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					PORTFOLIO ID     PORTFOLIO NAME                         KNOWLEDGE AREA CODE




               9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices                     701
9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701




9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701
9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701




9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701
9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701
9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701
9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701




9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701

9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701




9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701




9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701
9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701




9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701
9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701
9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701


9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701




9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701




9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701




9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701




9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701


9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701

9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701


9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701


9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701

9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701
9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701
9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701




9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701




9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701




9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701
9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices     701




9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices     701




9   Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701
9   Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701
9   Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701
9   Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701
9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701




9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701

9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701


9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701




9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701




9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701


9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701




9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701

9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701

9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701


9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701




9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701
9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701




9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701




9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701




9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701
9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701
9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701
9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701




9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701




9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701




9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701
9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices     701


9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices     701


9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices     701

9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices     701




9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices     701




9   Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701
9   Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701
9   Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701
9   Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701




9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices     701
9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701


9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701




9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701
9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701




9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701
9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701




9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701




9 Nutrition and Healthier Food Choices   701
KNOWLEDGE AREA NAME




Nutrient Composition of Food
Nutrient Composition of Food




Nutrient Composition of Food
Nutrient Composition of Food




Nutrient Composition of Food
Nutrient Composition of Food
Nutrient Composition of Food
Nutrient Composition of Food




Nutrient Composition of Food

Nutrient Composition of Food




Nutrient Composition of Food




Nutrient Composition of Food
Nutrient Composition of Food




Nutrient Composition of Food
Nutrient Composition of Food
Nutrient Composition of Food


Nutrient Composition of Food




Nutrient Composition of Food




Nutrient Composition of Food




Nutrient Composition of Food




Nutrient Composition of Food


Nutrient Composition of Food

Nutrient Composition of Food


Nutrient Composition of Food


Nutrient Composition of Food

Nutrient Composition of Food
Nutrient Composition of Food
Nutrient Composition of Food




Nutrient Composition of Food




Nutrient Composition of Food




Nutrient Composition of Food
Nutrient Composition of Food




Nutrient Composition of Food




Nutrient Composition of Food
Nutrient Composition of Food
Nutrient Composition of Food
Nutrient Composition of Food
Nutrient Composition of Food




Nutrient Composition of Food

Nutrient Composition of Food


Nutrient Composition of Food




Nutrient Composition of Food




Nutrient Composition of Food


Nutrient Composition of Food




Nutrient Composition of Food

Nutrient Composition of Food

Nutrient Composition of Food


Nutrient Composition of Food




Nutrient Composition of Food
Nutrient Composition of Food




Nutrient Composition of Food




Nutrient Composition of Food




Nutrient Composition of Food
Nutrient Composition of Food
Nutrient Composition of Food
Nutrient Composition of Food




Nutrient Composition of Food




Nutrient Composition of Food




Nutrient Composition of Food
Nutrient Composition of Food


Nutrient Composition of Food


Nutrient Composition of Food

Nutrient Composition of Food




Nutrient Composition of Food




Nutrient Composition of Food
Nutrient Composition of Food
Nutrient Composition of Food
Nutrient Composition of Food




Nutrient Composition of Food
Nutrient Composition of Food


Nutrient Composition of Food




Nutrient Composition of Food
Nutrient Composition of Food




Nutrient Composition of Food
Nutrient Composition of Food




Nutrient Composition of Food




Nutrient Composition of Food
PROGRAM NAME




Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP)
Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP)




Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP)
Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP)




Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP)
Food, Nutrition & Health
Food, Nutrition & Health
Food, Nutrition & Health




Food, Nutrition & Health

Food, Nutrition & Health




Food, Nutrition & Health




Food, Nutrition & Health
Food, Nutrition & Health




Food, Nutrition & Health
Foods and Nutrition
Foods and Nutrition


Foods and Nutrition




Improving Human Health and Wellbeing through Food Function and Food Safety




Dining With Diabetes




Dining With Diabetes




3.1 Nutrition, Food Safety and Health


3.1 Nutrition, Food Safety and Health

3.1 Nutrition, Food Safety and Health


3.1 Nutrition, Food Safety and Health


3.1 Nutrition, Food Safety and Health

3.1 Nutrition, Food Safety and Health
Human Nutrition, Health, Wellness and Obesity
Program in the Post Harvest Quality of Fruits and Vegetables




Nutrition Education Program




Nutrition Education Program




Food, Nutrition & Health
Food, Nutrition & Health




Food, Nutrition & Health




Herbs, Spices, and Medicinal Crops
Human Nutrition, Food Safety, and Human Health and Well-being
Human Nutrition, Food Safety, and Human Health and Well-being
Human Nutrition, Food Safety, and Human Health and Well-being
Food, Nutrition & Health




Food, Nutrition & Health

Food, Nutrition & Health


Food Safety, Quality, and Nutrition




Food Safety, Quality, and Nutrition




Food Safety, Quality, and Nutrition


Food Safety, Quality, and Nutrition




Food Safety, Quality, and Nutrition

Individuals, Families, and Communities

Individuals, Families, and Communities


Individuals, Families, and Communities




3.1 Nutrition, Food Safety and Health
3.1 Nutrition, Food Safety and Health




Institute of Biological Chemistry




Institute of Biological Chemistry




Institute of Biological Chemistry
Agromedicine, Nutrition and Food Safety
Agromedicine, Nutrition and Food Safety
Youth/Adult Obesity




Human Nutrition, Diet, and Health




Human Nutrition, Diet, and Health




Food Systems
Promoting a healthy, well-nourished population


Promoting a healthy, well-nourished population


Promoting a healthy, well-nourished population

Promoting a healthy, well-nourished population




High Latitude Agriculture- AFES




High Latitude Agriculture- AFES
Obesity Research Projects
Obesity Research Projects
Obesity Research Projects




Health and Human Nutrition
Health and Human Nutrition


Health and Human Nutrition




Health and Human Nutrition
Nutrition and Food Safety




Nutrition and Food Safety
Nutrition and Food Safety




Nutrition and Food Safety




Nutrition and Food Safety
INSTITUTION NAME 1               INSTITUTION NAME 2




West Virginia State University
West Virginia State University




West Virginia State University
West Virginia State University




West Virginia State University
University of Arkansas
University of Arkansas
University of Arkansas




University of Arkansas

University of Arkansas




University of Arkansas




University of Arkansas
University of Arkansas




University of Arkansas
University of Maine
University of Maine


University of Maine




University of Massachusetts




West Virginia State University




West Virginia State University




Cornell University               NY State Agricultural Experiment Station


Cornell University               NY State Agricultural Experiment Station

Cornell University               NY State Agricultural Experiment Station


Cornell University               NY State Agricultural Experiment Station


Cornell University               NY State Agricultural Experiment Station

Cornell University               NY State Agricultural Experiment Station
Alcorn State University
Washington State University




University of Minnesota




University of Minnesota




College of Micronesia
College of Micronesia




College of Micronesia




University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
Iowa State University
Iowa State University
Iowa State University
University of New Hampshire




University of New Hampshire

University of New Hampshire


University of Tennessee       Tennessee State University




University of Tennessee       Tennessee State University




University of Tennessee       Tennessee State University


University of Tennessee       Tennessee State University




University of Tennessee       Tennessee State University

Utah State University

Utah State University


Utah State University




Cornell University            NY State Agricultural Experiment Station
Cornell University                    NY State Agricultural Experiment Station




Washington State University




Washington State University




Washington State University
North Carolina A&T State University
North Carolina A&T State University
Rutgers




Auburn University             Alabama A&M University




Auburn University             Alabama A&M University




Prairie View A&M University
Auburn University                        Alabama A&M University


Auburn University                        Alabama A&M University


Auburn University                        Alabama A&M University

Auburn University                        Alabama A&M University




University of Alaska




University of Alaska
University of the District of Columbia
University of the District of Columbia
University of the District of Columbia




University of Idaho
University of Idaho


University of Idaho




University of Idaho
Colorado State University




Colorado State University
Colorado State University




Colorado State University




Colorado State University
INSTITUTION NAME 3   INSTITUTION NAME 4   STATE CODE STATE NAME




