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					                                                  LOS ANGELES COUNTY
                                                   OPERATIONAL AREA
                                                      EMERGENCY
                                                    RESPONSE PLAN




         ACCESS AND FUNCTIONAL NEEDS ANNEX




                          DRAFT: SEPTEMBER 9, 2010




                               APPROVAL PENDING




        Prepared for the Los Angeles County Office of Emergency Management.




November 29, 2010        DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT       Page 1 of 125
 1                                LETTER OF PROMULGATION
 2
 3
 4   TO:    OFFICIALS, EMPLOYEES, AND RESIDENTS OF LOS ANGELES COUNTY
 5
 6   Preservation of life and property is an inherent responsibility of local, state, and federal
 7   government. The County of Los Angeles developed this Access and Functional Needs
 8   Annex to ensure the most effective allocation of resources for the maximum benefit and
 9   protection of populations with access and functional needs in times of emergency.
10
11   While no plan can guarantee prevention of injury, death and destruction, well-developed
12   plans carried out by knowledgeable and well-trained personnel, can minimize losses.
13   The Access and Functional Needs Annex establishes the County’s emergency policies
14   and procedures in the event of an emergency. This Annex provides for the coordination
15   of planning efforts among the various emergency departments, agencies, special
16   districts, and jurisdictions that comprise the Los Angeles County Operational Area
17   (LACOA). The Access and Functional Needs Annex conforms to the requirements of
18   the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and the California Standardized
19   Emergency Management System (SEMS).
20
21   The Access and Functional Needs Annex is an extension of the Operational Area
22   Emergency Response Plan (OAERP). The objective of the OAERP is to incorporate and
23   coordinate all County facilities and personnel, along with the jurisdictional resources of
24   the cities and special districts within the County, into an efficient organization capable of
25   responding to any emergency using SEMS, mutual aid, and other appropriate response
26   procedures. The Access and Functional Needs Annex will be reviewed and exercised at
27   least every three years and revised as necessary to meet changing conditions.
28
29   The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors gives its full support to the Access and
30   Functional Needs Annex and urges all officials, employees, and residents, individually
31   and collectively, to share in our commitment to effective preparedness and response for
32   emergency events.
33


     November 29, 2010        DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT             Page 2 of 125
 1   This letter promulgates the Access and Functional Needs Annex which becomes
 2   effective upon approval by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors.
 3
 4
 5
 6   Signed _____________________________________
 7
 8
 9   Date: ________________
10          Mayor Gloria Molina
11          Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors
12
13




     November 29, 2010      DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT         Page 3 of 125
 1                                   EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
 2
 3
 4   History shows that disasters disproportionately impact populations with access and
 5   functional needs. Recognizing this, efforts are being made through the Los Angeles
 6   County Operational Area (LACOA or OA) to better prepare the community—individuals,
 7   local and county government agencies, key decision-makers, organizations, and
 8   emergency management responders—to take appropriate and informed actions as well
 9   as to empower individuals with access and functional needs in response and recovery
10   efforts. The Access and Functional Needs Annex (Annex) describes key policies,
11   procedures and issues directly related to the preparedness, response, and recovery of
12   access and functional needs populations.
13
14   This Annex is an extension of the Los Angeles County Operational Area Emergency
15   Response Plan (OAERP). It is intended to expand on the concepts of the OAERP and
16   work in conjunction with other State, County, and city plans, and their responding
17   agencies’ standard operation procedures.        This Annex addresses the Operational
18   Area’s role in responding to the needs of individuals with access and functional needs
19   and provides guidance to local jurisdictions in an effort to enhance existing plans.
20
21   The County will work towards coordinating the many community partners that are
22   required to effectively respond to the needs of individuals with access and functional
23   needs. This involves the active participation and involvement of a multi -disciplinary
24   group of stakeholders.    The Annex outlines roles and responsibilities of these key
25   organizations and agencies.
26
27   The Los Angeles County’s Office of Emergency Management (OEM) convenes and
28   chairs the Operational Area Specific Needs Population Task Force to coordinate the
29   development of this Annex. This Task Force consists of rep resentatives from the OEM,
30   County Public Health, County Health Services, County Mental Health, County Sheriff,
31   County Fire, County Public Social Services, Los Angeles City Emergency Management
32   Department, Emergency Network Los Angeles (ENLA), and Universit y of California-Los



     November 29, 2010        DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT            Page 4 of 125
1   Angeles Center for Neighborhood Knowledge. The task force is reconvened by OEM to
2   review and revise this Annex when necessary. The task force may be expanded at a
3   later time and will work closely with key stakeholders among populations with access
4   and functional needs.
5




    November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT       Page 5 of 125
 1                                        FOREWORD
 2
 3
 4   Overview
 5
 6   The Los Angeles County OAERP Access and Functional Needs Annex consists of five
 7   sections. Each section has a specific purpose, as stated below.
 8
 9   Section 1 – Introduction
10
11   This section provides the context for this Annex and includes background information,
12   purpose, scope, and mission. It also provides assumptions, authorities, and definitions,
13   specifically pertaining to people with access and functional needs.
14
15   Section 2 – Preparedness
16
17   This section describes the OA’s efforts in preparedness including information on
18   identification and assessment, registries, networks, community education and outreach,
19   training, and drills and exercises.
20
21   Section 3 – Operational Framework
22
23   Section 3 provides a framework for how the OA addresses key operational areas with
24   regard to people with access and functional needs. Key OA roles and responsibilities
25   are described, as are support mechanisms for local jurisdictions. This includes
26   communications, evacuation and transportation, mass care and sheltering, and
27   transition to recovery.
28
29   Section 4 – Roles and Responsibilities
30
31   This Section defines the various roles and responsibilities of County departments and
32   agencies to implement this Annex.
33
34   Section 5 – Maintenance
35   This Section outlines the policy and responsibilities for ongoing management and
36   maintenance of this Annex.
37




     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT            Page 6 of 125
 1   Table of Contents
 2
 3   Executive Summary
 4   Foreword
 5
 6   1.    Introduction...............................................................................................................................8
 7        1.1    Background
 8        1.2    Purpose
 9        1.3    Scope
10        1.4    Definition
11        1.5    Assumptions
12        1.6    Responsibilities
13        1.7    Mission
14        1.8    Authorities
15        1.9    Relationship to Other Plans
16        1.10 Hazard Impact
17
18   2.    Preparedness..................................................................................22
19        2.1   Community Assessment
20        2.2   Community Preparedness Education
21        2.3   Training
22        2.4   Drills and Exercises
23
24   3.    Operational Framework ......................................................................36
25        3.1   Introduction
26        3.2   Communications
27        3.3   Evacuation and Transportation
28        3.4   Sheltering and Mass Care
29        3.5   Transition to Recovery
30
31   4.    Roles and Responsibilities ...................................................................75
32
33   5.    Maintenance ...................................................................................81
34
35   6.    Appendices ....................................................................................82
36
37        Appendix A: Reference List
38        Appendix B: Glossary – Definitions and Acronyms
39        Appendix C: LA County OA Organizational Matrix
40        Appendix D: SNAP Overview
41        Appendix E: Planning Checklists
42        Appendix F: Website Accessibility
43        Appendix G: Federal Communications Commission’s Requirements
44        Appendix H: Functional Needs Transportation Inventory List
45        Appendix I: Department of Justice’s Sheltering Guidelines
46


     November 29, 2010                      DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT                                       Page 7 of 125
 1                                       1. INTRODUCTION
 2
 3
 4   1.1 BACKGROUND
 5
 6   Past disasters have demonstrated that people with access and functional needs are
 7   disproportionately impacted by those disasters. Consider that nearly 75% of those who
 8   perished as a result of Hurricane Katrina were seniors. Further, research shows that
 9   61% of people with disabilities have not made plans to quickly and safely evacuate their
10   homes, and that 58% of people with disabilities do not know whom to contact about
11   emergency plans for their community in the event of a disaster.
12
13   The Los Angeles County Operational Area (OA or LACOA) recognizes the need to
14   continue to move towards a more inclusive emergency management system and to
15   develop a strong public awareness campaign about the necessity for personal
16   preparedness, as both are key factors in reducing the impact of disasters on people with
17   access and functional needs.      (See Section 1.4 below for the County definition of
18   access and functional needs populations)
19
20   As the largest county in the Unites States with a population of over 10 million, an elderly
21   population of 1 million, a disabled population of 1.75 million, and a population of over
22   150,000 residents who receive In-Home Social Services (IHSS), Los Angeles County
23   must address the needs of a substantial number of people with access and functional
24   needs on a regular basis. Disasters create new physical barriers and eliminate and/or
25   lessen services available to everyone. For people with access and functional needs,
26   this may take away their ability to perform certain functions that were previously
27   possible, and/or their capacity to live independently, and/or navigate the available
28   response and recovery systems effectively. Information before, during, and after an
29   emergency can make a difference . Ensuring that preparedness and emergency
30   information is accessible and available in multiple formats and provides content that
31   addresses access and functional needs is critical.         Further, plans for sheltering,
32   evacuation, transportation, and recovery, among other areas, must carefully integrate
33   access and functional needs issues to ensure that they are considered and addressed


     November 29, 2010        DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT            Page 8 of 125
1   before a disaster occurs and can be responded to appropriately during and after the
2   event.
3
4   Public agencies cannot wait until they are in the middle of a disaster to start planning
5   and training their staff to address access and functional needs. Planning ahead will
6   foster collaboration between agencies and the non-governmental organizations and
7   community before, during, and after disasters.
8




    November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT           Page 9 of 125
 1   1.2 PURPOSE
 2
 3   The purpose of this Access and Functional Needs Annex (Annex) to the Los Angeles
 4   County Operational Area Emergency Response Plan (OAERP) is to provide guidelines
 5   and procedures for disaster planning, response, and recovery efforts to address
 6   populations with access and functional needs in the County of Los Angeles.
 7
 8   This Annex also: (1) provides the framework for the OA response to access and
 9   functional needs populations, including assignment of responsibilities and a description
10   of the actions to be taken by the County upon a disaster; and (2) establishes a
11   countywide understanding of the unique operational concepts, organization, tasks, and
12   coordinated emergency actions of public agencies, special districts, and other
13   organizations and institutions to address access and functional needs populations
14   during disasters.   Detailed descriptions of how County departments or jurisdictions
15   respond to access and functional needs populations will be located in their respective
16   department/jurisdiction-specific plans or procedures.
17
18   This is not a stand-alone plan. This Annex pulls together information from existing
19   Operational Area plans and procedures that address access and functional needs
20   before, during, and after disasters. This Annex is intended for use in conjunction with
21   these other plans and to highlight the key preparedness, response, and recovery steps
22   that the County will take in addressing access and functional needs populations. (See
23   Appendix A for a list of the documents that s upport this Annex.)
24
25
26   1.3 SCOPE
27
28   This Annex applies only to the Los Angeles County Operational Area and does not
29   address response and recovery operations for local governments or agencies outside
30   the OA. The primary audience for this Annex is County departments, emergency
31   response agencies, and special districts (transit and school districts) within the OA that
32   hold the responsibility for implementing this Annex and/or have responsibilities detailed
33   herein.



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 1   1.4 DEFINITION
 2
 3   The term ―populations with access and functional needs‖ is defined as:
 4
 5   Populations whose members may have additional needs before, during, and after an incident in
 6   functional areas including but not limited to: maintaining independence, communication,
 7   transportation, supervision, and medical care. Individuals in need of additional response
 8   assistance may include those who have disabilities; who live in institutionalized settings; who are
 9   elderly; who are children; who are from diverse cultures; who have limited English proficiency
10   or are non- English speaking; or who are transportation disadvantaged. This is consistent with
11   the definition that FEMA uses in the National Response Framework to define the term
12   ―special needs.‖ The LACOA has decided to use ―access and functional needs‖ in place
13   of ―special needs‖ as this terminology is consistent with current trends in California and
14   nationally. Thus, be aware that these interchangeable terms mean the same thing.
15
16   All other terms and acronyms are defined in Appendix B.
17
18
19   1.5 ASSUMPTIONS
20
21   This Annex is based on the following assumptions:
22
23         that key components highlighted in the Annex will be incorporated into response
24          plans, checklists, and integrated into the emergency response system to create a
25          fully inclusive approach;
26         that in a county of over 10 million people there are significant, diverse
27          populations with access and functional needs during emergencies;
28         that government agencies must create strong networks with the community to
29          reach those with access and functional needs;
30         that populations with access and functional needs, as well as their caregivers
31          and families, must be empowered to take steps to learn about preparedness and
32          make plans for disasters;
33         that agencies providing temporary or long-term residency services or custodial
34          care to people with access and functional needs must develop comprehensive




     November 29, 2010          DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT               Page 11 of 125
 1          emergency plans according to their regulatory authorities and ensure that
 2          emergency policies and procedures are adequate and up to date:
 3         that the County will provide support in accordance with SEMS and the State
 4          Emergency Plan to local jurisdictions in order to address emergency-related
 5          issues for populations with access and functional needs;
 6         that local jurisdictions and the County for the unincorporated areas within the
 7          LACOA are responsible for developing and maintaining plans that take into
 8          consideration people with access and functional needs; and
 9         that the Annex will be reviewed at least every three years and updated as
10          needed.
11
12
13   1.6 RESPONSIBILITIES
14
15   The responsibilities for developing, implementing, maintaining, and supporting this
16   Access and Functional Needs Annex are as follows:
17
18         Los Angeles County Office of Emergency Management (OEM) is responsible for
19          the development, implementation, and maintenance of this Annex.

20         Other assigned County departments and agencies will carry out their
21          responsibilities as described in this Annex and according to the LACOA
22          Organization Matrix (see Appendix C) detailed in the OA Emergency Response
23          Plan (OAERP). All County departments will operate under the umbrella of the
24          County OA using SEMS/NIMS.

25         County communities and special districts are responsible for developing access
26          and functional needs population emergency response plans compatible with this
27          Annex. Additionally, each OA jurisdiction is responsible for developing their own
28          emergency operations plans as well as standard operating procedures for
29          possible implementation of plans in response to local- or distant-source incidents.
30          The expectation is that local governments, response agencies and special
31          districts in the predicted impact areas will implement their plans and standard
32          operating procedures, when appropriate.


     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT           Page 12 of 125
 1         County departments will coordinate with OEM and inform them of additional
 2          planning activities they are involved with, particularly in terms of populations with
 3          access and functional needs.

 4
 5
 6   1.7 MISSION
 7
 8   The mission of the LACOA is to reduce the potential for loss of life and property from
 9   disasters for all populations, including those with access and functional needs by: (1)
10   providing timely, accurate, reliable, and effective disaster preparedness information and
11   support to access and functional needs populations and emergency management within
12   their area of responsibility; and (2) advancing other aspects of disaster mitigation such
13   as community preparedness and public education.
14
15
16   1.8 AUTHORITIES
17
18   This section outlines key Federal, State and local legislation, regulations, and practices
19   that pertain specifically to emergency management and populations with access and
20   functional needs.
21
22      1.8.1 Federal
23
24             Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)
25              Signed into law on July 26, 1990, by President George H. W. Bush, the
26              Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a broad civil rights law that prohibits
27              discrimination against people with disabilities. The law covers a wide range of
28              areas, from employment to the accessibility of public buildings. The ADA also
29              requires that people with disabilities have equal access to all government pro-
30              grams.
31
32              Those working in the field of emergency management should become familiar
33              with the ADA guide for local governments, Making Community Emergency
34              Preparedness and Response Programs Accessible to People with



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 1             Disabilities. This guide was released in 2004 by the U.S. Department of
 2             Justice, Civil Rights Division, Disability Rights Section and covers ways in
 3             which local government emergency preparedness and response programs
 4             can be made accessible to people with disabilities. For more information, visit:
 5             http://www.usdoj.gov/crt/ada/emergencyprep.htm.
 6
 7            ADA Amendments Act (ADAAA)
 8             In 2008, President George W. Bush signed an updated version of the ADA,
 9             which is known as the ADA Amendments Act (ADAAA). The revised law
10             broadens the scope of the definition of what it means to have a disability.
11             These changes went into effect January 1, 2009. These amendments make it
12             easier for people with access and functional needs to seek protection under
13             the law. The ADAAA also mandates that those with access and functional
14             needs be included in all disaster plans de veloped for a community under Title
15             II. For more information, visit: http://www.ada.gov.
16
17            Americans with Disabilities Act Accessibility Guidelines (ADAAG)
18             The Americans with Disabilities Act Accessibility Guidelines (ADAAG) covers
19             the scoping and technical requirements necessary to ensure that buildings
20             and facilities are accessible. The scoping and technical requirements outlined
21             in the ADAAG must be applied during the design, construction, and alteration
22             of buildings and facilities covered by Title II and Title III of the ADA to the
23             extent required by regulations issued by Federal agencies such as the
24             Department of Justice and the Department of Transportation. To review these
25             regulations, visit: http://www.access-board.gov/adaag/about/index.htm. The
26             Department of Justice also drafted an ―ADA Checklist for Emergency
27             Shelters‖ (www.ada.gov/pcatoolkit/chap7shelterchk.htm), which provides
28             guidance for emergency managers to help them determine if a building could
29             be utilized as a shelter and, if so, what barriers would need to be rectified in
30             order to make it accessible/ADA compliant.
31



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 1            Executive Order 13347 – Individuals with Disabilities in Emergency
 2             Preparedness
 3             In 2004, President George W. Bush signed Executive Order 13347 --
 4             Individuals with Disabilities in Emergency Preparedness. This Order
 5             established the Interagency Coordinating Council on Emergency
 6             Preparedness and Individuals with Disabilities (ICC).
 7
 8             Chaired by the Department of Homeland Security and assigned to the Officer
 9             for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties, the ICC helps to ensure that the federal
10             government accounts for the safety and security of people with disabilities
11             during disasters. Although the ICC is essentially a policy and coordinating
12             body, it has been involved during major disaster activations. The ICC is
13             made up of representatives from federal agencies including: Environmental
14             Protection Agency, General Services, Office of Personnel Management,
15             Social Security, Department of Transportation, Department of the Treasury,
16             Department of Agriculture, and Department of Justice, among others. Other
17             invited members include the U.S. Access Board, the National Council on
18             Disability, and the Federal Communications Commission.
19
20            Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act of
21             1988
22             The Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief a nd Emergency Assistance Act, PL
23             100-707 was signed into law on November 23, 1988 as an amended version
24             of the Disaster Relief Act of 1974. The Act provides the statutory authority for
25             FEMA to coordinate most Federal disaster response activities. It also
26             established a system through which financial and physical assistance can be
27             obtained from FEMA following a presidential declared disaster. For more
28             information on the Act, visit: http://www.fema.gov/about/stafact.shtm.
29
30            Post-Katrina Emergency Reform Act




     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT             Page 15 of 125
 1             As a result of the devastation caused by Hurricane Katrina, President George
 2             W. Bush signed into law the Post-Katrina Emergency Reform Act, to amend
 3             the Homeland Security Act of 2002. Effective March 31, 2007, the Act aims to
 4             strengthen the Department of Homeland Security/FEMA’s ability to prevent,
 5             prepare for, protect against, respond to, and recover from disaster.
 6
 7             Additionally, the Act requires that new leadership roles are created within
 8             DHS, including the position of National Disability Coordinator (NDC) (now part
 9             of the Office of Disability Integration and Coordination as of February 2010).
10             The Act also includes provisions for the inclusion of people with disabilities in
11             evacuation plans, accessible housing, and regional disability coordinators,
12             among     many    other    changes.       More    information    is   available   at
13             http://www.govtrack.us/congress/bill.xpd?bill=s109-3721.
14
15            The Pets Evacuation and Transportation Standards Act of 2006
16             The Pets Evacuation and Transportation Standards Act amends the Stafford
17             Act, and requires evacuation plans to take into account the needs of
18             individuals with household pets and service animals, prior to, duri ng, and after
19             major disaster or emergency.
20
21            Federal Communications Commission – Emergency Alert System Rules
22             In October 2005, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) expanded
23             the Emergency Alert System (EAS) rules to require EAS participation by
24             digital television broadcasters, digital cable television providers, digital
25             broadcast radio, Digital Audio Radio Service, and Direct Broadcast Satellite
26             systems. The FCC’s EAS rules require that an EAS provide access to people
27             with disabilities by providing both visual and aural alerts. Under the rules, a
28             visual EAS alert does not have to be an exact transcription of an audio alert,
29             but must be ―any method of visual presentation which results in a legible
30             message conveying the essential emergency information.‖
31


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 1            Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973
 2             Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended (29 U.S.C. 794d),
 3             requires that when Federal agencies develop, procure, maintain, or use
 4             electronic and information technology, Federal employees with disabilities
 5             have access to and use of information and data that is comparable to the
 6             access and use by Federal employees who are not individuals with
 7             disabilities, unless an undue burden would be imposed on the agency.
 8             Section 508 also requires that individuals with disabilities, who are members
 9             of the public seeking information or services from a Federal agency, have
10             access to and use of information and data that is comparable to that provided
11             to the public who are not individuals with disabilities, unless an undue burden
12             would be imposed on the agency.
13
14            Presidential and Other Initiatives
15             o In 2009, President Barack Obama created and staffed the new position of
16                Senior Advisor on Disability Issues within FEMA to report to the
17                administrator. This senior staff position is responsible for addressing
18                emergency management issues relating to the disability community and is
19                intended to enhance preparedness efforts at the agency’s highest levels.
20                As of February 2010 this advisor is now the Director of the newly created
21                Office of Disability Integration and Coordination.
22
23             o As a result of lessons learned from Hurricane Katrina, FEMA drafted
24                Comprehensive Preparedness Guide 302 (CPG-302) to provide planning
25                considerations for a variety of hazards, security, and emergenc y functions.
26                It also offers general guidelines for developing a state, territorial, tribal,
27                and local government Household Pets and Service Animals Plan
28                (HPSAP). FEMA has also developed Comprehensive Preparedness
29                Guide 301: Emergency Management Planning Guide for Special Needs
30                Populations (CPG-301), which aims to help tribal, state, territorial, and




     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT           Page 17 of 125
 1                local governments develop emergency plans for people with functional
 2                needs.
 3
 4             o In 2009, FEMA released its National Disaster Housing Strategy, which
 5                calls for national and state efforts to plan for accessible housing that can
 6                be made available after a disaster. The National Council on Disability
 7                (NCD) recommends that each state create task forces on disaster housing
 8                consistent with the Strategy, and involve disability organizations.
 9
10            SARA Title III – 1986 Superfund Amendment and Reauthorization Act
11             This Act directs the creation and membership of Local Emergency Planning
12             Committees (LEPC). For more information, visit:
13             http://www.epa.gov/emergencies/content/epcra/epcra_plan.htm#LEPC.
14            The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations
15             (JCAHO)
16             JCAHO oversees standard setting for healthcare facilities and the
17             accreditation of healthcare facilities, such as nursing homes and hospitals.
18             For more information, visit: http://www.jointcommission.org.
19
20      1.8.2 State
21
22            California Emergency Services Act (California Government Code, Title 2,
23             Division 1, Chapter 7, Article 12, Sections 8550 - 8668).
24             This Act provides the basic legal authorities for emergency management in
25             the State and for conducting emergency operations in the State following the
26             proclamation of emergencies by approp riate local officials and/or the
27             Governor. The provisions of the Act are further reflected and expanded upon
28             by local emergency ordinances.
29            Standardized Emergency Management System (SEMS) Regulations
30             (California Code of Regulations, Title 19, Division 2 , Chapter 1; Government
31             Code, Section 8607).
32            California Government Codes, §§11135, 8588.15 and 8608



