Arthur Conan Doyle Worksheet

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					                                             Day 1

Author(s) Suzie Skaff

Grade Level: 9-12

Integrated disciplines: Reading Fiction

NE Standards:

8.1.3 By the end of the eighth grade, students will identify and use characteristics to
classify different types of text.

Objectives:

Students will be able to:
* To look up the settings in The Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
* To learn about realistic and fictional settings
* To write an essay comparing realistic and fictional settings

Assessment:

Students will be graded on the accuracy of their information of the realistic settings and
their comparison to the fictional settings.

Materials:

*   The Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
*   Notebook paper
*   Pens and whiteouts
*   Computer and paper

Procedures

         Anticipatory Set:

         In this lesson, the students will read The Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir
         Arthur Conan Doyle, and then they will look up information about the places
         the author used in his book.

         Learning Activities

                Teacher:

                The teacher will ask the students the difference between fiction
                and non-fiction. The teacher will provide copies of the books
                required for this assignment. The teachers will also answer and
                questions regarding the reading and writing assignment. The
                teacher will lead the discussion at the end of the class period
                over fiction and non-fiction settings.
              Students:

              First, the students read The Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir
              Arthur Conan Doyle. As they read, they will write down the
              main facts about the settings such as specific names and
              descriptions of those names. When they have finished reading
              the book, they are ready to write out their essays. They need to
              write their essays on notebook paper first, and then they can
              type it on the computer for their final copy. When they have
              finished their first draft, they need to set it aside for a while
              and pick it up later so they can read over their essay and make
              sure they have used correct grammar, spelling, punctuation,
              sentence structure, and paragraph structure. After they have
              edited their work and typed the final copy, they can submit
              their papers for grading.

              Provision for special needs:

              Students with an IEP may have extra time or help with reading,
              writing and/or typing as stated in their IEP.

Closure:

The students will share their comparisons with the class for further discussion about fiction
and non-fiction.

References:

http://www.localschooldirectory.com/lesson-plans/id/721

Reflection:

As students are able to compare fiction and non-fiction a better understanding of both
concepts will be discovered

                                            Day 2

Author(s) Suzie Skaff

Grade Level: Middle School

Integrated disciplines: Writing non-fictiction

NE Standards:

8.1.3 By the end of the eighth grade, students will identify and classify different types of
text.

Objectives:
* Thinking about their future occupation
* What would they do on their job?
* Write a story using first person

Assessment:

Students will be graded on the structure of the story and mechanics.

Materials:

* Notebook paper
* Pencils and Erasers
* Pens for final copy

Procedures

Anticipatory Set:

Have students think about their future occupation and write a story with them as the main
character in a work situation.

Learning Activities

Teacher:

Teacher will lead the discussion with the students about occupations.
Teacher will have students write a story with them as first person and what they are doing
the first day on their job.

Students:

The students will write a story in first person desribing what they are doing the first day on
the job.

Provision for special needs:

Students with an IEP may have extra time or help with reading, writing and/or typing as
stated in their IEP.

Closure:

Students will share their stories with the class and discussion the aspects of the different
occupations

References:

http://www.localschooldirectory.com/lesson-plans/id/620

Reflection:
Introducing students to think about life after high school is imperative and the requirements
of jobs will help them get a better understanding of what they need to do to prepare.

                                             Day 3

Author(s) Suzie Skaff

Grade Level: middle school

Integrated disciplines: Reading and Writing

NE Standards:

8.2.4 By the end of the eighth grade, students will demonstrate the use of multiple forms to
write for different audiences and purposes.

Objectives:

Students will be able to:
* To describe a character physically

* To describe a character's personality

* To write a character sketch

Assessment:

Students will be graded on how they wrote their character sketch and if they included every
detail in the sketch.

Students will also be graded on spelling, punctuation, grammar, and sentence structure.

Materials:

* The worksheet I have included in this lesson

* Pencils and Erasers or Pens and Whiteouts

* Note cards to take notes

Procedures

Anticipatory Set:

In this lesson, the students will write a character sketch.

Learning Activities

Teacher:
Teacher will had out the worksheet and note cards as well as explain the assignment.

Students:

Students will answer the questions using complete sentences

Provision for special needs:

Students with an IEP may have extra time or help with reading, writing and/or typing as
stated in their IEP.

Closure:

Students will share their descriptions with their classmates at the end of class.

References:

http://www.localschooldirectory.com/lesson-plans/id/284

Reflection:

Students will learn how to use adjectives so their audience can get a mental picture of what
they are describing.




Worksheet - Character Sketch

Directions: You are to think of a character you would like to use in a short story. Then, you are to make a
character sketch so you will become familiar with the character of your short story.

1. What is the name of your character?


2. What is the age of your character?


3. Does your character have any pets? If so, what kind and how many?




4. Does your character have any brothers or sisters?




5. What does your character look like?




6. What hobbies does your character have?
7. What other interests does your character have?



8. What does your character like to do the most?



9. What is your character's least favorite thing to do?



10. What are your character's beliefs?




11. Is your character outgoing or shy?



12. Do other people enjoy being around your character?



13. What does your character like to do in his/her free time?




14. Does your character like to read short stories or books? If yes, what kind of short stories or books does your
character like to read?