                                          WV         West Virginia
WV   West Virginia




WV   West Virginia
WV   West Virginia




WV   West Virginia
AR   Arkansas
AR   Arkansas
AR   Arkansas




AR   Arkansas

AR   Arkansas




AR   Arkansas




AR   Arkansas
AR   Arkansas




AR   Arkansas
ME   Maine
ME   Maine


ME   Maine




MA   Massachusetts




WV   West Virginia




WV   West Virginia




NY   New York


NY   New York

NY   New York


NY   New York


NY   New York

NY   New York
MS   Mississippi
WA   Washington




MN   Minnesota




MN   Minnesota




FM   Micronesia, Fed States
FM   Micronesia, Fed States




FM   Micronesia, Fed States




AR   Arkansas
IA   Iowa
IA   Iowa
IA   Iowa
NH   New Hampshire




NH   New Hampshire

NH   New Hampshire


TN   Tennessee




TN   Tennessee




TN   Tennessee


TN   Tennessee




TN   Tennessee

UT   Utah

UT   Utah


UT   Utah




NY   New York
NY   New York




WA   Washington




WA   Washington




WA   Washington
NC   North Carolina
NC   North Carolina
NJ   New Jersey




AL   Alabama




AL   Alabama




TX   Texas
Tuskegee University   AL   Alabama


Tuskegee University   AL   Alabama


Tuskegee University   AL   Alabama

Tuskegee University   AL   Alabama




                      AK   Alaska




                      AK   Alaska
                      DC   District of Columbia
                      DC   District of Columbia
                      DC   District of Columbia




                      ID   Idaho
ID   Idaho


ID   Idaho




ID   Idaho
CO   Colorado




CO   Colorado
CO   Colorado




CO   Colorado




CO   Colorado
OUTCOME MEASURE




45% of participants will be able to choose foods according to MyPyramid recommendations.
50% of participants will increase their physical activity.




75% of participants will be able to explain safe food handling practices.
65% of participants will be able to demonstrate their ability to make good decisions with
regard to budgeting for food purchases.




65% of participants will be able to demonstrate their ability to prepare nutritious, affordable
meals.
Number of research projects conducted related to Food, Nutrition & Health
Number of participants who indicated that they increased their knowledge related to Food,
Nutrition & Health following an educational class, seminar, or workshop
Number of 4-H Journals completed in Food, Nutrition & Health




Number of 4-H Youth projects completed in Food, Nutrition & Health

Percent increase in knowledge of healthy food choices among nutrition program participants

Percent of county and state Extension FCS/Nutrition educators and other public and private
representatives involved in discussions regarding public and organizational policies,
regulations and industry practices that are barriers to dietary quality and physical activity




Number of Refereed Journal Publications
Number of journal articles accepted




Percent increase in adoption of healthy food practices among nutrition program participants
# of new analytical methods for detecting phytocompounds in foods
# of Maine food processors learning about new methods to detect pesticide residues


New methods for detecting melamine in petfood




Accurate research on the effect of animal proteins on iron uptake




50% of participants will reduce the number of days they will eat fried foods.




50% of participants will increase their consumption of non-fat or low-fat dairy products.

# of program participants who demonstrate knowledge or skill gains related to food, nutrition
and health topics including: attitudes about healthy eating, healthy food choices, selection of
healthy foods, preparation of healthy foods. (3.1.1e)

# of program participants who demonstrate knowledge or skill gains related to benefits of
physical activity, physical activity recommendations for health and obesity prevention. (3.1.1f)
# of program participants who demonstrate knowledge or skill gains related to healthy weight
gain during pregnancy and breast feeding. (3.1.1g)
# of program participants who demonstrate knowledge or skill gains related to issues that
influence food and health behavior and associated appropriate public/community actions,
programs, and policy. (3.1.1h)
# of program participants who demonstrate knowledge or skill gains related to status of food
security in their communities and possible actions to promote increased food security.
(3.1.2c)

# reported instances of changes made in school nutrition/wellness policies. (3.1.2g)
Thirty percent (30%) will increase their involvement in the number of organized neighborhood
sports and or other programs to increase physical fitness among youth at risk during the next
five years
Please see written paragraph under evaluation.




Basic research will inform understanding of human nutrition and support healthful food
choices.




Research will contribute to the scientific understanding of the benefits of whole grains.




Number of program participants who increase awareness of nutrition related health issues.
Number of program participants adopting recommended practices after completing
educational programs.




Annually increase the number of healthy food snacks or lunch programs in schools and
communities.




# of people adopted the new foods in their daily diets
Number of peer-reviewed publications
Number of proceedings and published abstracts.
Number of theses produced.
Number of graduate students trained


Number of presentations/posters at regional, national or international conferences or
workshops

Number of public presentations


Effect on obesity of dairy products




Encapsulation of pharmaceutical compounds




Fruit and vegetable quality


Novel biodegradable and edible films and coatings




Polyunsaturated fatty acids and human health
Number of clientele who gain knowledge about healthy and financially secure individuals,
families, or communities.
Number of clientele who implement practices for healthy and financially secure individuals,
families, or communities.
Percentage of Adult Graduates Who Reported Seven or More Days Physical Health NOT Good
in the Past 30 Days. (Less than or equal to the 2004 Utah IBI-PH Indicator, Income less than
$20,000.)




Albany Fire Department Wellness
Retired Senior Volunteer Program Bone Builders




Increase numbers of students




External Funding in millions of dollars




Peer reviewed journal articles
# of companies purchasing licenses for food and food safety related patents
# of adolescents reducing their overweight and obesity status
Short Term--Individuals gain awareness, knowledge, skills related to:
- Attitudes about healthy eating for adults/youth
- Healthy food choices for adults/youth
- Selection of healthy foods for adults/youth
-Benefits of physical activity, (reduced overweight and obesity, reduced risk of diabetes, heart
disease and cancer)
-Physical activity recommendations for health for adults/youth
-RCRE
-Identify factors that promote excessive weight gain as well as protect against childhood
obesity
-Understand the molecular mechanisms of lipid transport in the intestinal cell
- Demonstrate the affects of calcium absorption and bone mass by weight loss
Each ACES employee is required to provide a success story on the program activity which they
felt best demonstrates the impacts of their work. These success stories contain the following
elements:
Why: Explain the reason the program was done, or the situation or problem that the program
addressed
What: Specifically what was done and how it was done.
When: If this was a one-time event, the date it occurred. If it is was a series of events, or an
on-going program, when it began.
Where: Specific location-- the county or counties involved.
Who and how many: The "who" includes both who did the program and who
were the clients of the program, as well as how many people were served.
So what: This is the part that gives the real meaning to "success". The basic
question to be answered in this part is "what difference did this program make".
The difference may be measured in terms of dollars, or in changes in habits, lifestyles or
attitudes. Whenever possible use numbers to show the effect of the program. If it is not
possible to use numbers, provide a qualitative measurement like client comments or another
type of testimonial about the program.

Since this program area is very broad in scope and contains multiple Extension Team Projects

Major outcome measures in Human Nutrition, Diet, and Health will be the decrease in
diseases which are directly related to nutrition, and the decrease in the percent of obese
adults and children. The yearly targets below are percentage decreases in diseases.
-Commercialization of methods/technology for improving the quality, safety and use of food
and food products for the reduction of obesity, food borne illnesses and other nutritionally
related diseases.
-Nutrition/exercise intervention programs leading to a reduction in obesity.
-Increase in the dissemination and use of research based information into newsletters and
incorporation into extension and other programs leading to a reduction in nutrition related
and food borne diseases and illnesses.
New professionals in the workforce with training in nutrition and in areas related to healthful
lifestyle choices. (Medium term outcome)

Incidence of hypertension and obesity in teenagers (AL Dept Public Health Stats--incidence of
death due to heart disease in 10 - 19 yr olds, 2004 = 6.3%) (Medium term outcome)

Life expectancy (AL Dept Public Health special report-- 1998, 74 yrs). Program success will be
indicated by maintenance or increase in life expectancy in AL. (Long-term outcome)

New and enhanced product(s) with improved nutritional value. (Medium term outcome)




Cost savingsby utilization of in-state animal feeds




Number of new crop and animal markets identified and utilized.
Percentage of decrease in the incidences of obesity in the District of Columbia.
Number of participants from targeted group.
Number of participants gaining awareness, knowledge and skills.