     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT            Page 18 of 125
 1            California Health and Safety Codes, §§101025 and 34070-34082
 2            California Education Code, §32282
 3            Title 22, California Code of Regulations (CCR), §72551
 4            Title 22 CCR §87223
 5            Title 24 CCR, Accessibility Regulations
 6
 7      1.8.3 Local
 8
 9            Los Angeles County Emergency Ordinance, Chapter 2.68
10             In accordance with the County’s Emergency Ordinance (Chapter 2.68), this
11             Annex is applicable to all County departments, cities, and special districts.
12             The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors recognized the critical nature
13             of providing for the protection of access and functional needs populations
14             during disasters in Los Angeles County and directed the development of this
15             Annex.
16
17            County Charter
18             Los Angeles County Emergency Ordinance, Los Angeles County Code Title
19             2, Division 3, Chapter 2.68 Emergency Services, known as the ―Emergency
20             Ordinance‖, defines the duties and provides the basic legal authorities for
21             emergency management in the County in the event of a disaster.
22
23   1.9 RELATIONSHIP TO OTHER PLANS
24
25   This document is an Annex to the OAERP and is not meant to stand alone, but is
26   intended to be used in support of and in conjunction with State, OA/County, city, and
27   special districts’ emergency response plans, and their responding agencies’ standard
28   operation procedures.
29
30   This Annex is consistent with and augments the OAERP and the County Emergency
31   Operations Center (CEOC) Standard Operating Procedures (SOP), and the County of
32   Los Angeles All-Hazards Local Hazard Mitigation Plan. The OAERP outlines broad




     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT        Page 19 of 125
 1   emergency response concepts with appendices detailing emergency response for each
 2   hazard faced by the County, including, but not limited to, fires, earthquakes, and floods.
 3
 4   Additionally, this Annex is to be used in conjunction with the CEOC SOP as an
 5   operational document. County departments and agencies with assigned tasks outlined
 6   in the OAERP, CEOC SOP, and in this Annex, are responsible for developing specific
 7   mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery procedures and checklists to support
 8   these plans.
 9
10   Plans, policies, and procedures to be used in support of, and in conjunction with this
11   Annex are listed in Table 1.
12
13   Table 1: Los Angeles County Operational Area Access and Functional Needs
14   Annex Associated Plans, Policies, and Procedures.
                              COUNTY/Operational Area
                                                                  Responsible Entities
     Los Angeles County Operational Area Emergency                         OEM
     Response Plan (OAERP)
     Los Angeles County Operational Area Emergency
     Operations Center Standard Operating Procedures                       OEM
     (CEOC SOP)
     Los Angeles County All-Hazard Mitigation Plan                         OEM
     Los Angeles County Operational Area Disaster
                                                                           OEM
     Information Reporting Procedures
     Los Angeles County Operational Area Emergency                     Sheriff, OEM
     Public Information Plan (Revised)
     Sheriff Evacuation Plan                                             Sheriff
     Sheriff Alert and Warning Plan                                      Sheriff
     Public Works Flood Plan                                          Public Works
     Public Works Disaster Routes Plan                                Public Works
     Department of Public Social Services (DPSS) Care and                 DPSS
     Shelter Plan (Draft)
     Adverse Weather Plan (Draft)                                      DPSS, OEM
     Animal Response Plan                                        DACC, DPH VPH, OEM
     Family Assistance Plan                                            DMH, OEM
     County Department Plans                                   Individual County Agencies
15




     November 29, 2010        DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT           Page 20 of 125
 1   1.10 HAZARD IMPACT
 2
 3   The County of Los Angeles is located in one of the most disaster-prone areas of the
 4   United States. The County is subject to an exceptional earthquake hazard in addition to
 5   other types of major emergencies, such as:
 6
 7         Wildland fires
 8         Flooding
 9         Hazardous materials
10         Civil unrest
11         Utility Outages
12         Dam Failure
13         Tsunami
14         Extreme Heat or Cold
15         Pandemic Flu
16         Terrorism
17
18   The vulnerabilities and risks created by these and other hazards can have lasting
19   effects on people, their property, and their surroundings. These vulnerabilities and risks
20   can severely interfere with the ability of people with access and functional needs to take
21   preventative and precautionary actions before, during, and following an emergency. For
22   a more detailed hazard analysis, see the LAC All-Hazards Mitigation Plan.
23




     November 29, 2010        DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT          Page 21 of 125
 1                                     2. PREPAREDNESS
 2
 3   This section outlines key factors in preparedness including:
 4         Community Assessment
 5         Community Education
 6         Training
 7         Drills/Exercises
 8
 9   Planning for specific operational areas is included in Section 3, Operational Framework,
10   within that area (e.g. communications, mass care and sheltering).
11
12   2.1 COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT
13
14   Los Angeles County Operational Area, which is home to over 10 million people,
15   includes significant numbers of persons with access and functional needs. With a
16   county this large, the task of community assessment is done through multiple
17   measures, combining statistical data, registries, and networking and outreach within the
18   community.

19      2.1.1 Statistical Information
20          Statistical information is always changing, underscoring the need to continually
21          review and update the data provided in this Annex. The Department of Public
22          Health produced a report on Adult Disability in LA County in the September 2006
23          edition of LA Health. The trends noted in the report parallel national statistics.
24          Some of the findings from this report, as well as other relevant statistics are listed
25          below.
26
27             Nearly 20% of adults (1.3 million) in Los Angeles County reported having a
28              disability. The likelihood of reporting a disability increased with age, with 7%
29              of 18-24 year olds reporting a disability compared to over one-third (36%) of
30              those 65 years or older.
31             The prevalence of reported disability was highest in the South Service
32              Planning Area (SPA), Antelope Valley SPA, and South Bay SPA (23% in



     November 29, 2010         DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT           Page 22 of 125
 1             each), while the total number of adults who reported having a disability was
 2             highest in the San Fernando Valley SPA (266,000).
 3            Over three-quarters of people with disabilities reported having a physical
 4             disability defined by a lack of mobility, a limitation in body movement such as
 5             standing, crouching, bending, or sitting; or difficulty gripping, holding, or
 6             manipulating small objects; or carrying light loads; 45% reported a sensory
 7             disability of difficulty hearing or problems seeing; 17% reported a mental
 8             health condition as a disability; and 16% reported problems with learning.
 9            Among people with disabilities, 46% reported having only one type of
10             disability, 29% reported having two types of disabilities, 9% reported having
11             three types of disabilities, and 6% having all four types of disabilities
12             measured (physical, sensory, mental health, learning). Another 10% reported
13             that their type of disability was not captured in any of the four categories.
14            According to 2008 U.S. Census estimates, approximately 10.7% of the
15             population in LA County is 65 years old and over, which represents
16             approximately 1,055,239 people.
17            Approximately 224 languages are spoken in LA County.
18
19      2.1.2 In-Home Support Services (IHSS) Data
20         As of March 2010, the latest caseload data for IHSS consumers indicates that
21         there are 184,321 clients in the system. Of this population 63% are female and
22         37% are male. The charts below demonstrate the ethnicity of and languages
23         spoken by clients within the IHSS system.         (See Section 2.1.3 for additional
24         information on IHSS)
25




     November 29, 2010        DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT            Page 23 of 125
1




2
3
4         Building upon the information gleaned from statistical reports, the County also
5         carries out additional measures to assess the community. As described below,


    November 29, 2010      DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT        Page 24 of 125
 1         the County is involved in a mapping and registry program – Specific Needs
 2         Awareness Planning (Mapping) system (SNAP) – to identify individuals in the
 3         community with access and functional needs who voluntarily register with SNAP,
 4         as well as the organizations and resources throughout the county that support
 5         these populations. The County has also developed networks with agencies that
 6         work directly with access and functional needs populations.
 7
 8
 9      2.1.3 Registries
10          To better identify people with access and functional needs, the County has
11         initiated and is currently developing a Specific Needs Awareness Planning
12         (Mapping) System (SNAP). Another resource the County uses to identify people
13         with access and functional needs is the In-Home Support Services (network).
14         Appendix E1 includes a Registry Checklist that outlines key considerations when
15         developing a registry program.
16
17            SNAP Registry
18             The County has recently developed the SNAP program. The SNAP program
19             integrates Geographic Information Systems (GIS) mapping platforms and
20             sophisticated database connectivity to both store data and make it available
21             to emergency operations managers and first responders in a timely manner.
22             SNAP organizes and maps three different kinds of data:
23
24                o People/organization data: individuals/organizations with specific needs
25                   (or access and functional needs) within the County can voluntarily
26                   register information such as name, address, contact information, and
27                   personal short and long-term post disaster needs via the SNAP
28                   website;
29                o Accessibility data: maps and details of the accessibility features of pre-
30                   planned reception and evacuation centers and Points of Dispensing
31                   (PODs);




     November 29, 2010      DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT           Page 25 of 125
 1                o Resource data: organizations will be listed which have resources that
 2                    could be made      available in a disaster specific to the post-disaster
 3                    needs of people with a wide array of disabilities and frail, at-risk
 4                    seniors.
 5             A public outreach campaign is concurrently being developed to inform the
 6             public about this new program and to encourage persons with access and
 7             functional needs to register. Appendix D provides an overview of the SNAP
 8             program.
 9
10            In-Home Support Services (IHSS)
11             The IHSS disaster policies and procedures are documented in the LA County
12             DPSS IHSS Handbook and are summarized below. IHSS is a program within
13             the DPSS, that helps pay for services provided to eligible persons who are 65
14             years of age or older, or legally blind, or adults and children with disabilities,
15             so that they can stay safely in their own homes. As of March 2010, there are
16             just over 184,000 clients currently enrolled in IHSS.
17
18             IHSS      has   created   a   system      for   contacting   their   most    ―at-risk‖
19             applicants/recipients during times of disaster. The IHSS Caseload Disaster
20             Preparedness Assessment Profile Listing helps caseworkers identify at-risk
21             IHSS applicants/recipients who would require contact by emergency
22             personnel or social services staff during or immediately following a disaster.
23             Utilizing the assessment process, IHSS Social Workers code each
24             applicant/recipient based on a risk assessment scale, which establishes a
25             priority for contact. The factors that contribute to this assessment are:
26                o Primary       factors:   including     the    quality   and     availability   of
27                    applicant’s/recipient’s social support systems, and access to adequate
28                    transportation and geographic isolation; and
29                o Secondary factors: including conditions such as blindness, deafness,
30                    and medical supply needs in conjunction with the applicant’s/recipient’s
31                    primary factors.
32


     November 29, 2010         DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT             Page 26 of 125
 1            Based on the assessment, individuals will be given a designation that
 2            indicates the time in which they should be contacted:
 3                o Critical: these individuals are first priority and will be contacted within
 4                   24 hours;
 5                o Urgent: these individuals will be contacted within 48 hours; or
 6                o Moderate: these individuals will be contacted within 72 hours.
 7
 8            The State generates a monthly report called the ―Caseload Disaster
 9            Preparedness Profile‖ which includes the consumers name, phone number,
10            address, and social worker file number. It also identifies the vulnerability of
11            the consumer, any disabilities, or medical needs such as oxygen, insulin,
12            respirator, etc., and languages spoken other than English.        This report is
13            distributed to the IHSS social worker so they can make contact with
14            consumers when a disaster occurs or when alerts are issued for severe
15            weather conditions.
16
17
18      2.1.4 Networks
19          In a county with over 10 million people, there is a need to utilize strong
20         networking partners in all aspects of emergency management – preparedness,
21         response, and recovery – to identify and address emergency related issues of
22         access and functional needs populations. The following is a list of such groups
23         that are made up of government agencies, non-governmental organizations
24         (NGOs), community based organizations (CBOs), and faith based organizations
25         (FBOs) that provide services directly and/or indirectly to people with access and
26         functional needs living in the County.
27
28         The Operational Area continues to initiate and develop existing networking
29         relationships.   The OA strongly recommends local jurisdictions to ensure that
30         these kinds of partners are established and maintained at the local level as well.
31         See Appendix E2 Creating and maintaining an Access and Functional Needs
32         Planning Group



     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT           Page 27 of 125
 1
 2            Emergency Network of Los Angeles (ENLA)
 3             The LACOA recognizes ENLA as the official VOAD (Volunteer Organizations
 4             Active in Disasters) networking agency for community based organizations
 5             (CBOs) in regard to emergency management. The mission of ENLA is to
 6             enhance preparedness for and to coordinate response efforts in disasters by
 7             fostering connections between CBOs in the county and the government and
 8             private sectors. The group consists of a network of non-profit, CBOs that
 9             provide assistance to individuals, families, and organizations following
10             emergencies and disasters.      With representation of over 60 organizations,
11             ENLA members provide services to various populations with access and
12             functional needs throughout the OA. ENLA has several recruitment activities
13             throughout the year and has made it an expressed goal to increase
14             communication and collaboration with agencies providing services to access
15             and functional needs populations, specifically those populations who are
16             homeless, disabled, with mental health/addiction disorders, and seniors.
17
18            Senior Emergency Preparedness Action Committee (SEPAC)
19             SEPAC was started by the two Los Angeles Area Agencies on Aging (AAA)
20             representing both the County and City of Los Angeles and the Los Angeles
21             County Department of Public Health (LACDPH). The mission of SEPAC is to
22             improve outcomes related to emergency preparedness and response among
23             LA’s older adult population. SEPAC identifies and evaluates projects and
24             plans to improve emergency preparedness among frail senior populations
25             and people with disabilities.    Membership in SEPAC now involves 12
26             agencies including several Los Ange les City and County offices such as
27             emergency management, recreation and parks, social services, senior health,
28             mental health, and American Red Cross, Greater Los Angeles Chapter.
29
30            In-Home Supportive Services (IHSS)




     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT         Page 28 of 125
 1             Through DPSS, IHSS helps to pay for services provided to eligible persons
 2             who are 65 years of age or over, or legally blind, or adults and children with
 3             disabilities, so they can remain safely in their homes.                 There are
 4             approximately 184,000 clients currently enrolled in IHSS. Prior to disasters,
 5             IHSS conducts a risk assessment with applicants/recipients to identify
 6             individuals who are most at-risk during emergencies. IHSS has established a
 7             call-down system to check in on clients using a priority system based on the
 8             risk assessment.
 9
10            OA Specific Needs Population Task Force
11             OEM convened this task force to coordinate the development of this Annex in
12             2009, and will re-convene during review and updating periods. The task force
13             consists of representatives from the OEM, County Public Health, County
14             Health Services, County Mental Health, County Sheriff, County Fire, County
15             Public Social Services, Los Angeles City EMD, ENLA, and the UCLA Center
16             for Neighborhood Knowledge.
17
18            Operational Area Advisory Board (OAAB)
19             The mission of the Los Angeles County OAAB is to provide a forum for the
20             county, cities, special districts, and other key agencies in the OA to work
21             together cooperatively to help ensure the successful functioning of the
22             operational area. OEM is currently in the process of identifying members t hat
23             represent populations with access and functional needs.OEM chairs the
24             OAAB and convenes the board quarterly.
25
26             In December 2010, the OAAB will hold the first Access and Functional Needs (AFN)
27             Committee meeting. The AFN Committee will provide a forum for discussion and
28             planning on issues impacting disaster planning for people with access and functional
29             needs, and will report directly to the OAAB.
30
31
32   2.2 COMMUNITY PREPAREDNESS EDUCATION


     November 29, 2010        DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT             Page 29 of 125
 1
 2   The public’s response to any emergency is based on their understa nding of the nature
 3   of the emergency, the potential hazards, the likely response of emergency services, and
 4   the knowledge of what individuals and groups should do to increase their chances of
 5   survival and recovery.
 6
 7   Ensuring that members of the community with access and functional needs have
 8   personal preparedness plans in place for times of disaster warrants the implementation
 9   of a comprehensive public education program.            The County of Los Angeles is
10   committed to running a proactive public information program to prepare access and
11   functional needs populations for the threat of disasters.
12
13   Appendix E3 is a checklist of recommendations on how to include considerations for
14   populations with access and functional needs in community education programs. The
15   County encourages local jurisdictions to ensure that community education programs
16   and efforts are inclusive.
17
18      2.2.1 Emergency Survival Program
19          The Emergency Survival Program (ESP) is the Los Angeles County’s public
20          awareness campaign that strongly emphasizes personal preparedness and
21          planning by individuals whether they are at home, at work, at school, or out in the
22          community. ESP is a statewide program, created by Los Angeles County, and
23          replicated by a number of jurisdictions throughout the State and nationwide. It is
24          governed by a Coordinating Council with representation from 16 counties in
25          California. Staff from OEM serves as            Chair of the    Council. Council
26          representatives include individuals from area non-profits, businesses and the
27          local media.
28
29          Each year, ESP releases a list of monthly action steps to help the public prepare
30          for all hazards. Also, those who visit the website (http://lacoa.org/esp.htm) can
31          download all materials developed as part of ESP’s campaign. These materials




     November 29, 2010        DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT          Page 30 of 125
 1         include a number of publications that cover a range of topics, such as preparing
 2         a neighborhood for disaster.
 3
 4         ESP offers two emergency preparedness documents that are specifically geared
 5         for people with access and functional needs:
 6            ESP’s Emergency Preparedness: Taking Responsibility for Your Safety --
 7             Tips for People with Activity Limitations and Disabilities. This comprehensive
 8             guide, which is in the process of being updated, was created for anyone with
 9             limitations, whether due to a disability, aging, or even allergies. The guidance
10             covers all aspects of emergency preparedness, from conducting a self-
11             assessment to developing a personal plan.
12
13            ESP Bulletin on Special Needs
14             This bulletin offers recommendations for serving those with access and
15             functional needs. The bulletin suggests that neighborhoods establish planning
16             committees and/or response teams to work on issues related to each phase
17             of emergency management (mitigation, preparedness, response, and
18             recovery). It also recommends that planning committees identify members of
19             an access and functional needs branch as well as a coordinator to oversee
20             efforts when it comes to assisting those with disabilities or other access and
21             functional needs. These efforts should include determining who has access
22             and functional needs in the area as well as devising a plan to meet their
23             needs in times of disaster.
24
25         ESP materials are available in accessible formats including large font, Braille,
26         and audio format.     Materials are also available in Spanish. Requests can be
27         made via the ESP Hotline (213-974-1166) or 211 LA County.
28
29      2.2.2 ESP Hotline and 211 LA County
30         The public can receive free information in English or Spanish on how to prepare
31         for emergencies by calling the ESP Hotline at 213-974-1166. Members of the


     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT           Page 31 of 125
 1         public can also call 211 LA County to ask for information or request a
 2         preparedness presentation. 211 LA County operators are trained to handle TTY
 3         and Relay calls from the public.
 4
 5      2.2.3 OEM Website
 6         Los Angeles County        makes several preparedness guides and documents
 7         available through their website (http://lacoa.org/).       In addition to the ESP
 8         materials, the following preparedness materials are available on the website and
 9         targeted to people with disabilities and seniors:
10
11            Emergency Evacuation and Preparedness: A Guide for People with
12             Disabilities and Other Activity Limitations (Center for Disability Issues and the
13             Health Professions)
14            Saving Lives: Including People with Disabilities in Emergency Planning
15             (National Council on Disability).
16            Serving and Protecting All by Applying Lessons Learned Including People
17             with Disabilities and Seniors in Disaster Services (California Foundation for
18             Independent Living Centers)
19         OEM also created the Emergency Survival Guide for residents who live in the
20         County as a way to help them better prepare for, respond to, and recover from
21         disasters they may face. Individuals will find numerous tips throughout this guide
22         to help them become self-sufficient after a disaster. Moreover, the guide prompts
23         residents to make provisions in emergency plans for those with access and
24         functional needs who live in the area. The guide also asks residents to help care
25         for those with disabilities during an emergency and to assist them when there is a
26         need to evacuate. This guide is available for viewing and can be downloaded
27         at: http://lacoa.org/doclibrary.htm
28
29         The OEM website is 508 compliant (see Appendix F on website accessibility).
30
31      2.2.4 Community Events



     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT            Page 32 of 125
 1         County Departments participate throughout the year at expos and other events to
 2         share preparedness material with communities in the County. Organizations,
 3         business, and individuals throughout the county can request emergency
 4         preparedness presentations and/or information at an event, meeting, or expo.
 5
 6      2.2.5 Department of Public Health (DPH)
 7         The County also supports the Department of Public Health’s Just Be Ready
 8         campaign. This campaign targets people with access and functional needs and
 9         provides materials in accessible format.
10
11
12   2.3 TRAINING
13
14   One objective of the OEM is to train and educate County department emergency
15   management staff on issues pertaining to Emergency Operations Centers, Department
16   Operations Centers and Building Emergency Plans.         The County will make efforts to
17   ensure that training is inclusive of populations with access and functional needs.

18
19      2.3.1 Access and Functional Needs Annex Training
20         Key personnel will be trained on the proper use of this Annex and its
21         components. Moreover, to ensure the Annex is fully effective and functional, it
22         will be reviewed and revised as necessary to meet changing conditions.
23
24      2.3.2 Functional Assessment Service Teams (FAST) Training
25         The County, led by the Department of Public Social Services, is working in
26         conjunction with the State to identify and train FAST members who can support
27         populations with access and functional needs during emergencies.           Working
28         primarily in emergency shelters, FAST members would assist managers to
29         assess needs in shelters and help identify resources for persons with access and
30         functional needs.
31




     November 29, 2010         DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT         Page 33 of 125
 1         FAST    training   includes   information   regarding   emergency   management,
 2         activation, sheltering, and identifyi ng and addressing emergency related issues
 3         regarding populations with access and functional needs.
 4
 5      2.3.3 Shelter Training
 6          The County collaborates with the American Red Cross (ARC) to provide select
 7         County employees with training in shelter operations. This covers instruction on
 8         how to manage and operate shelters during emergencies.            ARC has been
 9         working towards developing shelter training that is inclusive of people with
10         disabilities and other access and functional needs.
11
12      2.3.4 Local Jurisdictions
13          Local jurisdictions are encouraged to develop a comprehensive training program
14         based upon their own training needs assessment that includes populations with
15         access and functional needs. This may include training such as:
16
17            Development of an ―Access and Functional Needs Response Training
18             Program‖ for first responders and emergency managers that reviews specific
19             emergency issues and experience regarding populations with access and
20             functional needs;
21            Training on emergency management structure and plans for agencies and
22             community organizations that serve people with access and functional needs,
23             as well as individuals with access and functional needs and their
24             caregivers/families;
25            Emergency preparedness training and information that is inclusive of
26             emergency related issues of populations with access and functional needs.
27            Volunteer training that is open to people with access and functional needs
28             such as CERT;
29            Offering FEMA’s G197 Course, Emergency Planning and Special Needs
30             Populations, through the State Training Office.
31
32
33   2.4 Drills and Exercises


     November 29, 2010        DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT        Page 34 of 125
 1
 2   Both emergency response personnel and members of the community can benefit from
 3   developing and implementing a comprehensive exercise program to test emergency
 4   plans. Offerings may consist of workshops, tabletops, and functional exercises that
 5   test the effectiveness of the various components of such plans, which focus on the
 6   coordination of response and recovery efforts of agencies in assisting access and
 7   functional needs populations.
 8
 9   The County will make every reasonable effort to include populations with access and
10   functional needs and the organizations that serve these populations in drills and
11   exercises—from development and participation to post-exercise evaluation, debriefing
12   and after action reports.
13   The County encourages local jurisdictions to include populations with access and
14   functional needs in drills and exercises. Further, local jurisdictions are encouraged to
15   test components of plans that specifically deal with emergency related issues of
16   populations with access and functional needs.
17




     November 29, 2010           DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT     Page 35 of 125
 1   3. OPERATIONAL FRAMEWORK
 2
 3   3.1 Introduction
 4
 5      3.1.1 Operational Priorities
 6          The County of Los Angeles considers the following issues when prioritizing
 7         emergency response and recovery operations for access and functional needs
 8         populations:
 9
10            Protecting life and property of access and functional needs populations;
11            Meeting the immediate needs of access and functional needs populations,
12             including rescue, medical treatment, evacuation, transportation, and shelter;
13            Temporary restoration of facilities essential to the health, safety, and welfare
14             of the access and functional needs population.
15
16      3.1.2 Concept of Operations
17          In order to successfully accomplish the mission statement of this Annex, County

18         departments, agencies, special districts, and other jurisdictions will use a multi-

19         agency, multi-disciplinary coordinated approach in response to any threat or

20         event. The County will use the Incident Command System (ICS) component of

21         the SEMS and the NIMS to manage all events.

