Docstoc

Exposition program

Document Sample
Exposition program Powered By Docstoc
					Text Type: Exposition

Week: 6-11 Outcomes Reading Reading and viewing texts RS2.5 Reads independently a wide range of texts on increasingly challenging topics and justifies own interpretation of ideas, information and events. Skills and strategies RS2.6 Uses efficiently an integrated range of skills and strategies when reading and interpreting written texts. Context and text RS2.7 Discusses how writers relate to their readers in different ways, how they create a variety of worlds through language and how they use language to achieve a wide range of purposes. Language structures and features RS2.8 Discusses the text structure of a range of text types and the grammatical features that are characteristic of those text types.

Talking and Listening Talking and listening TS2.1 Communicates in informal and formal classroom activities in school and social situations for an increasing range of purposes on a variety of topics across the curriculum Skills and Strategies TS2.2 Interacts effectively in groups and pairs, adopting a range of roles, uses a variety of media and uses various listening strategies for different situations. Context and Text TS2.3 Identifies the effect of purpose and audience on spoken texts and distinguishes between different varieties of English. Language structures and features TS2.4 Identifies common organisational patterns and some characteristic language features of a few types of predictable spoken texts.

Writing Producing texts WS2.9 Drafts, revises, proofread and publish wellstructured texts that are more demanding in terms of topic, audience and written language features. Grammar and punctuation WS2.10 Produces texts clearly, effectively and accurately, using the sentence structure, grammatical features and punctuation conventions of the text type. Spelling WS2.11 Uses knowledge of letter–sound correspondences, common letter patterns and a range of strategies to spell familiar and unfamiliar words. Language structures and features WS2.13 Discusses how own texts are adjusted to relate to different readers, how they develop the subject matter and how they serve a wide variety of purposes.

Social Purpose To argue a case for or against a particular point of view or position. Exposition texts persuade an audience to adopt a certain opinion. Basic Structure Statement of position Arguments and supporting evidence Conclusion to reinforce the statement of position Basic Grammar Language of cause and effect Language of sequence Language of opinion General nouns Detailed noun groups Stage Two Students in this stage will be required to engage in more sustained arguments involving the justification of opinion, arguments with supporting evidence and critical evaluation of others opinions. Content Students moving into less familiar area A certain amount of research required to support and argument Abstract and technical language developing Structure Students should be able to succinctly outline an issue Identify arguments for or against an issue Provide supporting evidence for their views Draw conclusions based on arguments Language Extended noun groups Comparing adjectives Oral debates Modeled texts, independent and joint construction of texts.

▪ ▪

▪ ▪ ▪ ▪

▪ ▪ ▪ ▪

▪

Language Features Building the field Lesson One

Teaching/learning experiences Week One
▪ ▪

Resources Topic Cards Agree/disagree poster

Teacher makes statements, reposition on different topics. For example  children should be allowed to bring ipods to school  Animals should be kept in zoos  Children should go to school before 7.30. Children stand under a sign that says Agree or Disagree. Don’t ask children to justify their choices. Come back as a group and have a class discussion, making generalisations from the previous activity. Example – some people agreed, most people agreed. Establish that everyone has a different opinion on different topics. Talk about what opinion means. When we give our opinion, what type of words do we use? For example, think and believe. Put the words on the board. Talking Have topic cards with statements of position. In groups of 3-4, children select a card and give their opinion, whether they agree or disagree. Encourage them to give a reason. Writing Children select two topics and write their opinion based on those two topics. Three topics for higher ability. Negotiating the field Lesson Two Introduce the term exposition Explain that we are going to be learning about expositions. Explain that an exposition is where they get to say or write what they believe about a particular topic. Brainstorm: Break students into 6 groups. Each group is given a question. They need to write as much as they can about their topic and then a reporter from each group reports back to the class. Explain the role of the reporter. Record answers in a class matrix.

