AGRI-SCIENCE by liuqingyan

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									                   AGRI-SCIENCE-- CAREER/TECH DEPT

AGRICULTURAL EXPLORATION: - Full Year Course
Course #: 0101 – 0102

Credit: 2
Elective: Grades 9 - 11
Prerequisite: None
Course Description:
This course is designed for students interested in exploring the seven career pathways in agriculture: Agri-
Business Systems, Animal Systems, Environmental Service Systems, Food Products and Processing Systems,
Natural Resources Systems, Plant Systems, and Power, Structural, and Technical Systems. Shop safety and
project along with quest speakers and movies are utilized. The FFA will also be discussed. Students will begin
and maintain and individual Supervised Agricultural Experience. (SAE)

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Positive attitude, communication skills.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.      Describe the seven areas of agriculture.
2.      Define agriculture.
3.      Keep accurate records for agricultural enterprises.
4.      List and describe two careers in each agricultural area.

Careers Related to Content:
Agricultural Instructor, Farming, Ranching, Bio Processor, Conservationist



AG MECHANICS AND CONSTRUCTION: - Semester Course
Course #: 0151
Credit: 1
Elective: Grades 10 - 12
Prerequisite: None
Course Description:
Students will develop skills in identification and the use of hand and power tools, welding and ag carpentry.
Electricity, concrete, structures and small gas engines will also be studied if time permits. Students will have an
opportunity to construct projects that are required and some of their choice. Approximately 50% of the time will
be spent in the shop working on projects.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Mechanical, positive attitude, carpentry.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.      Identify and describe 25 major hand tools.
2.      Identify and describe 15 major power tools.
3.      Weld a butt, lap, tee and corner joints.
4.      Complete 4 assigned projects (2 wood, 2 metal)
Careers Related to Content:
Implement Sales, Welder, Small Engine Mechanic, Implement Repair.
                   AGRI-SCIENCE-- CAREER/TECH DEPT

ADVANCED AG MECHANICS AND CONSTRUCTION: - Semester Course
Course #: 0152
Credit: 1
Elective: Grades 10 - 12
Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Ag Mechanics
Course Description:
This class will be a continuation of Ag Mechanics. Areas to be studied will include hydraulics, pneumatics and
robotics. Students will have the opportunity to construct the project of their choice. Approximately 75% of the
time will be spent in the shop working on projects.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Mechanical, positive attitude and carpentry.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.      Describe the difference between hydraulics and pneumatics.
2.      Describe a basic hydraulic system.
3.      Describe robotics systems and how they are important to industry.
4.      Complete an ag mechanics project approved by instructor.
Careers Related to Content:
Welder, Mechanic, Ag Engineer, Sales




ANIMAL SCIENCE: - Semester Course
Course #: 0113
Credit: 1
Elective: Grades 10 - 12
Prerequisite: None
Course Description:
This course will deal with beef, dairy, swine, sheep and goats. Topics covered will include identification,
selection-evaluation, marketing, nutrition, reproduction, genetics, cell development and more.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Positive attitude math, desire for animal welfare (humane treatment).

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.      Identify, select and evaluate breeds of beef, swine, dairy, sheep and goats.
2.      Balance a ration.
3.      Identify and label reproduction systems of beef, swine, sheep and goats.
4.      Describe basic genetics and cell development.
5.      Explain how livestock was domesticated and arrived in North America.
6.      Explain the difference between animal rights and animal welfare.

Careers Related to Content:
Veterinarian, Livestock Breeder, Geneticist, Livestock Buyer, Feed Salesman/Nutritionist, Agricultural Instructor.
                 AGRI-SCIENCE-- CAREER/TECH DEPT

HORSE/SMALL ANIMAL PRODUCTION: - Semester Course
Course #: 0123
Credit: 1
Elective: Grades 10 - 12
Prerequisite: None
Course Description:
Topics will include careers, care, management, marketing and sale of horses, small animals including
rabbits, bees and pets. Field trips and guest speakers will be utilized as supplemental materials.
Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Positive attitude, communication skills, desire for animal welfare (humane treatment).
Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Describe basic management practices for small animals.
2.     Explain the development of the horse, identify 15 breeds and describe basic care.
3.     Explain the development of the dog and identify 15 breeds.
4.     Explain the development of the cat and identify 15 breeds.
5.     Explain the difference between animal welfare and animal rights.
Careers Related to Content:
Veterinarian, Pet Store Supervisor, Small Animal Groomer, Kennel Supervisor.




WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT: - Semester Course
Course #: 0143
Credit: 1
Elective: Grades 10 - 12
Prerequisite: None
Course Description:
Topic area will center around the conservation and protection of the earth's resources. Subjects will
include Wildlife Management, Water Quality, Air Quality and Soil Conservation.
Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Positive attitude, desire in environmental conservation, desire for animal welfare (humane treatment).
Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Explain how wildlife management is important to wildlife species and humans.
2.     Explain how resource conservation is important to present and future generations.
Careers Related to Content:
Wildlife Conservation Officer, Biologist, Park Supervisor, Environmental Engineer.
                   AGRI-SCIENCE-- CAREER/TECH DEPT
HORTICULTURE: - Semester Course
Course #: 0131
Credit: 1
Elective: Grades 10 - 12
Prerequisite: None
Course Description:
This course is designed for students interested in ornamental and/or landscaping plants. Areas to be
studied will include landscape design, floral arrangements, pruning, plant identification and more.
Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Positive attitude, math, drawing and imagination.
Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Layout and design landscaping projects.
2.     Design and create a floral arrangement.
3.     Identify and describe the major ornamental/landscaping plants.
4.     List and describe five horticulture careers.
Careers Related to Content:
Greenhouse Manager, Nursery Manager, Landscape Architect, Golf Course Superintendent, Bio
Technologist




ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE: - Semester Course
Course #: 0132
Credit: 1
Elective: Grades 10 - 12
Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Horticulture
Course Description:
This course is designed for students interested in ornamental and/or landscaping plants as well as
greenhouse production. Areas to be studied will include greenhouse production (includes working in a
greenhouse), landscape projects, plants sales and much more.
Skills Need To Be Successful In The Class:
Strong interest in plants, positive attitude, creatively.
Specific Outcomes:
1.     Propagate popular ornamental plant varieties.
2.     Identify the major ornamental plants.
3.     Germinate and transplant popular ornamental plants.
4.     Complete a landscape project.
Careers Related to Content:
Agricultural Instructor, Greenhouse & Nursery Manager, Landscape Architect and Golf Course
Superintendent.
                 AGRI-SCIENCE-- CAREER/TECH DEPT


AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS: - Full Year Course                  [Formerly Commodity Marketing Strategies]
Course #: 0161 – 0162

Credit: 2
Elective: Grade 11 - 12
Prerequisite: None

Course Description:
This course is designed for the agricultural student planning on post-secondary education and eventually
a career in agriculture. Topics will include career exploration and college requirements, cash flows,
marketing, Chicago Board of Trade, budgeting, investments, speaking skills, record keeping and
employment skills. Time will be allowed to create individual and group projects.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Positive attitude, communication skills and money management.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Complete a 5-10 minute speech.
2.     Keep accurate records (budgeting, enterprises, etc.).
3.     Explain how the Chicago Board of Trade functions.
4.     Explain how the Chicago Board of Trade is important to agriculture.
5.     Complete a cover letter, resume‘ and references.
6.     Complete a 500 – 1000 word essay on a specific facet in agriculture.

Careers Related to Content:
Commodity Broker, AG Sales, Farm Manager, Agriculture Instructor.
                      BUSINESS-- CAREER/TECH DEPT


ACCOUNTING 1 - Semester Course
Course #: 0201


Credit: 1
Elective Grades 11-12
Prerequisite: None

Course Description
Accounting 1 is for the students who desire beginning vocational preparation for accounting
careers; or, for students looking to careers in related business fields for which mastery or some
accounting knowledge, understanding, and application is needed; (small business ownership or
entrepreneurship) or, for students seeking a foundation on which to continue studying business and
accounting at the collegiate level. Understanding the accounting cycle is the basis of the course.
Students begin with a simple accounting cycle and proceed to the more complex systems. Students
will study the accounting cycle for a sole proprietorship and a partnership. The IBM computer lab,
with accounting software, will be used to solve some of the problems. There is a fee for course
material.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must have average or above average grades, be accurate, like to work with numbers, and
have problem-solving skills.

Specific Expected Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Identify the correct definition of accounting terms and list career in the accounting field.
2.     Distinguish between correct and incorrect accounting principles.
3.     State and explain the fundamental accounting equation.
4.     Record transactions in a journal and post to ledgers.
5.     Describe for a cash-basis organization, each step of the accounting cycle.
6.     Find and correct errors in the general journal and ledgers.
7.     Handle the merchandise inventory account in a retail business.
8.     Complete financial statements.
9.     Prove cash.
10.    Use special journals for transactions.
11.    Demonstrate the ability to use subsidiary ledgers to keep track of receivables and payables.