22

23         This Annex becomes effective upon notification of a disaster.             Authorized

24         personnel may activate the CEOC (County Emergency Operations Center)

25         according to the CEOC Standard Operating Procedures. Activation protocols are

26         based on the potential threat and its scope. If the CEOC is activated, the CEOC

27         Manager will direct implementation of this Annex or applicable portions, as

28         appropriate. If the CEOC is not activated, this Annex may be implemented in

29         whole or in part, based on the potential threat and its scope.



     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT             Page 36 of 125
 1

 2             Any city or special district may activate their respective access and functional

 3             needs emergency response plans for areas under their incident command

 4             authority.   Each jurisdiction or community must consider the estimated time

 5             needed to thoroughly evacuate an area, the access and functional needs of the

 6             evacuees, the identification of all densely populated areas, and how best to

 7             handle the complicating factors of impending impacts and damage resulting from

 8             the specific disaster.

 9
10
11   3.2 COMMUNICATIONS
12
13   This section addresses communications during emergencies in two distinct ways. The
14   first section, Alert and Warning, primarily deals with initial warning and notification of the
15   public.     The second section, Information Sharing During Response and Recovery,
16   addresses both interagency communications as well as public information through the
17   response and recovery phases.
18   This section addresses specific communication considerations with the access and
19   functional needs populations and builds upon the procedures a nd guidance outlined in
20   the County of Los Angeles Emergency Public Information Plan, the Operational Area
21   Emergency Response Plan, and the Operational Area Mass Evacuation Process Guide.
22   The County plans to use diverse and redundant mechanisms to reach the public, as
23   this kind of approach better takes into account varying communications needs.
24
25      3.2.1 Alert and Warning
26             Redundant and diverse methods are used to alert the public prior to or during an
27             emergency as described in the Los Angeles County Emergency Public
28             Information Plan. This approach benefits the entire community, including people
29             with access and functional needs, as it offers multiple options to access critical




     November 29, 2010           DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT          Page 37 of 125
 1         and timely information thus enabling all people to take the necessary steps under
 2         the circumstances.
 3
 4         Alert and warning is primarily coordinated through the Sheriff’s Department at the
 5         County level or city law enforcement agencies at the city level. The Sheriff’s
 6         Department is responsible for implementing the Emergency Alert System (EAS ).
 7         The    Public   Information    Office   (PIO)    is    responsible   for   coordinating
 8         communication to the public, working closely with the media, and promoting
 9         greater interagency communication.
10
11         The following section expands upon the alert and warning methods descri bed in
12         the plans listed above to specifically address notifying individuals with access
13         and functional needs. None of these approaches will be used exclusively, but
14         instead, multiple and redundant mechanisms will be used to reach the public.
15
16            Alert LA County Emergency Mass Notification System
17             Alert LA County is an automated system with capabilities of alerting via phone
18             message, text message, or email messages.
19             The system is TTY/ TDD compatible, as indicated on the Alert LA website
20             (http://portal.lacounty.gov/wps/portal/alertla).
21                o The Alert LA system has access to all county listed and unlisted land
22                    line telephone numbers. Individuals can also register additional cell
23                    phone numbers, Voice over IP phone numbers, and email addresses
24                    at http://portal.lacounty.gov/wps/portal/alertla . The website is the only
25                    way to register additional numbers to the Alert LA system.
26                o Los Angeles County’s main website is 508 compliant.                 For more
27                    information about website accessibility, see Appendix F.
28                o Alert and warning messages are disseminated through the LA County
29                    Sheriff’s Office, via Alert LA.            Messages may contain critical
30                    information about an imminent or active emergency and provide
31                    directions regarding necessary actions to be taken by the public. The


     November 29, 2010        DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT            Page 38 of 125
 1                   user has the option for the message to be repeated.              Often the
 2                   messages include a hotline number or website in the event that the
 3                   individual receiving the call wants or needs additional information. This
 4                   is especially beneficial to people with functional or access needs who
 5                   may need to hear the message multiple times, or             who may need
 6                   additional information or clarification of the information provided in the
 7                   original scripted message. This also enables emerge ncy management
 8                   to include greater depth of detail not possible in the scripted message.
 9
10            Local Mass Notification Systems
11             Some local jurisdictions have mass notification systems in addition to, or in
12             place of Alert LA. Local jurisdictions are encouraged to ensure availability
13             and usability of their systems for those with access and functional needs.
14             This includes:
15
16                o Ensure accessible and multiple ways for signing up for the system
17                   such as:
18                          Accessible website and software (see Appendix F);
19                          Phone     registration   with capabilities   for   TTY/TDD, other
20                           language operators (and access to a language bank), and
21                           information regarding Relay 711 options;
22                          Collaboration with service agencies that work directly with
23                           populations with access and functional needs that can offer
24                           suggestions for making the process more accessible and that
25                           can assist constituents with signing up for the services;
26                          Provide a system that complies with the Americans with
27                           Disabilities Act (ADA) in all respects. Specifically, a system
28                           which has services for individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing,
29                           or have a speech disability that are functionally equivalent to the
30                           services to be received by individuals who are not deaf, nor
31                           have a speech disability;




     November 29, 2010          DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT          Page 39 of 125
 1                             Ensure that the system is capable of disseminating messages in
 2                              multiple languages. The seven (7) preferred ballot languages
 3                              include English, Spanish, Chinese (Mandarin and Cantonese
 4                              dialects), Japanese, Korean, Tagalog and Vietnamese.
 5                o Ensure that those with access and functional needs are aware of the
 6                   mass notification systems:
 7                             Provide information about the system in accessible formats via
 8                              web, fliers, PSAs (Public Service Announcements), etc.;
 9                             Include specific language about the accessibility of the system
10                              in messages;
11                             Collaborate with service agencies that can help share the
12                              information.
13                o Provide a means for people to follow up with questions or clarification
14                   via live operator or alternate phone/email (ensure that these options
15                   are accessible).
16                o Test the system regularly and include people with disabilities, e.g.,
17                   deaf, hard of hearing, deaf/blind, blind individuals, etc.
18            Media
19             In the event of an emergency, the County will alert the media as outlined in
20             the Emergency Public Information Plan. The media will make information
21             available   to    the public.     The Emergency Public        Information (EPI)
22             communications network includes a list of key contacts for radio, television,
23             daily newspapers, multilingual media, and specialized publications.
24
25                o According to FCC laws and regulations, broadcast media is
26                   responsible for ensuring that information is accessible.             A brief
27                   explanation of these responsibilities can be found in Appendix G;
28                o The designated County PIO will work with the various media outlets to
29                   ensure that information is accessible and relevant to individuals with
30                   access and functional needs.           The County will encourage local
31                   jurisdictions to do the same.        The Media Checklist, Appendix E4,



     November 29, 2010          DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT         Page 40 of 125
 1                   includes a number of suggestions that the County and local
 2                   jurisdictions should encourage the media to take to ensure greater
 3                   access.
 4
 5            211 LA County Hotline
 6             211 LA County provides information and access to a comprehensive range of
 7             human services for County residents. The 211 system is available 24 hours a
 8             day/7 days a week. During emergencies, the County will utilize the 211
 9             hotline system to provide information to callers. The 211 system is TTY/TDD
10             compatible and operators are available to communicate in multiple
11             languages.
12
13            711 Relay Services
14             California Relay Service (CRS) provides specially- trained operators to relay
15             telephone conversations back and forth between people who are deaf, hard
16             of hearing, or speech-disabled and all those they wish to communicate with
17             by telephone. Information regarding the 711 resource should be provided on
18             all public documents, materials and/or websites that list agency phone
19             numbers, hotlines, etc. To access:
20                o Users      dial   711    (additional   numbers     are    available   at:
21                   http://www.ddtp.org/california_relay_service/Default.asp#phone_numb
22                   ers);
23                o The service is available 24 hours a day/7 days a week;
24                o The service offers information in English, Spanish, American Sign
25                   Language, and conversational English.
26
27            OEM Website
28             During emergencies, OEM may post information to its website throughout the
29             course of the event. The website is http://www.lacoa.org/ and is accessible.
30




     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT         Page 41 of 125
 1            Door-to-Door Notifications
 2             The Alert LA County system described in Section 3.1.1 is used to make initial
 3             contact with individuals in the event of an emergency. When additional
 4             contact is necessary and practical, field level personnel (including Sheriff’s
 5             Department personnel and volunteer disaster service workers) may conduct
 6             door-to-door notifications. When conducting notifications, personnel should
 7             take the following into consideration:
 8                o A communication protocol should be developed to ensure that all
 9                    individuals are provided with the same information. Messages should
10                    be clear, consistent, and include directives as necessary;
11                o Become familiar with the communities where notifications are taking
12                    place and then make appropriate adjustments. If a language other
13                    than English is predominantly spoken, bring along an interpreter. If
14                    there is a large community of people with disabilities, identify a group
15                    to work with in that community to assist;
16                o Try to identify unique communication needs from the start.            Carry
17                    communications tools, such as non-text signs, pictograms or pen and
18                    paper, to facilitate communications;
19                o Partner with trusted community groups when possible;
20                o Ask the individual if they need any assistance and be specific about
21                    the kind of assistance necessary.
22
23            Public Address Systems
24             The County and local jurisdictions plan to use public address systems, when
25             deemed necessary, to make notifications via helicopters, sirens, and police
26             and fire vehicles. Public address systems will not be used exclusively in
27             emergencies, as those who are hard of hearing, deaf, or who have cognitive
28             disabilities may not be able to hear or comprehend these alerts.
29
30            Social Service Networks/Call Downs




     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT          Page 42 of 125
 1             The County may utilize existing social service networks to share critical
 2             information with staff and constituents. The County will provide notifications
 3             and information to the agency or network, which will in turn contact its staff,
 4             member agencies, and constituents.
 5
 6             The following is a list of networks that DPSS and/or the CEOC Care and
 7             Shelter Branch will reach out to prior to, during, and after emergency events.
 8             Local jurisdictions are also encouraged to establish relationships with public
 9             and private agencies that work directly with people with access and functional
10             needs to utilize existing networks and establish communication protocols.
11             The networks listed below are described in more detail in Section 2,
12             Preparedness.
13
14                o In-Home Supportive Services (IHSS). IHSS will be contacted via the
15                   DPSS liaison to OEM. IHSS has established a call-down system to
16                   check in on clients using a priority system based on a risk assessment;
17                o Emergency Network of Los Angeles (ENLA). ENLA has a seat in the
18                   CEOC through DPSS (which is a government member of ENLA).
19                   DPSS will make the initial contact to ENLA to activate the initial call
20                   down to all member agencies;
21                o Los Angeles Area Senior Emergency Preparedness Action Committee
22                   (SEPAC). Notifications will be made to SEPAC members.
23
24            Other Resources
25             There are other resources available that are aimed at getting emergency
26             information to people with access and functional needs.         Individuals with
27             functional needs are encouraged to use these devices, and emergency
28             management officials should be familiar with this technology:
29                o A special-needs weather radio that activates a strobe light and/or
30                   shakes a pillow or bed to alert those who are deaf or hard of hearing of
31                   an emergency. The device can even turn on alarms, pagers, personal


     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT          Page 43 of 125
 1                    computers, text printers, and other devices once the receiver registers
 2                    a warning. The radio can also be adapted to send messages in large
 3                    print or Braille for persons who are visually impaired or blind;
 4                o Handheld sign language translators can also be helpful when
 5                    interpreters or video conferencing systems are not available.
 6
 7            Specific Needs Awareness Planning (Mapping) System (SNAP) (in
 8             development)
 9             SNAP is currently in development and is being coordinated                 by OEM.
10             Information is put into the registry voluntarily. The SNAP registry is intended
11             to be a useful tool for local jurisdictions to make notifications to registrants.
12             The SNAP registry is scheduled to be launched summer 2010. See Section
13             2.1.3 and Appendix D for more detailed information.
14
15            Internet/Social Networking (in development)
16             The County is in the process of setting up accounts with Facebook, Twitter,
17             and other popular social networking websites to share preparedness,
18             response, and recovery information.
19
20      3.2.2 Information Sharing through Response and Recovery
21          The County of Los Angeles Emergency Public Information Plan outlines critical
22         components of the County’s plan to share information during emergencies and
23         through recovery.       This section highlights specific areas pertaining to
24         communication with individuals with access and functional needs.
25
26         The first part of this section addresses different modalities used to communicate
27         in regard to interagency communications and to the public. The second part of
28         the section addresses the importance of developing content that is appropriate
29         for people with access and functional needs.
30            Interagency Communications
31             This section addresses interagency communications between departments
32             and organizations that serve people with access and functional needs.


     November 29, 2010        DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT           Page 44 of 125
 1
 2               o Emergency Operations Centers (EOCs)
 3                  County agency liaisons will be present in the CEOC, and have been
 4                  assigned functional responsibilities in accordance with the OAERP and
 5                  SEMS.       The CEOC and County Departments will provide Agency
 6                  representatives to impacted jurisdiction EOCs, as appropriate and
 7                  practical, to facilitate interagency communications.             Situational
 8                  awareness and the development of a common operating picture will be
 9                  supported through data-sharing systems which may include integrated
10                  GIS data.
11
12                  The DPSS liaison is the CEOC Care and Shelter Branch Coordinator
13                  and is responsible for communicating with all facets of the agency,
14                  DPSS contracted agencies, IHSS, as well as other agencies such as
15                  the County’s Community and Senior Services, American Red Cross,
16                  ENLA, and others as needed.
17
18                  When the need arises, additional agencies that serve individuals with
19                  access and functional needs will be given a seat in the CEOC during
20                  activation.
21
22               o Joint Information Center (JIC)
23                  Local and Operational Area Joint Information Centers (JIC) are
24                  responsible for providing information updates to the public and to the
25                  media. The Public Information Officer (PIO) is the designated lead in
26                  the JIC and is responsible for coordinating crisis communications with
27                  County offices and each district’s public information officer.     The PIO
28                  will make every effort to work with subject matter experts among
29                  different access and functional needs populations to identify effective
30                  communications practices throughout the event.




     November 29, 2010      DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT          Page 45 of 125
 1                   The PIO Checklist (Appendix E5) includes suggested action steps that
 2                   the PIO should consider during emergency events pertaining
 3                   specifically to individuals with access and functional needs.

 4            Communications with the Public
 5             This section addresses modalities for sharing information with the public
 6             specifically regarding people with access and functional needs.

 7                o Media
 8                   Print and broadcast media offer primary means for sharing information
 9                   before, during, and after disasters.     Los Angeles County Sheriff’s
10                   Department’s PIO works closely with the media on an everyday basis
11                   and works to increase media contacts that go directly into diverse
12                   communities throughout the County.       The PIO works with media to
13                   identify ways to enhance communications to persons with access and
14                   functional needs. Appendix E4 is a tool for the PIO to use to help
15                   guide media to better ensure that the needs/issues/capabilities of
16                   people with access and functional needs are addressed before, during,
17                   and after emergencies.
18                o Hotlines
19                   211 will serve as the hotline for the County during emergencies. The
20                   County will work directly with 211 to ensure information is available to
21                   individuals who call 211.
22                o Websites
23                   The County will provide critical response and recovery information on
24                   the County OEM website. In addition, local jurisdictions, organizations,
25                   and other entities are likely to utilize the Internet to post critical
26                   information to the public. See Appendix F.
27
28            California Disaster Response Interpreter Program (DRI)
29             The California Emergency Management Agency (Cal-EMA) Office of Access
30             and Functional Needs (OAFN), in collaboration with NorCal Services for the
31             Deaf and Hard of Hearing, the American Red Cross and the California



     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT          Page 46 of 125
 1             Specialized Training Institute (CSTI) have developed the DRI program to
 2             assist local jurisdictions with engaging sign language interpreters during
 3             emergencies.
 4
 5             The purpose of the program is to ensure the rapid deployment of sign
 6             language interpreters to press conferences and shelters when requested
 7             during the time of a declared emergency. The program is statewide and
 8             utilizes local community-based organizations that currently provide on-call
 9             sign language interpreting services on 24/7 basis for medical, mental health
10             and law enforcement emergencies. Organizations agreeing to participate in
11             the program have a current Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with Cal-
12             EMA OAFN. By agreeing to participate in the program, these organizations
13             assume responsibility to locate, recruit and dispatch Cal-EMA credentialed
14             sign language interpreters as quickly and efficiently as possible during a
15             declared emergency.
16
17             Requests for assistance from DRI’s should occur through the SEMS/NIMS
18             process and partner agencies will be mission-tasked by Cal EMA, following
19             requests made by the OA CEOC, through the Southern Region Emergency
20             Operations Center, to the State Operations Center. It is recommended that
21             local governments     establish agreements     with organizations    in   their
22             community to ensure that qualified sign language interpreters can be rapidly
23             deployed to press conferences and shelters.
24
25            Community Outreach
26             The County may create outreach teams to share information in the response
27             or recovery phase of an emergency. The County will also encourage local
28             jurisdictions to create outreach teams, in collaboration with County teams, or
29             separately.    The County will engage first responders, volunteers, and
30             specialists/experts who work with people with access and functional needs to
31             ensure that outreach efforts are effective.   The Outreach Team Checklist



     November 29, 2010        DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT        Page 47 of 125
 1             found in Appendix E6 includes considerations specific to populations with
 2             access and functional needs.
 3
 4            Community/Town Hall Meetings
 5             During the recovery phase, the County and/or local jurisdictions may hold
 6             town hall meetings to share critical information about the recovery effort such
 7             as services being provided, rebuilding, etc. The Town Hall Meeting Checklist
 8             in Appendix E7 outlines key considerations when these events are planned.
 9
10            Community Groups/Stakeholders
11             The County and local jurisdictions where possible will engage community
12             organizations that work directly with individuals with access and functional
13             needs during the response and recovery phases.            These organizations
14             provide a valuable resource because they know their constituents,
15             understand communication and information needs, and are trusted by the
16             community. These organizations can help develop the content of messages
17             and disseminate information appropriately. They may also share information
18             with OEM regarding the information needs and requests of their constituents.
19
20            Recovery Sites and Distribution Points
21             The County and/or local jurisdictions will target recovery centers and
22             distribution points to share information with the public. Efforts will be made to
23             make information accessible to individuals with access and functional needs
24             at these sites.
25
26            Message Content
27             The County will work towards developing information content that is relevant
28             to the public including those with access and functional needs and encourage
29             local jurisdictions to do the same. Message content should include, when
30             appropriate, incident facts, health risk concerns, pre-incident and post-
31             incident   preparedness      recommendations,     and   where/how    to   access


     November 29, 2010           DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT       Page 48 of 125
 1             assistance.   Messages should be in a format or language that a broad
 2             spectrum of the community can understand.
 3
 4             Message content checklists can be found in Appendices D2, D7, D8 and D9.
 5
 6
 7   3.3 EVACUATION AND TRANSPORTATION
 8
 9      3.3.1 Introduction
10          When a local jurisdiction has initiated or is considering the evacuation of an area,
11         the County’s Emergency Operations Bureau is alerted. LA County’s operational
12         role in evacuation is to conduct evacuations in the unincorporated areas and to
13         support local jurisdictions with equipment, personne l, communication and
14         guidance. The County’s Evacuation EOP defines procedures to be followed
15         during evacuation operations.
16
17         To ensure that jurisdictions in the LACOA have a consistent approach to
18         evacuation, the County along with LA City has developed the Los Angeles
19         Operating Area Mass Evacuation Process Guide.             This document provides
20         guidance and a framework for local jurisdictions on best practices for jurisdictions
21         in developing their own local evacuation plans.