O: Change in level of physical activity of individuals in the Diabetes Pedometer Program.I:
Number of daily steps individuals enrolled in the Diabetes Pedometer Program walk.
O: Adult ENP participants will plan to change a behavior after completing MyPyramid class.I:
Number of adult ENP participants who plan to eat a variety of foods from all five food groups
every day.
O: Approximately 87% of Adult EFNEP participants will improve their diets after completing 6
core lessons.I: Use pre/post 24 hour recalls to determine the number of adults that improve
their diets by at least one food group.




O: Steps To A New You participants will change their attitude toward physical activity.I: The
number of Steps To A New You participants that complete pre, post, and follow-up surveys
with questions on attitudes toward physical activity.
Number of participants at the trainings




Percent of participants at trainings indicating an increase in knowledge gained
Percent of participants indicating a change in behavior as a result of the training




Number of Partnering agencies throughout the state who collaborated in these efforts




Basic research on human nutrition
OUTCOME TYPE     KA PERCENTAGE - 1862 EXTENSION   KA PERCENTAGE - 1890 EXTENSION




Action Outcome                                                                     20
Action Outcome      20




Knowledge Outcome   20
Action Outcome          20




Action Outcome          20
Knowledge Outcome   5
Knowledge Outcome   5
Knowledge Outcome   5




Knowledge Outcome   5

Knowledge Outcome   5




Knowledge Outcome   5




Action Outcome      5
Action Outcome      5




Action Outcome      5
Knowledge Outcome
Knowledge Outcome


Knowledge Outcome




Condition Outcome




Action Outcome          20




Action Outcome          20




Knowledge Outcome   2


Knowledge Outcome   2

Knowledge Outcome   2


Knowledge Outcome   2


Knowledge Outcome   2

Action Outcome      2
Action Outcome           5
Knowledge Outcome




Knowledge Outcome    0




Knowledge Outcome    0




Knowledge Outcome   12
Action Outcome      12




Condition Outcome   12




Knowledge Outcome        30
Knowledge Outcome   10
Knowledge Outcome   10
Knowledge Outcome   10
Action Outcome




Knowledge Outcome

Knowledge Outcome


Knowledge Outcome    0   0




Knowledge Outcome    0   0




Knowledge Outcome    0   0


Knowledge Outcome    0   0




Knowledge Outcome    0   0

Knowledge Outcome   10

Action Outcome      10


Condition Outcome   10




Action Outcome       2
Action Outcome      2




Knowledge Outcome




Knowledge Outcome




Knowledge Outcome
Action Outcome
Action Outcome
Knowledge Outcome   10




Condition Outcome   20   20




Condition Outcome   20   20




Condition Outcome
Action Outcome


Action Outcome


Condition Outcome

Action Outcome




Action Outcome       0




Knowledge Outcome    0
Condition Outcome   25
Knowledge Outcome   25
Action Outcome      25




Knowledge Outcome   20
Knowledge Outcome   20


Action Outcome      20




Knowledge Outcome   20
Knowledge Outcome    0




Knowledge Outcome    0
Knowledge Outcome   0




Action Outcome      0




Knowledge Outcome   0
KA PERCENTAGE - 1862 RESEARCH   KA PERCENTAGE - 1890 RESEARCH   PLAN START YEAR




                                                                            2007
2007




2007
    2007




    2007
5   2007
5   2007
5   2007




5   2007

5   2007




5   2007




5   2007
5   2007




5   2007
5   2007
5   2007


5   2007




1   2007




    2007




    2007




2   2007


2   2007

2   2007


2   2007


2   2007

2   2007
     5   2007
10       2007




80       2007




80       2007




10       2007
10        2007




10        2007




     30   2007
10        2007
10        2007
10        2007
 8   2007




 8   2007

 8   2007


 1   2007




 1   2007




 1   2007


 1   2007




 1   2007

10   2007

10   2007


10   2007




 2   2007
2        2007




6        2007




6        2007




6        2007
    18   2007
    18   2007
10        2007




          2007




          2007




     10   2007
29   29   2007


29   29   2007


29   29   2007

29   29   2007




 5        2007




 5        2007
25        2007
25        2007
25        2007




15        2007
15   2007


15   2007




15   2007
20   2007




20   2007
20   2007




20   2007




20   2007
                           1862 EXTENSION    1890 EXTENSION    1862 RESEARCH
QUANTITATIVE TARGET        OUTCOME MEASURE   OUTCOME MEASURE   OUTCOME MEASURE




                      45                     y
50   y




75   y
65     y




65     y
17 y       y
22000 y
  130 y




  200 y

   55 y




   10 y




   30     y
   10 y   y




   50 y
    5     y
  2         y


            y




            y




 50     y




 50     y




  0y        y


  0y        y

  0y        y


  0y        y


  0y        y

250 y       y
  6
  0     y




        y




        y




900 y   y
600 y   y




  6y    y




  0
 10     y
 10     y
  8     y
    6       y




    7       y

    7       y


            y




            y




            y


            y




            y

21400 y

11700 y


   23 y




        y
     y




32       y




 0       y




50       y
 0
 0
         y




9y   y




5y   y




0
   0     y


   6     y


  75     y

   0     y




   0     y




  50     y
  20 y
4000 y
 400 y




2000 y
 325 y


 330 y




  50 y
3000 y   y




  50 y
50 y




  y




       y
1890 RESEARCH
OUTCOME MEASURE   ACTUAL AMOUNT




                                  0
0




0
 0




 0
69
30222
  111




  230

   92




   33




   82
   83




   80
    2
   2


   0




   0




  50




  50




   0


   0

   0


   0


   0

1361
y     0
      0




      0




      0




    956
    593




     11




y    20
      0
      0
      0
     9




    16

    12


     0




     0




     0


     0




     0

228092

131427


    31




     0
          0




         27




    4951958




         39
y         0
y         0
    0




    0




    0




y   0
y      0


y      6


y     74

y      0




       0




       2
       0
       0
       0




    5000
 1543


  618




   40
23876




   76
 71




224




  0
QUALITATIVE OUTCOME - ISSUES
The Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) is designed to assist limited
resource audiences on how to improve their dietary practices and become more effective
managers of available resources. EFNEP includes programming to reach two primary
audiences: adult and youth. EFNEP is delivered in a series of lessons by paraprofessionals and
volunteers, many of whom are indigenous to the target population. EFNEPs hands-on, learn-
by-doing approach allows the participants to acquire the practical skills necessary to make
positive changes in behaviors.

EFNEP is a federally mandated program that addresses the issues of food insecurity, obesity,
food safety, and physical inactivity. The paraprofessionals who deliver the program recruit
families and receive referrals from neighborhood contacts and community agencies (i.e. Food
Stamps and WIC).

The objectives of EFNEP are to help low-income families and youth acquire the knowledge,
skills, attitudes, and change-behavior necessary for nutritionally sound diets and to contribute
to their personal development.

The goals of Adult EFNEP are to help limited resource families: 1) improve the quality of their
diets for the total family; 2) improve practices in food production, preparation, storage,
safety, and sanitation; 3) increase the ability to manage food budgets and food resources such
as food stamps; 4) increase their physical activity; 5) and increase knowledge of the essentials
of human nutrition.

Youth EFNEP will: 1) to provide education in the principles of nutrition and diets and in the
The Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) is designed to assist limited
resource audiences on how to improve their dietary practices and become more effective
managers of available resources. EFNEP includes programming to reach two primary
audiences: adult and youth. EFNEP is delivered in a series of lessons by paraprofessionals and
volunteers, many of whom are indigenous to the target population. EFNEPs hands-on, learn-
by-doing approach allows the participants to acquire the practical skills necessary to make
positive changes in behaviors.

EFNEP is a federally mandated program that addresses the issues of food insecurity, obesity,
food safety, and physical inactivity. The paraprofessionals who deliver the program recruit
families and receive referrals from neighborhood contacts and community agencies (i.e. Food
Stamps and WIC).

The objectives of EFNEP are to help low-income families and youth acquire the knowledge,
skills, attitudes, and change-behavior necessary for nutritionally sound diets and to contribute
to their personal development.