▪ ▪

Question cards Paper

Language of opinion

Questions – what we know – what we’ve learnt What is an exposition? Who would write an exposition? Why would people write an exposition? Who would read an exposition? Where would you find an exposition? What is included in an exposition? Modelling of the text Text Deconstruction Learning about the text type Lesson Three Introduce a text sample Show text sample: Should children where uniforms to school? Page 266 LFTT text. As a class, read the text. Ask children what the purpose of this might be. Who do you think the audience might be? What issue is being addressed? On the board, highlight and discuss the following: The title – Why do we have a title? What is the purpose of the title? The statement of position – why do we think it is called that The arguments and evidence The conclusion Next, highlight the language of opinion. Discuss why language of opinion is used. Children have copy of text. Children highlight the features on their own copy. They then write the language of opinion in their English books. Modelling the text – Language features Lesson Four Revisit language of opinion recorded from previous lesson. Introduce children to further language of opinion structures – Ask children if they can think of any. Listening Teacher reads a variety of statements using language of opinion. Students listen on the first reading. On the second reading, students record language of opinion structures. Talking

▪ ▪

Copy of text on Smart board Copy of text for each child

Language of opinion

▪ ▪ ▪

Language of opinion spinners Topic cards Retrieval chart with Language of opinion brainstorm

Using the same topic cards as in lesson one, children choose a topic. Using a spinner with language of opinion words, they spin the spinner and which ever word they land on, they make a statement based on a topic. For example, I strong believe that animals should not be kept in zoos. Take turns using the language. Writing Students choose three topics and make three statements re their opinion using a variety of language of opinion structures. Five topics for higher ability students

Week Two Building the field Lesson Five Topic: Should children wear school uniforms to school? Carry out a class survey. Ask a question and ask children to raise their hands. How many agree/disagree that school uniforms should be worn How many girls agree/disagree How many boys agree/disagree Make generalizations about the results. Most girls agree…. More girls agree than disagree… In small groups children brainstorm reasons for or against the topic. They are in a group with others who have the same opinion. Come back as a class. One group member reports back to the class. As a class, record reasons for and against. Ask for evidence. Make the reasons into a table. For example, we have a school hat which is compulsory. Evidence that this is important: if you don’t wear a hat you will get skin cancer. Then ask children to put up their hand if they agree with each statement. Record the number of children who agreed with each statement. This is a way to gather data. We will use this data to write our own class exposition. Modelling the text – joint construction of the plan Lesson Six
▪ ▪ ▪

Smartboard table to record results Task card Joint and independent planning sheets

▪

Planning sheet

Language of opinion

Introduce a planning sheet Based on the survey results from lesson five, begin to write a plan. The survey should determine which side of the argument to choose as well as the strongest three arguments. As a class write a plan. Explain that a good writer always plans their writing. Children find a partner (or on their own if they are at that stage) who has the same position as them. Children take their own position, write their own arguments with their own priorities. Use the same plan as the class used. If done impairs, both children need to complete an individual plan. Modelling the text – join construction of the plan Lesson Seven Listening Teacher reads a variety of statements using language of opinion. Students listen on the first reading. On the second reading, students record language of opinion structures. Talking Using the same topic cards as in lesson one, children choose a topic. Using a spinner with language of opinion words, they spin the spinner and which ever word they land on, they make a statement based on a topic. For example, I strong believe that animals should not be kept in zoos. Take turns using the language. *As this is the second time the students have engaged in this activity, it can be done quite quickly. Look back at the text sample, focusing on the structure. Joint construction based on the plan. Jointly construct the statement of position focusing on the three reasons which will be discussed in the exposition. Students then independently write their own statement of position based on their own plan. Week Three Modelling the text – Text Structure Lesson Eight Sequencing arguments. Explain that arguments need to be presented sequentially and with priorities. Language of sequence helps us to arrange our arguments. Go back to the text sample. Highlight the language of sequence. In a different colour, students also highlight on their copy of the text.

▪ ▪ ▪

Oral text Language of opinion spinner Topic cards

Language of sequence

▪ ▪

Language of sequence dice Word bank

Start a word bank for the language of sequence. Listening Teacher reads a spoken text sample. Students listen on the first reading. On the second reading, students record language of sequence. Add to word bank. Align semantic varieties. For example, the first reason – to begin with etc Talking Using the same topic cards as in lesson one, children choose a topic. Children find a partner who is of the same position. With their partner, students create a spoken exposition based on the topic. Students must choose alternate parts of the exposition (statement of position, first argument, second argument, third argument and conclusion). Students must use a different language of sequence structure each time and roll the language of opinion structure dice to determine the language structure they will use. Writing As a class, jointly construct the first argument. Children then independently construct their first argument. Modelling the text Lesson Nine As a class, jointly construct the second and third argument and conclusion. Children then independently construct their second and third argument and conclusion. Refer back to the survey when doing your arguments.
▪ ▪