22         This section of the Annex both reiterates and supplements the material in the
23         aforementioned documents, focusing on issues related to people with access
24         and functional needs. Although most practices identified here can apply to any
25         scale evacuation, this Annex is meant to address the particular challenges of
26         large-scale events, such as those the County would most likely be engaged with.
27
28      3.3.2 Preparedness
29
30            Community Inventory
31
32                o Methods
33                  LA County engages in various activities to identify and to continually
34                    refine data that helps to inform preparedness and response efforts




     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT            Page 49 of 125
 1                  regarding people with access and functional needs.             This data is
 2                  essential for evacuation planning. These data-gathering efforts include:
 3                          Developing documents such as the Special Needs Population
 4                           Summary, 2006. The Department of Public Health produced the
 5                           summary as part of the Bioterrorism Preparedness Program.
 6                           The purpose of the summary was to identify and determine the
 7                           current state     of knowledge   and    level of preparedness
 8                           concerning the population with access and functional needs.
 9                           The summary examined existing data on populations with
10                           access and functional needs, but also highlighted areas where
11                           there was limited or no available information in order to inform
12                           future efforts;
13                          Working with the Departments of Public Social Services, Mental
14                           Health, and Public Health as well as umbrella agencies that
15                           work with people with access and functional needs to identify
16                           locations, needs and nuances of the populations they serve;
17                          Using publically available data to identify locations of various
18                           critical facilities and those facilities that serve, house or are
19                           related to people with access and functional needs.
20




     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT          Page 50 of 125
 1               o Data
 2                  Different types of data regarding populations with access and
 3                  functional needs available to LA County Emergency Management (or
 4                  data in the process of being identified) includes:
 5
 6                          Individuals
 7                                 OEM has initiated and is currently developing the
 8                                  Specific Needs Awareness Planning (SNAP) mapping
 9                                  initiative. Individuals with access and functional needs
10                                  within the county can register vital information via the
11                                  internet that could be used by public safety personnel
12                                  during evacuations and other emergencies. The program
13                                  has a GIS component that will allow maps to be made
14                                  identifying populations with access and functional needs.
15                                  (See Section 2.1.3 and Appendix D for more details)
16                                 IHSS has emergency procedures for contacting clients
17                                  before during and after emergencies to identify and assist
18                                  with emergency related issues. (See Section 2.1.3 for
19                                  more details)
20
21                          Organizations/critical facilities/census tracts
22                           Knowing the location and approximate size of a given
23                           population, as well as the general numbers of people with
24                           access and functional needs within the facility/organization
25                           allows emergency management and public safety personnel to
26                           quickly identify transportation and other needs of a given
27                           evacuating population. These tools can assist in gathering this
28                           information:
29
30                                 SNAP




     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT                Page 51 of 125
 1                             In addition to information on individuals, SNAP also
 2                             allows organizations that serve people with access and
 3                             functional needs to register facility and other information.
 4                            Enterprise GIS (EGIS)
 5                             Under    development      of   the   Los   Angeles   County
 6                             Information Office, the EGIS system is a hardware and
 7                             software investment to support Countywide GIS storage
 8                             and access to over 200 layers o f authoritative GIS data.
 9                             Data most relevant to serving population with access and
10                             functional needs that the Operational Area utilizes
11                             includes, but is not limited to:
12                                o Census       data, demographics, and        population
13                                     estimates including areas where the public is likely
14                                     to rely on public transportation, where languages
15                                     other than English are primarily spoken, areas with
16                                     high concentrations of homelessness and/or with
17                                     high concentrations of people of 65 years of age.
18                                o Hospitals
19                                o Assisted Living Communities
20                                o Colleges/Universities
21                                o Day-care centers
22                                o Schools
23                                o Dialysis/Infusion Centers
24                                o Group Homes
25                                o Hospice
26                                o Long-term care facilities
27                                o Nursing Homes
28                                o Senior Centers
29                                o Senior Housing
30                                o Emergency response locations
31


     November 29, 2010   DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT           Page 52 of 125
 1            Transportation Resources
 2             The County is engaging in various activities to ensure an adequate number of
 3             accessible transportation resources will be available during evacuations and
 4             other emergency activities.       Activities associated with identification of
 5             transportation resources include, but are not limited to:
 6
 7                o Identification of accessible transportation needs
 8                          The Department of Public Social Services has determined that
 9                           approximately 9,149 of the 176,566 people to whom IHSS
10                           provides homecare services require wheelchairs for mobility. In
11                           addition, IHSS has also identified which clients are most likely to
12                           need assistance during evacuations.
13                          The County will continue to develop other access and functional
14                           needs transportation estimates based on engagement with
15                           organizations serving people with access and functional needs
16                           and through examination of the community inventory lists
17                           above, as well as current statistics.
18
19                o Identification     and     inventory    of       accessible   transportation
20                    resources and engagement in Memoranda of Understanding that
21                    identify clear activation procedures
22                          Current accessible transportation resources identified in LACOA
23                           Mass Evacuation Guide include Metropolitan Transportation
24                           Authority (MTA) buses and rail (including qualified personnel).
25                           MTA buses will most likely be the main sources of transportation
26                           during evacuations.     Each MTA bus can accommodate two
27                           wheelchairs;
28                          Other transportation agreements being pursued by the LACOA
29                           are those with the LA Unified School District, municipal bus
30                           services, and private charter bus companies;




     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT              Page 53 of 125
 1                          The Functional Needs Transportation Inventory Guidance
 2                           worksheet was developed to           expedite    the matching of
 3                           transportation resources with the specific functional needs of
 4                           evacuating populations, and to ensure that transportation
 5                           resources can be activated quickly (See Appendix H).
 6                o Coordination and Prioritization of Transportation Resources
 7                    Coordination of transportation resources in the County is accomplished
 8                    through the transportation branch under the CEOC Logistics Section.
 9
10            Facilities/Gathering Points Used During an Evacuation Event
11             Local jurisdictions, coordinated through the County, may identify and use the
12             following facilities/gathering points for evacuating populations:
13                o Evacuation points and reception and care areas are gathering
14                    locations where individuals can access evacuation transportation out of
15                    the threatened area and/or to a shelter. Well known areas such as
16                    shopping centers, libraries, and schools are used for these points.
17                    These areas must, at a minimum, have bathrooms, food, and water.
18                    They are not meant to house individuals overnight. Access and
19                    functional needs considerations include:
20                          Entrances (if the site has an enclosed structure attached to it)
21                           and bathrooms are accessible;
22                          Accommodations to ensure access to food, water, and
23                           information are made for people with various access and
24                           functional needs (e.g., straws available, communication in
25                           multiple formats, etc.);
26                          Boarding areas should be level to facilitate use by persons
27                           using wheelchairs and other auxiliary aids;
28                          Accessible transportation (from home to evacuation points, and
29                           from evacuation points to reception and care areas).
30                o Shelters will be opened if the duration of an evacuation is expected to
31                    continue overnight. See Section 3.4 for more details.
32


     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT              Page 54 of 125
 1
 2            Congregate Care Facilities
 3             The County encourages congregate care settings to have strong emergency
 4             plans, such as evacuation, sheltering, and continuity of operations plans, in
 5             place and to ensure the safety and continuity of care for all their clients.
 6             Licensed facilities will be held to the rules and regulations governi ng their
 7             licensing (usually but not always the state department of health). Congregate
 8             care facilities include: nursing homes, adult homes, group homes, children’s
 9             homes, daytime activity centers, and rehabilitation centers.         The County
10             recognizes the reality that informal congregate arrangements also exist, and
11             that they need to be taken into account in the planning process.
12
13             The County encourages local jurisdictions to support congregate care
14             facilities, and to be familiar with their emergency plans. This includes their
15             staffing   and    equipment capabilities, alternate   site    movement plans,
16             transportation assets and ability to transfer people, medical records, data,
17             etc. In the event that the needs of one or more congregate care facilities
18             cannot be met at the local level, the County will support that jurisdiction as
19             needed.
20
21            Family reunification
22             Due to the unplanned nature of most evacuations, families can become
23             separated from each other, and individuals can become separated from other
24             support systems and caregivers.
25
26             County DPSS, as the lead for human services has overall responsibility for
27             family re-unification during disasters. Los Angeles County Department of
28             Children and Family Services (DCFS) is specifically responsible for working
29             with unaccompanied minors, including those who are at shelters.
30




     November 29, 2010          DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT          Page 55 of 125
 1             As part of their planning process home-based care providers are required to
 2             have plans to ensure continuity of care for their clients. IHSS has procedures
 3             for keeping in contact with and identifying clie nt needs before, during, and
 4             after disasters.
 5
 6             For large scale events, the County and local jurisdictions will also encourage
 7             evacuees and the general public to utilize the American Red Cross’ Safe and
 8             Well Website (https://disastersafe.redcross.org/). The Federal Department of
 9             Health and Human Services may also activate the National Emergency
10             Family Registry Locator System (NEFRLS) and the National Emergency Child
11             Locator Center (NECLC), in order to assist displaced adults and medically
12             evacuated patients in reunification with their families.
13
14             People with access and functional needs may need additional assistance in
15             utilizing all of these systems.
16
17      3.3.3 Operations
18
19            Agency and Organizational Notifications
20             When a local jurisdiction is considering an evacuation or has decided to call a
21             voluntary or mandatory evacuation, initial notifications and contacts may
22             include:
23                o American Red Cross: for identification of reception and care centers
24                    and shelters;
25                o Department of Social Services IHPP: as the major contractor of Home
26                    Health Services;
27                o ENLA: as the link to numerous social services agencies with clients
28                    who may have functional needs;
29                o Accessible transportation resources: in order to activate resources or
30                    place them on stand-by (private resources especially may require
31                    additional lead time;




     November 29, 2010        DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT          Page 56 of 125
 1                o Facilities with concentration of individuals with functional needs in the
 2                   area such as those listed above in Section 3.3.2.             (Allows these
 3                   facilities time to prepare for possible evacuation).
 4
 5            Public Information and Communication
 6             See the Section 3.2 of this Annex for details on how LA County ensures
 7             public information messages and mechanisms take into account the access
 8             and functional needs of the community.
 9
10            Decision Making/Assessment
11               o Immediate Considerations
12                   When making initial evacuation decisions, incident commanders and
13                   other decision makers conduct an analysis of the community to be
14                   evacuated. Factors related to people with access and functional needs
15                   that should be considered in these decisions include:
16                          What concentrations of individuals likely to have functional
17                           needs are in the area? (See Community Inventory, Section
18                           3.3.2 above) What are the associated functional needs of these
19                           populations? How large are these populations?
20                          What critical and other facilities are in the area?
21                          How quickly will those in the area with functional needs be able
22                           to evacuate? Should a phased evacuation be considered to
23                           allow more time for these populations to evacuate? Is it safer for
24                           some critical facilities to shelter in place with support instead of
25                           evacuating?
26                          Is this an area with a large percentage of low income population
27                           and others who may rely on public transportation?
28                          Is this an area where languages other than English are primarily
29                           used?
30
31            Continued Operational Planning Considerations
32             As an evacuation operation continues, the following access and functional
33             needs issues are addressed:


     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT             Page 57 of 125
 1                o Evaluate the status of, and assisting critical and other facilities either
 2                    as they evacuate or shelter in place.        If nursing homes or other
 3                    facilities need to evacuate, confirm that necessary arrangements are in
 4                    place including:
 5                          an alternate facility;
 6                          appropriate transportation resources; and
 7                          communication to family members regarding evacuation status.
 8                o Ensure designated evacuation sites, reception and care areas and/or
 9                    shelters are accessible and plans for family re-unification are in place.
10                o Transportation Issues
11                          Ensure various types of accessible transportation are available
12                           at all designated        evacuation areas   and      that additional
13                           accessible resources are staged and available for deployment
14                           as needed.
15                          Ensure estimates for transportation needs include room for
16                           companion        and/or     service    animals,       DME,      and
17                           companions/family members/personal assistants/aides.
18                          Ensure that the length of time to evacuate frail elderly and other
19                           vulnerable populations are kept to a minimum
20
21            Access Control/Security
22             In some circumstances officials may allow residents to remain in their
23             dwellings but restrict access for all non-residents.      In this event, LACOA
24             officials work with law enforcement, DPSS, and other social services
25             providers to ensure continued delivery of services including:
26                o Home health aides/visiting nurse services/personal attendants;
27                o Meals on Wheels;
28                o Para transit.
29
30            Temporary Re-Entry
31             If residents are temporarily allowed access to dwellings to retrieve
32             belongings, officials will ensure, where possible and practical:




     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT            Page 58 of 125
 1                o Escorts from American Red Cross, DPSS, or other organizations are
 2                   available to assist people with access or functional needs;
 3                o Accessible transportation is available to and from sites;
 4                o Protocol modifications are made to allow designated other individuals if
 5                   resident is not able to be present;
 6                o For other long-term reentry issues see Transition to Recovery, Section
 7                   3.5.
 8
 9   3.4 SHELTERING AND MASS CARE
10
11      3.4.1 Introduction
12         This section of the Annex describes how the County supports the unincorporated
13         areas and local jurisdictions in addressing mass care and sheltering during
14         emergencies specifically in regard to people with functional and access needs.
15         The Annex builds upon policies/procedures that are detailed in the Care and
16         Shelter Appendix to the EAP.      The Annex is also consistent with the California
17         Governor’s Office of Emergency Services Guidelines for Inter-County Sheltering
18         Caused by Large-Scale Evacuations of People. The American Red Cross (ARC)
19         also maintains a plan detailing ARC’s role in shelters, site selection, shelter
20         operations, and shelter closing/transition.
21
22         The LACOA also offers the Mass Care and Shelter Guidance for Emergency
23         Management Planners, outlining key planning considerations for a multi-
24         jurisdictional approach to sheltering. Currently in draft form this document offers
25         guidance specifically regarding the integration of people with access and
26         functional needs in shelters including a section called ―Assisting persons with
27         special needs‖ and a list of countywide resources.
28
29         This Annex highlights the key components of these plans that pertain especially
30         to populations with access and functional needs.           This Annex should be
31         considered in conjunction with the aforementioned plans.
32



     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT          Page 59 of 125
 1      3.4.2 EOC – Care and Shelter Branch
 2         DPSS leads and coordinates the functions of mass care, emergency assistance,
 3         housing, and     human services       with state    and    federal agencies, local
 4         governments, and non-governmental organizations. Within the SEMS structure,
 5         DPSS serves as the Care and Shelter Coordinator, which is under the
 6         Operations Section.       DPSS coordinates closely with supporting agencies to
 7         assist and augment local governments’ resources and abilities in the areas listed
 8         below:
 9            Sheltering
10            Feeding
11            Bulk distribution of food and emergency relief supplies
12            Emergency first aid
13            Identifying and tracking disaster survivors
14
15      3.4.3 Sheltering
16         According to the Statement of Understanding (SOU) between the ARC and the
17         State of California Department of Social Services (CDSS), ARC is designated as
18         the lead agency in all sheltering operations throughout the State. ARC works
19         cooperatively with local government to clarify roles and responsibilities.
20
21         In the OA, DPSS is the designated County agency responsible to support
22         sheltering operations during emergencies and works closely with ARC, local
23         government, and other OA sheltering partners.
24
25            ADA and Sheltering
26             The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) generally requires shelters to
27             provide equal access to the many benefits that shelters provide, including
28             safety, food, services, comfort, information, a place to sleep until it is safe to
29             return home, and the support and assistance of family, friends, and
30             neighbors. In general, the ADA does not require any action that would result




     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT            Page 60 of 125
 1             in a fundamental alteration in the nature of a service, program, or activity that
 2             would impose undue financial and administrative burdens.
 3
 4             As stated in the SOU between the California Department of Social Services
 5             (CDSS) and American Red Cross (ARC), pursuant to Title II of the ADA,
 6             Public Law 336, enacted, July 26,1990 and Title 24 of the California Code of
 7             Regulations, ARC will provide care and shelter in facilities that comply wit h
 8             current government ADA requirements and meet all health and safety
 9             requirements, whenever possible. The County works with ARC to ensure that
10             these standards are adhered to whenever possible.
11
12             See Appendix I, Department of Justice’s (DOJ’s) Shelter Guidance, for more
13             explanation on how the ADA impacts sheltering.
14
15            Shelter Site Selection
16             The ARC is responsible for selecting shelter sites within the County.         To
17             assess shelters, ARC uses ARC Shelter Site Guidelines and the DOJ’s ADA
18             Checklist for Emergency Shelters (which is part of the DOJ guidance listed
19             above), to determine the most appropriate sites and to determine ADA
20             accessibility of sites. This includes, for example, an accessibility review of
21             shelter elements including:
22                o Parking
23                o Entrance
24                o Toilets
25                o Bathing facilities
26                o Drinking fountains
27                o Sleeping area
28                o Food distribution and dining areas
29                o First aid/medical unit
30                o Emergency notification system
31


     November 29, 2010        DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT           Page 61 of 125
 1            Ensuring Access and Making Accommodations in Shelters
 2             The County works with ARC to ensure that a general atmosphere of inclusion
 3             is maintained and that reasonable accommodations are made in shelters.
 4             The ADA generally requires emergency managers and shelter operators to
 5             make reasonable modifications to policies, practices, and procedures when
 6             necessary to avoid discrimination. A reasonable modification must be made
 7             unless it would impose an undue financial and administrative burden.
 8             Examples of reasonable modifications that emergency managers and shelter
 9             operators may need to make include, but are not limited to:
10                o Intake
11                          ARC will implement an intake process at the shelter that
12                           provides an opportunity for people to self-identify any dietary,
13                           medical, medication, or accommodation needs.
14                o Physical accessibility
15                          Modifications    to   facilities   –   offering   accessible   portable
16                           toilets/showers if not available at the shelter.
17                          Building a ramp if there are barriers to accessing the facility or
18                           areas within the facility.
19                          Modification of kitchen access policies for people with medical
20                           conditions that may require access to food.
21                          Offering refrigeration for medication management.
22                          Providing a verbal orientation to the shelter for those who are
23                           blind or with low vision.
24                o Shelter Layout
25                          Modifying sleeping arrangements to meet disability-related
26                           needs.
27                          Identifying private areas for reasons such as lessoning the
28                           stress for people with psychiatric disorders, or to allow persons
29                           to attend to personal hygiene needs.
30                o Communications




     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT                Page 62 of 125
 1                          Helping individuals to locate auxiliary aids and services for use
 2                           at the shelter.
 3                          Providing materials in alternate format for people who are blind
 4                           or who have low vision and when not possible have a volunteer
 5                           assist by reading printed documents and helping to fill out
 6                           documents.
 7                          Ensuring that audible information is made accessible to people
 8                           who are deaf or hard of hearing through qualified sign language
 9                           or oral interpreters, posting messages and announcements in
10                           written format on a centrally located bulletin board, or writing
11                           notes back and forth with residents who are deaf or hard of
12                           hearing, when appropriate.
13                          Providing a TTY for the use of people who are deaf or hard of
14                           hearing if standard voice telephones are available.
15                          Using Pictogram Signage.
16                o Assistance with Daily Living Activities
17                          Identify and volunteers to help people who need assistance with
18                           activities of daily living.
19                o Transportation
20                          Evacuees      may     require   transportation   services, including
21                           accessible transportation, from the shelter to places such as
22                           recovery assistance sites, neighborhoods, work, etc.
23                o Supply Requests
24                          Assistive    technology, durable      medical    equipment        a nd/or
25                           consumable medical supplies.
26                          Accessible/Medical cots.
27                          Refrigerators or coolers for medications.
28
29            Service Animals
30             Service animals are permitted in shelters to assist their owners. The ADA
31             defines ―service animal‖ as any ―guide dog, signal dog, or other animal



     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT               Page 63 of 125
 1             individually trained to provide assistance to an individual with a disability.‖
 2             Service animals do not have to be licensed or certified by the government,
 3             and the ADA does not require service animals to have specific training. A
 4             service animal may be excluded from a place ONLY if its behavior is a direct
 5             threat to the health or safety of people.    Service animal tasks include, but
 6             are not limited to:
 7                o Guiding individuals with impaired vision;
 8                o Alerting individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing;
 9                o Pulling a wheelchair;
10                o Fetching dropped items;
11                o Alerting people to impending seizures;
12                o Assisting people with mobility disabilities with balance or stability.
13             The Los Angeles County OAERP’s Animal Emergency Response Annex goes
14             into additional detail regarding service animals.
15
16            Public Information
17             See the Section 3.2, Communications, which addresses public information
18             regarding shelters.
19
20            Shelter Resource Requests
21             The role of the County is to provide support to local shelters including
22             securing necessary Operational Area shelter resources.           DPSS may be
23             requested to support populations with functional and access needs in shelters
24             in a number of ways such as providing staffing, supplies and/or equipment.
25             To fulfill many of these resource requests, the County relies on existing
26             vendor contracts identified through an ―approved vendor list‖.       Included on
27             this list are vendors that provide medical supplies, durable medical
28             equipment, personal hygiene supplies, and other items, which may be
29             needed during a shelteri ng operation.
30
31             Additionally, DPSS will coordinate with other governmental agencies (e.g.
32             DCFS and Los Angeles County Department of Senior and Community
33             Services (CSS), non-profit entities (e.g., ENLA member organizations,


     November 29, 2010        DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT           Page 64 of 125
 1            community based organizations), and local businesses and industry to obtain
 2            necessary resources.
 3
 4            Requests for resources such as assistive technology (AT), durable medical
 5            equipment (DME), consumable medical supplies (CMS), generators, etc. will
 6            be communicated to the Logistics Branch a nd coordinated through the
 7            Shelter/Mass Care Branch as defined in the CEOC SOP.
 8
 9            When resource needs exceed the capabilities of the County, requests will be
10            made to the Region and the State.
11
12               o   Staffing
13                          DPSS trained employees:        Upon request, DPSS will deploy
14                           trained staff to work in shelters. As of April 2010, nearly 1,000
15                           DPSS employees have participated in ARC Shelter Operations
16                           Training.    In addition, an estimated 75% of the trained staff are
17                           bilingual;
18                          DPH supports provision of nurses, where feasible in shelters;
19                          DCFS staff will be deployed to shelters to assist with
20                           unaccompanied minors;
21                          CSS staff will be deployed to shelters to address senior, elder
22                           issues;
23                          DMH will deploy licensed and trained staff to provide mental
24                           health services to ARC shelters (to both evacuees and staff);
25                          FAST Teams:         The County is in the process of training
26                           individuals to serve on Functional Assessment Service Teams
27                           (FAST). FAST teams are deployed to shelters (when deemed
28                           necessary) to provide assistance to shelter sta ff in meeting
29                           accommodation requests, and providing other support for
30                           populations with access and functional needs in the shelter.
31                           Made up of government and CBO personnel, members of FAST



     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT            Page 65 of 125
 1                           teams are trained to deploy to disaster areas to work in shelters,
 2                           temporary housing, and other disaster recovery centers. Team
 3                           members have in-depth knowledge of the populations they
 4                           serve, cultures, and support service systems including housing,
 5                           resources, benefit programs, and disaster aid programs.
 6
 7               o Assistive Technology (AT), Durable Medical Equipment (DME) and
 8                  Consumable Medical Supplies (CMS)
 9                  The CEOC, upon request, will assist in supporting AT, DME, and CMS
10                  resource needs at shelters.       Evacuees are likely to request DME
11                  and/or CMS at the shelter. The evacuation process may also create
12                  additional needs. Often times, during evacuation, these items may be
13                  lost, are unable to be transported, or are broken or in limited supply.
14
15                  The LACOA Mass Care and Shelter Guidance for Emergency Planners
16                  includes an appendix listing possible shelter logistics supplies. The
17                  types of DME/CMS supplies that may be requested include, for
18                  example:
19
20                          Wheelchairs (junior, adult, and large sizes)
21                          Walkers
22                          Walking canes
23                          White canes
24                          Shower chairs
25                          Commode chairs
26                          Raised toilet seats
27                          Magnifiers
28                          Gauze pads
29                          Catheters
30                          Ostomy supplies
31                          Gloves
32                          Bandages
33                          Padding
34                          Adult and child diapers
35                          Baby formula and food
36                          Transfer boards
37                          Oxygen



     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT             Page 66 of 125
 1
 2                o Prescribed Medications
 3                  The County will work with ARC to ensure that they can support
 4                    persons within shelters who have i ndividualized medical regimes that
 5                    cannot be interrupted without consequences by ensuring that:
 6                          Medications are stored in a secure setting and that a cooling
 7                           mechanism such as refrigerators or coolers are in place if
 8                           refrigeration is required;
 9                          Prescriptions can be refilled through local pharmacies.
10
11                o Generators
12                  It is likely that the request for generators will arise if power outages are
13                    occurring during the emergency. Continued power supply is critical for
14                    functional and access needs populations who require power to
15                    maintain or operate       life-sustaining   medical devices, motorized
16                    wheelchairs, and for storing medications that require refrigeration.
17                    The County will help to support ARC in obtaining, transporting,
18                    connecting, and refueling generators at the loca tions identified.
19
20      3.4.4 Mass Care
21
22            Feeding
23             The County, if requested, will work directly with ARC to coordinate feeding
24             efforts in disaster-impacted areas.        Feeding will be provided to disaster
25             victims and emergency workers through a combination of fixed sites, mobile
26             feeding units, and bulk distribution of food. Such operations will be based on
27             sound nutritional standards and will include efforts to meet the requirements
28             of disaster victims with special dietary needs. This may require direct delivery
29             rather than providing food at a selected mass fixed site.
30
31            Bulk distribution of emergency relief supplies to disaster victims
32             Sites may be established within the affected area for bulk distribution of
33             emergency relief items to meet urgent needs of disaster victims. The County



     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT            Page 67 of 125
 1             will help support these efforts to ensure that people with access and
 2             functional needs can access these supplies. This may require direct delivery
 3             rather than providing supplies at a mass fixed site. Supplies may include:
 4                o Potable water/ice
 5                o Food
 6                o Clean-up kits (shovels, pails, cleaning products)
 7                o Personal hygiene supplies
 8
 9            Support with reporting victim status and assisting in family reunification
10             The County will support ARC, where practical, to collect information to
11             operate a Disaster Welfare Information (DWI) system for the purpose of
12             reporting victim status and assisting in family reunification. Specifically, the
13             County will help ensure, where possible, that people with access and
14             functional needs have full access to the DWI system. Information regarding
15             individuals residing within the affected area will be collected and provided to
16             immediate family members outside the affected area through a DWI system.
17             DWI will also be provided to aid in reunification of family members within the
18             affected   area   who   were   separated    at   the   time     of   the   disaster.
19
20
21   3.5 TRANSITION TO RECOVERY
22
23
24      3.5.1 Introduction
25          The lines between response and recovery are fluid and diverse depending on the
26         scope and nature of a particular disaster.       In addition, actions taken during
27         response impact directly on the way in which a jurisdiction undertakes recovery.
28         Therefore, although this Annex focuses on preparedness and response, this
29         section will identify the major mechanisms and issues that are relevant to the
30         early stages of recovery specifically in regards to people with functional and
31         access needs. See Appendix E10, E11, and E12, Recovery Checklists.
32




     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT              Page 68 of 125
 1         This section includes and augments information found in draft documents and
 2         plans of individual County Departments such as DMH and DPSS.
 3
 4      3.5.2   Recovery Coordination/Advisory Entities
 5         The Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the County of Los Angeles, as the
 6         designated Director of Recovery Operations, may establish - as warranted and at
 7         his/her discretion – one or both of the following entities:
 8
 9             Recovery Advisory Council
10              The Recovery Advisory Council will advise and assist the Director of
11              Recovery on all matters pertaining to the recovery operations.
12
13             Recovery Coordination Center (RCC)
14              When activated, the RCC can coordinate initial recovery operations of the
15              County    departments   and    provide   information,    liaison   and   recovery
16              coordination between state and federal agencies, impacted Cities and other
17              OA partners.     Branches may include Housing, Transportation, Medical,
18              Mental Health, Education, Identification, Security, and Access and Functional
19              Needs. Depending on need, the CEO will designate specific departments to
20              participate.
21
22      3.5.3   Initial Damage Assessment
23         The Finance, Administration and Recovery (FAR) Section of the CEOC, or OEM
24         if the CEOC is not activated, will coordinate gathering of initial damage
25         assessments to document and support a request to the Governor of California for
26         an Emergency Proclamation and appropriate State or Federal assistance.