The goals of Adult EFNEP are to help limited resource families: 1) improve the quality of their
diets for the total family; 2) improve practices in food production, preparation, storage,
safety, and sanitation; 3) increase the ability to manage food budgets and food resources such
as food stamps; 4) increase their physical activity; 5) and increase knowledge of the essentials
of human nutrition.
The Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) is designed to assist limited
resource audiences on how to improve their dietary practices and become more effective
managers of available resources. EFNEP includes programming to reach two primary
audiences: adult and youth. EFNEP is delivered in a series of lessons by paraprofessionals and
volunteers, many of whom are indigenous to the target population. EFNEPs hands-on, learn-
by-doing approach allows the participants to acquire the practical skills necessary to make
positive changes in behaviors.

EFNEP is a federally mandated program that addresses the issues of food insecurity, obesity,
food safety, and physical inactivity. The paraprofessionals who deliver the program recruit
families and receive referrals from neighborhood contacts and community agencies (i.e. Food
Stamps and WIC).

The objectives of EFNEP are to help low-income families and youth acquire the knowledge,
skills, attitudes, and change-behavior necessary for nutritionally sound diets and to contribute
to their personal development.

The goals of Adult EFNEP are to help limited resource families: 1) improve the quality of their
diets for the total family; 2) improve practices in food production, preparation, storage,
safety, and sanitation; 3) increase the ability to manage food budgets and food resources such
as food stamps; 4) increase their physical activity; 5) and increase knowledge of the essentials
of human nutrition.
The Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) is designed to assist limited
resource audiences on how to improve their dietary practices and become more effective
managers of available resources. EFNEP includes programming to reach two primary
audiences: adult and youth. EFNEP is delivered in a series of lessons by paraprofessionals and
volunteers, many of whom are indigenous to the target population. EFNEPs hands-on, learn-
by-doing approach allows the participants to acquire the practical skills necessary to make
positive changes in behaviors.

EFNEP is a federally mandated program that addresses the issues of food insecurity, obesity,
food safety, and physical inactivity. The paraprofessionals who deliver the program recruit
families and receive referrals from neighborhood contacts and community agencies (i.e. Food
Stamps and WIC).

The objectives of EFNEP are to help low-income families and youth acquire the knowledge,
skills, attitudes, and change-behavior necessary for nutritionally sound diets and to contribute
to their personal development.

The goals of Adult EFNEP are to help limited resource families: 1) improve the quality of their
diets for the total family; 2) improve practices in food production, preparation, storage,
safety, and sanitation; 3) increase the ability to manage food budgets and food resources such
as food stamps; 4) increase their physical activity; 5) and increase knowledge of the essentials
of human nutrition.
The Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) is designed to assist limited
resource audiences on how to improve their dietary practices and become more effective
managers of available resources. EFNEP includes programming to reach two primary
audiences: adult and youth. EFNEP is delivered in a series of lessons by paraprofessionals and
volunteers, many of whom are indigenous to the target population. EFNEPs hands-on, learn-
by-doing approach allows the participants to acquire the practical skills necessary to make
positive changes in behaviors.

EFNEP is a federally mandated program that addresses the issues of food insecurity, obesity,
food safety, and physical inactivity. The paraprofessionals who deliver the program recruit
families and receive referrals from neighborhood contacts and community agencies (i.e. Food
Stamps and WIC).

The objectives of EFNEP are to help low-income families and youth acquire the knowledge,
skills, attitudes, and change-behavior necessary for nutritionally sound diets and to contribute
to their personal development.

The goals of Adult EFNEP are to help limited resource families: 1) improve the quality of their
diets for the total family; 2) improve practices in food production, preparation, storage,
safety, and sanitation; 3) increase the ability to manage food budgets and food resources such
as food stamps; 4) increase their physical activity; 5) and increase knowledge of the essentials
of human nutrition.
Based on research young people require life-building skills such as self-awareness, when they
are the most impressionable. The key to building successful lives, communities and
civilizations is through the attainment of lifeskills.




The need for advanced food research to support Arkansas' vast food processing industries
remains paramount to improving the state's economy. The types of food research include
harvest, storage, processing and nutritional quality.




In 2006, the overall obesity rate for adult Arkansans was 27 percent. The obesity rate is
greater among low-income Arkansans where 29 percent are obese. Strong evidence exists
that overweight children have a greater chance of becoming overweight or obese adults. In
2007, 38 percent of Arkansas' children in grades K-12 were overweight or at risk of being
overweight.
In the spring of 2007, thousands of pet owners became concerned as their pets sickened and
some died due to melamine in pet food.




Iron deficiency anemia is a major nutritional problem due,largely,to poor absorption of
dietary iron This project examines the effect of animal proteins on iron uptake
The "Dining with Diabetes" program is designed to educate individuals with diabetes, those
who have been diagnosed with pre-diabetes, and family members about the fundamentals of
nutrition; how to prepare foods by reducing carbohydrates, sugar, and salts; and how to be
more aware of proper serving sizes.

Diabetes is a leading cause of death; seven percent of the people living in West Virginia have
diabetes. The "Dining with Diabetes" program is designed to educate individuals with
diabetes, those who have been diagnosed with pre-diabetes, and family members about the
fundamentals of nutrition; how to prepare foods by reducing carbohydrates, sugar, and salts;
and how to be more aware of proper serving sizes.
One out of five Americans has insulin resistance, an obesity-related disorder in which cells
lose their ability to respond to their pancreas's prompting to absorb glucose from the
bloodstream. Insulin resistance often leads to type 2 diabetes. As obesity is a growing
problem in American, the incidence of insulin resistance and diabetes is growing too, with
huge health implications.




The role of food choices on human health is of increasing interest to both the food industry
and medical professions, yet there is still not enough scientific information about
food/disease interactions.
The prevalence of non-communicable diseases has been escalating during the past decade.
The population of FSM in fy'07 was estimated at 107,000. In Chuuk State alone, of a
population of 53,595, the number of patients who go to Public Health for diabetes was 6,547
and 9,013 for hypertension. The Needs Assessment Survey conducted in 2003-04; revealed
that 54% of the 851 subjects were overweight and very overweight. More people in the
survey were eating only the energy and body building foods and do not consume vegetables
and fruits. More people combine local as well as imported refined foods in their diet. There is
also big consumption of foods high in saturated fats and sugars. These statistics are
representative of 50% of the FSM population. Everyone cares!

With people's diet too high in sugars, sodium and saturated fats and very low in fruits and
vegetables, the rate of non-communicable disease is escalating everywhere. If this trend
continues, the end results is that there will be more cases of cardiovascular diseases, obesity,
hypertension and significant disability from these chronic diseases. Another problem was
food poisoning or food-borne illnesses. Most of the food consumed in parties, traditional
ceremonies, family and public gatherings, including funerals and important events were
prepared and packed hours before they were actually served without proper storage.

Participants of food technology classes had gained knowledge about processing food products
People who had hands on practice in the processing of food products as well as those who
have evaluated the food items by taste tests, demonstrated interest in increasing their
productivity in food provision, as well as opening their minds to go into food businesses,
having been armed with acquired skills and product ideas for sale.

It has always been difficult to reverse the change in attitudes toward fast and imported
processed food, which has become a habit to so many people in the islands. There is a huge
change in the preference of imported processed food over local food, which has contributed
to an increase in NCDs and the escalating cost of health care.

Surveys showed a high rate of vitamin A deficiency is associated with poor eating habits.
Nutrition agents conducted educational programs on human nutrition in order to raise
awareness among homemakers and promoted balance diets to reduce nutrition related
illnesses.

A dietary study carried out in 2001 in Kosrae (Englberger, 2003) involving a random sample of
65 children and 65 women showed that not a single child or woman met the estimated
Vitamin A requirements. The study examined food preferences and investigation for vitamin A
-rich foods that might be promoted to alleviate the VA deficiency and increasing health
problems in Kosrae. Provitamin A carotenoid-rich foods can protect against VA deficiency.
Epidemiological research suggests that carotenoid-rich food may also protect against chronic
diseases including diabetes, heart diseases and certain cancer.

The processing of local foods gives support to the local tourism industry, the lifeblood of the
economy, by providing foods for tourists for them to consume and patronize. This activity
also addresses the problem of low agricultural productivity and large food importation in
Palau. Production and utilization of local foods will result in self-sufficiency and food security.