Planning sheet Survey results

Reflect on the text type and its use. Lesson Ten With the students, look at the joint construction. Evaluate whether or not all the necessary parts of the text type were included. Highlight language of opinion and statement. Did we include the different language of opinion words? Students then reflect on their own writing. Students highlight their own work as we did on the board. Students then give themselves a rating and complete the evaluation rubric. Week Four

▪

Evaluation rubric

Building the field Lesson Eleven Topic: Australian schools should provide lunch for their students Survey stake holders who would have an opinion on the topic: parents, principle. (Survey is being done to support your arguments) Interview those people to get your data. Ask the class to brainstorm whether they agree/disagree and why. Record the ideas on the board. Language of cause and effect Modelling the Text – Language Features Lesson Twelve Teach the cause and effect. Why do we use cause and effect? Ask students why they think we have supporting evidence. Ask students to give reasons to support their brainstorming points from previous lesson. Teacher makes statements, reposition on different topics. For example  children should be allowed to bring ipods to school  Animals should be kept in zoos  Children should go to school before 7.30. Children stand under the Agree or Disagree sign. Students give reasons for making their choice. Give students the opportunity to change their opinion and swap sides. Explain that it is more convincing when we use supporting evidence. If we use the language of cause and effect we will be able to make our topic more convincing. Modelling the Text – Language Features Lesson Thirteen Students brainstorm a list of words that might be associated with cause and effect. Add to the list if students cannot think of examples. As a class, highlight the cause and effect words in the school uniform text. Students highlight their own copy. Listening Teacher reads out a list of sentences. On the first reading, students just listen. On the second reading, students match the cause with the effect. Talking

▪ ▪

Survey Paper

Language of cause and effect

Using the same topic cards as in lesson one, children choose a topic. Using a spinner with language of cause and effect words, they spin the spinner and which ever word comes up, they make a statement based on a topic. For example, keeping animals in zoos will result in unhealthy animals. Take turns using the language. Writing Students write three/five sentences using cause and effect language. Language of opinion Language of sequence Language of cause and effect Building the field Modelling the Text – Joint construction Lesson Fourteen Discuss with children that when we write a letter we might be writing an exposition. Teach the conventions of letter writing. Explain that our second topic will be written in the form of a letter. Revisit the brainstorm about why we should/shouldn’t have lunches provided. As a class, plan a joint model of the topic. Students then do their own plan. Students then create their own text construction. Unless the students are struggling, there is no need to jointly construct the text. Week Five Reflect on the text type and its use. Lesson Sixteen With the students, look at the joint construction. Evaluate whether or not all the necessary parts of the text type were included. Highlight language features and statement. Did we include the different language of opinion, sequence and cause and effect words? Students then reflect on their own writing. Students highlight their own work as we did on the board. Students then give themselves a rating and complete the evaluation rubric. Modelling the Text – Language Features Lesson Fifteen Listening Teacher reads out a list of sentences. On the first reading, students just listen. On the second reading, students match the cause with the effect.
▪ ▪ ▪

Planning sheet Example of a letter

Evaluation rubric

Language of cause and effect

▪ ▪

Cause and effect spinner Cause and effect template

Talking Using the same topic cards as in lesson one, children choose a topic. Using a spinner with language of cause and effect words, they spin the spinner and which ever word comes up, they make a statement based on a topic. For example, keeping animals in zoos will result in unhealthy animals. Take turns using the language. Building the field Lesson Seventeen Topic: Would Japan be a more exciting place to live than Australia? Teacher reads out a list of statements. Depending on how the children feel about the statements, they move to different points of the room. For example, in Japan they have many festivals. If they think that is a positive, they move to the positive section. In groups of 3, students brainstorm as many things about Japan as they can think of. One student reports back to the class. Make a list of the things we know on the board. Students write an individual plan. Modelling the Text – Independent construction Lesson Eighteen Students individually write an exposition: Would Japan be a more exciting place to live than in Australia? *Assessment item Reflect on the text type and its use. Lesson Nineteen With the students, look at the joint construction. Evaluate whether or not all the necessary parts of the text type were included. Highlight language features and statement. Did we include the different language of opinion, sequence and cause and effect words? Students then reflect on their own writing. Students highlight their own work as we did on the board. Students then give themselves a rating and complete the evaluation rubric. Negotiating the field Lesson Twenty Students look at brainstorm from week two and add new knowledge.

▪ ▪

Japanese statements Planning sheet

Language of opinion Language of sequence Language of cause and effect

▪

Planning sheet

▪

Evaluation Rubric

▪

Brainstorm from lesson two


				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:4918
posted:6/3/2009
language:English
pages:10