27         Initial damage assessments for private nonprofit organizations will be requested
28         from the chair of Emergency Network Los Angeles (ENLA) whose membership
29         includes organizations serving diverse populations. This information, along with
30         reports from County and private entities servi ng people with access and
31         functional needs, will help to establish initial estimates on the impact to


     November 29, 2010         DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT           Page 69 of 125
 1         organizations that serve various communities and thus inform initial recovery
 2         needs and prioritizations.
 3
 4      3.5.4. Continuity of Care and Family & Caregiving Reunification
 5         In addition to personal losses and injuries, individuals with access and functional
 6         needs might lose vital connections with personal care providers, service animals,
 7         community liaisons, accessible public transportation and routes, medical care,
 8         neighbors, and other people integral to their everyday support network. These
 9         disconnections create disruptions in services that people with access and
10         functional needs rely on to participate independently in everyday activities
11         including work, school, commerce, worship, etc.
12
13         The County will support both public and private social services providers who
14         provide essential services to people with access and functional needs.
15
16         Some mechanisms used to ensure continuity of services are as follows:
17
18            Continuity of Operations Planning (COOP)
19             The County encourages local and city government departments and non-
20             governmental organizations to develop COOP plans during a phase of
21             preparedness to ensure continuity of essential functions during and after
22             emergencies. This becomes especially important when working to ensure
23             community based essential services without which support networks can
24             quickly fail for people with access and functional needs.
25
26            In-Home Supportive Services (IHSS)
27             IHSS caseworkers conduct health and welfare checks on high risk disabled
28             and elderly IHSS recipients immediately following a disaster. As part of their
29             planning process Home-based Care providers are required to have plans to
30             ensure continuity of care for their clients.
31


     November 29, 2010        DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT           Page 70 of 125
 1            Family Reunification
 2             In the early stages of recovery, a coherent system for the reunification of
 3             support networks and to reunite children with their parents or guardians,
 4             adults or elderly persons with their caregivers is essential.
 5
 6             DPSS, as the lead for human services, has overall responsibility for family re-
 7             unification during disasters. Department of Children and Family Services is
 8             specifically responsible for working with unaccompanied minors, including
 9             those who are at shelters.
10
11             For large scale events the County and local jurisdictions will also encourage
12             evacuees and the general public to utilize the American Red Cross’ Safe and
13             Well Website. The Federal Department of Health and Human Services may
14             also activate the National Emergency Family Registry Locator System
15             (NEFRLS) and the National Emergency Child Locator Center (NECLC), in
16             order to assist displaced adults and medically evacuated patients in
17             reunification with their families.
18
19      3.5.5 Recovery Players
20             As the transition to recovery occurs, the County, with DPSS in the lead, will
21             work closely with ENLA member organizations as well as other NGOs, CBOs,
22             and FBOs that are working to provide recovery services. The County will
23             work with all recovery organizations to ensure that populations with access
24             and functional needs are taken into account in all aspects of recovery
25             services.
26
27            DPSS will coordinate services they are providing (e.g. food cards, disaster
28             unemployment) with other governmental and non-governmental agencies;
29
30            DMH may be asked to augment the Public Health and Medical Divisions by
31             providing disaster mental health services as requested through the CEOC.


     November 29, 2010        DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT               Page 71 of 125
 1             The department may coordinate and provide mental health services to
 2             community disaster victims and disaster workers throughout the entire
 3             duration of the disaster and its recovery period;
 4
 5            While ENLA member organizations will provide recovery services to those
 6             impacted.    ENLA organizations will work towards collaboration to avoid
 7             duplication of services and to ensure that resources are directed to need and
 8             gap areas of service. ENLA will coordinate closely with DPSS throughout the
 9             recovery period;
10
11            Spontaneous groups and volunteers are likely to participate in the recovery
12             period to provide services to those impacted by the disaster;
13
14            National organizations may also participate in recovery efforts, especially
15             during large disasters.     OEM and DPSS will work closely with these
16             organizations as well.
17
18      3.5.6 Local Assistance Centers
19         Following a major disaster, residents will need accelerated access to County and
20         other government and non-government services. Local Assistance Centers may
21         be established to meet the need.         OEM is charged with setting up Local
22         Assistance Centers (LAC); a temporary one-stop center designed to provide
23         family, individual and business victims of disasters with a place to begin the
24         recovery process.
25
26         A LAC is a starting point; agencies and organizations that can provide direct or
27         immediate assistance should be included when forming a LAC, but referrals
28         should be given to groups not represented such as counseling and support
29         groups, senior citizen organizations, Chambers of Commerce, the Humane
30         Society, etc.
31


     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT          Page 72 of 125
 1         When setting up a LAC, OEM will take critical steps to ensure that people with
 2         access and functional needs will be accommodated. The following are some
 3         examples:
 4
 5            The LAC will meet ADA requirements in regard to physical and programmatic
 6             accessibility;
 7            OEM will coordinate transportation services to ensure that transportation is
 8             provided to and from the LAC including accessible transportation resources;
 9            OEM will work with LAC staff to ensure accommodations are provided to
10             individuals with access and functional needs;
11            OEM will work with LAC staff to ensure that lines into the Center are
12             manageable and that accommodations are provided for those waiting in line;
13            OEM will work with the governmental and non-governmental agencies that
14             are working in the LAC to ensure that programs take into account access and
15             functional needs including:
16                o Information is in multiple and accessible formats;
17                o Program information specifically addresses concerns of people with
18                    access and functional needs;
19                o Modifications to application processes;
20                o Sign Language interpreters and other language interpreters are
21                    available; and
22                o Accommodations are provided as necessary
23            OEM will work with the governmental and non-governmental agencies that
24             are working in the LAC to ensure that referrals are provided to community
25             resources serving people with access and functional needs;
26            OEM will work with the facility to ensure full accessibility and will take steps to
27             make modifications to the facilities when necessary ensuring access to
28             bathrooms, wide aisle space to navigate through the Center.
29
30      3.5.7 Assistive Technology, Durable Medical Equipment and other resources




     November 29, 2010          DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT          Page 73 of 125
 1         The County will work with governmental and non-governmental organizations, as
 2         well as private industry, to ensure that services are available to people to replace
 3         lost or missing AT, DMEs or other critical items, required to allow someone to
 4         maintain a certain level of independence.           The County will also work with
 5         agencies to ensure that people who did not need this equipment before, but now,
 6         as a result of the disaster or their experience, require it. This may be done in
 7         several phases, identifying temporary equipment or fixes, and then move into
 8         long-term solutions.
 9
10      3.5.8 Long-term Sheltering, Housing, and Re-entry
11         The County will work with governmental and non-governmental organizations
12         and private industry to ensure that people with access and functio nal needs are
13         part of the plans for long-term sheltering, housing, and re-entry into the
14         community. The following are examples of the kinds of considerations that will
15         be taken into account:
16            Involving people with and organizations that serve people with access and
17             functional needs
18            Availability of accessible temporary and permanent housing;
19            Keep people as close as possible to support and health networks that are
20             operating;
21            Re-building with universal design principals.
22
23      3.5.9 Communications
24         Recovery information should be provided frequently, reliably, and in multiple
25         modalities and formats. See Communications Section that outlines the County’s
26         approach.
27
28      3.5.10 Utility Restoration
29         The County will work with utility companies and local jurisdictions to develop a
30         priority facility restoration list to expedite the recovery process. Hospitals are a
31         major priority, as are dialysis facilities. The County will work with partners to


     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT            Page 74 of 125
 1          determine additional priorities such as schools, day care centers, nursing homes,
 2          and other similar types of facilities.
 3
 4      3.5.11 Transportation Restoration
 5          The County will work closely with the MTA and other transportation agencies to
 6          ensure that accessible resources are restored alongside and in proportion to pre-
 7          disaster percentage for people who need it.
 8
 9   4. ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
10
11   The County Emergency Operations Center (CEOC) may activate based upon a disaster
12   threat or an actual event. Each CEOC section of the Incident Command Structure must
13   focus on several key response and recovery issues unique to the specific disaster. In
14   addition, County departments, communities, and special districts have hazard-specific
15   roles and responsibilities, outlined below, in addition to their assignments and functional
16   requirements as outlined in the OAERP and CEOC SOP (see Appendix C for the
17   County’s OA Organization Matrix).
18




     November 29, 2010         DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT          Page 75 of 125
 1   4.1 Management Section
 2   The CEOC will activate the appropriate ICS Sections and staffing assignments based
 3   upon the specific threat or actual event. The County will use multi-agency, multi-
 4   discipline coordination in its response to a specific threat or event. The CEOC will
 5   facilitate coordination among all responding agencies and disciplines. CEOC staffing
 6   will be augmented to expedite response activities, as necessary. Detailed information
 7   on the CEOC operations are found in the County’s Standard Operating Procedure
 8   Manual. Areas of special concern for CEOC management include:
 9
10      CEOC coordination;
11      Information sharing and dissemination, including Board reports and warning the
12       public;
13      Coordination with government departments, external community organizations, and
14       congregate care facilities/agencies that work directly with people with access and
15       functional needs;
16      Collaboration with regional, State, and Federal authorities when appropriate.
17
18   4.2 Organizational Roles & Responsibilities – County Agencies
19   The following is a brief description of the functions of County departments and their
20   roles during an emergency or major disaster, both in general, and specificall y for access
21   and functional needs populations. All departments serve as a potential resource for the
22   Finance, Administration, and Recovery (FAR) Section during such events. Also, there
23   are ten Lead Departments for emergency response, and all other departments are
24   Support Departments to these Leads.
25
26   Los Angeles County Office of Emergency Management
27   The Office of Emergency Management (OEM) provides overall project coordination for
28   the Specific Needs Awareness Planning (Mapping) System (SNAP) Project, this Access
29   and Functional Needs Annex, the SNAP Committee and Specific Needs Plan Task
30   Force, and for coordinating with County Departments to incorporate SNAP into their
31   emergency planning and training activities.
32
33   Executive Office, Chief
34   The Chief Executive Officer (CEO) serves as the Chair of the Emergency Management
35   Council and is the Director of the Office of Emergency Management (OEM). The CEO
36   is charged with other duties and responsibilities, as defined in the Emergency
37   Ordinance, in coordination of countywide emergency preparedness activities, response
38   at the CEOC and cost-recovery efforts following major emergencies and disasters.
39
40   County Fire Department
41   The Fire Department’s mission is to ―proudly protect lives and property and the
42   environment providing prompt, skillful, cost effective protection and life safety services.‖
43   This includes response to emergencies of all types: fires, floods, earthquakes, wildland
44   fires, hazardous materials incidents, civil disturbances, emergency medical rescues,
45   Urban Search and Rescue incidents and ocean lifeguard rescues.
46


     November 29, 2010        DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT           Page 76 of 125
 1   The Fire Department is responsible for coordinating rescue and evacuation and
 2   emergency medical services for all populations including people with access and
 3   functional needs. Fire may also provide evacuation support as necessary to law
 4   enforcement to support people with access and functional needs.
 5
 6   County Sheriff’s Department
 7   The Sheriff’s Department performs mandated law enforcement functions regardless of
 8   the level of the emergency. Standard operating policies and procedures are in place to
 9   keep the peace, to enforce applicable laws fairly and impartially, to protect the rights of
10   all people involved, and to prevent property damage and personal injury. During an
11   emergency where the CEOC is activated, the Sheriff is the Director of Emergency
12   Operations. It is anticipated that only in worst case emergencies involving the entire
13   County would the supporting County law enforcement agencies be mobilized. The
14   support law enforcement departments are: Superior and Municipal Courts, District
15   Attorney, Public Defender, Alternate Public Defender and Probation.
16
17   The Sheriff’s Department is responsible for coordinating evacuations (mandatory and
18   voluntary) alerting and warning (including responsibility for Alert LA County), and
19   message dissemination to those affected by the incident including those with access
20   and functional needs.
21
22   County Department of Public Health
23   This Department provides and coordinates public health services during disaster
24   response conditions. Public health services may include preventive health services,
25   including the control of communicable diseases; coordinating inspection of health
26   hazards in damaged buildings; inspection of vital foodstuffs, water, drugs, and other
27   consumables; mosquito and other vector control; and detection and identification of
28   possible sources of contamination dangerous to the general physical and mental health
29   of the community.
30
31   The Department of Public Health is responsible for providing public education materials
32   for guidance to residents of Los Angeles County, including those with access and
33   functional needs.
34
35   County Department of Health Services
36   The mission of the Department of Health Services (DHS) during disaster response
37   conditions is to provide for the medical and health needs of the population of the Los
38   Angeles County Operational Area (OA) by organizing, mobilizing, coordinating and
39   directing public and private medical and health resources. The Director of Health
40   Services is responsible for the countywide management and allocation of medical and
41   health resources, both public and private. DHS is unique in that a majority of its medical
42   response capability is provided by private sector health facilities. These facilities
43   include hospitals, clinics and skilled nursing facilities that may also be designated as
44   Casualty Collection Point (CCP) sites to handle mass casualties.
45
46



     November 29, 2010        DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT           Page 77 of 125
 1   County Department of Public Social Services
 2   The Department of Public Social Services (DPSS) is designated as the Los Angeles
 3   County Area Branch Coordinator for Care and Shelter. DPSS is the OA liaison with
 4   private, not-for-profit human services agencies, including community based
 5   organizations. DPSS is also the OA liaison with the grocery industry.
 6
 7   DPSS manages the Emergency Food Stamp program when activation is requested by
 8   the County and approved by the USDA. DPSS In-Home Supportive Services (IHSS)
 9   social workers conduct health and welfare checks on high risk disabled and elderly
10   HISS recipients immediately following a disaster.
11
12   County Department of Mental Health
13   The Department of Mental Health (DMH) is responsible for providing care and treatment
14   of mentally disordered individuals through County-operated mental health clinics and
15   hospitals, State hospitals and private contract providers.
16
17   In response to a disaster, DMH may augment the Public Health and Medical Divisions
18   of the Department of Health Services by providing disaster mental health services as
19   requested through the Los Angeles County Emergency Operations Center. The
20   Department will coordinate and provide mental health services, including Critical
21   Incident Stress Debriefing (CISD) Teams, to community disaster victims and disaster
22   workers throughout the entire duration of the disaster and its recovery period.
23
24   County Department of Animal Care and Control
25   During emergencies, the Department of Animal Care and Control patrols disaster areas
26   to rescue domestic animals displaced by catastrophic events and provides support to
27   fire and law enforcement agencies responding to the crisis. Additionally, the
28   Department offers emergency animal housing at its shelters. Depending on the
29   circumstances, the Department may also set up temporary emergency animal shelters
30   to assist persons who have taken their pets from evacuated areas. This department
31   also acts as a support department to the Sheriff.
32
33   County Department of Children and Family Services
34
35   The primary concern of the DCFS is the safety and well being of the children in its care,
36   the department’s employees, and children otherwise known as ―unaccompanied minors‖
37   who may be left unsupervised as a result of a disaster.
38
39   In a major disaster, DCFS is a support for DPSS and provides a variety of services for
40   displaced children and offer various programs, including: 1) deployment of DCFS staff
41   to designated ARC shelters to process the initial intake and registration of
42   unaccompanied minors, including follow-up action to reunite them with their
43   parents/guardians or to provide appropriate placement; 2) support DPSS, on request, in
44   the provision of emergency welfare services, including assigning staff to emergency
45   shelters or relief programs to assist in interviewing victims, processing requests for
46   disaster assistance and other related tasks; and 3) continuing commitment to provide



     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT          Page 78 of 125
 1   services to children under DCFS care, including the placement of children affected by a
 2   disaster.
 3
 4   County Internal Services Department
 5   It is the primary responsibility of the Internal Services Department (ISD) to gather safety
 6   assessment information relative to County facilities and report their status to the CEOC.
 7   Additionally, ISD must determine if County facilities are mechanically safe for
 8   occupancy; then if feasible, facilitate the repair or alterations of damaged/unsafe County
 9   facilities to safe operating levels, or secure them.
10
11   ISD leads the Logistics Section of the CEOC. ISD supports other emergency services
12   by providing and repairing communications, by providing and repairing vehicles and off-
13   highway equipment; by providing fuel, water and temporar y power, by providing
14   procurement support for essential emergency supplies, and by maintaining and/or
15   restoring computer operations to support critical applications required for the operation
16   of the County. ISD provides a liaison with utilities (except wa ter) concerning the status
17   of electrical, natural gas and telecommunications systems.              ISD is also the
18   transportation coordinator for mass transportation resources such as the Metropolitan
19   Transit Authority (MTA).
20
21   ISD will expedite departments' requests for specific needs-related purchases of
22   supplies, services, equipment, and facilities required for both the response and recovery
23   phases. ISD will also assist impacted cities having difficulty with procurement, or
24   specific requests. Cities have financial responsibility for goods and services the County
25   procures at their request.
26
27   During emergency operations, ISD will place particular emphasis on maintaining the
28   operational capabilities of computer systems and telecommunications, including the
29   SNAP registries and website.
30
31   County Department of Public Works
32   The Department of Public Works (DPW) is the lead County department in conducting
33   Safety Assessment and Construction and Engineering Recovery activities and has a
34   lead role in responding to major emergencies. DPW is responsible for maintenance and
35   repair of infrastructure, including the road network, flood control system, general
36   aviation airports administered by the department, sewer and waterworks districts and
37   building and safety functions.
38
39   Department of Community and Senior Services
40   The Department of Community and Senior Services (CSS) is designated as a support
41   department to DPSS for disaster-response efforts. CSS will provide liaison through a
42   human services community-based network of contractors through the operational units
43   (Aging and Adult Services, Employment and Training, Community Services Block
44   Grant) at Senior Centers, Community Centers, Senior Congregate and Home -Delivered
45   Meals, Food Pantries and shelters throughout the County.
46



     November 29, 2010        DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT           Page 79 of 125
 1   CSS also manages Adult Protective Services (APS) for high-risk individuals aged 18
 2   and over, who are a danger to themselves and others. APS social workers will conduct
 3   health and safety checks on high-risk individuals, in coordination with DPSS IHSS social
 4   workers immediately following a disaster, to determine their status and need for
 5   assistance.
 6
 7   CSS will also assist in providing information, where possible, for the elderly and frail
 8   population in Los Angeles County. .
 9
10   County Special Districts
11   County Special Districts will implement SNAP into their overall emergency response
12   including the printing or distribution of emergency preparedness materials.
13
14   Disaster Management Area Coordinators (DMAC’s)
15   Disaster Management Area Coordinators will coordinate information flow from the
16   County to their respective cities. They will also facilitate the dissemination of
17   information on the use of the SNAP database.
18
19   Affirmative Action Compliance
20   As a support department to the Chief Executive Office, Affirmative Compliance’s role in
21   a disaster is to provide guidance on access and functional needs issues. This includes
22   the County’s compliance with the American’s with Disabilities Act, as well as
23   coordination of specialized vendors that provide services to populations with access and
24   functional needs.
25
26   Parks and Recreation
27   The role of the Department of Parks and Recreation in the event of a disaster is to make
28   its parks and facilities available to relief and disaster agencies for use as evacuation
29   centers or mass care shelters to provide care and shelter for disaster victims. Park
30   Rangers will act as the primary security resource at these facilities. In a widespread
31   disaster, DPSS and Parks and Recreation personnel may be used to assist staff from
32   the relief agencies. Parks and Recreation is a support Department t for DPSS during
33   an emergency.
34
35
36   4.3 ORGANIZATIONAL ROLES & RESPONSIBILITIES—NON-COUNTY
37   GOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES
38
39   Cities in Los Angeles County
40   Cities in Los Angeles County are responsible for coordinating emergency response
41   activities pertaining to their cities, including coordinating any information and/or
42   resource requests with the Operational Area.
43
44   Rapid Transit (MTA)
45   The Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) is the primary source of mass transportation
46   equipment used by the Los Angeles County OA and a support to ISD. Both busses and



     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT         Page 80 of 125
 1   mass transit trains are available for use in evacuations, transportation of equipment and
 2   supplies, transportation of emergency response workers and establishment of
 3   temporary bus/train lines for the transportation of victims to Disaster Assistance Centers
 4   and other relief locations such as mass shelters. Requests for MTA resources are
 5   handled through the Logistics Section, Transportation Coordinator in the CEOC.
 6
 7   4.4 ORGANIZATIONAL ROLES & RESPONSIBILITIES—NON-GOVERNMENTAL
 8   SUPPORT AGENCIES
 9
10   American Red Cross (ARC)
11   Congress mandated the ARC to provide care, shelter and Disaster Victim Information
12   assistance for victims of natural disasters. DPSS works in cooperation with the ARC to
13   provide these services following a natural disaster.
14
15   Emergency Network Los Angeles (ENLA)
16   ENLA is a network of community based organizations working together to coordinate
17   volunteers and resources after disasters. ENLA is Los Angeles County’s official
18   Voluntary Agencies Active in Disaster (VOAD).
19
20
21
22                                      5. MAINTENANCE
23
24   The County of Los Angeles Office of Emergency Management (OEM) is responsible for
25   coordinating the development and maintenance of this Annex. OEM will review this
26   Access and Functional Needs Population Annex every three years and as necessary for
27   any updates.
28




     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT           Page 81 of 125
 1                                      6. APPENDICES
 2
 3                             APPENDIX A: REFERENCE LIST
 4
 5   Federal:
 6
 7   Accessibility of Emergency Information Part 79, Federal Communications Commissions
 8   (FCC), 2004. http://www.fcc.gov/cgb/dro/emergency_info_regs.html.
 9
10   Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), United States Department of Justice, 1990.
11   http://www.ada.gov.
12
13   Americans with Disabilities Act Accessibility Guidelines (ADAAG), The Access Board,
14   2002. http://www.access-board.gov/adaag/about/index.htm.
15
16   ADA Amendments Act (ADAAA), United States Department of Justice, 2008.
17   http://www.ada.gov.
18
19   ADA Best Practices Tool Kit for State and Local Governments, Department of Justice,
20   2006-2007. http://www.ada.gov/pcatoolkit/toolkitmain.htm
21
22   ADA Checklist for Emergency Shelters, U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Rights
23   Division, Disability Rights Section, July 2007.
24   www.ada.gov/pcatoolkit/chap7shelterchk.htm.
25
26   ADA Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Disability in the State and Local Government
27   Services, Title II of the Federal Americans with Disabilities Act, Public Law 336,
28   Department of Justice, January 26, 1992. http://www.ada.gov/reg2.html
29
30   Disaster Preparedness for People with Disabilities, American Red Cross (ARC) Disaster
31   Services.
32
33   Electronic and Information Technology Accessibility Standards (Section 508), United
34   States Access Board, December 2000. http://www.access-
35   board.gov/sec508/standards.htm.
36
37   Electronic and Information Technology: Amendment to Section 508 of the Rehabilitation
38   Act (29 U.S.C. 794d), Federal Communications Commission (FCC), August 1998.
39   http://www.ada.gov/cguide.htm or
40   http://www.section508.gov/index.cfm?FuseAction=Content&ID=14.
41
42   Executive Order 13347 – Individuals with Disabilities in Emergency Preparedness
43   (Federal Register Doc. 04-17150), United States Office of the President, July 2004.
44   http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/2004/pdf/04-17150.pdf.
45




     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT         Page 82 of 125
 1   Functional Needs of People with Disabilities: A Guide for Emergency Managers,
 2   Planners, and Responders, National Organization on Disability’s Emergency
 3   Preparedness Initiative’s.
 4   http://www.nod.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=Feature.showFeature&FeatureID=1034
 5
 6   G197: Emergency Planning and Special Needs Populations Course, Emergency
 7   Management Institute, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).
 8   http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/pub/register.asp
 9
10   GSA: Access to resources and tools to help you meet Section 508 requirements.
11   http://buyaccessible.gov.
12
13   Incorporating Household Pets and Service Animals Considerations into Emergency
14   Operations Plans, Comprehensive Preparedness Guide 302 (CPG-302), Federal
15   Emergency Management Association (FEMA), March 2009.
16   www.iaem.com/.../CPG_302_HPSA_CoordDRAFT_20090506.pdf.
17
18   Information Technology Technical Assistance and Training Center (ITTATC)
19   www.ittatc.org.
20
21   Interim Emergency Management Planning Guide for Special Needs Populations,
22   Comprehensive Preparedness Guide 301 (CPG-301), Federal Emergency Management
23   Agency (FEMA), August 2008. www.fema.gov/pdf/media/2008/301.pdf.
24
25   Making Community Emergency Preparedness and Response Programs Accessible to
26   People with Disabilities: An ADA guide for Local Governments, U.S. Department of
27   Justice, Civil Rights Division, Disability Rights Section, 2004.
28   http://www.usdoj.gov/crt/ada/emergencyprep.htm or
29   http://www.ada.gov/emerprepguidescrn.pdf.
30
31   National Disaster Housing Strategy, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA),
32   January 16, 2009. http://www.fema.gov/news/newsrelease.fema?id=47305.
33
34   National Emergency Family Registry and Locator System (NEFRLS) and the National
35   Emergency Child Locator Center (NECLC), Department of Homeland Security, August
36   7, 2009. www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/privacy/privacy_pia_fema_nefrls.pdf.
37
38   National Response Framework (NRF), Federal Emergency Management Agency
39   (FEMA), January 2008. http://www.fema.gov/emergency/nrf/# .
40
41   Post-Katrina Emergency Management Reform Act of 2006, 109 th Congress, 2005-2006.
42   http://www.govtrack.us/congress/bill.xpd?bill=s109-3721.
43
44   Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, as amended, and
45   Related Authorities, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), June 2007.
46   http://www.fema.gov/about/stafact.shtm.