Large food importation in the islands is currently decreasing the Gross Domestic Product
(GDP) from the agriculture sector. Processing of local food resources is made available as
outreach services attempt to entice and train women and entrepreneurs to go into food
business enterprise. The development of business enterprises has chain reaction and
synergistic effects in helping people meet the needs of tourists and locals for good quality


Small farmers, gardeners and consumers will have knowledge about the new improved crop
lines/varieties that will have better nutritional, health and economic benefits.
It is primarily other scientists in the discipline and some industry researchers that attend
scientific conferences to learn about new and ongoing research and recent discoveries.
Workshops are generally attended by end-users interested in application of research results.
Consumers and other persons involved in food, nutrition and health education and
practitioners.


Obesity is a well-documented problem, of epidemic proportion, in the U.S.


The pharmaceutical and dairy industries stand to gain from innovative use of milk
components.

The mechanism of calcium-induced firmness is debatable since fungi in general contain little
or no pectin substances. The purpose of this study is to enhance our understanding of calcium
binding to macromolecules in plant and mushroom cells.

The food industry is interested in the design and application of biodegradable and edible films
and coatings based on food biopolymers.

Americans are unlikely to achieve the proposed dietary recommendations of increased long
chain n-3 PUFA by consuming fish. Therefore, agricultural sources of n-3 PUFA must be
investigated as an alternative means to fish (in achieving equivalent health benefit).




Firefighters, because of the stress and intensity of their responsibilities have an increased risk
of suffering a cardiac event in the line of duty.
NYS Dept. of Health statistics indicate that osteoporosis affects 25 % of women over age 60--
an estimated 1,100 women in Schuyler and Yates Counties. Osteoporosis is a painful disease
characterized by weak, brittle, porous bones that tend to fracture. It is a major cause of
fractures of the spine, hip, wrist and other bones. Studies show that progressive weight-
bearing exercise helps reduce the incidence of osteoporosis as it stimulates formation of new
bone.




Graduate education of top tier students in plant biochemistry, genetics, cell biology and
related fields is needed to produce future scientists who will do basic research in areas of new
food sources, improved food products, new fuel sources, plant protection and crop
improvement.

Extramural funding from federal and non federal agencies comprises the Institute's main
financial resource and is used to pay for supplies, equipment, and salaries for graduate
research assistants and postdoctoral researchers. Approximately 60% of the unit's
expenditures are extramural (grant and development funds). Without extramural funding,
the Institute faculty would be unable to complete their research goals.
Journal articles are of value because they explain research results to the scientific community
and should be, if written properly (and after review and revision), have research results that
may be soundly discussed, reasoned out and replicated. Review also helps limit the
possibility of plagiarism and other unethical activities. Journal articles that are read by the
scientific community can also spur new research and collaborations in areas heretofore
unthought-of by the original researcher. The end result is that journal articles document
research.
Drug Therapies to Treat Obesity

Obesity in the United States has risen at an epidemic rate during the past 20 years, a
condition affecting about one-third of American adults, according to the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention. One of the national health objectives for the year 2010 is to reduce
the prevalence of obesity among adults to less than 15 percent. Obesity is widely prevalent in
the US and dietary fat is the major calorie generating nutrient in our diets. However, little is
known about the process of dietary fat uptake or how certain enzymes such as lipin affect fat
metabolism, where excess lipin promotes extra body fat.




The consuming public.
Reindeer producers are interested in marketing this high quality lean meat which has a ready
market. Farmed reindeer can't survive on pasture grass alone and a high quality feed was
needed to keep deer in enclosures during caribou herd migrations and to increase
profitability.




The potential for diversification of Alaska's economy lies in the use of its lands. The projects
proposed here show potential for utilization of Alaska's available land base that may provide
entry into new markets for products from the land. There is high potential for value-added
processing of high value products for the food and non-food market.
The Extension Nutrition Program (ENP) is Idahos Food Stamp Nutrition Education (FSNE)
program. ENP targets adult food stamp participants to teach them how to make healthy food
and lifestyle choices.
The USDA Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) encourages FSNE programs to focus their efforts
on the following behavioral outcomes: (1) eat fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and nonfat
or low-fat milk or milk products every day; and (2) be physically active every day as part of a
healthy lifestyle.




The 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that adults consuming a 2,000 calorie
diet include the following foods daily: 2 cups of fruit, 1½ cups of vegetables, 3 or more ounces
of whole grains, and 3 cups of fat-free or low-fat. Recent studies indicate that approximately
30 % of adults met fruit and vegetable recommendations and consumed only one serving of
whole grain and one cup of milk per day. Carbonated soft drinks contributed almost 30 % of
daily beverage intake.


Food borne illness in the US is a major economic burden and cause of human suffering and
death. Economic and social consequences are estimated to be over $3 billion each year, with
lost productivity estimated at $30-40 billion. It is estimated that food borne contaminants
cause approximately 76 billion illnesses, 325,000 hospitalizations, and 5,000 deaths in the US
each year. The risk of food borne illness is especially important when hazardous food is
served in group settings (eating establishments, child and assisted care facilities).
Food Stamp Education

According to USDA Food and Nutrition Service statistics, Colorado has more than 99,000 Food
Stamp Program households; 464,000 households are estimated to be eligible with 53 percent
of those classified as working poor.

Issues of food safety and human health are of concern to communities and community
agencies across the state. The cost of food borne and life changing illnesses including diabetes
and obesity are a constant in the popular press. The health issues of an aging US population
have been clearly documented.




Heart disease continues to plague the US and other industrial countries.
QUALITATIVE OUTCOME - WHAT WAS DONE




Planning and coordination for the program implementation.
Planning and coordination for program implementation.




Planning and coordination for program implementation.
Planning and coordination for program implementation.




Planning and coordination for program implementation.
The 4-H RACE Day Challenge targeted emerging leaders ages 9-13 in 4-H clubs in a four-county
area. The mini-conference used a race car theme, but the emphasis was on building assets.




The University of Arkansas Food Science Department of the Bumpers College and the Division
of Agriculture was recently ranked fourth nationally for faculty scholarly productivity by
Academics Analytics.




A school-based intervention program was implemented in schools where 50 percent or more
of children were receiving free or reduced-price school meals. Four counties were recruited to
implement the project. Teachers were trained in one elementary school in each county.
Teachers conducted the TAKE 10! activities at least 3 times per week for 10 minutes at a time.
OrganWise Guys materials were used as often as possible. A survey was sent home to 1,043
parents.
Responding to this national melamine pet food scare, UMaine food scientists started a joint
venture with a technology-driven Maine company to develop a rapid and inexpensive EIA kit
to test for melamine contamination of pet foods.




Our experimental approach will be to digest animal proteins(from muscle and milk) in the
presence of iron and determine the extent of iron binding,iron reduction and production of
dialyzable iron.Uptake of iron will be tested using cultured human caco -2 cells. Isolation of
iron binding peptides will be attempted using iron-chelate affinity chromatography and the
ability of separated peptides to enhance iron uptake will be tested with the caco -2
cells.Chemical determinants of iron binding/uptake will be tested by chemical modification of
key amino acid residues in the peptides.

A diabetes cooking school was performed at Dunbar Towers Assisted Living facility.
Participants were educated on the types and amounts of foods that have a negative impact
on blood sugars and were shown how to reduce fat and carbohydrates in their dishes.




Participants tasted several dishes where dairy was a main ingredient and were educated on
the importance of consuming adequate calcium and vitamin D.
No Activity reported from research


Research supported by MAES is helping to understand the link between obesity and insulin
resistance by studying key molicules within fat cells. The starting point was the fact that type
2 diabetes often goes hand-in-hand with a condition within cells known as oxidative stress.
Oxidative stress leads to the production of molecules known as reactive aldehydes that alter
the structure of protein. Researchers found, using a technique they developed, that altered
proteins were two to three times as common in the fat cells of overfed obese mice than in
those of lean mice.


Studies investigating the effects of whole grains on disease have been ongoing for several
years. One study, completed in 2007, investigated the effect of whole and refined wheat on
colon cancer risk in carcinogen-treated rats. The objective was to determine the effect of
whole versus refined wheat of two different wheat classes--hard read and soft white--on the
ability to reduce the risk of colon cancer.