Career Related to Content: Accounting Clerk, Junior or Assistant Accountant, Secretary, Typist,
General Office Workers, Bookkeeper, Accountant.
                     BUSINESS-- CAREER/TECH DEPT


ACCOUNTING 2 - Semester Course
Course #: 0202



Credit: 1
Elective Grades 11-12
Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Accounting 1


Course Description:
Accounting 2 focuses on specific needs and interests of students. It is designed for students who
have a desire to go to college and major in accounting or some other phase of business
administration; to broaden and improve knowledge about business procedures and the use of
accounting data. The course is essential for students considering small business ownership or a
career in an entrepreneurial field. The computer lab, with accounting software, will be used to
solve several problems in this class. There is a fee for course material.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must have average or above average grades, be accurate, like to work with numbers, and
have problem-solving skills.

Specific Expected Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Complete correctly the worksheet for a merchandising business organized as a partnership.
2.     Prepare schedules of accounts payable and receivable and compare the balances with those
       in the controlling accounts.
3.     Plan adjustments on a worksheet for a merchandising business.
4.     Complete financial statements for a partnership including balance sheets, income
       statements, distribution of net income or loss, and capital statements.
5.     Perform steps included in end-of-cycle adjusting and closing entries.
6.     Complete opening accounting steps for a corporation.
7.     Analyze transactions dealing with purchases, sales, cash receipts, cash payments, returns
       and allowances, and refunds in special journals designed for each business.
8.     Prepare payroll records and record the required entries.
9.     Prepare tax reports and the required entries.

Careers Related to Content: Private Accounting, Public Accounting, Government/Not for Profit
Accounting, Personal Accounting, Financial Accounting, Managerial Accounting, Cost
Accounting, Tax Accounting, Auditing.
                      BUSINESS-- CAREER/TECH DEPT
INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS - Semester Course
Course #: 0203

Credit: 1
Elective Grades 9-10
Prerequisite: None

Course Description:
Introduction to Business is a one semester course which will provide students with a fundamental
understanding of how business and our economy operate. As consumers, workers, and citizens, students
should be able to interpret economic issues which affect them and manage their economic affairs
efficiently and wisely. General Business is an excellent introductory course for any of the more
specialized courses in the business department.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must be able to read, write, and express opinions and ideas verbally, visually, and in writing.

Specific Expected Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Make informed and intelligent personal, business, and consumer decisions.
2.     Understand and appreciate the operations of the private enterprise system.
3.     Understand his/her economic rights and responsibilities as a citizen in a democracy.
4.     Explain how people, communities, and nations throughout the world depend upon each other.
5.     Discuss the value of marketing upon a product.
6.     Describe how tariffs, quotas, and embargoes affect world trade.
7.     Explain the function of banks and their methods of operation and money earning.

Careers Related to Content: Introduction to Business is a life skill course related to any and all careers.
                   BUSINESS-- CAREER/TECH DEPT
BUSINESS PROCEDURES – New Semester Course
       Combination of former courses – Office Procedures + Word Processing
       NOTE: Students who have taken OFFICE PROCEDURES are not eligible for this course.
       Students who have taken WORD PROCESSING – can take this course for credit.
Course #: 0233
Credit: 1
Elective Grades 10-12
Prerequisite: Possess a typing skill level of at least 30 wpm OR teacher approval

Course Description:
This ACTIVITY-ORIENTED class is designed to provide students with a realistic view of today's
business procedures, equipment and activities while developing business skills that are important to all
office-support personnel. Students will be placed in the role of an administrative assistant in a simulated
workplace environment. Tasks will include processing, creating, formatting, updating business documents
while performing related activities. Simulations used in this course may cover a variety of businesses;
River Oaks Mall, Tennessee Science Education Association, Salk Alumni Association, HPJ
Communication Specialists, Maple View Chamber of Commerce.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Planning and organization are important due to the number of individualized assignments. Students must
also be able to follow oral and written instructions and have keyboarding skills. This course is
recommended for students who possess basic computer skills and wish to improve these skills.

Specific Expected Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Understand the unique functions of the office and related career requirements.
2.     Describe important safety, organization, and time management skills and demonstrate improved
       productivity.
3.     Prepare calendars, agendas, travel itineraries, and meeting plans.
4.     Code alphabetic, numeric, geographic and subject files using recognized ARMA filing rules.
6.     Handle incoming and outgoing mail procedures.
7.     Demonstrate proper telephone techniques in answering incoming and placing outgoing calls.
       Understand basic telecommunication concepts.
8.     Prepare career-related papers (resume, application forms and letters, follow-up letters, skill
       inventories, interview questions, etc)
9.     Demonstrate proficiency in using the functions and features of both the computer hardware and
       software while completing office simulations using a variety of software and interactive situations.
10..   Keyboard and format usable/mailable documents, proofread and edit to correct all errors, and
       refine evaluation skills while increasing their keyboarding skill beyond their present level of
       keying speed and accuracy

Careers Related to Content:
Virtually every career requires the ability to utilize a computer to complete tasks. Any business has staff
that works in the "OFFICE". Specifically, administrative assistants, receptionists, support staff, word
processors, clerk-typists, data-entry operators, office supervisors, office managers, secretaries, Information
Technology (IT Computer) Positions, Entrepreneurs, Managers, and Medical Records. Oftentimes the
skills can be used for part-time college employment or used in their PERSONAL lives as a student,
consumer, employee, and a person maintaining their own home/apartment.
                  BUSINESS-- CAREER/TECH DEPT


BUSINESS LAW - Semester Course
Course #: 2733

Credit: 1
Elective Grade 12
Prerequisite: None

Course Description:
Law affects each of us on a daily basis. The relationship between individuals, business, and
government is very complex. This complexity makes a general understanding of how Business
Law affects us as citizens, workers, and consumers an essential life skill and thus a course strongly
recommended for all students. Students will find the content of this course interesting, dramatic,
practical, relevant, and challenging.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must be able to read, write, and express opinions and ideas clearly and concisely; must be
willing to work both independently and cooperatively; must demonstrate problem-solving skills,
and must possess good work habits and study skills.

Specific Expected Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Understand their basic legal rights and responsibilities and apply them to their everyday
       roles as consumers, citizens, and workers.
2.     Demonstrate a respect for law and an understanding of how the legal system functions.
3.     Understand the purpose, format, and uses of a variety of common legal documents.
4.     Understand the legal implications of various business transactions.
5.     Possess a working vocabulary of the most frequently used legal terms.
6.     Demonstrate decision-making, analysis, and application skills in solving frequently
       encountered legal situations.

Careers Related to Content: Virtually every aspect of life is touched by the law. Specifically Business
Law is related to careers such as law enforcement, private investigators, court reporters, legal assistants,
legal secretaries, lawyers, clerks of court, FBI agents, judges, insurance claims adjustors, title searchers
and examiners, sol proprietors, and any career associated with business administration
                         BUSINESS-- CAREER/TECH DEPT

ENTREPRENEURSHIP - Semester Course                 (Formerly called MARKETING & MANAGEMENT)
Course #: 1803

Credit: 1
Elective Grades 11-12
Prerequisite: None


Course Description:
The primary focus of this class deals with ENTREPRENEURSHIP. This course provides insight into the
characteristics, organization, and operation of business. Students will complete a BUSINESS PLAN for a business
of their own choice.

Another major section of this course is MARKETING and SALESMANSHIP. Students can use their creativity in
designing, naming, and marketing a "new product" of their choice--including the product itself, price, place, and
promotion. The SELLING portion of this class develops the skills necessary to become a successful salesperson.
Product features are translated into buyer benefits. The central theme is "helping the customer make wise buying
decisions." Each student presents an actual sales demonstration to another student.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
This course is designed for those students thinking of owning or managing their own business or understanding
those people who do. This class is also designed for those thinking of pursuing a career in sales. It is also
recommended for students pursuing a business degree in college, such as business administration, marketing,
management, accounting, and finance.

Students should have a desire to build an interest in the business field, and be able to relate concepts from the book
to actual projects of their own design. Students will read, write and express opinions and ideas verbally, visually, and
in writing, and to compute using basic math.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.      Be a simulated entrepreneur by developing a new business plan of their choice.
2.      Design new product and follow through with a Marketing Mix.
3.      Role-play a typical product sale. The student shall be aware of the importance of selling in their personal
        life; the importance of the customer to a business; and specific strategies and skills involved in each step of a
        sale.
4.      Become familiar with business vocabulary, understand the many activities, problems, and decisions
        involved in operating a business successfully in our global world.
5.      Appreciate the importance of business in our economy.

Careers Related to Content:
A wide variety of business-related careers would include Entrepreneurship (Business Ownership) and Management.
In addition, over a third of all Americans are employed in marketing-related positions. Thus, the number of possible
marketing careers is enormous and the opportunities are open to a full range of careers in Sales and Sales
Management, as well as Advertising, Public Relations, Buyers, Retail and Wholesale Management. This
background information is also helpful for students interested in the Accounting profession.
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS-- CAREER/TECH DEPT
COMPUTER LITERACY - Semester Course                            (Formerly COMPUTER SKILLS & KEYBOARDING)
Course #: 0213

Credit: 1
Elective Grades 9-12
Prerequisite: None.