     November 29, 2010      DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT        Page 83 of 125
 1
 2   Safe and Well List, American Red Cross (ARC), https://disastersafe.redcross.org/.
 3
 4   Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA), Title III: Implementation of
 5   Hazardous Materials Training for Tribal Nations (CFDA No. 97.020), Federal
 6   Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), 2006.
 7   http://www.fema.gov/government/grant/sara.shtm.
 8
 9   The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO), The
10   Joint Commission. http://www.jointcommission.org.
11
12   The Pets Evacuation and Transportation Standards Act of 2006, 109 th Congress, Public
13   Law 109-308, 2006. http://www.animallaw.info/statutes/stusfd2006pl109_308.htm.
14
15   Web Accessibility Initiative (W3C), http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/accessibility.php.
16
17   WebAIM: Web Accessibility in Mind. www.webaim.org.
18
19   State:
20
21   California Disaster Response Interpreter Program (DRI), Office for Access and
22   Functional Needs, California Emergency Management System.
23   http://www.calema.ca.gov/WebPage/oeswebsite.nsf/0/CF550341643F892B8825749B0
24   080867F?OpenDocument.
25
26   California Education Code, §32282.
27   http://law.onecle.com/california/education/32282.html
28
29   California Emergency Services Act (California Government Code, Title 2, Division 1,
30   Chapter 7, Article 12, Sections 8550 - 8668), Governor’s Office of Emergency Services,
31   2006. http://hazardmitigation.calema.ca.gov/docs/ESA-all8-06-final.pdf.
32
33   California Government Codes, §§11135, 8588.15 and 8608.
34   http://law.onecle.com/california/government/index.html.
35
36   California Health and Safety Codes, §§101025 and 34070-34082.
37   http://law.justia.com/california/codes/hsc.html.
38
39   Standardized Emergency Management System (SEMS) Regulations (California Code of
40   Regulations, Title 19, Division 2, Chapter 1; Government Code, Section 8607), Office of
41   Emergency Services, 2006.
42   www.cesa.net/.../SEMS%20Calif%20Code%20of%20Regs,%20Title%2019,%2012-
43   95.pdf.
44
45   Statement of Understanding Between The American Red Cross and The California
46   Department of Social Services, California Department of Social Services (CDSS), 2006.



     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT           Page 84 of 125
 1
 2   Title 22, California Code of Regulations (CCR), §72551, California Office of
 3   Administrative Law, Revised April 1990.
 4   http://www.archive.org/stream/gov.ca.ccr.22.3/ca.ccr.22.3_djvu.txt.
 5
 6   Title 22, California Code of Regulations (CCR), §87223. State of California.
 7   http://www.canhr.org/factsheets/rcfe_fs/html/rcfe_rightsoutline_fs.htm.
 8
 9   Title 24, California Code of Regulations (CCR), Accessibility Regulations, State of
10   California. http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Code/title24.htm.
11
12
13   Local:
14
15   711 Relay Services, California Relay Service (CRS),
16   http://www.ddtp.org/california_relay_service/Default.asp#phone_numbers/ .
17
18   Adverse Weather Emergency Plan, Los Angeles County Office of Emergency
19   Management (OEM), 2008.
20
21   Alert LA website, Los Angeles County, http://portal.lacounty.gov/wps/portal/alertla.
22
23   All-Hazard Emergency Management Plan, Los Angeles County Department of Public
24   Health (LACDPH), 2009.
25
26   Animal Emergency Response Annex to the Los Angeles County Operational Area
27   Emergency Response Plan (OAERP), Los Angeles County Office of Emergency
28   Management, Los Angeles County Operational Area, and Los Angeles County Office of
29   Emergency Management (OEM), 2010.
30
31   Department of Mental Health Emergency Plan, Los Angeles County Department of
32   Mental Health (DMH), 2009
33
34   Disaster Response Plan, Los Angeles County Department of Public Social Services
35   (DPSS), 1997.
36
37   Emergency Evacuation and Preparedness: A Guide for People with Disabilities and
38   Other Activity Limitations, Center for Disability Issues and the Health Professions,
39   available at: http://lacoa.org/.
40
41   Emergency Evacuation Procedures for Persons with Disabilities, Los Angeles County
42   Office of Affirmative Action Compliance and Office of Emergency Management (OEM),
43   2006.
44
45   Emergency Operating Procedure (EOP) 2 -6: Evacuations, Los Angeles County Sheriff’s
46   Department, 2006.



     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT           Page 85 of 125
 1   Emergency Survival Guide, Emergency Survival Program (ESP),
 2   http://lacoa.org/doclibrary.htm.
 3
 4   ESP’s Emergency Preparedness: Taking Responsibility for Your Safety -- Tips for
 5   People with Activity Limitations and Disabilities, Emergency Survival Program (ESP),
 6   (Requests can be made via the ESP Hotline (213-974-1166), 211 LA County, or the
 7   Community Outreach Coordinator.) www.espfocus.org.
 8
 9   ESP Bulletin on Special Needs, Emergency Survival Program (ESP), (Requests can be
10   made via the ESP Hotline (213-974-1166), 211 LA County, or the Community Outreach
11   Coordinator.) www.espfocus.org.
12
13   Guidelines for Inter-County Sheltering Caused by Large -Scale Evacuations of People,
14   State of California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services, 2000.
15
16   In-Home Support Services (IHSS) Handbook, Los Angeles County Department of Public
17   Social Services (DPSS).
18
19   In-Home Support Services (IHSS) Caseload Disaster Preparedness Assessment Profile
20   Listing (PA 1908), Los Angeles County Department of Public Social Services (DPSS),
21   2004.
22
23   Just Be Ready: Prepare Together campaign, Los Angeles County Department of Public
24   Health (DPH), launched 2005. http://www.lapublichealth.org/eprp/media/aboutus.htm.
25
26   Los Angeles County All-Hazards Hazard Mitigation Plan, Los Angeles County Office of
27   Emergency Management (OEM), 2005. http://lacoa.org/PDF/hazmitgplan.pdf.
28
29   Los Angeles County Code, Chapter 2.68, Emergency Services, Title 2, Division 3
30   ―Emergency Ordinance,‖ Los Angeles County.
31
32   Los Angeles County Emergency Public Information Plan, Los Angeles County Office of
33   Emergency Management (OEM), http://lacoa.org/PDF/ApprovedEPIPlan.pdf.
34
35   Los Angeles County Office of Emergency Management (OEM) Website,
36   http://www.lacoa.org/
37
38   Los Angeles County Operational Area Disaster Information Reporting Procedures, Los
39   Angeles County Office of Emergency Management (OEM), 2000.
40
41   Los Angeles County Operational Area Emergency Response Plan (OAERP), Los
42   Angeles County Office of Emergency Management (OEM), 2010.
43
44   Los Angeles County Operational Area Emergency Response Plan Standard Operating
45   Procedure Manual (OAERP SOP), Los Angeles County Office of Emergency
46   Management (OEM), draft 2010.



     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT         Page 86 of 125
 1   Los Angeles County Operational Area Emergency Operations Center Standard
 2   Operating Procedure Manual (CEOC SOP), Los Angeles County Office of Emergency
 3   Management (OEM), draft version 2010.
 4
 5   Los Angeles Operational Area Mass Evacua tion Process Guide, Los Angeles County
 6   Office of Emergency Management (OEM) and Los Angeles City Emergency
 7   Management Department (EMD), 2009.
 8
 9   Los Angeles County Operational Area Family Assistance Center (FAC) Plan, Los
10   Angeles County Department of Mental Health Emergency Outreach Bureau, 2010.
11   Los Angeles County Operational Area Mass Care and Shelter Guidance for Emergency
12   Management Planners, Los Angeles Operational Area, draft.
13
14   Los Angeles Sheriff Alert and Warning Plan, Los Angeles County Sheriff Department,
15
16   Care and Shelter Plan, Los Angeles County, Los Angeles County Department of Public
17   Social Services (DPSS),
18
19   Los Angeles County Recovery Annex to Los Angeles County Operations Area
20   Emergency Response Plan (OAERP), Los Angeles County Office of Emergency
21   Management (OEM), draft 2009.
22
23   Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department Manual of Policy and Procedures, Volume 5,
24   Chapter 6 – Emergency Preparedness, Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department.
25
26   LA Health Adult Disability in LA County, Los Angeles County Department of Public
27   Health (LACDPH), September 2006 edition.
28
29   Mass Care and Shelter Plan for Large-Scale Regional Evacuations of People, State of
30   California Department of Social Services Disaster and Safety Services Bureau, 2009.
31
32   Mass Prophylaxis Plan (Annex to All-Hazard Emergency Management Plan), Los
33   Angeles County Department of Public Health (LACDPH), 2007.
34
35   Monthly Action Steps, Emergency Survival Program (ESP), monthly release,
36   http://lacoa.org/esp.htm.
37
38   Saving Lives: Including People with Disabilities in Emergency Planning, National
39   Council on Disability, available at: http://lacoa.org/.
40
41   Serving and Protecting All by Applying Lessons Learned Including People with
42   Disabilities and Seniors in Disaster Services, California Foundation for Independent
43   Living Centers, available at: http://lacoa.org/
44
45   Special Needs Populations Summary, Los Angeles County Department of Public Health
46   (LACDPH) Bioterrorism Preparedness Program, 2006.



     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT          Page 87 of 125
1
2   Summary of Planning Activities and Projects for Special Needs Populations, Los
3   Angeles County Department of Public Health (LACDPH), 2006.
4
5
6




    November 29, 2010      DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT         Page 88 of 125
 1              APPENDIX B: GLOSSARY – DEFINITIONS AND ACRONYMS
 2
 3   ACRONYMS
 4
 5   For the purposes of this Access and Functional Needs Annex, the following acronyms
 6   apply:
 7
 8   AAA                 Area Agency on Aging
 9   ADA                 Americans with Disabilities Act
10   ADAAA               Americans with Disabilities Amendment Act
11   ADAAG               Americans with Disabilities Act Accessibility Guidelines
12   ALS                 Advanced Life Support
13   ARC                 American Red Cross
14   AT                  Assistive Technology
15   CALEMA              California Emergency Management Agency
16   CBO                 Community Based Organization
17   CCC                 Citizen Corps Council
18   CDSS                California Department of Social Services
19   CEOC                County Emergency Operations Center
20   CERT                Community Emergency Response Team
21   DHS                 Department of Health Services
22   DIRP                Disaster Information Reporting Procedures
23   DMH                 Department of Mental Health
24   DOJ                 U.S. Department of Justice
25   DPH                 Department of Public Health
26   DPSS                Department of Social Services
27   DPW                 Department of Public Works
28   DWI                 Disaster Welfare Information
29   EAS                 Emergency Alert System
30   ECC                 Los Angeles County Fire Emergency Command and Control Center
31   EGIS                Enterprise Geographic Information Systems
32   EMC                 Emergency Management Council
33   ENLA                Emergency Network of Los Angeles
34   EOP                 Emergency Operations Plan
35   ESP                 Emergency Survival Program
36   FAST                Functional Assessment Support Team
37   FBO                 Faith Based Organization
38   FCC                 Federal Communications Commission
39   FEMA                Federal Emergency Management Agency
40   GIS                 Geographic Information Systems
41   ICS                 Incident Command System
42   IHSS                In-Home Social Services
43   ISD                 Internal Services Department
44   JIC                 Joint Information Center
45   MOU                 Memorandum of Understanding
46   MTA                 Metropolitan Transportation Authority



     November 29, 2010      DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT        Page 89 of 125
 1   NECLC               National Emergency Child Locator Center
 2   NEFRLS              National Emergency Family Registry Locator System
 3   NGO                 Nongovernmental Organization
 4   NIMS                National Incident Management System
 5   OA                  Operational Area
 6   OA ERP              Operational Area Emergency Response Plan
 7   OAFN                CalEMA’s Office of Access and Functional Needs
 8   OEM                 Office of Emergency Management
 9   PIO                 Public Information Officer
10   SCC                 Sheriff’s Department Communications Center
11   SEMS                Standardized Emergency Management System
12   SEPAC               Senior Emergency Preparedness Action Committee
13   SOP                 Standard Operating Procedures
14   USDOJ               United States Department of Justice
15
16
17
18   DEFINITIONS
19
20   For the purposes of this Access and Functional Needs Annex, the following definitions
21   apply:
22
23   211 LA County. 211 provides information and access to a comprehensive range of
24   human services to County residents. The 211 system is available 24 hours a day/7 days
25   a week. During emergencies, the County will utilize the 211 hotline system to provide
26   information to callers. The 211 system is TTY/TDD compatible and interpreters are
27   available in multiple languages.
28
29   711 Relay Services. California Relay Service (CRS) provides specially- trained
30   operators to relay telephone conversations back and forth between people who are
31   deaf, hard of hearing, or speech-disabled and all those they wish to communicate with
32   by telephone. Information regarding the 711 resource should be provided on all
33   materials publicizing agency phone numbers, hotlines, etc.
34
35   Access and Functional Needs Populations. The County borrows FEMA’s definition
36   of ―Special Needs Populations‖ to define access and functional needs populations. This
37   includes populations whose members may have additional needs before, during, and



     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT          Page 90 of 125
 1   after an incident in functional areas, including but not limited to: maintaining
 2   independence, communication, transportation, supervision, and medical care.
 3   Individuals in need of additional response assistance may include those who have
 4   disabilities; who live in institutionalized settings; who are elderly; who are children; who
 5   are from diverse cultures; who have limited English proficiency or are non-English
 6   speaking; or who are transportation disadvantaged.
 7
 8   Accessible. Having the legally required features and/or qualities that ensure entrance,
 9   participation and usability of places, programs, services and activities by individuals with
10   a wide variety of disabilities.
11
12   Activities of Daily Living. Frequently used in national surveys as a way to measure
13   self-care abilities in daily life, ADLs include basic tasks such as eating, bathing,
14   dressing, toileting, getting in and out of a chair or bed, and getting around while at
15   home. National surveys also measure another level of self-care functioning,
16   Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs), which inc lude activities such as doing
17   everyday household chores, preparing meals, conducting necessary business, using
18   the telephone, shopping, and getting around outside the home. Resource: Family
19   Center on Technology and Disability: www.fctd.info
20
21   Americans with Disabilities Act / ADA Amendments Act of 2008. The Americans
22   with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a law designed to establish a clear and comprehensive
23   prohibition of discrimination on the basis of disability. The ADA gives civil rights
24   protections to individuals with disabilities that are like those provided to individuals on
25   the basis of race, sex, national origin, and religion, mandated in the Civil Rights Act of
26   1964. It guarantees equal opportunity for individuals with disabilities in employment,
27   public accommodations, transportation, state and local government services, and
28   telecommunications. The ―ADA Amendments Act of 2008‖ revised the definition of
29   ―disability‖ to more broadly encompass impairments that substantially limit a major life
30   activity. The amended language also states that mitigating measures, including
31   assistive devices, auxiliary aids, accommodations, medical therapies and supp lies



     November 29, 2010         DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT            Page 91 of 125
 1   (other than eyeglasses and contact lenses) have no bearing in determining whether a
 2   disability qualifies under the law. Changes also clarify coverage of impairments that are
 3   episodic or in remission that substantially limit a major life activity when active, such as
 4   epilepsy or posttraumatic stress disorder.
 5
 6   Assistive Technology Devices. In the Assistive Technology (AT) Act, an AT
 7   device is defined as ―any item, piece of equipment, or product system, whether
 8   acquired commercially, modified, or customized, that is used to increase,
 9   maintain, or improve functional capabilities of individuals with disabilities.‖ AT
10   includes and is not limited to certain durable medical equipment (DME). Other
11   terms that are closely synonymous with AT devices include rehabilitation
12   technology and adaptive devices.
13
14   Augmentative and Alternative Communication. Augmentative and alternative
15   communication (AAC) assists or replaces speech communication, helping individuals
16   with complex communication needs express feelings, wants, needs, and desires.
17   Augmentative communication can consist of symbols, devices, or strategies. Assistance
18   can range from low tech to high tech solutions. The American Speech-Language-
19   Hearing Association (ASHA) states that AAC is used as a temporary or permanent
20   solution for individuals without the ability to communicate through oral speech.
21
22   Auxiliary Aids and Services. Under the Americans with Disabilities Act, professionals
23   and organizations must communicate as effectively with people with disabilities as they
24   do with others. Auxiliary aids and services assist in this effort. Auxiliary aids may include
25   recorded texts, interpreters or other effective methods of making materials usually
26   delivered orally available to individuals with hearing impairments; readers in libraries for
27   students with visual impairments; classroom equipment adapted for use by students
28   with manual impairments; and other similar services and actions. Resource: Family
29   Center on Technology and Disability: www.fctd.info
30




     November 29, 2010        DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT             Page 92 of 125
 1   Braille. ―Braille,‖ unless otherwise specified, means a tactile system of reading and
 2   writing for individuals with visual impairments commonly known as Standard English
 3   Braille.
 4
 5   Centers for Independent Living (CILs). Community-based, non-residential
 6   organizations that help create opportunities for, and eliminate discrimination against,
 7   people with disabilities.
 8
 9   Closed Captioning. The display of text coinciding with the audio portion of a television
10   broadcast that allows persons with hearing disabilities to have access to these
11   broadcasts.
12
13   Cognitive Disability. A cognitive disability affects a person’s ability to reason,
14   understand, and learn. Cognitive disabilities are separated into two categories: learning
15   disabilities and mental retardation.
16
17   Communication access. Providing content in methods that are understandable and
18   usable by people with reduced or no ability to speak, see or hear, and/or experience
19   limitations in learning or understanding.
20
21   CART. Communications Access Real Time (CART) is a system that provides
22   simultaneous access to spoken information for people with hearing loss by creating a
23   transcript in ―real time‖. CART operators use a court reporting machine to input spoken
24   text. These machines are quite complex, but they are much faster than a typewriter
25   because they allow for inputting words a syllable at a time rather than a word at a time.
26   The output of the court reporting machine is fed to a computer, which produces a text
27   document that corresponds very closely to the words used by the speaker. Once in the
28   computer, the text can be displayed on a computer monitor (for one or two users) or
29   projected onto a screen.
30
31   Community Based Organization (CBO). CBOs are all organizations, institutions or



     November 29, 2010           DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT        Page 93 of 125
 1   congregations of people, which have local area presences, maturity and structural
 2   arrangements. These are owned and managed by members.
 3
 4   Consumable Medical Supplies (CMS). These are disposable supplies used by the
 5   recipient or caregiver which are essential to adequately care for the recipient’s needs.
 6   Such supplies enable recipients either to perform activities of daily living, or stabilize
 7   and monitor a health condition. Examples include catheters, ostomy supplies, gloves,
 8   bandages and padding. CMS often cannot withstand more than one use.
 9
10   Disability (individual with). A person who has a physical or mental impairment that
11   substantially limits one or more major life activities, a person who has a history or record
12   of such an impairment, or a person who is perceived by others as having such an
13   impairment. Disabilities fall into three categories: cognitive, physical, and sensory.
14
15   Durable Medical Equipment (DME) – Equipment that corrects or ameliorates a
16   medical condition or functional disability. Examples include wheelchairs, scooters,
17   canes, white canes, walkers, shower chairs, commode chairs, raised toilet seats,
18   oxygen equipment, nebulizer tubing and machines, and speech generating devices.
19   DME can withstand repeated use by a recipient.
20
21   Emergency. Absent a Presidential declared emergency, any incident(s), human-
22   caused or natural, that requires responsive action to protect life or property. Under the
23   Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, an emergency
24   means any occasion or instance for which, in the determination of the President,
25   Federal assistance is needed to supplement State and local efforts and capabilities to
26   save lives and to protect property and public health and safety, or to lessen or avert the
27   threat of a catastrophe in any part of the United States.
28
29   Emergency notification system. A system that sends alerts and warnings regarding
30   incidents that affect lives and property. The system can perform mass contacts through




     November 29, 2010         DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT             Page 94 of 125
 1   a myriad of personal communicating devices, land line telephones and the Internet.
 2   These alerts and warnings can be audible and visual.
 3
 4   Emergency Public Information. Information that is disseminated primarily in
 5   anticipation of, during, or after an emergency that relates to the emergency and
 6   provides public safety or other information for the general welfare of the public.
 7
 8   Emergency Support Function #6. A grouping of government and private-sector
 9   capabilities into an organizational structure to provide the Mass Care, Housing, and
10   Human Services support, resources, and program implementation for state, regional,
11   local, and tribal government and nongovernmental organizational needs.
12
13   Emotional support animal – Any animal that provides therapeutic benefit through
14   companionship and affection to an individual with a mental health disability.
15
16   Functional Assessment Service Team (FAST) – Trained NGO and government
17   workers ready to respond to and deploy to disaster areas to work in shelters, temporary
18   housing and other disaster recovery centers. Team members have in-depth knowledge
19   of the populations they serve, cultures and support service systems including housing,
20   resources, benefit programs and disaster aid programs.
21
22   Limited English proficiency. Persons who do not speak English as their primary
23   language and who have a limited ability to read, speak, write, and/or understand
24   English.
25
26   Local Government. A county, municipality, city, town, township, local public authority,
27   school district, special district, intrastate district, council of governments (regardless of
28   whether the council of governments is incorporated as a nonprofit corporation under
29   state law), regional or interstate government entity, or agency or instrumentality of a
30   local government; an Indian tribe or authorized tribal organization, or Alaska Native
31   village or organization; and a rural community, unincorporated town or village, or other



     November 29, 2010         DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT             Page 95 of 125
 1   public entity, for which an application for assistance is made by a state or political
 2   subdivision of a state.
 3
 4   Long Term Care (LTC). A diverse group of licensed care facilities, congregate
 5   facilities, residential facilities, nursing homes, assisted living, group homes, intermediate
 6   care facilities, and senior citizen housing.
 7
 8   National Response Framework (NRF). FEMA establishes a comprehensive all-
 9   hazards approach to enhance the ability of the United States to manage domestic
10   incidents. The plan incorporates best practices and procedures from incident
11   management disciplines - homeland security, emergency management, law
12   enforcement, firefighting, public works, public health, responder and recovery worker
13   health and safety, emergency medical services, and the private sector - and integrates
14   them into a unified structure. It forms the basis of how the federal government
15   coordinates with state, local, and tribal governments and the private sector during
16   incidents.
17
18   Non-Governmental Organization (NGO). Includes any non-profit, voluntary citizens’
19   group that is organized on a local, national or international level.
20
21   Paratransit. The family of transportation services which falls between the single
22   occupant automobile and fixed route transit. Examples of paratransit include taxis,
23   carpools, vanpools, minibuses, jitneys, demand responsive bus services, and
24   specialized bus services for the mobility impaired or transportation disadvantaged.
25
26   Personal care attendant / personal care assistant – Any person who provides
27   assistance to an individual with functional needs to complete activities of daily living,
28   such as toileting, bathing/showering, dressing, eating, etc. This person can be a family
29   member, volunteer, or hired assistant. Many people with disabilities and the elderly
30   utilize In-Home Supportive Services (IHSS) to provide financial assistance to maintain
31   personal care attendants.