A three-week (two hours per day) food technology-training course offered to the public as
outreach services of PCC-CRE was conducted in three States. 44 participants attended these.
Taste tests of food products were conducted during visits of different groups to the R&D
Station, Vocational Education Week, Earth Day Celebration, and Olechotel Belau Fair.

Programs on Adult and Youth EFNEP continued to be conducted by EFNEP staffs throughout
the islands to women groups and school children to educate them on healthy eating, healthy
diet utilizing local food, and proper food handling and storage.

Other training programs were on proper food handling and storage. Through the ADAP HLPI
project, health and nutrition staff continued to provide food safety, nutrition, and health
education programs to youths and families throughout the islands in Micronesia.
Nutrition agent conducted trainings and workshop to homemakers on human nutritional
issues. One major community evaluation and intervention effort was conducted in
collaboration with other agencies in Pohnpei. Results have been published internationally
through the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and through the
Secretariat of the Pacific Community. Nutrition agents collaborated with the FSM National
Government to establish health and nutrition guidelines, food labeling requirements and
nutrition standards for the Micronesian population. The 'Go Local' theme to promote the
value of local produce was promoted by all agencies addressing the nutrition concerns of the
nation.

The participants of the three Food Technology Classes practiced what they have learned by
providing their families with novel foods from abundant local resources like root crops, fish
and fruits. Some participants prepared selected foods for custom practices. Those who have
tasted the food products during civic events signified their interest to learn more about these
local products.

After taking the Food Technology Classes, follow up encounters with participants was
conducted through personal visits and telephone conversations. Linking the processors with
prospective buyers was also explored.

Introduction of new recipes using local food products and demonstrating these new recipes




Nutrition and food safety training workshops were conducted throughout the four states.
Group members shared tips and knowledge in preparing healthy food for daily consumption.
The 'Go Local' theme to promote the value of local produce was accepted by and promoted
by all agencies addressing the nutrition concerns of the nation. Nutrition education classes
were given in schools and as support for the Early Childhood Development programs. Where
lunch programs are available in the schools and communities there is a greater offering of
local produce.

In order to keep track of the teaching activities conducted among the participants, changes in
condition outcome measures was investigated. List of participants and food products learned
from the courses that are being marketed were determined.


Field experiments were conducted, a research publication on eggplant varieties was
submitted, and a Field Day and group meeting were conducted.
Sixteen conference and workshop presentations were made.
"Get Smart Eat Local" workshops were run in connection with the NH Farm to School
program.
We previously demonstrated that calcitrol regulates oxydative and inflamatory stress genes,
and test results showed that high Ca dairy foods substancially supress oxidative and
inflamatory stress associated with obesity.

We investigated casein micelle from bovine milk was as a nano-carrier system for Triclosan
(TCS), and results present the casein micelle as a suitable biopolymer for the potential
encapsulation of pharmaceutical compounds.

Stepwise extraction of apple, cucumber and mushroom tissues resulted in a set of fractions,
which were analyzed for protein, neutral polysaccharides, pectins and chitin content, and
binding of calcium.

We tested crystallinity, metal-binding capacity, and antibacterial efficiency of thick, thin, and
ultra-thin films using different chitosan/PEO blend ratios.

We previously established a mathematical model for allometric scaling of caloric intake in a
rodent that would mimic a human equivalent dose, and we tested it in rodents comparing it
to human archival data.




An Extension Educator provided nutrition education to the Albany Fire Department. Providing
such information as reducing dietary fat and cholesterol, adhering to proper portion sizes and
consumption, and increasing availability of fresh fruits and vegetables. to the 260 person
Albany Fire Department.
From Oct 2006 to May 2007, trained RSVP volunteers led weekly preventive exercise sessions
at three sites in Schuyler and 4 sites in Yates. Educational programs about the prevention of
osteoporosis through exercise, nutrition and other healthy lifestyle practices were
incorporated into these sessions. Each fall new leadership volunteers receive training and
experienced leaders receive a refresher course, utilizing Tufts University research-based
exercise plan. Five Bone Builder classes were conducted each week at five sites in Schuyler &
Yates from October 2006 to May 2007.


Institute faculty previously recruited most of their graduate students from a unit now called
the School of Molecular Biosciences. That unit has reduced their enrollment of students
interested in plant biochemistry and plant genetics/cell biology. At present many of the
faculty recruit students primarily through the Graduate Program in Molecular Plant Sciences.
Many of the applicants to the program do not have the biochemical background or interest to
succeed as researchers at the Institute and tend to enter other more biologically based
laboratories elsewhere in the university. It should be mentioned that direct recruitment into
IBC laboratory programs does occur. Additionally, the Institute takes part in an Integrated
Plant Sciences Retreat and recruitment weekend each February and also houses and helps
support the Molecular Plant Sciences Graduate Program.




IBC faculty continue to submit grant proposals.




As research is completed and understanding is gained, faculty work with graduate students,
research technologists and postdoctoral fellows to write papers for publication.
One research group investigated the mechanism and regulation of intestinal fatty acids and
monoacylglycerol lipase (iMGL) transport and metabolism. Transgenic mice that
overexpressed iMGL in the small intestine were used to elucidate the role of the enzyme in fat
metabolism. For lipin research, a yeast model was used to show that lipin (phosphatidic acid
phosphatase or PAP) was required for the formation of fat trigylcerides. They then decoded
the amino acid sequence for the PAP enzyme from yeast, and confirmed its correspondence
with mammalian lipin.




Developed information briefs.
The biomass production and nutritional profile of two pasture grasses were evaluated.




Two agricultural crop opportunities that have resulted from recent research are high quality
reindeer meat and peony crops for the floral market.




Participants in a nine-week course made significant improvements in their health and in their
choices related to best practices for diabetes care.
In FY2007, ENP collected data on nutrition and physical activity behaviors. Adult participants
completed a post-survey. For the 6 general nutrition classes the survey asked them if they
planned to: eat more fruits and vegetables, whole grains, or low-fat milk/dairy. For the five
food group lessons, they were asked how they would include more of these foods in their
diet. For the physical activity class, they were asked how many minutes/day they planned to
be physically active.




Three FCS Educators taught a 9-lesson curriculum, Steps To A New You, which focuses on
pleasurable and healthy eating, a realistic body image, and physical activity. The nutrition
topics included: (1) recommendations from the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans and
MyPyramid; (2) food portion sizes, (3) fast food, and (4) how to become an intuitive eater.
Participants completed an eating habits survey at three points: (1) Pre, (2) Post (week 9), and
(3) Follow-up (week 20).




CUS Extension has implemented ServSafe and Food Safety Works curriculum throughout the
state. More than 4000 individuals were trained last year in the safe handling of food. Most of
these individuals represented food service group settings.
Colorado State University Extension has 14 agents involved in food stamp nutrition education.
Educators and the campus research specialists who support them are working throughout the
state delivering high quality, tested nutritional, shopping and food preparation classes to
seniors, single parents, youth and working families. Extension's Healthy Habits Network is a
broad-based collaboration among several groups, including WIC, Rocky Mountain Prevention
Research Center (RMPRC), HeadStart, and the local hospital. They also work with community
gardens and local businesses to create new ways of bringing people together around healthy
food.


Through the food safety, Dining with Diabetes, and Strong Women,Strong Bones programs,
CSU Extension has provided an opportunity for community agencies to support programs that
aim to address significant health issues.




The overall goal of this project is to investigate the cellular effects and molecular mechanisms
of action by which soy derived phytoestrogens protect against cardiomyocyte injury and
regulate lipid metabolism.
QUALITATIVE OUTCOME - RESULTS




EFNEP staff has attended local and national meetings, submitted proposals and budget
revisions. A position description for paraprofessionals was created and is in the process of
being released for advertisement.
EFNEP staff has attended local and national meetings, submitted proposals and budget
revisions. A position description for paraprofessionals was created and is in the process of
being released for advertisement.




EFNEP staff has attended local and national meetings, submitted proposals and budget
revisions. A position description for paraprofessionals was created and is in the process of
being released for advertisement.
EFNEP staff has attended local and national meetings, submitted proposals and budget
revisions. A position description for paraprofessionals was created and is in the process of
being released for advertisement.