Course Description:: This course is an introduction to business computer software and hardware. Students will use basic
and intermediate features of word processing and spreadsheet software, and basic features of database and presentation
software. General computer concepts and the internet will also be covered. This course is highly recommended for
students who want more computer application experience, but do not want to enroll in Computer
Applications I for college credit. This course is also designed for any student who does not type at a skill level
they would like. This course is especially designed for students who type less than 40-50 wpm, or students
who have never successfully completed a formal keyboarding course or who could profit from a major review
of the keys. Many students who have taken an elementary/middle school Computer Literacy/Keyboarding course
may choose to take this course and will benefit by advancing in Microsoft Word, and from intensive technique
review and development. Many personal-use topics will be taught as well: keying & composing emails, memos,
letters, reports, etc. In addition, data base, spreadsheet, power point, and graphic concepts will be introduced. This
course is DEFINITELY recommended for students who have had no prior keyboarding training or who have
limited keyboarding skills. After completing this course, students should have a solid keyboarding background
for Computer Applications, Business Procedures, Computer Programming I & II, Composition, and for personal use.
Students who have a keyboarding skill of 40-50 wpm through classes and/or experience may choose to NOT take
this course, and to enroll in Business Procedures or Computer Applications I with instructor permission.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must be willing to work toward developing their keyboarding and software skills beyond their present level
and possess the ability to follow oral and written directions.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Able To:
1.      Key and format documents including letters, memos, emails, envelopes, outlines, reports, tables, and
        enumerations.
2.      Efficiently operate a keyboard using the touch method and with proper techniques of all alpha-numeric
        keys, symbols, numbers, and punctuation marks.
3.      Demonstrate proficiency in the use of the functions/features of the computer hardware/software.(Usually
        Microsoft Word, Microtype Pro, and Checkpro.) Use basic features of the Windows operating system
4.       Demonstrate proficiency in database, word processing, spreadsheets, and presentation software..
5.      Demonstrate how effectively use an Internet search engine, how to use electronics resources, including e-mail and
        various Web Services
6.     Demonstrate proficiency in using the functions and features of both the computer hardware and
       software while completing office simulations using a variety of software and interactive situations.
7..    Keyboard and format usable/mailable documents, proofread and edit to correct all errors, and
       refine evaluation skills while increasing their keyboarding skill beyond their present level of
       keying speed and accuracy
8.      Apply proofreading and editing skills Input data at an acceptable rate of speed with acceptable accuracy.
9.      Utilize the keyboard in lieu of pencil/paper to generate/compose documents.
10.     Discuss issues related to Computers and Society, Security, Privacy, and Ethics, and computer ergonomics.
11.     Study careers involving computer technology

Careers Related to Content: ANY CAREER THAT USES A COMPUTER!
All careers involve computer technology at some level.. . Part-time and career employment is available to students with
basic computer knowledge, word processing skills, and/or data entry skills.
       COMPUTER APPLICATION -- CAREER/TECH DEPT
                 *Concurrent College Credit
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I - Semester Course
FHS #: 0303C Credit: 1
IHCC#: CSC110 Introduction to Computers      College Credit: 3
Elective Grades 9-12         Prerequisite: Ability to Type

Course Description:: This course is an introduction to business computer software and hardware. Students will use basic
and intermediate features of word processing and spreadsheet software, and basic features of database and presentation
software. General computer concepts and the internet will also be covered.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students should have an interest in learning a variety of computer programs and related topics. Students should have basic
keyboarding skills of at least 30 wpm or the completion of Computers Skills & Keyboarding and/or Computer Literacy ==

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Able To:

1. Use basic features of the Windows operating system
2. Demonstrate how effectively use an Internet search engine
3. Demonstrate the use of electronics resources, including e-mail and Web Services
4. Demonstrate proficiency in database software
5. Demonstrate proficiency in word processing software
6. Demonstrate proficiency in spreadsheet software
7. Demonstrate proficiency in presentation software
8. Explain how Computers can be used in various professions
9. Demonstrate software integration
10. Explain the functions of and relationship between system software and application software
11. Explain computer system components
12. Demonstrate an understanding of computer network technology
13. Explain computer crime, privacy and ethics issues.
14. Discuss issues related to computers – such as the importance of computer literacy. the impact of computers in society
    and how computers affect the quality of lives.
15 Study careers involving computer technology.



Careers Related to Content

All careers involve computer technology at some level. Applications are vast in the field of Business, High Technology,
Engineering, Education, Journalism, and Medicine. Part-time and career employment is available to students with basic
computer knowledge, word processing skills, and/or data entry skills.

-
      COMPUTER APPLICATIONS -- CAREER/TECH DEPT
Computer Applications 2/Web Design – Semester Course
Course #: 0312


Credit: 1
Elective Grades 10-12
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Computer Applications I

Course Description: ‗
This course uses projects to focus on business use of computer systems and application software. Topics include
the Internet as a business resource, web page design and creation; desktop publishing, presentation software, and
software integration Specialized information, as well as a hands-on advanced exploration method of teaching
will be used in this course. Students will receive advanced instruction on how to use the Microsoft Office Suite –
Word, Access, Excel, and Power Point. Students will have an opportunity to complete advanced computer
application projects and research various computer topics. Students will also learn basic web design techniques,
using HTML and then Dream Weaver.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
 Students should have successfully completed the Computer Applications I course, and have a desire to
independently explore programs in a controlled "try-it" environment. Students need to be able to access online
help as needed. The ability to follow written and oral instructions is important.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:

1.      Complete advanced word processing applications: outlines, macros, merge features, advanced formatting,
        moving documents from one type of word processor to another as text files, preparing envelopes on the
        printer, and columns.
2.      Complete advanced spreadsheet applications using spreadsheet functions, ―what if‖ scenarios, business
        functions, macros, and various printouts. Develop charts from spreadsheet information. (i.e. pie, bar, etc.)
3.      Complete advanced power point projects—using templates, graphics, transitions and animations.
4..     Prepare and update advanced databases. Prepare a variety of REPORTS and a variety of queries in the
        database program. Create graphs. Alter appearances of forms and reports. Evaluate database design
        and functionality. Index files.
5.      Integrate files between word processor, database, spreadsheet, Power Point and communications/graphics
        software. Develop desktop publishing skills with Microsoft Publisher.
6.      Utilize and evaluate the INTERNET and various pieces of software in a variety of ways.
7.      Be proficient in utilizing Windows XP Operating System
8.      Understand various types of networking, facsimiles, etc. Discuss advanced computer topics and select a
        topic of choice to develop a personalized project utilizing a variety of programs.
11.     Visit a variety of computer installations (as time and locations permit)
14.     Utilize various types of computer hardware, including the scanner to scan a picture
15.     Learn HTML to build basic web pages.
16.      Learn Dream Weaver Web Page Software. Design an authentic web page with the class. Take part in
        active discussion about web-related topics. Edit the web pages as needed. Publish the web site for a real
        ―audience‖.

Careers Related to Content:
All careers involve computer technology at some level. Applications are vast in the field of Business, High
Technology, Engineering, Education, Journalism, and Medicine. Specific careers may include: Information
Systems, Data Processing, Word Processing, Computer Programming, Systems/Analyst, Computer Managers,
Teachers, Web Designers and Computer Technicians.
    COMPUTER APPLICATIONS -- CAREER/TECH DEPT


PROGRAMMING 1: - Semester Course
Course #: 0323


Credit: 1
Elective: Grades 9 – 12
Prerequisite: Algebra 1 with a ―C‖ or better


Course Description:
Have you ever wondered who makes the computer software you enjoy using? That‘s the job of
computer programmers. In this class students will learn the fundamentals of creating computer software
using the Visual Basic programming environment. Students will be able to write very small programs
which will use buttons, labels, check boxes, radio buttons and input boxes to communicate with the user.
Most of the applications will deal with business concepts, but some simple games will be written as
well.

Skills Needed To Be Successful in the Class:
Students need to be interested in computers and familiar with keyboarding skills. They need to
understand the concept of a variable, be logical and organized, and be interested in solving problems.
Patience, diligence, and attention to detail are important personality traits for students to have.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Recognize the difference between a procedure-oriented language and an event driven language.
2.     Create new projects in Visual Basic.
3.     Work with controls in Visual Basic.
4.     Use variables and constants to store data.
5.     Program alternate actions using the selection structure.
6.     Use pretest, post-test, and nested loops properly.
7.     Work with string functions.
8.     Use elementary graphics, color, and sound to enhance the applications they are creating.