     November 29, 2010         DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT            Page 96 of 125
 1
 2   Physical disability. A physical disability is a condition that substantially limits one or
 3   more basic physical activities, such as walking, climbing stairs, reaching, lifting, or
 4   carrying.
 5
 6   Pictogram – A picture representing a word or idea; also referred to as a pictograph.
 7
 8   Preparedness. Those activities, programs, and systems that exist before an
 9   emergency and that are used to support and enhance response to an emergency or
10   disaster.
11
12   Private sector. Organizations and entities that are not part of any governmental
13   structure. Includes for-profit and not-for-profit organizations, formal and informal
14   structures, commerce and industry, private emergency response organizations, and
15   private voluntary organizations.
16
17   Reasonable Accommodation/Reasonable Modification. Any modification or
18   adjustment to policies, practices, procedures or the environment that enables an
19   individual to perform essential functions or participate in the program or event. A
20   requested accommodation is unreasonable if it poses an undue financial or
21   administrative burden or a fundamental alteration in the program or service.
22
23   Response. Activities to address the immediate and short-term effects of an emergency
24   or disaster. Response includes immediate actions to save lives, protect property, and
25   meet basic human needs. Based on the requirements of the situation, response
26   assistance will be provided to an affected state under the National Response
27   Framework (NRF) using a partial activation of selected Emergency Support Functions
28   (ESFs) or the full activation of all ESFs to meet the needs of the situation.
29
30   Sensory disability. A sensory disability is blindness, deafness, or a severe vision or
31   hearing impairment.



     November 29, 2010        DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT             Page 97 of 125
 1
 2   Service animal. Any animal individually trained to perform tasks for people with
 3   disabilities. Service animals are not pets. Requirements of service animal licensing or
 4   permits are prohibited under the Americans with Disabilities Act.
 5
 6   Sign Language. A language that uses a system of manual, facial and other body
 7   movements as the means of communication, especially among Deaf people.
 8
 9   Sign Language Interpreter. A person who has been trained to use a system of
10   conventional symbols or gestures made with the hands and body to help people who
11   are deaf, are hard-of-hearing, or have speech impairments communicate.
12
13   Speech-to-Speech (STS). A service offered through the Telecommunications Relay
14   Services through the United States, Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico, Australia, New Zealand
15   and Sweden that provides communication assistants (CA’s) for people with speech
16   disabilities who may experience difficulty being understood by the public on the
17   telephone. STS services can be reached by dialing 711 from any standard telephone.
18
19   Telecommunications. The transmission, emission, or reception of voice and/or data
20   through any medium by wire, radio, other electrical electromagnetic or optical means.
21   Telecommunications includes all aspects of transmitting information.
22
23   Telecommunication Device for the Deaf (TDD). There are several types of
24   communication devices that allow individuals who cannot speak or hear to use a
25   telephone. These devices allow individuals to communicate using a standard telephone
26   line. The caller can either communicate with another device or can place a call using an
27   operator (or ―communication assistant, part of the Telephone Relay Service available
28   through 711 across the US). The operator can relay the call, allowing the two people to
29   "speak." They are usually small and have a keyboard or other input device and screen
30   or printer.
31



     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT           Page 98 of 125
 1   There are some differences in the way these devices allow for communication;
 2   new devices can communicate from a personal computer using an Internet
 3   connection and specially designed software. Some models are portable and can
 4   be used instead of a normal landline phone.
 5
 6   A TTY (sometimes ―TT‖ or ―text telephone‖) stands for telephone typewriter or
 7   teletypewriter. Telecommunications Device for the Deaf (TDD) s a device with a
 8   keyboard that sends and receives typed messages over a telephone line.
 9   Because these technologies are used by other than people who are deaf (e.g.
10   people with significant speech disabilities), the more generic ―TTY‖ is in common
11   usage.
12
13   Telecommunications Relay Service (TRS). A telephone service that uses operators,
14   called communications assistants (CAs), to facilitate telephone calls between people
15   with hearing and speech disabilities and other individuals. TRS providers - generally
16   telephone companies - are compensated for the costs of providing TRS from either a
17   state or a federal fund. There is no cost to the user.
18
19   Telecommunications Service Priority (TSP) Program. The National
20   Security/Emergency Preparedness (NS/EP) TSP program is the regulatory,
21   administrative, and operational program authorizing and providing for priority treatment
22   (i.e. provisioning and restoration) of NS/EP telecommunications services. As such, it
23   establishes the framework for NS/EP telecommunications service vendors to provide,
24   restore, or otherwise act on a priority basis to ensure effective NS/EP
25   telecommunications services.
26
27   Tele Typewriter (TTY). An input device that allows alphanumeric characters to be
28   typed in and sent over a standard telephone line to another TTY machine one character
29   at a time as they are typed. TTYs provide a means of communication over the
30   telephone line for the Deaf, people who are hard of hearing or who have speech
31   disabilities.



     November 29, 2010        DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT          Page 99 of 125
 1
 2   Tribal Government. An Indian or Alaska Native tribe, band, nation, pueblo, village or
 3   community that the Secretary of the Interior acknowledges to exist as an Indian tribe
 4   pursuant to the Federally Recognized Indian Tribe List Act of 1994, 25 USC 479a.
 5
 6   Undue Hardship. An excessive difficulty or expense required to provide a reasonable
 7   accommodation considering the resources of the facility asked to provide the
 8   accommodation and other relevant factors.
 9
10   Video Remote Interpreting (VRI). Video conferencing equipment and web-based
11   technology that provides on-demand access to sign language interpreting services
12   without an interpreter onsite. The Deaf individual and hearing individual are in the same
13   location.
14
15   Video Relay Service. Form of Telecommunications Relay Service that enables people
16   who are deaf, are hard of hearing, or have speech disabilities who use American Sign
17   Language (ASL) to communicate with voice telephone users through video equipment,
18   rather than through typed text.
19
20   Voluntary Agency. Any chartered or otherwise duly recognized tax-exempt local,
21   state, or national organization or group that has provided or may provide needed
22   services to the states, local governments, or individuals in coping with an emergency or
23   a major disaster.
24




     November 29, 2010        DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT         Page 100 of 125
 1                     APPENDIX C: LOS ANGELES COUNTY OPERATIONAL AREA
 2                                   ORGANIZATIONAL MATRIX
 3
 4     Legend
 5         P = Prim ary Agency
 6         S = Support Agency
 7         R = Potential Resource
 8         C = Coordination
 9         L = Liaison
10
                                                                                                                                                                                 FUNCTION




                                                                                                                                                                                                                      ices
                                                                                                                   is




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             y
                                                                                                                  n
                                                                                                    ituation Analys




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                t
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              ring & Recover




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   nty Governmen
                                                                                                  blic Informatio




                                                                                                                                                                                                        r/ Human Serv



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              and Rescue




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         ources
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    ement)
                                                                           nology




                                                                                                    otection




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       inistration
                                                                         ssment
                                              arning




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   aterials
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              ement



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               n Res
                                                                                                                                            ent
                                                                      ch




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           ov




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    y
                                                                                    Management/S



                                                                                    Radiological Pr
                                Alerting and W




                                                                                    Emergency Pu




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Const/Enginee
                                                       Information Te




                                                                                                                                        Law Enforcem




                                                                                                                                                                                                                             Evacuation (M
                                                                                                                                    e




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Initial Recover
                                                              Damage Asse




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Supply Procur
                                                                                                                                                                                           Care & Shelte



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Urban Search




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Status of Cou
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Hazardous M
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Finance/Adm
                                                                                                                                                                 Public Health




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 Transportatio
                                                                                                                        Fire & Rescu




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Personnel
County Departments/




                                                                                                                                                                                 Coroner
                                                                                                                                                       Medical




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Utilities
Special Districts/ Local
Agencies
Administrative Officer, Chief                                              R        S         S                                                                                                                                                        S       S        P                                          P                         P          P
Agriculture/Weights & Meas                                                                                                                                       S
Alternate Public Defender                                                                                                               S
Animal Care & Control                                                                                                   R                                        R                         R
Assessor                                                                   R                                                                                                                                                                           R
Auditor - Controller                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    R
Beaches & Harbors                                                                                                       S                                                                                                R                      S                                R
Children & Family Services                                                                                                                                                                 S
Community Dev. Comm                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     R                                                                               S
Community/Senior Services                                                                     R                                                                                            S
Coroner                                                                                       R                                                        R         R               P
County Counsel                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         S
District Attorney                                                                                                                       S
Fire                                                   R                   R        R         R           P             P                              R         R               R                                                              P              R                                                                     P
Health Services                 R                      R                                                                                               P         P               R         R                                                                                                                                         R
Human Resources                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         S
Internal Services                                      R                   R        R                                   R               R                                                  R                             R                      R      R       P                 C                     L                                                S
Mental Health                                                                                 R                         R               R              R         R               R         R                                                                                                                                                            R
Military & Veterans                                                                                                                                                              R
Municipal Courts                                                                                                                        S
Parks & Recreation                                                                                                      R                                                        R         S                                                    R      R
Probation                                                                                                                               S                                                                                                       R                                R
Public Defender                                                                                                                         S
Public Library                                                                                R                                                                                            S
Public Social Services                                                                                                                                                                     P                             S                                                                                                                              S
Public Works                                           R                   P        R                                   R                                                        R         R                             R                      R      P                         R                     R                                                S
Rapid Transit (MTA)                                                                                                                                                                                                      R                                                       S
Regional Planning                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      S
Registrar-Recorder/Co Clerk                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             R
Schools/Office of Education                            R                                      R                                                                                            S                                                                                     R
Sheriff                         P                      P                   R        P         P           R             R               P                                        R         R                             P                      R                                R
Superior Courts                                                                                                                         S
Treasurer/Tax Collector                                                                                                                                                          R                                                                                      R
All Departments                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         R                                          R                         R
11
12


       November 29, 2010                                                   DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT                                                                                                                                                 Page 101 of 125
 1      APPENDIX D: Specific Needs Awareness Planning (SNAP) Mapping System
 2
 3   Los Angeles Operational Area Specific Needs Awareness Planning (SNAP) Mapping
 4   System (new)
 5
 6   Overview
 7   The Specific Needs Awareness Planning (SNAP) Mapping System is a comprehensive
 8   planning and response tool developed to address the needs of residents without the
 9   ability to self-evacuate, or who may require specialized care during a disaster. The
10   System integrates Geographical Information System (GIS) mapping and database
11   connectivity, which allows emergency operations managers and first responders to
12   assess the impact of an emergency incident in a particular area on its most vulnerable
13   residents.
14

15   Types of Data
16   SNAP will be the Los Angeles Operational Area’s (OA) first countywide comprehensive
17   voluntary registry to take into account people with access and functional needs. This
18   system allows new capabilities and tools for use in the Los Angeles OA. The voluntary
19   self-identification registry allows individuals to identify their personal short-term and
20   long-term disaster needs, information that can be used by emergency planners to
21   enhance planning for services and supplies. SNAP is an interactive set of databases
22   tied to geo-spatial mapping which allows first responders to collect, query and use a
23   wide variety of data sources to perform a number of critical disaster-related activities,
24   both pre-disaster and post disaster. These functions include being able to locate, help
25   evacuate, inoculate, and/or educate people with access and func tional needs.
26
27   SNAP organizes three different kinds of data:
28
29               People: Identifies where people with access and functional needs live and
30                congregate and their specific disaster needs.
31
32               Places: Identifies, maps and details the accessibility features of pre-planned
33                reception and evacuation centers and Points of Dispensing (PODs).
34




     November 29, 2010          DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT        Page 102 of 125
 1             Resources: Identifies hundreds of community-based resources which can be
 2              integrated into the response to assist with meeting the disaster needs of
 3              people with a wide array of disabilities and frail, at-risk seniors.
 4

 5   SNAP data can be accessed and displayed on a map in an emergency vehicle, at a
 6   supervisor’s/manager’s desk, or at an emergency operations center. As shelters are
 7   opened and community resources become available or are exhausted, information is
 8   made readily accessible through SNAP to authorized emergency personnel only on an
 9   as needed basis.


10   Oversight and Governance
11   A SNAP Committee was formed to oversee the development of the registry. Committee
12   members originally included:
13
14         County Office of Emergency Management
15         County Department of Public and Social Services
16         County Department of Public Health
17         City of Los Angeles Fire Department
18         City of Los Angeles Police Department
19         City of Los Angeles Disability Department
20         City of Beverly Hills
21         UCLA Center for Neighborhood Knowledge.
22
23   As the project progressed, the following agencies were added to the Committee:
24
25         County Office of Affirmative Action Compliance
26         County Department of Health Services
27         County Department of Mental Health
28         County Community and Senior Services Department
29         County Internal Services Department
30         County Fire Department
31         County Sheriff Department
32         County Office of Education
33         City of Los Angeles Emergency Management Department
34         City of Santa Clarita
35         Emergency Network Los Angeles
36         American Red Cross
37
38   To maintain the SNAP system, an Access and Functional Needs (AFN) Committee is in
39   development.    The AFN Committee will provide a forum for discussion on issues
40   affecting disaster planning for people with access and functional needs (including

     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT       Page 103 of 125
 1   SNAP), and report to the OAAB. The first meeting of the AFN Committee was held in
 2   December 2010.
 3

 4   Public Outreach
 5   Working with other County departments, OEM has drafted a public outreach plan to
 6   promote the SNAP Registry. The plan includes three strategies: leveraging existing
 7   programs, networking with community organizations, and media.
 8
 9         Leveraging: Promoting the registry through emergency preparedness expos
10         and community events. Using existing County programs and services; such as
11         the Department of Public Social Services In-Home Support Services program;
12         providing linkage from County websites; and promoting the program through the
13         Disaster Management Area Coordinators (DMACs), and Operational Area
14         Advisory Board (OAAB).
15
16         Networking: Outreach to the disability community, including Regional Living
17         Centers, Independent Living Centers, disability specific agencies (e.g. Braille
18         Institute, Greater Los Angeles Agency on Deafness, etc.), and various
19         community organizations are included in the outreach plan.
20
21         Media: To the extent that grant funds are available, the outreach plan will
22         include developing public service announcements (PSA), media buys and other
23         marketing initiatives.
24
25   More details are available in the DRAFT SNAP Public Outreach Plan (5/20/10).
26
27




     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT         Page 104 of 125
 1                           APPENDIX E: PLANNING CHECKLISTS
 2
 3
 4   1. Registry Checklist
 5   2. Creating and maintaining an Access and Functional Needs Planning Group
 6   3. Community Preparedness Education Checklist
 7   4. Media Checklist
 8   5. Public Information Office (PIO) Checklist
 9   6. Outreach Team Checklist
10   7. Town Hall Meeting Checklist
11   8. Evacuation Information Checklist
12   9. Shelter Information Checklist
13   10. Recovery Information Checklist
14   11. Recovery Program Access Checklist
15   12. Recovery Assistance Center Checklist
16
17
18   1. Registry Checklist
19   This checklist notes critical factors to consider when developing a registry of people with
20   access and functional needs.
21
22       A registry is only one tool among others that emergency managers can use to
23          identify, communicate with, plan for/with and assist people with access and
24          functional needs; it is a tool and not a solution.
25       It is voluntary to place your name on a registry; registries will not capture all, or
26          necessarily most, people with access and functional needs.
27       Registries do not take the place of personal preparedness p lans; this message
28          must be given concurrently with any public information regarding registries.
29       All efforts must be made to manage expectations of a registrant (and their
30          families/caregivers); information should clearly indicate what the County will do
31          with personal information in the registry, when that information will be used and
32          by whom, as well as what the registry will not ensure.
33       Registry data must be secure and the highest level of confidentiality needs to be
34          assured.
35       A system and protocol schedule for updating and maintaining registries must be
36          in place to ensure the registry is current as this helps to ensure greater safety for
37          registrants and first responders.



     November 29, 2010        DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT          Page 105 of 125
 1       Engagement of people with access and functional needs as well as the
 2         organizations that serve them should be involved in all aspects of the registry to
 3         ensure that it is relevant and information is reaching the intended populations.
 4       Back-up power sources may be needed to access the registry during a power
 5         outage and such plans should be in p lace.
 6       Registries will not be immediately inclusive of individuals who develop disabilities
 7         or health or mental health conditions as a result of the emergency itself.
 8       Registries usually only include a home address, if the disaster strikes while the
 9         registrant is at school, work, or somewhere else during the day, this information
10         will be of little use in the initial emergency stage.
11       Criteria regarding eligibility to be part of the registry must be communicated
12         clearly to the public.
13       Registries can be expensive to maintain – the funding source should be an
14         annual budget item and determined prior to putting a registry in place.
15       There must be various ways for people to register, even on web-based systems;
16         these can include paper forms; assistance to complete fo rms; phone registration,
17         etc.
18
19
20   2. Creating and maintaining an Access and Functional Needs Planning Group
21
22   Generally, access and functional needs planning groups include people from public or
23   private agencies representing the spectrum of issues for the stake holder group. The
24   planning group is established and coordinated by OEM to work as advisors to OEM in
25   the entire planning process to be sure access and functional needs issues are
26   integrated in emergency plans, procedures, and policies.
27
28   In the best-case scenario, at very least the local Emergency Management Agency and
29   the Department of Health are active members of the group. This participation suggests
30   strong local support and promotes good communication, coordination, and a greater
31   ability to effectively ensure inclusive emergency plans. Equally important is to include a
32   diverse group of stakeholders include agencies, non-profits, faith based organizations,



     November 29, 2010        DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT         Page 106 of 125
 1   individuals, and others from the community who serve as subject matter experts in
 2   regards to varying access and functional needs and the interplay of these issues during
 3   emergencies.
 4
 5   The following checklist provides only a starting point for creating and maintaining an
 6   Access and Functional Needs Planning Group. The key is to ensure that the group is
 7   diverse and that it is an integral partner in all aspects of emergency preparedness,
 8   response, recovery, and mitigation. This group must convene regularly, have
 9   meaningful assignments, and produce measured outcomes.
10
11       Create a small planning group with others who support an Access and Functional
12         Needs Planning Group. Important issues to begin discussing with the planning
13         group include:
14            o Is there already an existing group in the community that is doing this type
15               of planning?
16            o What is the level of support from the local emergency management
17               agency and health department and how can they be brought to the table
18               to participate in the planning group?
19            o Who should be invited to participate in this planning group? Who are the
20               stakeholders in the community (consider government, private
21               organizations, faith-based, etc.)?
22            o What/where/when is the best time to hold a first meeting? What will be
23               the agenda?
24            o Which agency will take responsibility for leadership and coordination?
25            o How often will the group meet as a whole and will there be structure for
26               work to be completed between meetings?
27       Invite a diverse group of stakeholders to participate in the group. This may
28         include, but is not limited to the following types of groups:
29             o    State, Territorial, Tribal or Local emergency management agencies;
30             o    Citizen Corps Councils and Program Partners (Community Emergency
31             o    Response Teams (CERT), Medical Reserve Corps (MRC), Fire Corps,
32             o    Volunteers in Police Service (VIPS) and Neighborhood Watch).
33             o    Local Emergency Planning Committees (LEPCs).
34             o    Local first responders (i.e., police, fire, EMT).
35             o    Metropolitan Medical Response System (MMRS),
36             o    Local government and nongovernment disability agencies.
37             o    Developmental disabilities networks and service providers.
38             o    Protection and advocacy agencies.
39             o    Departments of aging and social services.