EFNEP staff has attended local and national meetings, submitted proposals and budget
revisions. A position description for paraprofessionals was created and is in the process of
being released for advertisement.
RACE is an acronym for Recognizing Assets Creates Enrichment. Each session was tied to the
theme: Races Begin with the Pit Crew (Building Assets), Maintenance Keeps You in the Race
(Health), Fueling Up to Burn Rubber (Nutrition) and In the Driver's Seat (Self Awareness). Each
session included both information and hands-on activities to reinforce the learning. Survey
results showed 96% indicated they would choose more fruits and vegetables and more
calcium rich foods for snacks, while 86% indicated they planned to increase daily exercise. The
reasons given included 60% who indicated they wanted to be healthy and 26% who indicated
they did not want to be overweight. Seventy percent recognized the statement"I enjoy family
activities with those I love" as an external asset. Following the 4-H RACE Day Challenge, 30%
of the participants have identified at least one of their personal strengths as helping others.




The UA Food Science Department's ranking testifies to its productivity in food research in
aiding food processing in Arkansas. In addition, the well-trained Food Science Department
graduates are hired by food processors in Arkansas assuring the continued success of
Arkansas food processing industries. Peer-review articles appeared regularly in the Journal of
Food Science and Journal of Food Protection.

Six hundred nine parents were surveyed. 71% of parents said their child had talked to them
about healthy food or snacks.
56% of parents said their child had talked to them about being more active.
55% of parents said their child had asked for more or different fruits, vegetables, milk or
yogurt since school started in the fall of 2006.
44% of parents said they had made changes in their family's eating and/or physical activity
practices.

Of the parents who said they had made changes:
47% reported that the family drank more water
44% reported that the family ate more or different fruits
42% reported that the family was more active
38% reported that the family ate more dairy foods
37% reported that the family ate more high-fiber, whole-grain foods
37% reported that the family ate less high-fat/fried foods
35% reported that the family drank less sugary drinks
33% reported that the family ate less salt/salty foods
The EIA kit for rapid melamine detection in pet food is now a commercial product marketed
by Beacon Analytical Systems, Inc. (Portland, ME).
The findings of this research help us understand the nutritional impact of food choices among
animal protein foods. The findings of this research showed that digestion of chicken muscle
proteins increased the production of bioavailable forms of iron and that both soluble
(sarcoplasmic) and insoluble (myofibrilar) muscle proteins contribute nearly equally at
equivalent protein levels. Soluble, low molecular weight non-protein components had a
measurable but minor effect. In contrast, other non-muscle animal proteins such as egg white
had no effect or in the case of whey protein concentrate-a negative effect. Muscle proteins
produced dialyzable ferrous iron species, which are the most bioavailable, whereas other
animal proteins produced hardly any ferrous iron. There was an excellent correlation between
ferrous iron production and sulfhydryl content of proteins from all sources suggesting that
these are, at least partly, responsible. Histidine content was not similarly correlated. We
found differences in the size of the dialyzable iron species produced by digestion of animal
proteins. With non-muscle proteins all of the dialyzable iron was smaller than 1KDa, whereas
with muscle proteins there was a range of sizes (1-10KDa) with most in the range 2-3 KDa,
illustrating that the peptides from muscle which enhance iron uptake are quite different and


Based on the results of post-questionnaires, paritcipants reduced their consumption of fried
foods.




Based on post-questionnaires, the participants increased their consumption of non-fat and/or
low-fat dairy foods.
The research has determined the nature of oxidation of an important protein involved in
adipocyte fatty acid metabolism. This also suggests anti-oxidant foods may have a role in
reducing the risk of developing this disease.

Interestingly, what was discovered was the characteristic of wheat that primarily influences its
chemoprotective effect is the wheat class. Specifically, red wheat reduces colon cancer risk
relative to white wheat, regardless of whether the wheat is whole wheat flour or refined
flour. So the conventional thinking that whole wheat is superior to refined wheat was not
supported by this research. It may be more important to promote red wheat, regardless of
refining state, over white wheat, to reduce cancern risk.

Results showed that participants in formal Food Technology Training Course have learned
how to process about 50 products from local resources like root crops, fish, banana and
coconut. Food product evaluators of different age groups, genders and affiliations increased
their awareness on the utilization of local crops into value-added processed food products.

According to CRS5 Behavior Checklist Summary Report, 27% or 15 of 56 adult participants
showed improvement in planning meals, making healthy food choices, preparing foods
without adding salt, reading nutrition labels and having children eat breakfast. For youth,
91% of 68 increased their ability to select nutritious foods.

About 30-50% of homemakers started to apply learned knowledge to their families, especially
on food preparation by adding fruits and vegetables to the family meals depending on group
and location. About fifteen percent already learned how to read food labels by doing this in
the stores and sharing with the storekeepers the problem of selling expired food to
customers. About fifty percent of the school children and out of school youths learned the
names of the different kinds of local food and the nutrient content of each food by sharing
with other family members.
As a result of the follow up activities, two participants working at the PCC Cafeteria started
preparing some of the food products that they have learned from the class. These processed
foods were served to the students and those who take their meals at the Cafeteria. A
storeowner prepared foods for sale. One participant prepared tapioca pancake mix and
served them to 50 LEEP students during a 4-week camping activity. Eight other participants
prepared some of the foods for traditional events such as funerals and birth ceremony.

People have come to appreciate the value added products from their staple food crops as a
result of their gained knowledge in processing them.

Thirty percent of the homemakers started to apply learned knowledge to their families
especially on food preparation by adding fruits and vegetables to their family meals. About
fifteen percent already learned how to read food label by doing this in the stores and sharing
with the storekeepers the problem of selling expired food to customers. About fifty percent of
the school children and out of school youth learned the different kinds of local food and the
content of each food by sharing with their families and friends.




There was an increase in the number of healthy food snacks or lunch programs in schools and
communities. Observations of local markets and quick lunch stands indicate a greater
demand for local produce.

One participant has successfully embarked on the commercialization of Taro Sub Sandwich.
Another continued to prepare taro wine and selling the product. Tapioca steamed cakes were
sold at the Bethlehem market during payday weeks. A participant sold tapioca cookies and
cakes during civic events like Tourism Week. One participant is producing tapioca starch for
sale at grocery stores. A manager of a big hotel indicated interest in serving local foods to
their guests after they tasted the food products that were taught to the participants of the
Food Technology Course.

Different recipes of local food content are now being accepted by an increasing number of
people in the communities. Varieties of banana and taro that have a high nutrient and Vitamin
A content and easy to cultivate have been widely accepted for their taste, which is
contributing to a healthy and well-nourished population.

In the preliminary tests, 66 hot pepper lines were evaluated and 40 selected; 50 ornamental
pepper lines were evaluated and 45 selected for further test. Nutritional and phytochemical
analyses are being planned in collaboration with the Tuskegee University Department of Food
and Nutritional Sciences.
The audiences gained up-to-the-minute knowledge in their respective disciplines.
27 schools in 10 districts with over 15,000 students have benefitted from locallay grown
produce in school menus
We have provided a theoretical framework, cellular data and clinical data to demonstrate that
dietary calcium protects against both oxidative and inflammatory stresses and that dairy
exerts a greater effect than calcium alone.

This research enables the use of dairy-based ingredients for new rheological/binding
application in food products and the development of carrier/delivery systems for hydrophobic-
low molecular-weight molecules in the pharmeceutical industry.

Understanding the capacity of various macromolecules in plant and mushroom tissues in
binding of calcium will provide novel and more efficient pre- and post-harvest practices to
enhance quality of fresh and processed fruits and vegetables.
Addition of natural polysaccharide, chitosan, to synthetic PEO films would increase the
functionality and biodegradability of the material, and at the same time partially reduce use
of petrochemicals for polymer production.

Our data (based on the established mathematical allometric scaling model) support the FDA's
policy decision that alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) cannot be used as a viable substitute for
eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA).