Careers Related to Content:
Computer Science, Computer Programming, Computer Engineering, Information Technology,
Computer Information Systems, Mathematics, Science, Medicine, Business, Engineering, Education
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS -- CAREER/TECH DEPT



PROGRAMMING 2: - Semester Course
Course #: 0332


Credit: 1
Elective: Grades 10 – 12
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Programming 1 with a "B" or better


Course Description:
This course is a continuation of Programming 1. Students will continue to code applications using
Visual Basic on IBM-compatible computers and will learn advanced coding techniques. Students will
also read and report on articles related to computers in computer journals and magazines.

Skills Needed to be Successful in the Class:
Students need to enjoy creating Visual Basic applications, possess keyboarding skills, and feel
comfortable with computers. They also need to enjoy solving problems.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student will be expected to:
1.     Work in a group and individually solving problems.
2.     Work with user-defined procedures and functions.
3.     Work with mathematical and business functions.
4.     Work with one- and two-dimensional arrays.
5.     Use graphics, color, and sound to enhance the applications they are creating.
6.     Work with concepts particularly related to object-oriented programming.
7.     Utilize data files.
8.     Learn and use various sorting and searching techniques.

Careers Related to Content: Computer Science, Computer Programming, Engineering, Mathematics,
Medicine, Computer Information Systems, Science, Education, Business
    COMPUTER APPLICATIONS -- CAREER/TECH DEPT


AP Computer Science --Full year course
Course #: 0324


Credit: 2
Elective : Grades 10 - 12
Prerequisite: Programming 1 with a ―B‖ or better
              Algebra 2 (previously or concurrently)


Course Description:
This course is built around the development of computer programs or parts of programs that correctly
solve a given problem. It emphasizes the design issues that make programs understandable, adaptable,
and reusable. The course will utilize the Java programming environment. In May students will take
the Advanced Placement Computer Science A test. Students will also read and report on articles
relating to computers.

Skills Needed To Be Successful in the Class:
It is suggested that students possess the knowledge of mathematics at the Algebra 2 level and have
experience in problem solving. Students should be comfortable with functions and functional notation.
Competence in written communication is important as well to help with documentation. Students
should plan on spending several hours weekly outside of class working on the computer. Patience,
diligence, and attention to detail are important personality traits for students to have.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To work with:
       1. Program design -- description, purpose, object-oriented design
       2. Designing and implementing classes
       3. Fundamental data types
       4. Decision making and iteration
       5. Arrays and Array lists
       6. Interfaces, Polymorphism, Inheritance
       7. Recursion
       8. Sorting and searching techniques
       9. Hardware, system software, types of systems

Careers Related to Content:
Computer Science, Computer Programming, Computer Engineering, Information Technology,
Computer Information Systems, Mathematics, Science, Medicine, Business, Engineering, Education
                   LIFE ESSENTIALS – CAREER/TECH DEPT
LIFE ESSENTIALS –- Semester Course
FHS DEPARTMENT: CAREER/TECH
Course #: 0515
Credit: 1

Required: 9th graders starting 2010-11; optional elective for Grades 10-12
Prerequisite: None

Course Description: This course is designed to insure all 9th grade students obtain the basics in
financial literacy. In addition students will learn the Career/Employability planning. Technology literacy
will be incorporated throughout the course including efficient and appropriate software usage and
quality final product. High school students need to have a core of basic financial, career, and technology
literacy. This required course will be taught by teachers with content knowledge of these 21st Century
Skills and who will help students of all levels reach their highest level of understanding leading into
their adult lives. Both Career-Tech and Exceptional Learners Instructors will co-teach as necessary.

Course Enduring Understandings
* Using overall 21st Century Skills continually throughout their lifetime.
* Realizing the importance of 21st Century Skills to successful lives.
* Being financially responsible in their personal lives.
* Repeating the career process as their careers change.

Course Essential Questions
 * What is necessary to plan my career and get a job?
* What financial tasks will I face both now and in the future?
* How can technology be used to help meet career and financial goals?

Specific Outcomes: -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
   1. Have financial literacy (budgeting, income tax, savings/checking/investing, credit, risk
       management insurance and employment pay, benefits, and working conditions
   2. Complete the career process: research career opportunities, choosing careers, updating their
       four-year educational plan—including secondary and post-secondary options, and researching
       aptitude, skills, education needed, and related pay and benefits and career advancement).
   3. Discuss and follow the job process of writing application letters, resumes, application forms,
       interviews and follow-up (which will be differentiated to student interest).
   4. Develop employability literacy that will include adapting to work, interpersonal skills, attitude
       and communication skills, work laws and responsibilities, preparing for the world of work and
       adult living.
   5. Use technology as a tool to access information and solve problems.
   6. Display the ability to effectively manage time and resources.
    7. Display the ability to set goals, solve problems and persevere.

Career Related to Content:
All careers need these life essentials.
SCHOOL – TO – WORK PROGRAM-- CAREER/TECH DEPT


SCHOOL-TO-WORK: - Semester Course
FHS DEPARTMENT: CAREER/TECH
General Course #: 1613
Credit: 2

Elective: Grade 12
Prerequisite: Attend a workshop prior to the work experience.
              Every student must be interviewed by the School-to-Work coordinator and accepted
              in the course, with coordinator, administrator and teacher recommendation.
              Students must carry 4 additional credits during the semester if they are
              participating in School-to-Work.


Course Description:
School-to-work is an opportunity to experience career opportunities in a natural work setting. It is an
educational program, not a job. Students would be at the job site two periods per day for one semester.
Students would not be paid during their work experience during school hours. However students could
work for pay outside the school day (before/after school, week-ends, etc).

Specific Outcomes: -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Report to the job site on time and work with a good attitude.
2.     Learn as much about the place of employment as possible.
3.     Use technology as a tool to access information and solve problems.
4.     Display the ability to effectively manage time and resources.
5.     Display the ability to set goals, solve problems and persevere.

Career Related to Content:
Any job similar to where the student has worked. It is hoped the student will learn not only the job
he/she is trained in and experiences, but observes and understands other jobs within the frame work of
each specific business.
FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES-- CAREER/TECH DEPT
Teen Living: - Semester Course
Course #: 0501

Credit: 1
Elective: Grades 9 - 10
Prerequisite: None

Course Description:
Teen Living is offered as a semester course that is an overview of different areas in the Family and
Consumer Sciences Department. Topics such as resources and decision making; relationships; food
choices and food preparation; clothing buymanship and construction; child care/development and
housing are included. A greater emphasis is placed on foods and clothing with labs or hands-on
experiences provided. It is recommended for freshman and sophomores. It makes a good background
for the other semester courses offered in the Family and Consumer Sciences Department.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must be able to read, write and follow step-by-step instructions and express ideas verbally,
visually and in writing. If skills are lacking, extra effort is made to help students develop them.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
 1.    Recognize that individuals have resources to help themselves as well as others.
 2.    Use the decision making process in solving problems.
 3.    Identify ways to deal with peer pressure.
 4.    Recognize the personal, social and cultural aspects of food.
 5.    Follow a good personalized nutritional program.
 6.    Follow safety and sanitation procedures.
 7.    Buy, store and prepare a variety of foods.
 8.    Describe several influences on decisions about what to wear.
 9.    Select clothing that enhances personal appearance.
10.    Follow clothing care practices that give desired results.
11.    Recognize the value in being able to sew.
12.    Recognize ways to give care to children and the elderly that meets the physical, mental,
       social and emotional needs.
13.    Recognize alternatives in housing.
14.    Recognize how people's needs are met through housing.
15.    Discuss ways the individual can improve his or her own housing situation.
16.    Describe several careers in the family and consumer sciences.

Careers Related to Content:
Various careers mentioned with the suggestion that students follow up with the semester courses in areas
of particular interest where skills and careers are considered in more detail.
-40-
FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES-- CAREER/TECH DEPT

FOODS AND NUTRITION: - Semester Course
Course #: 0511

Credit: 1
Elective: Grades 10 - 12
Prerequisite: None


Course Description:
The Foods and Nutrition semester class covers the following topics: kitchen planning; selection, use and
care of equipment; safety and sanitation; good nutrition throughout the family life cycle including the
seven dietary guidelines and food pyramid; special dietary considerations; getting the most for
supermarket dollar. Labs are included in all of the previous topics with additional ones in the following
areas: yeast and quick breads; milk and cheese; fruits, vegetables and salads; meat, poultry and eggs.
Computer nutritional analysis programs are available for student use.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must be able to read, write, follow step-by-step instructions, work cooperatively in small
groups and be able to express ideas verbally and in writing. Cooperation is also needed for field trips
and labs.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
 1.    Recognize how various food choices affect our lives physically and emotionally.
 2.    Plan well-balanced foods for the entire family by using the food pyramid and the seven dietary
       guidelines.
 3.    Prepare meals that practice good management of time, money, personal and environmental
       resources.
 4.    Evaluate and use kitchen equipment effectively for better time and money management.
 5.    Effectively adjust recipe quantities to meet specific needs.
 6.    Apply the principles of sanitation, recycling and safety when working with food and equipment.
 7.    Know and put into effect the correct food preparation methods.
 8.    Recognize and practice wise supermarket shopping techniques to get the most from food dollars.
 9.    Use the computer for nutritional and cost analysis.
10.    Identify food related occupations.