     November 29, 2010        DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT           Page 107 of 125
 1            o   Hospitals and hospices.
 2            o   Culturally or language-based community groups.
 3            o   VOADs such as the American Red Cross and The Salvation Army.
 4            o   Health departments (State, Territorial, Tribal, and Local as appropriate).
 5            o   Departments of education.
 6            o   Health and human services agencies (including child welfare).
 7            o   2-1-1 Human Services Information and Referral Services
 8            o   HUD or other rent-subsidized multi-family complexes.
 9            o   HUD or otherwise subsidized non-licensed supervised living facilities.
10            o   Nursing homes.
11            o   Media
12            o   Home healthcare organizations.
13            o   Medical service and equipment providers (including durable medical
14                equipment providers).
15            o   Pharmaceutical providers.
16            o   Agencies on alcohol and drug addiction.
17            o   Job and family service agencies.
18            o   Vocational rehabilitation agencies.
19            o   Independent living centers.
20            o   Behavioral health and mental health agencies.
21            o   Commissions on the deaf and hard of hearing and the blind and visually
22                impaired.
23            o   Governor’s committees on individuals with special needs and/or
24                disabilities (as applicable).
25            o   Translation and interpretation service agencies.
26            o   Transportation service providers (including those with accessible
27                vehicles).
28            o   Utility providers.
29            o   Colleges and universities.
30            o   Faith-based organizations.
31            o   Schools.
32            o   Childcare facilities (both center-based and home-based).
33            o   Veterinary resources.
34            o   Individuals with access and functional needs
35
36       Establish priorities of the group and create a strategic plan that is consistent with
37         and informed of other emergency planning activities taking place within the
38         jurisdiction.   There are likely many issues for the group to address, so it is
39         important to set practical and realistic goals. Approach the planning as a ―step-
40         by-step‖ process, identifying priority issues to begin working on and then building
41         off of that as you go along as a group.
42       In the interest of maintaining support and involvement, might be best to try with
43         smaller projects with determinate parameters that are likely to succeed. Once


     November 29, 2010        DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT         Page 108 of 125
 1         participants see that their time and effort brings productive results they are more
 2         likely to continue to participate. You can also use this as a ―selling‖ point to pull
 3         in more agencies.
 4       If you have enough participants in your SNAP, it may also be useful to split into
 5         committees to address different issues.       This will depend on the number of
 6         people, their expertise, and their leadership skills and willingness. The group
 7         should decide the priority areas but sub-committees can be very effective at
 8         feeding back up and into the full group.
 9       Ensure that there is a direct link from this group to emergency managers to
10         ensure that the work is meaningfully incorporated in all emergency phases. An
11         OEM representative should sit on each sub-committee to ensure consistency.
12
13
14   3. Community Preparedness Education Checklist
15
16   The following actions items provide guidance for the development of a community
17   outreach program that includes people with access and functional needs for
18   emergencies:
19
20       Involve those with access and functional needs and/or their advocates in the
21         development process to ensure that information is accurate and usable.
22       Ensure to collaborate with disability, cultural, and linguistic media partners.
23       Make sure that training and outreach materials are available in accessible
24         formats and make sure these formats are vetted by people with access and
25         functional needs before use/distribution.
26       When posting information on websites, ensure that it is accessible to people with
27         access and functional needs. (See Appendix F on website accessibility)
28       Partner with organizations to create programs that train people to conduct
29         preparedness presentations to peers with similar conditions/disability/life
30         experiences.
31       Offer training on emergency preparedness to people with functional and access
32         and their advocates.




     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT          Page 109 of 125
 1       Ensure that preparedness materials stress the importance of putting personal
 2         preparedness plans in place as well as addressing where individuals can access
 3         tools and guidance on how to create a personal plan.
 4       Develop workshops for people with access and functional needs and their
 5         families, and caregivers that help walk them through the emergency planning
 6         process.
 7       Establish a CERT program that integrates people with access and functional
 8         needs through ensuring active recruitment of people with access and functional
 9         needs, ensuring accessible meeting spaces, and making accommodations.
10       Create a section devoted to issues related to access and functional needs on the
11         OEM website. The section can contain tips, video messages/demonstrations,
12         podcasts, a list of resources, and a forum for those with questions, and so forth.
13         Make sure the website is designed to be accessible to people with access and
14         functional needs.
15
16   4. Media Checklist
17
18   In the event of an emergency, the County, through OEM’s Public Information Officer
19   (PIO), will alert the media as outlined in the County’s Emergency Public Information
20   Plan. The media will make information available to the public. The Emergency Public
21   Information (EPI) communications network includes a list of key contacts for radio,
22   television, daily newspapers, multilingual and cultural media.
23
24   The FCC has specific rules and regulations in regards to the accessibility of emergency
25   information (outlined in Appendix G).

26   The following checklist is intended for the PIO and distributed to the media, when
27   necessary.
28
29   Format
30       Review and become familiar with the Federal Communications Commission’s
31         rules and regulations in regards to accessibility of emergency information which
32         can be found at: http://www.fcc.gov/cgb/dro/emergency_info_regs.html.



     November 29, 2010         DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT       Page 110 of 125
 1       Provide real-time, open-captioning when possible (Note: this helps all people in a
 2         community)
 3       Any visual information, such as telephone numbers, e-mail addresses, street
 4         closures, school closures, shelter locations, etc., that are shown on the screen
 5         must also be spoken verbally to viewers to ensure effective communication with
 6         people who are blind or low vision
 7       Live television broadcasts should include captioning, sign-language interpreters
 8         and signage. Ensure to keep the sign-language interpreters in the frame, even
 9         when doing close ups or cutting away to show video footage during press
10         conferences
11       Provide information in Braille, large print, and in an audio format
12       Do not cover over a captioning line with scrolling alerts
13       Utilize visual/aural cues (as required)
14       Post information on 508-compliant websites
15       Test the emergency information system regularly and include participation and
16         feedback from individuals who are deaf/hard of hearing, deaf-blind, blind/low
17         vision and/or who have cognitive disabilities, etc.
18
19   Content
20      Encourage people to share emergency information with their neighbors
21         especially those who may have difficulty receiving and/or understanding an
22         official notification.
23       Be sure to include TTY/TDD and 711 Relay Service information when providing
24         phone numbers to the public.
25       Provide information in a clear and simple manner, repeating it as often as
26         possible for those with cognitive or learning disabilities. Easy-to-understand
27         language ensures that the information is more accessible to many people.
28
29
30
31
32
33


     November 29, 2010         DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT        Page 111 of 125
 1   5. Public Information Officer Checklist
 2      The PIO Checklist includes suggested action steps that the PIO should consider
 3      during emergency events pertaining specifically to ensure inclusion of people with
 4      access and functional needs.
 5
 6       Include in media releases a message encouraging people to share emergency
 7         information with their neighbors, especially those who may have difficulty
 8         receiving and/or understanding an official notification.
 9       Ensure that all public information regarding phone numbers such as agency
10         phone numbers, hotlines, etc. include TTY/TDD and 711 Relay information.
11       Engage diverse sources including mainstream television, radio, and print media;
12         local television, radio, and print channels; non-English speaking television, radio,
13         and newspapers; disability organization newsletters and websites, on-line social
14         networking sites, etc.
15       Engage organizations that serve people with access and functional needs to
16         ensure that needs are appropriately addressed in public information. Also work
17         with these organizations to identify direct and accessible ways to share
18         information with functional and access needs populations.
19       When posting information to the OEM or other agency website, ensure that the
20         website and the information is provided in a 508-compliant format (see Appendix
21         F regarding website accessibility).
22       For the benefit of many individuals, including those with cognitive disabilities, the
23         most pertinent information should be repeated frequently using simple,
24         straightforward language.
25       Work with subject matter experts in areas such as disability, aging, non-English
26         speaking populations, etc. to identify communications barriers and solutions.
27       Identify credible, trusted individuals to convey the messages as well as
28         appropriate channels of delivery. Ensure backup systems are in place.
29       Monitor television screens as information is displayed keeping attention to
30         preserving the integrity of visual images.
31       Share the Media Checklist with media partners.



     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT          Page 112 of 125
 1
 2   6. Outreach Team Checklist
 3   To ensure that outreach teams can effectively reach individuals with access and
 4   functional needs the following considerations should be made:
 5       Before going into a neighborhood, meet with neighborhood leaders to identify
 6         cultural and language norms within that community.
 7       Utilize a team approach; teams should be made up of emergency personnel and
 8         community members. Engage trusted members in the community to deliver
 9         messages and lend subject matter expertise to the outreach effort.
10       Develop a script for outreach teams to use. Ensure that the script includes
11         identifying the access and functional needs of individuals. This will help to
12         ensure that teams are providing clear and consistent information.
13       Be sure to include TTY/TDD and 711 Relay Service information when providing
14         phone numbers to the public.
15       Be sensitive and recognize potential communication barriers; for example,
16         persons who do not speak English or who have low English proficiency, persons
17         who are deaf, hard of hearing, with cognitive disabilities, etc.
18       For the benefit of individuals with cognitive disabilities, the most pertinent
19         information should be repeated frequently using a simple vocabulary
20       Ask if a person needs assistance and be prepared to direct them to assistance
21       Ensure that teams have pre-printed written materials and that they are in different
22         languages, and have clear and appropriate messages for the community.
23       Equip outreach teams with individual communication tools. Utilize non-written
24         tools for communicating such as pictogram boards.
25       Consider that this may be the only means for homeless populations to receive
26         information and extend outreach efforts to this population
27       Be ready to answer questions about pet care needs
28
29   7. Town Hall Meeting Checklist
30   When Town Hall or community meetings are being planned to share emergency
31   recovery information, the following should be taken into consideration:




     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT           Page 113 of 125
 1       Ensure that information announcing the meeting is disseminated through diverse
 2          modalities, accessible formats, and that it encourages the community to attend
 3       Reach out to community leaders, organizations serving individuals with access
 4          and functional needs and invite them to participate as well as share information
 5          with constituents
 6       Ensure that the facility is in a convenient location for individuals to get to and
 7          make transportation options available and known
 8       Ensure that the facility where the meeting to be held is accessible for individuals
 9          with mobility disabilities and be sure to announce this
10       Ensure that interpreters – different languages and/or sign language interpreters
11          are at the meeting and be sure to announce this
12       Provide hand out materials that reflect the information given at the meeting that is
13          in alternate formats
14
15
16   8. Evacuation Information Checklist
17   The OA Mass Evacuation Process Guide provides guidance on the information that
18   should be included in messaging during evacuations (information should also be
19   included in preparedness information regarding evacuation). This is included below
20   with additional information that is particularly relevant to individuals with access and
21   functional needs and caregivers.
22
23       Encourage people to evacuate with family members and caregivers;
24       Encourage evacuees to first seek shelter with friends and family outside of the
25          impact area
26       Encourage people to check on neighbors especially those who may need
27          assistance;
28       Inform individuals how to request evacuation assistance if needed.
29       Remind people to bring essential items such as:
30             o medication and extra supply if available;
31             o a list of medications they use including the name, dosage frequency,
32                 pharmacy, and doctor;



     November 29, 2010          DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT         Page 114 of 125
 1             o identification for medications that require refrigeration or other specialized
 2                care;
 3             o auxiliary aids such as walkers, canes, and other equipment they use
 4                regularly;
 5             o batteries for hearing aids, wheelchairs, scooters, etc.
 6             o extra oxygen tanks
 7             o medical supplies that they require;
 8             o vital records and personal information;
 9             o assistive technology supplies;
10             o personal care supplies
11             o baby supplies
12             o clothing
13             o supplies for service animals
14             o money
15       Transportation options if person requires assistance
16             o Also include accessible transportation options including information on
17                Paratransit services
18             o Types of assistance provided
19             o Who to contact if individual/family needs transportation assistance
20             o When transportation services will begin and end
21             o Transportation point locations – and accessibility at those locations
22             o Frequency of pick-ups
23             o Travel destinations (evacuation points)
24
25   9. Shelter Information Checklist
26       Identify which shelters are accessible and locations;
27       Inform individuals that service animals are permitted in all shelters – and remind
28         them to bring supplies (food, toys, bags) to support that animal.
29       Describe the level of care that can be provided at shelters
30       Inform individuals that they should communicate accommodation requests to
31         shelter personnel
32


     November 29, 2010         DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT          Page 115 of 125
 1   10. Recovery Information Checklist
 2        Location(s) of Disaster Assistance Service Centers
 3       Location(s) of Distribution Points
 4       Access to neighborhoods
 5       Community information – what is the status of schools, hospitals, grocery stores,
 6          dialysis centers, etc.
 7       Types of programs and services available
 8      
 9   11. Recovery Program Access Checklist
10       Ensure that a mechanism is in place to coordinate the delivery of recovery
11          services
12       Ensure language interpreting contracts are in place at recovery centers. Utilize
13          bi-lingual caseworkers when possible
14       Use trusted community organizations to communicate recovery information,
15          including eligibility criteria
16       Staff working on recovery hotlines should be trained to work with people with
17          access and functional needs
18       Staff working in local recovery centers should be trained using advance training
19          and just-in-time training to work with people with access and functional needs
20       All recovery sites should meet both physical and programmatic accessibility
21          standards
22       Ensure that recovery information is available in multiple formats and dispersed
23          through multiple modalities
24       Incorporate the ability to conduct home visits into recovery programs for
25          individuals who are not able to get to assistance sites
26       Ensure that there are multiple ways to fill out applications for recovery assistance
27          (phone, online, with assistant)
28       Ensure extensive and repeated outreach to communities by trusted stakeholders
29       Engage stakeholder advisory groups to review programs, report findings in the
30          field, identify gaps in services, and make policy adjustments and
31          recommendations




     November 29, 2010          DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT      Page 116 of 125
 1       Recovery programs should take into account adults and children who are
 2         wounded, nonverbal, or have limited English proficiency, as well as potential
 3         legal issues regarding custody (i n the case of children).
 4   12. Local Recovery Assistance Centers
 5        All recovery sites should meet both physical and programmatic accessibility
 6         standards. This must at very least include the access to the site; route into the
 7         site and intake areas; and restrooms.
 8       Include and consult with government and non-governmental agencies that can
 9         provide subject matter expertise to ensure access and functional needs are taken
10         into account in recovery assistance centers. Note: This may mean taking factors
11         and work-arounds into account during the planning phase and/or making real
12         time determinations during an event to put modifications/accommodations in
13         place at that moment.
14       Ensure language interpreting contracts are in place at recovery centers. Utilize
15         bi-lingual caseworkers when possible.
16       Ensure that recovery information is available in multiple formats and languages
17         and dispersed through multiple modalities.
18       Staff working in local recovery centers should be trained to work with people with
19         access and functional needs and this is best done in advance but a just in time
20         training should be available for immediate use.
21       Ensure that security personnel are trained to work with people with access and
22         functional needs in advance and/or through just in time training. Ensure that
23         security policies and practices take people with access and functional needs into
24         account.
25       Ensure that there are multiple ways to fill out applications for recovery assistance
26         (phone, online, with assistant).
27       Create a method to identify accommodation requests for staff, clients, caregivers,
28         and others who utilize the recovery center.
29       Offer adult and childcare supervision services at the center.




     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT           Page 117 of 125
 1       Include mental health professionals to assist in all aspects of the recovery center
 2         and offer support for mental and behavioral needs for those who utilize the
 3         Center.
 4       Be sure to have space available to offer privacy to clients when necessary.
 5       Ensure that there is adequate signage throughout the Center. All
 6         announcements should be posted throughout the Center. Signs should be
 7         posted in multiple languages.
 8       Be sure to offer seating or other alternatives while people wait in line. Assign
 9         staff to the lines to identify any issues or requests for accommodations.
10       Offer comfort items such as water and light snacks as people may be waiting a
11         long time and may require sustenance for health or other reasons.
12




     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT         Page 118 of 125
 1                          APPENDIX F: WEBSITE ACCESSIBILITY
 2
 3   The following information is based on information available through the U.S. Access
 4   Board and the National Organization on Disability’s Emergency Preparedness
 5   Initiative’s Functional Needs of People with Disabilities: A Guide for Emergency
 6   Managers, Planners, and Responders.
 7
 8   Web accessibility is based on the principle that no potential Website visitors, including
 9   those with varied disabilities, should be precluded from accessing content or services
10   the site provides.   A website can be considered accessible if it meets certain widely
11   accepted design standards, such as those outlined in Section 508 of the Rehabilitation
12   Act.
13
14   Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended (29 U.S.C. 794d), requires
15   that when Federal agencies develop, procure, maintain, or use electronic and
16   information technology, Federal employees with disabilities have access to and use of
17   information and data that is comparable to the access and use by Federal employees
18   who are not individuals with disabilities, unless an undue burden would be imposed on
19   the agency. Section 508 also requires that individuals with disabilities, who are
20   members of the public seeking information or services from a Federal agency, have
21   access to and use of information and data that is comparable to that provided to the
22   public who are not individuals with disabilities, unless an undue burden would be
23   imposed on the agency.
24
25   The US Access Board has provided a detailed report called, Electronic and Information
26   Technology Accessibility Standards (Section 508) which can be accessed at
27   http://www.access-board.gov/sec508/standards.htm.             The   Website     Accessibility
28   Initiative is another great resource to learn about website accessibility, evaluation, and
29   methods      for     increasing   accessibility    and     can      be    accessed        at
30   http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/accessibility.php.           Other      resources       include:
31   www.webaim.org; www.ittatc.org; and http://buyaccessible.gov.
32


     November 29, 2010        DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT          Page 119 of 125
 1   This federal guidance can be applied at the county and local levels thereby making
 2   critical information available to more people during emergencies.
 3
 4   There are evaluation tools to help evaluate a website’s level of accessibility and there
 5   are services available that test the accessibility of websites. The Website Accessibility
 6   Initiative offers different approaches to evaluating accessibility of a website, found at:
 7   http://www.w3.org/WAI/eval/Overview.html.
 8
 9   No evaluation tool alone can replace the evaluation conducted through knowledgeable
10   computer users with disabilities.     Agencies and organizations wanting to evaluate
11   accessibility, can engage the disability community to ―test‖ the accessibility and usability
12   of their websites. Working with computer users with varied disabilities from a local
13   Center for Independent Living, for example, is a good way to test accessibility of a
14   website.
15




     November 29, 2010        DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT          Page 120 of 125
 1           APPENDIX G: FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (FCC)
 2          REQUIREMENTS IN REGARD TO PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES AND
 3                        EMERGENCY COMMUNICATIONS
 4
 5   The FCC rules and regulations in regards to accessibility of emergency information can
 6   be found at: http://www.fcc.gov/cgb/dro/emergency_info_regs.html.
 7
 8   The following summary is excerpted from FEMA’s Comprehensive Planning Guide
 9   (CPG) 301: Interim Emergency Management Planning Guide for Special Needs
10   Populations.
11
12   In October 2005, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) expanded the
13   Emergency Alert System (EAS) rules to require EAS participation by digital television
14   broadcasters, digital cable television providers, digital broadcast radio, Digital Audio
15   Radio Service, and Direct Broadcast Satellite systems. The FCC’s EAS rules require
16   that EAS provide access to people with disabilities by providing both visual and aural
17   alerts. Under the rules, a visual EAS alert does not have to be an exact transcription of
18   an audio alert, but must be ―any method of visual presentation which results in a legible
19   message conveying the essential emergency information.‖ In the future, EAS will be
20   based on a Common Alerting Protocol that will transmit EAS messages so they can be
21   received by equipment in voice, text, data, or video formats.
22
23   Many communities also use the NOAA Tone-Alert or Specific Area Message Encoder to
24   provide a warning for any community emergency. These inexpensive receivers issue
25   alerts for emergency messages only, increasing the probability of a message being
26   noticed.
27
28   Not all broadcasts of emergency information trigger the EAS. Accordingly, the FCC
29   adopted separate requirements to meet the needs of persons with disabilities in cases
30   where radio and television broadcasters and cable service providers provide non-EAS
31   emergency announcements and alerts. In 47 Code 38 of Federal Regulations (CFR) §
32   79.2, the FCC requires that any information intended to further the protection of life,



     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT         Page 121 of 125
 1   health, safety, or property, such as immediate weather situations, civil disorders,
 2   evacuation orders, school closings, relief assistance, etc., be accessible to persons with
 3   disabilities. These rules apply to all local broadcasters, cable operators, and satellite
 4   television services.
 5
 6   There are no exemptions to FCC rules regarding accessibility of emergency broadcast
 7   information. Television and broadcast stations must provide emergency public
 8   information in a visual format, such as open captions, scrolls, or even hand-lettered
 9   signs, accessible to persons with hearing disabilities. The critical details must also be
10   provided in an aural format, meaning that spoken information must be accessible to
11   persons with vision disabilities. If the emergency information is provided in the video
12   portion of programming that is not a regularly scheduled newscast or a newscast that
13   interrupts regular programming, this information must be accompanied by an aural tone.
14   If crawls or scrolls are provided during regular programming, an aural tone is required to
15   indicate to persons who are blind or who have low vision that emergency information is
16   being provided. Additionally, if television stations run a text message crawl across the
17   bottom of the screen, they should ensure it does not interfere with the area reserved for
18   closed captioning. Camera operators and editors need to include the sign language
19   interpreter in the picture (frame) if one is interpreting next to the emergency
20   spokesperson. (Title IV of the Americans with Disabilities Act also requires closed
21   captioning of federally funded public service announcements.)
22




     November 29, 2010       DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT          Page 122 of 125
 1          APPENDIX H: FUNCTIONAL NEEDS TRANSPORTATION INVENTORY
 2                            GUIDANCE WORKSHEET
 3
 4   ―Accessible‖ in terms of transportation can mean a number of different things.
 5   Transportation for the public during evacuations must accommodate people with a
 6   variety of functional needs including those who use oxygen and those who use
 7   wheelchairs, scooters, walkers, and other mobility aids.     The guidance below identifies
 8   the types of data that must be gathered in order to expedite the matching of
 9   transportation resources with the specific functional needs of an evacuating population
10   as well as ensure that transportation resources can be mobilized quickly. Requirements
11   for this data must also be specified in written agreements with transportation providers.
12
13         Source of the Resource:
14             o Administrative Contact
15             o Activation Contacts and numbers
16             o Designation as public or private
17
18         Type of Resource
19          This should include a general identifier, e.g., van bus, etc., the size of the vehicle
20          and any brand name, e.g., Aerotech 240, Uplander, etc.
21
22         Availability of the Resource:
23             o Realistic knowledge of when or under what conditions source will or will
24                 not be available. (e.g., during school hours, or program hours)
25
26         Entry
27             o Mechanical lift: key and power source
28             o Manual ramp
29             o Kneeling entrance: Common on buses allows access without a high step.
30
31         Interior configuration/capacities
32              o Fixed or moveable (e.g., Bus may have 10 fixed seats and two spots with
33                  lock down for wheelchairs, or the fixed seats may be flip up to
34                  accommodate a total of 6 wheel chairs).
35
36         Number of the Resource
37
38         Fuel Type
39
40         Drivers/Access
41           Licensure required
42           Skills required (e.g., operate manual lift)


     November 29, 2010        DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT            Page 123 of 125
 1             Plan for redundant drivers and access to keys (ignition and lift keys)
 2             Knowledge and sensitivity to populations with access and functional needs
 3
 4         Availability of air conditioning/heat (exposure to extreme heat or cold can be
 5          detrimental to many people with access and functional needs.
 6
 7
 8                  Appendix I: Department of Justice (DOJ’s) Shelter Guidance
 9
10   The U.S. Department of Justice offers the ADA Best Practices Tool Kit for State and
11   Local Governments and has a dedicated chapter to emergency management called,
12   Chapter 7: Emergency Management Under Title II of the ADA.              The chapter and
13   Addendum 1: Title II Checklist offer information to emergency managers regarding
14   emergency management requirements under Title II of the ADA. Addendums 2 and 3
15   (detailed below) specifically address the ADA and shelters used during emergencies.
16   This       information      is     posted      on      the      DOJ       website       at:
17   http://www.ada.gov/pcatoolkit/toolkitmain.htm.
18
19         Chapter 7 Addendum 2: The ADA and Emergency Shelters: Access for All in
20          Emergencies and Disasters. The US Department of Justice provides guidance
21          regarding how the ADA applies to shelters during emergencies.      Chapter 7,
22          Addendum 2 discusses the ADA in terms of various sheltering components
23          including:
24              o    advanced planning
25              o    accessibility
26              o    eligibility criteria
27              o    reasonable modifications
28              o    effective communication
29              o    shelter environment
30              o    supplies
31              o    transitions back to the community
32
33         Chapter 7 Addendum 3: ADA Checklist for Emergency Shelters offers the Quick-
34          Check Survey and the ADA Checklist for Emergency Shelters, which are
35          designed to assist State and local officials and operators of emergency shelters
36          to determine whether a facility being considered for use as an emergency shelter
37          is accessible and if not, whether modifications are needed to remove barriers or



     November 29, 2010         DRAFT – For Public Comment – DRAFT        Page 124 of 125
1         whether relocation to another accessible facility is necessary. Filling out the
2         Quick-Check Survey will provide guidance on whether a facility has certain basic
3         accessible features, and filling out the detailed ADA Checklist for Emergency
4         Shelters will provide specific information on any barriers to accessibility.




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