                                                                                                college at HCCS
    White, Non-Hispanic         25%            Credit Hours Earned                                    Blacks). As
  Hispanic, Latino, Spanish     27%                      None                              13%        should be
            Other               3%                                                                    the case,
                                                      1-4 Credits                          38%
    International Student       8%                                                                    HCCS’ student population mirrors that
  Enrollment Status                                  15-29 Credits                         22%        of its service area.
          Full-Time             31%                  30-44 Credits                         13%
          Part-Time             69%                  45-60 Credits                         8%
  Limited English                                  Over 60 Credits                         6%
  Speaking Skills               40%
                                            *Data was weighted according to the full-time/part-time
                                            population data from IPEDS
       Institutional Research
                                                       The Office of Institutional Research (OIR) at Houston Community College System
                                                       is responsible for the collection, analysis, interpretation, and dissemination of accu-
                                                       rate and timely information on all aspects of the College System in support of in-

      Office of Institutional Research                 stitutional decision-making, planning and reporting.
       3100 Main St., Third Floor
          HCCS Mail Code 1147
                                                       The office serves as a clearinghouse for many system-wide surveys, including the
             Phone: 713-718-8625
               Fax: 713-718-2031                       Community College Survey of Student Engagement. HCCS has participated in
           Email: linda.gibbs@hccs.edu
                                                       CCSSE since 2002.


HOUSTON COMMUNITY                                      For information contact Dr. Linda Gibbs, Director of Institutional Research,
  COLLEGE SYSTEM                                       at 713-718-8627.


    OIR supports data-driven decision
      making for the HCCS Board,
       administration, and faculty.

            Find us on the Web at
            http://www.hccs.edu/system/
            admin/research/oirhome.html




HCCS Population Data for CCSSE 2006
Credit classes were randomly selected –        Hispanic, 19% as Black or African Ameri-
stratified by time of day (morning, after-     can, and 11% as Asian. The remaining 3%           International Students
noon, and evening) – from HCCS class data      are American Indian or other Native               Approximately 19% of the students who
files to participate in the survey. Of those   American and Other.                               completed the survey indicate interna-
sampled, 1,261 students submitted us-                                                              tional/ foreign student status.
able surveys. The number of completed
surveys produced an overall “percent                                                               Enrollment Status
of target” rate of 52%.                                                                            Fifty-eight percent of the student respon-
                                                                                                   dents report attending HCCS full-time.
Student Respondent Profile
                                                                                                   CCSSE scores were weighted to reverse
Gender                                                                                             sampling method basis toward full-time
Of the student respondents who an-                                                                 status.
swered this item, 40% are male and
60% are female. This closely mirrors
the full population of HCCS students.

Age
Respondents range in age from 18 to
65+ years old. Approximately 90% are
between 18 to 39 years old.

Racial Identification
Twenty-six percent of student respon-
dents identify themselves as Hispanic/
Latino/Spanish, 21% White/Non-
  Houston Community College                                                                                        Office of Institutional Research




                                                            Students Accepting Financial Aid Awards (Annual)

                                               7,000
                   Students Accepting Awards




                                                                                                                                           6,327
                                               6,000
                                                                                                      5,772               5,912
                                                                                       5,694
                                               5,000
                                                          4,845                                                          4,633             4,512
                                               4,000
                                                          3,683                        4,407          4,511
                                               3,000
                                                          1,741                         1,932        1,943               1,830
                                               2,000                                                                                       1,875
                                                                                                                                           1,613
                                                          1,507                         1,653         1,677              1,269
                                               1,000

                                                  0

                                                             2001-02              2002-03        2003-04         2004-05              2005-06

                                                        African American              Hispanic       Caucasian              Asian/All Others




                                                       Students Accepting Financial Aid Awards (Annual)
                                                                                      2001-02    2002-03      2003-04            2004-05    2005-06
                                                       African American                 4,845      5,694         5,772            5,912         6,327

                                                       Hispanic                         3,683      4,407         4,511            4,633         4,512
                                                       Caucasian                        1,741      1,932         1,943            1,830         1,613
                                                       Asian/All Others                 1,507      1,653         1,677            1,269         1,875
                                                       Total Students Accepting
                                                       Awards                          11,776      13,686      13,903             14,011        14,327




Note:
Total Awards Accepted includes African American, Hispanic, Caucasian, and Asian & All Other.
Source: DM07_end of Aid Year



TP: Trends_In_Achievement_IV.xls

								
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