Careers Related to Content:
Education, Food Service (hotels, hospitals, restaurants, retail stores, etc.), Chef, Dietitian, Research,
Food Chemist, Food Journalist, Nutritionist, Caterer, Homemaker, Marketing, Food Related
Transportation, Kitchen Designer.
FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES-- CAREER/TECH DEPT

ADVANCED FOODS: - Semester Course
Course #: 0512

Credit: 1 Articulation agreement with Kirkwood Community College available
Elective:     Grades 11 - 12
Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in Foods and Nutrition, or course instructor approval.


Course Description:
The Advanced Foods class has two major emphasis: 1) obtaining knowledge about restaurant operations
and food science careers; 2) individualized contracted lessons in advanced cooking techniques. Students
select the individualized units and work at their own pace. Each unit contains a variety of opportunities
such as study guide, work sheets, experiments and food preparation. Favorite units selected to name a
few are foreign foods, special dietary needs, garnishing, fancy desserts, breads, meats, entertaining, and
cost control. Quantity cooking and meal service are demonstrated as small groups of students prepare
and serve a meal for the entire class. A catering project is completed if possible. Field trips and guest
presentations are also included.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must be able to read, write and express opinions verbally as well as work together
cooperatively in small and large group settings. Students also need competence in basic food
preparation skills and basic math skills. Self motivation is important when students work independently.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Identify requirements for a job in food service.
2.     Comply with safety and health rules.
3.     Prepare foods from the basic food groups with emphasis on creativity, garnishing and
       presentation of food.
4.     Promote food that enhances family customs and traditions (i.e. holiday meals, wedding
       showers, graduation receptions, etc.).
5.     Cost out recipes to determine high cost and low cost of foods.
6.     Plan menus within budget guidelines, prepare shopping lists and purchase food to be served
       in a social/entertainment setting.
7.     Examine occupations related to the food service/hospitality industry.
8.     Identify entrepreneurship businesses that can be operated in the home (i.e. bed and breakfast,
       catering, etc.).
9.     Identify ways to balance work, family and individual needs.

Careers Related to Content:
Education, Food Service (hotels, hospitals, restaurants, etc.) Chef, Dietitian, Food Journalist,
Nutritionist, Caterer.
FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES-- CAREER/TECH DEPT

CLOTHING AND MERCHANDISING: - Semester Course
Course #: 0503
Alternate years (2011 – 2012)


Credit: 1
Elective: Grades 10 - 12
Prerequisite: None


Course Description:
Emphasis for the clothing and merchandising course is given to: why people wear clothes, fashions of
today and times past, getting the most for our clothing dollars, reading and interpreting label
information, analyzing workmanship and proper fit, buying for family members and personal selection.
Recycling and mending are part of the clothing care unit. Career possibilities are examined. Students
also complete individualized sewing projects according to abilities and interest. Students with sewing
abilities of any level will benefit. Alterations and sewing for others as a career choice are included.
Computerized embroidery machine can be used with preprogrammed designs. Students will furnish
their own sewing supplies and fabric for projects or purchase through the school.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must be able to read, write and follow step-by-step instructions and express ideas verbally,
visually and in writing. Patience is helpful but previous sewing experience is not needed.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
 1.    Identify factors that influence clothing choices.
 2.    Use wise consumer practices in selecting clothing for self and family members.
 3.    Apply knowledge of fibers, fabrics and finishes when making clothing purchases.
 4.    Evaluate ready-to-wear clothing for its construction.
 5.    Modify, repair and construct clothing.
 6.    Maintain one's personal clothing and that of the family laundry.
 7.    Describe the steps in the production of clothing.
 8.    Follow steps for construction and evaluating sewing projects.
 9.    Recognize possibilities and experiment with computer assisted designing and sewing.
10.    Investigate employment opportunities and requirements in the field of clothing.

Careers Related to Content:
Apparel Industry, Textile Industry, Design, Research, Marketing, Retailing, Fashion Buyers,
Advertising, Alterationists.
FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES-- CAREER/TECH DEPT

HOUSING AND INTERIORS: - Semester Course
Course #: 0522
(Alternate Years 2010 -2011)


Credit: 1
Elective: Grades 10 - 12
Prerequisite: None


Course Description:
Evaluating alternatives is the main focus of the housing and interiors semester course. Students visit a
variety of homes examining the advantages and disadvantages of each concept. Housing is evaluated in
relation to its site, structure, energy efficiency, safety, living space, zoning, traffic, storage and cost.
Decision-making skills are emphasized in buying or renting and in making consumer choices concerning
furniture, floor and wall coverings, window treatments and lighting. Students will be better prepared to
choose, pay for and maintain housing, home furnishings and equipment that meets the needs of the
individual or household group.


Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must be able to read, write and express ideas verbally, visually through decorating projects and
in writing. Listening skills and cooperation are needed for the many field trips.


Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
 1.    Accept the home as a place in which an individual's basic needs are satisfied.
 2.    Compare cultural and global influences on housing choices.
 3.    Identify values, attitudes, interests and activities of individuals that effect decisions
       relating to housing.
 4.    Relate the effect of physical and environmental factors of the neighborhood and community
       to housing needs.
 5.    Develop higher order thinking skills by using criteria to evaluate existing housing.
 6.    Explain basic financial and legal aspects in buying or renting.
 7.    Use wise buymanship practices in furnishing, decorating and equipping a home.
 8.    Apply the principles and elements of design when purchasing and decorating a home.
 9.    Recognize and obtain assistance from resource people within a community.
10.    Identify and explore career possibilities in housing and home furnishings.


Careers Related to Content:
Advertising and Sales of Home Furnishings, Interior Designer, Buyer for Furniture Store, Building
Industry, Realtor, Architect, Home Care and Maintenance, Appraiser, Planner or Developer,
Homemaker.
FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES-- CAREER/TECH DEPT

PARENTING AND CHILD DEVELOPMENT: - Semester Course
Course #: 0542


Credit: 1
Elective: Grades 10 - 12
Prerequisite: None


Course Description:
This course is designed to help students become more knowledgeable about what is involved in
parenting children. Students are given opportunities to practice parenting skills through interaction with
parents and children in various stages of development. The challenges of parenting a newborn are
experienced through the "Baby-Think-It-Over" project. Emphasis is also placed on preparing students
for entry level jobs in the field of child development. Areas covered include such topics as the decision
to parent, planning for children, family situations affecting children, pregnancy and birth, baby's first
year, the toddler and the preschooler. Children's play, health and safety, and guidance are also important
aspects. The class includes a field trip to the maternity ward and observing and participating in
community preschools.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must be able to read, write and express opinions and ideas verbally and in writing.
Cooperation is needed as we go out to the preschools.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
 1.    Describe sexual reproduction and birthing process.
 2.    Analyze contraception and family planning methods.
 3.    Discuss health concerns and needs at various stages of prenatal and postnatal development.
 4.    Identify the additional risks of teen pregnancy and parenting.
 5.    Describe ways to guide the physical, social, emotional, and intellectual development of children
       including those with special needs.
 6.    Select toys, equipment, food and materials appropriate for the developmental stage of a child.
 7.    Select and use appropriate childhood guidance techniques.
 8.    Discuss childhood diseases and immunization procedures.
 9.    Identify ways to provide a safe environment for a child.
10.    Locate and/or utilize child development resources for assistance.
11.    Evaluate personal qualities while making the decision to parent or the decision to select a career
       in working with children.

Careers Related to Content:
Early Childhood and Elementary Education, Child Care Providers, All Health Related Occupations such
as Nursing, All Human Relations Fields such as Social Work, Psychology and Counseling.
FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES-- CAREER/TECH DEPT

INDEPENDENT LIVING: - Semester Course
Course #: 0533

Credit: 1
Elective: Grade 11 - 12
Prerequisite: None
(Recommended for those with no previous classes in the Family & Consumer Sciences Dept.)


Course Description:
The Independent Living class is designed for juniors/seniors that would like to pick up practical skills
before moving out on their own. Areas covered include: decision making, budgeting, balancing a
checkbook, using credit wisely, clothing selection and buymanship, good clothing care including
laundry procedures, mending and using the sewing machine; food buymanship; dietary guidelines and
wellness; equipment selection, care and proper usage; sanitation and safety; and several food labs in
each of the basic food groups are enjoyed by all of the students. A small unit is included on apartment
hunting and furnishing the first apartment.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
A positive attitude and a willingness to cooperate with other students.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
 1.    Use wise consumer practices in purchasing clothing for self and others.
 2.    Repair and launder one's personal clothing.
 3.    Comprehend basic concepts of nutrition and its relation to wellness.
 4.    Purchase food according to nutritional value, anticipated use and available resources.
 5.    Experience success in food preparation.
 6.    Follow good management, safety, and sanitation procedures while cooking.
 7.    Recognize technological advances in foods and equipment.
 8.    Evaluate and choose a place to live based on needs, values, and resources.
 9.    Furnish a first home on a limited budget.
10.    Develop problem solving techniques.