In collaboration with the firefighters union and local healthcare organizations, CCE provided
educational intervention regarding all aspects of cardiac wellness. As a result of this
educational intervention, firehouse menus have been altered to incorporate less dietary fat as
well as more fresh produce. Additionally, the firefighters have made progress toward
incorporating more physical activity into their daily routine. Two hundred-sixty Albany
firefighters participated in this mandatory program with the intention of sustained follow-up
by various cardiac health entities. Through this intervention each firefighter has been
provided with the knowledge to mitigate the stress incurred in their line of work by employing
better dietary strategies and improving their fitness status.
71 individuals age 55 and older learned and practiced research-based exercises designed to
reduce the incidence of osteoporosis. 58% (41 participants) responded to post-program
surveys reporting as follows: 28 reported improved balance; 27 reported improved balance;
26 reported increased flexibility; 15 reported increased stamina/endurance; 20 reported
increased energy and 27 reported an overall increased sense of well-being.




Recruitment of some top tier students is occurring but not to the extent that Institute faculty
would prefer and could finance. Efforts to collaborate with other units such as Chemistry are
in progress, to help bring in top students with strong biochemistry backgrounds. The result is
that at present, the unit is not reaching its enrollment goal.




Extramural income in fiscal year 2007 ($4,951,958) has increased by $1.45 million since fiscal
year 2006 ($3,498,351).

The average number of peer reviewed journal publications per faculty in 2007 is 4.3 (9
faculty). For 2006 the amount was 5.44 and for 2005, 5.22.
The reduction in publications may be partially due to the death of one of the faculty members
in 2007 (Clarence A. Ryan). The Institute had also expected to hire one-to-two new faculty
members in 2007, but the hires have been delayed until late 2008. This is expected to affect
2008 figures as well.
This research provides new information on how certain enzymes regulate fat uptake in the
body provide new targets for drug therapies to prevent or treat obesity. The transgenic mice
ate much more and had decreased energy expenditure as compared to normal mice. Based
on the research, iMGL has a role in whole body energy balance, possibly via regulation of food
intake. Also, iMGL, may play a functional role not only in lipid synthesis but also in the
regulation of appetite and energy expenditure.
The breakthrough for lipin research was the isolation of the PAP enzyme from yeast that
corresponds in form to lipin in mammals and the fact that yeast cells lacking the enzyme
exhibited a 90 percent reduction in the yeasts version of fat loss. Without PAP enzyme, the
ability to lose fat was practically extinguished, highlighting the role of this lipin enzyme in fat
loss, and adding a key process for for lipin's role in fat metabolism. Combined with the
information from the iMGL work, there are new substances and pathways to target new
pharmaceuticals and other therapies for treatment and prevention of obesity.




Public awareness.
Recommendations can be made to reindeer producers that Kentucky bluegrass has a better
nutritional profile and is palatable to reindeer. However, smooth bromegrass may be more
profitable since it can be used for pasture and hay production. In previous reporting periods it
was determined that use of local feed can save as much as 50% in the cost of reindeer rations
when the deer are ranched.

Reindeer: By using enclosures and supplemental feed reindeer quickly socialize to humans.
This allows producers increased control of free-ranging animals. Socialized reindeer are easily
penned which reduces losses to migrating caribou and predators. Supplemental feed
improved body condition and reproduction when green forage was not available. The use of
enclosures and supplemental feeding shows promise to increase the productivity of free
ranging reindeer herds in Alaska. Peonies: Mayesh Wholesale Flower Distributor evaluated a
sample of Alaska-grown peonies when they were harvested in early July. Our trial cutting of
peonies was received favorably by Mayesh. They offered to purchase peonies next year for
$1.25 per stem.




(1) Weight a blood sugar levels: During this nine week period, there was an increase in the
percentage of participants who reported: (1) that their weight remained constant (33% at pre,
67% at post and 56% at follow-up; (2) that their blood sugar levels (29% at pre, 57% at post,
86% at follow-up) and Hemoglobin A1C levels (29% at pre, 57% at post, 72% at follow-up)
were under good control. These positive results may be related to their changes in physical
activity.
(2) Physical activity levels: Physical activity results showed a 61-65% increase in the number of
times per week participants reported (3.3 times/week at pre, 5.3 times/week at post, and 5.4
times/week at follow-up) that they met the 30 minutes/day of physical activity
recommendation. This increase may be related to the increase in number of average daily
steps recorded by participants. Their average daily steps at baseline was 5481 steps/day,
which classified them as low active (5000-7499 steps a day = low active). At the time of the
post-survey (week 5), their average daily steps had increased to 10,094, an 84% increase over
baseline, and placed them in the active category (10,000 -12,499 steps a day = active).
Between post and follow-up, their average steps/day remained in the active category (10,383 -
11403) and at week 9, they had increased their steps by 108% over baseline.
Having an instructor conducting strength training activities in each class may be related to two
During FY2007, adult ENP participants completed 1,449 general nutrition, 1,359 food group
and 57 physical activity surveys. Results from the surveys collected indicated that participants
were most likely to make changes in their fruit and vegetable consumption (46%), followed by
whole grain (23%) and low-fat dairy consumption (13%). Food group changes selected by the
greatest number of participants included: eating at least 2 cups of fruit/day (37%), eating
vegetables as a snack (44%), making half the grains they consumed whole grains (49%), and
eating 3 cups of low-fat dairy foods daily (43%). The physical activity behavior that
participants most planned on implementing was to be active for 30 minutes a day (49%).
Research has shown that individuals who follow a healthy diet and are physically active are
less likely to develop heart disease, type 2 diabetes and certain cancers. Following a healthy
lifestyle could reduce health care costs by an estimated one trillion dollars a year.




1) Food intake by food group: Grain and whole grain consumption increased by ½ serving/day.
Fruit, vegetable, and milk/yogurt consumption increased by ½ cup/day. There was a 12 %
increase in the number who consumed fat-free or skim milk products. Meat consumption
decreased by ½ oz/day.
2) Beverage and fast food consumption: There was an 11% decrease in the number of
participants who drank 2 or more sodas/day; a 10% decrease in the number of individuals
who ate fast food 2-5 times per week; and a 9% increase in the number who never ate large
portions at fast food restaurants.
3) Eating Style: 50% of participants ate when they were hungry. There was a 21% increase in
the number of participants who learned to stop eating when they were full and a 12%
decrease in those who did other activities while they were eating.
These improved eating habits may decrease participants' risk of developing certain chronic
diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and some cancers.




Seventy-five to 99% of program participants demonstrated knowledge gain through pre- and
post program evaluations. Sixty-six percent of participants indicated they would implement a
procedure that reduces a food safety risk. Approximately 43% indicated that they would train
others in food safety procedures.
Access to healthy food at farmer's markets in Colorado is improving through the efforts of the
Colorado Farmers' Market Association, the State Department of Human Services and local
Extension and a grant from the USDA. Colorado, like most states, now uses the Electronic
Benefit Transfer (EBT) system to administer food stamp benefits. While EBT has proven
beneficial it automatically eliminated access to many facilities that feature local fresh fruits
and vegetables such as farmers' markets. However, thanks to a grant from United States
Department of Agriculture to the Colorado Farmers' Market Association, food stamps will
now be legal tender at 18 farmers' markets throughout the state. This new technology will
help both food stamp recipients and local farmers.
• On average 92 percent of adults participants have changed one or more dietary habits to
improve their health.
• On average adult participants reported a savings of $80.75 on their monthly grocery bills.





Through Nutrition and Food Safety programs, more than 220 community agencies have
partnered with Extension to address significant community health issues.


We have continued to make great progress on examining the effects of soy derived
phytoestrogens on lipid-induced cardiac myocyte death and survival pathways. Following
characterization of primary cardiac myocyte death and survival in response to lipid exposure,
a dose-response approach was used to examine the effects of 2 soy derived phytoestrogens
on lipid induced heart cell death. Data was obtained supporting our hypothesis that soy
derived phytoestrogen genistein attenuates cardiomyocyte death and promotes survival
following lipid exposure. While in a widely used cardiomyocyte line we found this to be true at
both physiological and supraphysiological concentrations of genistein, in primary
cardiomyocytes isolated directly from left ventricular myocardium, we found that high
concentrations of genistein rapidly resulted in cell death. Additionally, we have found no
significant protection against lipotoxic effects by the phytoestrogen daidzein.

				
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