15. Does your character like to write short stories or books?




16. Is there any other information about your character that you need to know?



                                                          Day 4

Author(s) Suzie Skaff

Grade Level: middle school

Integrated disciplines: Language Arts

NE Standards:
8.2.1 By the end of the eighth grade, students will write using standard English
(conventions) for sentence structure, usage, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling.

Objectives:

Students will be able to:
* The definition of a how-to presentation

* To prepare a how-to presentation

* To edit the presentation

* To revise the presentation

* To write the final draft

Assessment:

Students will be graded on how well they prepare their presentation. The students should
explain the topic from start to finish without missing steps.

Materials:

* The worksheet I have included in this lesson

* Notebook paper

* Pens or Pencils and Erasers

*access to computers with power-point

Procedures

Anticipatory Set:

Students will chose a topic from the worksheet provided in this lesson plan. The teacher will
discuss the definition of a how-to presentation.

Learning Activities

Teacher:

Pass out the worksheet and explain to the class what a how-to presentation is and then
answer any questions while students are working.

Students:

Chose a topic from the worksheet and write down the steps and then transfer into a
PowerPoint

Provision for special needs:
Students with an IEP may have extra time or help with reading, writing and/or typing as
stated in their IEP.

Closure:

The teacher will lead a discussion on the importance of clear, concise direction

References:

http://www.localschooldirectory.com/lesson-plans/id/175

Reflection:

This is a great exercise for students to learn the importance of communication in detail.

Worksheet - Writing How-To Paper

Directions: Write a how-to paper on one of the topics below.

1. How to cook a meal.

2. How to swim.

3. How to play tennis.

4. How to fish.

5. How to draw an object.

6. How to edit a paper.

7. How to give a persuasive speech.

8. How to organize your study area.

9. How to shoot a basket.

10. How to study to pass a test.

11. How to write a book review.

12. How to write a movie review.

13. How to plan a birthday party.

14. How to plan a surprise party.

15. How to organize a file cabinet.

                                                     Day 5

Author(s) Suzie Skaff

Grade Level: Middle School

Integrated disciplines: Reading & Writing
NE Standards:

8.4.1 By the end of the eighth grade, students will identify information gained and complete
tasks through listening.

Objectives:

Students will be able to:
* Learn about listening to stories
* Learn to illustrate what they hear
* Develop concentration

Assessment:


Grading will be done on how accurate the illustration is.

Materials:

*   Plain Paper
*   Pencils
*   Erasers
*   Crayons

Procedures

Anticipatory Set:

Students will draw a picture of the story their teacher reads to them.

Learning Activities

Teacher:

The teacher will explain the importance of listening as a part of the communication process.
The teacher can ask students to talk of a time where they felt like someone didn’t listen to
them and what happened because of it. The teacher will tell the students to draw the
setting and characters that they hear about while the teacher reads a a small portion of a
book of choice.

Students:

The students will listen closely and draw the scenery and the characters they hear while the
teacher reads.

Provision for special needs:

Students with an IEP may have extra time or help with reading, writing and/or typing as
stated in their IEP.
Closure:

Students will share their illustrations with the class and explain the detail of what they
created.

References:

http://www.localschooldirectory.com/lesson-plans/id/619

Reflection:

This is a great assignment to show students the importance of using their listening skills.

                                            Day 6

Author(s) Suzie Skaff

Grade Level: Middle School

Integrated disciplines: Reading & Writing

NE Standards:

8.2.5 By the end of the eighth grade, students will demonstrate the ability to use self-
generated questions, note taking, summarizing and outlining while learning.

Objectives:

Students will be able to:
* To read for understanding.

* To take notes

* To outline from their notes

Assessment:

Students will be graded on the structure of their outline and the information they put in
their outline.

Materials:

* Textbook such as history, social studies, science, language, reading, or other books they
use where they need to take notes.

* Notebook paper

* Highlighter

* Pens and whiteouts
Procedures

Anticipatory Set:

The teacher will complete the first chapter with the students together as a class. The
students will then complete the next chapters independently

Learning Activities

Teacher:

First, the teacher will explain the importance of taking good notes throughout school and
college. The teacher will explain that this is a way to prepare a study guide. Then the
teacher will have show the students how to read a section in their book. The teacher will
explain how the sections have titles in bold print. You can also explain how they can
highlight the main points in each section.

After you have explained the process, you can have the students read a section.

Then, you can ask them questions to see if they read it or understood what they read.

Students:

After the class has gone over one section, the students will write down the main facts in
each heading so they can have the information in an outline form. This will help them study
for tests.

Then, the students will be assigned the next chapter so they can follow the same procedure.

When they have completed the chapter, they can outline their chapter by writing down each
main section in bold print and the main facts in each section.

When they have completed their outline, they can submit it to the teacher for grading.

Provision for special needs:

Students with an IEP may have extra time or help with reading, writing and/or typing as
stated in their IEP.

Closure:

The teacher will debrief with the students about the importance of note-taking.

References:

http://www.localschooldirectory.com/lesson-plans/id/197

Reflection:

Note-taking can be overwhelming for students. Having a lesson on note taking will give
them practice with both reading and writing.

				
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