Careers Related to Content:
Emphasis is placed on learning skills that help balance any career with home and family life.
     INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY-- CAREER/TECH DEPT

AUTOMOTIVE COLLISION REPAIR: - Semester Course
Course #: 0923


Credit: 1
Elective: Grades 11 - 12
Prerequisite: None


Course Description:
Basic study of auto body and collision damage repair. Includes units in straightening, refinishing
materials, body tools, and painting techniques.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must be able to read, write, follow directions in classroom and lab, and work with hand and
power tools.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Exhibit knowledge of auto body construction and chassis components.
2.     Demonstrate basic auto body repair techniques.
3.     Demonstrate problem solving abilities and safe work habits.

Careers Related to Content:
Auto Body Repair Technician, Insurance Claims Adjuster.
     INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY – CAREER/TECH DEPT


WOODWORKING I: - Semester Course                     (Formerly ―Machine Woodworking‖)
Course #: 0413
Credit: 1
Elective: Grades 9 - 12
Prerequisite: None
Course Description:
Work with wood to build projects using basic skills necessary for both hand tool use and power tool
practices. Learn kinds of wood, types of construction, joints and fasteners, and operation of portable
and stationary power machines.
Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must be able to read, write, exhibit basic math skills, and utilize some hand and machine tools.
Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Identify common woods used in construction.
2.     Demonstrate safe use of tools and equipment.
3.     Demonstrate problem solving techniques and safe work habits.
Careers Related to Content:
Carpentry, Construction, Manufacturing, and Production.

WOODWORKING II: - Semester Course                    (Formerly ―Wood Technology‖)
Course #: 0412
Credit: 1
Elective: Grades 10 - 12
Prerequisite: Woodworking 1
Course Description:
Advanced woodworking course offering units in wood product manufacturing, building trades skills,
carpentry, and construction. Students select projects using various woodworking methods with hand
and power tools.
Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must be able to read, write, exhibit basic math skills relating to measurement, and utilize hand
and machine tools.
Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Clearly define ideas through written plans.
2.     Identify sequential steps for project completion.
3.     Understand materials and processes and their relationship to the manufacturing industry.
4.     Demonstrate problem solving techniques and safe work habits.
Careers Related to Content:
Carpentry, Construction, Manufacturing, and Production
     INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY – CAREER/TECH DEPT


ELECTRICITY: - Semester Course
Course #: 0403


Credit: 1
Elective: Grades 10 - 12
Prerequisite: None


Course Description:
Study of electrical circuits, components, including resistors inductors and capacitors. Study effect of
direct current on electronic components in series parallel and combination circuits. Learn wire soldering
techniques and assemble electronic devices. Use of electrical test equipment, wiring devices, electrician
tools, electronic meters and test instruments.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students will do labs to help visualize and validate theories and mathematical formulas. Student should
be able to read, write, use calculators, use complex mathematical formulas, visualize current flow,
possess hand-eye coordination, and respect electricity.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Explain basic and intermediate electronic theory and techniques.
2.     Find the relationship between current, voltages, resistance, power, Ohm's Law, magnetism, and
       operation of meters.
3.     Construct electronic circuits using a schematic.
4.     Demonstrate problem solving techniques.
5.     Demonstrate proper use of multimeters.
6.     Work safely around electricity.

Careers Related to Content:
Electrician, Construction, Heating and Air Conditioning, Electrical Engineer, Technician,
Communications, Robotics, Fiber-Optics
     INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY – CAREER/TECH DEPT


INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN (PLTW): - Full Year
FHS Course #: 0801 – 0802
Project Lead The Way Course #: EGT 400 Credits: 3

Credit: 2
Elective: Grades 9, 10, 11, 12
Pre/Co-requisite: Algebra I

*College Credit Available
Course Description:
Introduction to Engineering Design is a partner of Project Lead the Way. Project Lead the Way is an up
and coming program for students interested in engineering, design, CAD, and other related fields. This
is a course that teaches problem-solving skills using a design development process. Models of products
solutions are created, analyzed, and communicated using solid modeling computer design software
(Auto Desk Inventor). Students learn how to solve problems using a design development process.
Portfolios are created and include topics such as sketching and visualization, geometric relationships,
three dimensional modeling, model analysis and verification, documentation, production and marketing.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must be able to read, write, follow directions in the lab, and have a basic understanding of
mathematics and computers, and visualization.

Specific Outcomes: The Student Will Be Expected To:
   1. Demonstrate problem-solving techniques to improve existing products.
   2. Implement advanced three dimensional modeling software to communicate the details of the
       products.
   3. Demonstrate the ability to research the chronological development and rate of change that
       innovation in tools and materials have produced for consumers.
   4. Research, design, and evaluate projects and present findings to the class.

Careers Related To The Content:
Engineering/Industrial/Design
     INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY – CAREER/TECH DEPT

PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING (PLTW): - Full Year
FHS Course #: 0803 - 0804
Project Lead The Way Course #: EGT 108 Credits: 3

Credit: 2
Elective: Grades 10, 11, 12
Pre/Co-requisite: Algebra I and Introduction to Engineering Design

*College Credit Available
Course Description:
Another sequential course partnering with Project Lead the Way, an up and coming program for students
interested in engineering, design, computer aided drafting, and other related fields. This is a contextual,
project and problem-based course that integrated national standards in mathematics, science, technology,
and English/Language Arts. The course focuses on the practical application of the principles of
mathematics to solve engineering problems.

Exploring various design process and structures help students learn how engineers and technicians use
math, science and technology in an engineering problem solving process to benefit people. Topics
include mechanical advantage and simple machines, control systems and programming, statics and
strengths, material testing, and an intro to dynamics/kinematics. The course also includes concerns
about social and political consequences of technological change.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Communication skills                                         Problem solving skills
Desire to learn through hands-on projects                    Strong work ethic
Mathematics success in Algebra I

Specific Outcomes: The Student Will Be Expected To:
1. Learn about types of engineers and their contributions to society, past, present, and future.
2. Collect, categorize, and graphically represent data.
3. Document and communicate research findings.
4. Learn about problem solving and how products are developed.
5. Keep an engineer‘s notebook.
6. Create and present oral presentations.
7. Learn about mechanical, thermodynamics, fluid, electrical, and control systems.
8. Learn the categories and properties of materials, and how they are shaped, joined, and tested.
9. Use precision measurement tools to gather and apply statistics for quality and process control.
10. Learn about reliability, redundancy, risk analysis, safety factors, liability, and ethics.
11. Explore dynamics and kinematics.

Careers Related To The Content:
Engineering Technology: testing and evaluation, routine design, production, operation, service, and
maintenance, distribution and sales
Engineering: research, complex analysis, complex design, development, manufacturing, computer
integrated manufacturing, civil engineering and architecture
     INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY – CAREER/TECH DEPT


METALS TECHNOLOGY: - Semester Course
Course #: 2403


Credit: 1
Elective: Grades 10 – 12
Prerequisite: None


Course Description:
Learn the types of metals, their use in manufacturing, and metalworking. Study the operation and set-
up of the major industrial machine shop tools. Learn specific metal working techniques and processes.
Related areas include blueprint reading, precision measuring instruments, heat treating.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must be able to read, write, follow directions in the lab, WORK SAFELY and utilize hand and
machine tools, make precision measurements.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Identify ferrous and non-ferrous metals.
2.     Operate various hand and power metal working machines.
3.     Perform basic machinist skills on metalworking lathes and milling machines.
4.     Interpret blueprints and working drawings.
5.     Demonstrate proficiency in precision measurement.
6.     Exhibit efficient and safe work habits.
7.     Understand materials and processes and their relationship to the manufacturing industry.
8.     Perform foundry processes.

Careers Related to Content:
Machinist, Tool and Die Maker, Foundry Worker, Sheet Metal Technician, General Factory
Maintenance Repair.
     INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY – CAREER/TECH DEPT
POWER MECHANICS 1: - Semester Course
Course #: 0903
Credit: 1
Elective: Grades 9 - 12
Prerequisite: None
Course Description:
Students will study power and energy systems energy conversion and transmission, transportation
systems, energy production and consumption.
Disassemble and reassemble two- and four-stroke cycle small engines.
Study mechanical, fuel, and electrical systems common to small engines. Perform troubleshooting,
repair, and tune-up operations.
Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must be able to read, write, and follow directions in the classroom and lab areas.
Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Students will understand power and energy systems as they relate to the world.
2.     Exhibit knowledge of basic operational theory of small engines.
3.     Identify common parts and their placement in small engine construction.
4.     Use tools and equipment related to small engine repair and maintenance.
5.     Demonstrate problem solving techniques and safe work habits.
Careers Related to Content:
Small Engine Service Technician, Mechanic.


POWER MECHANICS 2: - Semester Course
Course #: 0913
Credit: 1
Elective: Grades 10 - 12
Prerequisite: Power Mechanics 1
Course Description:
Students will concentrate on auto care through servicing, maintenance, and tune-up procedures.
Exposure to automotive engine construction and drive-train components, ignition and fuel systems.
Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must be able to read, write, and follow directions in the classroom and lab areas.
Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Understand how a vehicle is suppose to work.
2.     Demonstrate correct vehicle maintenance procedures.
3.     Demonstrate troubleshooting techniques for auto-related problems.
4.     Safely use tools and equipment related to auto technology.
Careers Related to Content:
Auto Mechanic, Automotive Service Technician.
     INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY – CAREER/TECH DEPT



AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY: - Year Long Course                    Extended Class Period
Course #: 0921 – 0922


Credit: 4
Elective: Grade 12
Prerequisite: Power Mechanics 2


Course Description:

Study of automotive systems including fuel injection, electronic ignition, hydraulic and pneumatic
power systems. Lab activities will include repair and troubleshooting on student or lab vehicles.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:

Students must be able to read, write, and follow directions in the classroom and lab areas, read and
understand measurement instruments and understand basic automotive operating principles.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:

1.     Explain and demonstrate auto engine fundamentals and service.
2.     Explain and demonstrate auto fuel systems and tune-up procedures.
3.     Demonstrate troubleshooting techniques for auto related problems.
4.     Safely use the tools and equipment related to auto technology.

Careers Related to Content:

Auto Mechanic, Automotive Service Technician, Auto Parts Counter person.
                                           ENGLISH

ENGLISH 9: - Full Year Course
Course #: 1001 - 1002

Credit: 2
Required: Grade 9
Prerequisites: None

Course Description:
English 9 is a full-year survey course that emphasizes the study of various genres of literature. Through
individual and group projects, students improve communicative skills in reading, writing, speaking,
listening, visual expression, and observation. The literary elements are used in the discussion of how
literature relates to life. Writing is developed and practiced through a process approach. Units covered
are an introduction to the high school media center- (taught by the media specialist), an extensive short
story unit, an introduction to Shakespearean and classic drama, contemporary drama, novel study,
vocabulary, and other units. Grammar instruction will improve on accuracy and precision in students‘
language skills. The instruction includes parts of speech, parts of a sentence, correct punctuation and
application within their writing

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students are expected to be able to read at a level where they can independently read and draw meaning
from classroom materials, express ideas in written and oral form, and have appropriate skills and
behaviors which allow them to successfully work both individually and in groups. Students are
expected to be able to read, to write, and to speak clearly and in an organized manner. They are
expected to build on a working command of language skills

Specific Outcomes: The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Identify and demonstrate an understanding of literary elements.
2.     Demonstrate the ability to draw meaning about life from the study of literature.
3.     Identify likenesses and differences between classic and modern drama.
4.     Demonstrate a working knowledge of the media center.
5.     Build vocabulary and reading skills.
6.     Develop self-management and time skills.
7.     Demonstrate the ability to write, revise, edit and polish personal writing..
8.     Discern important information from a lecture or article, paraphrasing and summarizing from
       notes and writing a report.
9.     Consider reading as a leisure activity.
10.    Recognize and correctly use standard American English beginning with the basic parts of speech.
11.    Use the composing process to generate writing assignments.
12.    Know the parts of a sentence and be able to vary their work through sentence combining
       technique.

Careers Related To Content:
Education, Law, Journalism, Communications, Writing, Publications, Editing, Advertising, Human
Relations, International Relations, Business, Marketing and Technical Writing.
                                            ENGLISH

ENGLISH 10: - Full Year Course
Course #: 1011 – 1012
Credit: 2
Required: Grade 10
Prerequisites: English 9
Course Description:
English 10 is a full-year survey course which covers both a broad range of literature and composition.
Through individual and group projects, students improve communicative skills in reading, writing,
speaking, listening, visual expression, and observation. Writing emphasizes the use of logical
organization of ideas and development of detail through a variety of written responses and a research
paper. Writing is developed and practiced through a process approach. Units covered are research paper
process, short story, Shakespearean and other classic drama, contemporary drama, assorted novels, and
vocabulary study. Grammar instruction will improve on accuracy and precision in students‘ language
skills. The instruction includes parts of speech, parts of a sentence, correct punctuation and application
within their writing.
Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students are expected to be able to read at a level where they can independently read and draw meaning
from classroom materials, express ideas in written and oral form, and have appropriate skills and
behaviors which allow them to successfully work both individually and in groups. Students are
expected to be able to read, to write, and to speak clearly and in an organized manner. They are
expected to build on a working command of language skills.
Specific Outcomes: The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Differentiate between general and specific material as found in written sources and the
       organization of the students‘ own thoughts.
2.     Recognize the organization in written material, and then demonstrate the ability to organize and
       categorize original ideas and develop them into essay form.
3.     Demonstrate understanding of selected literary works by paraphrasing, summarizing, and
       discussing.
4.     Differentiate between the main ideas and the less important facts in a long literary work.
5.     Select and evaluate, according to criteria supplied in class; work on fiction and non fiction.
6.     Write a research paper.
7.     Examine experiences and their relationship to the literature through discussing and writing.
8.     Build vocabulary and reading skills.
9.     Identify the elements and terms related to specific genres.
10.    Recognize and correctly use standard American English beginning with the basic parts of speech.
11.    Use the composing process to generate writing assignments.
12.    Know the parts of a sentence and be able to vary their work through sentence combining
       technique.
Careers Related to Content:
Education, Law, Journalism, Communications, Writing, Publications, Editing, Advertising, Human
Relations, International Relations, Business, Marketing and Technical Writing.
                                            ENGLISH


AMERICAN LITERATURE: - Semester Course
Course #: 1043

Credit: 1
Elective: Grades 11 – 12 (Meets Literature Requirement)
Prerequisite: None

Course Description:
Students will examine and respond, both verbally and in writing to selections of American literature.
This literature will range from Early American writing to contemporary literature, emphasizing major
authors and works in each period. This survey will be accompanied by a study of relevant historical
events. When possible or practical, the study of American literature will be supplemented by exhibits of
art and music of the time. All major literary genres will be represented. Students learn to establish
reading goals. The class has reading assignments with a variety of reader response tasks. Students read
a variety

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must be able to read and comprehend well. They must also be able to express themselves
logically and intelligently both verbally and in writing. Self-motivation and active participation are
necessary.
of genres. Students must read with a high level of comprehension, fluency, and competency. They
should be self motivated and able to work independently to achieve their reading goals.



Specific Outcomes: The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Discuss and write intelligently about the stylistic development and historical influences.
2.     Identify the distinct characteristics of each major genre.
3.     Discuss and write intelligently about the characteristics and works of selected significant authors.
4.     Develop and use strategies for oral and written response to various works of literature.
5.     Demonstrate personal growth of literary knowledge and interests through journals, essays, class
       discussions, test or other assignments.
6.     Achieve reading goals and corresponding assignments.
7.     Use a variety of means to demonstrate understanding of books read.


Careers Related to Content:
Education, Law, Journalism, Communications, Writing, Publications, Editing, Advertising, Human
Relations, International Relations, Business, Marketing and Technical Writing.
                                            ENGLISH


WORLD LITERATURE: - Semester Course
Course #: 1063

Credit: 1
Elective: Grades 11 – 12       (Meets Literature Requirement)
Prerequisite: None

Course Description:
World Literature class prepares students for college-level reading expectations. Novels, poetry, drama,
and other literary resources are chosen from world literature. Necessary background information as well
as an in-depth study of content will be covered for each piece. Evaluation will be through response
writing, daily assignments, thematic discussions, objective tests, or reflective essays. Students learn to
establish reading goals. The class has reading assignments with a variety of reader response tasks.
Students read a variety of genres.



Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must be able to read and comprehend as well as maintain a rigorous reading schedule. In
addition, students must be able to formulate and articulate personal thoughts about literature. They must
also be able to express themselves logically and intelligently both verbally and in writing. Self-
motivation and active participation are necessary. Students must read with a high level of
comprehension, fluency, and competency. They should be self motivated and able to work
independently to achieve their reading goals.


Specific Outcomes: The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Apply literatures specific themes to real-life situations.
2.     Appreciate individual differences and cultural diversity.
3.     Discuss topics that are self-generated and motivated.
4.     Respond to ideas and concepts as presented through various higher level literary elements
       such as plot, character, theme, etc.
5.     Achieve reading goals and corresponding assignments.
6.     Use a variety of means to demonstrate understanding of books read.


Careers Related to Content:
Education, Law, Journalism, Communications, Writing, Publications, Editing, Advertising, Human
Relations, International Relations, Business, Marketing and Technical Writing.
                                              ENGLISH


AP ENGLISH LITERATURE:– Full Year Course
Course #: 1070 – 1071


Credit: 2
Elective: Grade 11 – 12    (Meets literature requirement)
Prerequisite: ―B‖ Average in English 10, or course instructor approval


Course Description:
The purpose of this course is to recognize and understand trends in the literature. Because English is our
national language, the development as well as creative use of it is part of our heritage as well as our
consciousness. Language shapes perception and we will read literature that was produced by some of the
greatest and most creative thinkers in history. Students will survey this literature in the context of history
and whenever practical, the accompanying art and music of the time. All major literary genres will be
represented. Students will respond, discuss, and decide which authors best represent their own tastes and
opinions. These thoughts must be expressed logically and intelligently both orally and in writing.
Students will understand how literary trends affect life and vice versa. This will also involve a basic
recognition of authors, genres, and characteristics of literary eras. They will show this understanding by
writing intensively about several topics, some assigned, some chosen by students. Writing will be in the
form of journal reflections, formal papers, and writing on demand.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
    Reading Comprehension and Composition skills are necessary to succeed at this level. In order
        to perform well on the AP exam students will need to understand and interpret difficult and
        complex literature and be able to express both their understanding and their own thoughts and
        reactions to the literature intelligently in writing.

Specific Outcomes: Students Will Be Expected To:
   1. Discuss and write intelligently about stylistic development and historical influences.
   2. Identify the distinct characteristics of each major genre.
   3. Discuss and write intelligently about the characteristics and works of selected significant authors.
   4. Discuss and write intelligently about significant trends in literature as well as prevalent
       philosophies and context that accompany the literature.
   5. Demonstrate personal growth of literary knowledge and interests through various writings, class
       discussions, tests, and/or other assignments.
   6. Pass the AP exam.

Careers Related to Content:
Education, Law, Journalism, Communications, Writing, Publications, Editing, Advertising, Human
Relations, International Relations, Business, Marketing, and Technical Writing.
                                           ENGLISH

FHS COMPOSITION: - Semester Course
Course #: 1073

Credit: 1
Required: Grades 11 – 12             (Meets composition requirement)
Prerequisite: English 9 & 10

Course Description:
Composition is designed to help the student improve in writing ability and ease of expression through a
wide variety of writing exercises. Instruction in conventions, word choice, sentence fluency,
organization, and voice is based on student need. Emphasis is on clear, logical development of a thesis
and ideas. Composition includes essays or poetry. The essays are of four types: expressive, expository,
persuasive, and literary. At least one essay includes material obtained from media center research.
Instruction of five-seven essays follows the writing process. Grammar instruction will improve on
accuracy and precision in students‘ language skills. The instruction includes parts of speech, parts of a
sentence, correct punctuation and application within their writing.


Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must be able to read and write. They should be able to express themselves in writing and
express ideas and opinions verbally as well as visually. Students are expected to be able to read, to
write, and to speak clearly and in an organized manner. They are expected to build on a working
command of language skills.


Specific Outcomes: The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Generate ideas for pieces of writing through prewriting activities.
2.     Follow the writing process in producing pieces of writing.
3.     Share their work with peers and respond positively and constructively to peers work.
4.     Find personal success in writing.
5.     Write with clarity and meaning.
6.     Proofread.
7.     Demonstrate computer literacy.
8.     Evaluate personal writing; understand and conduct revisions.
9.     Set personal writing goals based on self evaluation.
10.    Recognize and correctly use standard American English beginning with the basic parts of speech.
11.    Use the composing process to generate writing assignments.
12.    Know the parts of a sentence and be able to vary their work through sentence combining
        technique.

Careers Related to Content:
Education, Law, Journalism, Communications, Writing, Publications, Editing, Advertising, Human
Relations, International Relations, Business, Marketing, and Technical Writing.
                                                ENGLISH

IHCC COMPOSITION I: - Semester Course
FHSCourse #: 1083C   IHCC Course #: ENG105

Credit: FHS: 1 IHCC: 3 credit hours          (Meets composition requirement)
Required: Grades 11 – 12      Elective
Prerequisite: English 9 & 10; 41st percentile on standardized test

Course Description:
IHCC Composition I is designed to help the student improve in writing ability and ease of expression through a
wide variety of writing exercises while meeting the rigorous standard as established by IHCC for alignment with
community college standards and collegiate expectations. Instruction in conventions, word choice, sentence
fluency, organization, and voice is based on student need. Emphasis is on clear, logical development of a thesis
and ideas. Composition includes essays or poetry. The essays are of four types: expressive, expository,
persuasive, and literary. At least one essay includes material obtained from media center research. Instruction of
five-seven essays follows the writing process. Grammar instruction will improve on accuracy and precision in
students‘ language skills. The instruction includes parts of speech, parts of a sentence, correct punctuation and
application within their writing.

Also, students are to meet these IHCC established goals:
1. Demonstrate mechanical and grammatical competence.
2. Demonstrate stylistic competence.
3. Organize ideas logically.
4. Use critical thinking.
5. Write at least three expository essays.
6. Write at least one critical / analytical essay.
7. Study methods of research.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must be able to read and write. They should be able to express themselves in writing and express ideas
and opinions verbally as well as visually. Students are expected to be able to read, to write, and to speak clearly
and in an organized manner. They are expected to build on a working command of language skills.

Specific Outcomes: The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.      Generate ideas for pieces of writing through prewriting activities.
2.      Follow the writing process in producing pieces of writing.
3.      Share their work with peers and respond positively and constructively to peers work.
4.      Find personal success in writing.
5.      Write with clarity and meaning.
6.      Proofread.
7.      Demonstrate computer literacy.
8.      Evaluate personal writing; understand and conduct revisions.
9.      Set personal writing goals based on self evaluation.
10.     Recognize and correctly use standard American English beginning with the basic parts of speech.
11.     Use the composing process to generate writing assignments.
12.     Know the parts of a sentence and be able to vary their work through sentence combining
         technique.

Careers Related to Content:
Education, Law, Journalism, Communications, Writing, Publications, Editing, Advertising, Human Relations,
International Relations, Business, Marketing, and Technical Writing.
                                                     ENGLISH
IHCC COMPOSITION II: - Semester Course
Course #: 1084C College Course #: ENG106

Credit: FHS: 1    IHCC: 3 credit hours
Elective: 12
Prerequisite: IHCC Composition I;     41st percentile on standardized test


Course Description:

IHCC Composition II further prepares the student for college-level writing expectations while meeting the rigorous standard
as established by IHCC for alignment with community college standards and collegiate expectations.. Literature and research
are used to develop in writing. Focus is given to both content and structure of writing. Portions of the course focus on
individual needs and various developmental stages. Grammar instruction will improve on accuracy and precision in students‘
language skills. The instruction includes parts of speech, parts of a sentence, correct punctuation and application within their
writing.

Also, students are to meet these IHCC established goals:
    1. Demonstrate mechanical competence.
    2. Demonstrate stylistic competence.
    3. Organize ideas logically.
    4. Use correct MLA documentation.
    5. Use critical thinking.
    6. Use sources responsibly.
    7. Write correctly documented argumentative essay.
    8. Write correctly documented research report.


Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:

Students need to be able to use written and oral communication skills effectively. They must be able to analyze literature,
research, and express opinions concerning the selected works. Students must be able to work independently. Students are
expected to be able to read, to write, and to speak clearly and in an organized manner. They are expected to build on a
working command of language skills.


Specific Outcomes: The Student Will Be Expected To:

1.       Write in a variety of rhetorical modes.
2.       Criticize and evaluate his/her own work.
3.       Use both fiction and non-fiction text as supporting evidence.
4.       Proofread and edit his/her own work and that of others.
5.       Contribute to group discussions.
6.       Recognize and correctly use standard American English beginning with the basic parts of speech.
7.       Use the composing process to generate writing assignments.
8.       Know the parts of a sentence and be able to vary their work through sentence combining
         technique.


Careers Related to Content:

Education, Law, Journalism, Communications, Writing, Publications, Editing, Advertising, Human Relations, International
Relations, Business, Marketing and Technical Writing.
                                           ENGLISH


TECHNICAL WRITING: Semester Course
Course #: 1074

Credit: 1
Elective: 12
Prerequisite: Composition


Course Description:

Today‘s world of employment demands effective writing that goes beyond traditional essay
composition. This course will assist student progress towards real-life learning, communication, and
complex thinking and writing skills. This class will cover reading, writing and speaking skills as it
pertains to career fields and to the 21st Century Skills. Power point presentations, graphic design,
technical writing and research, brochures, summaries, news releases, interviews and other writing
assignments will be covered during the semester. Throughout the course, students will focus on
improving the accuracy of their grammar, word choice, spelling and mechanics.


Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students need to be able to use written and oral communication skills effectively. They must be able to
analyze, research, and write for the 21st century. Students must be able to work independently.
Students are expected to be able to read, to write, and to speak clearly and in an organized manner.
They are expected to build on a working command of language skills.


Specific Outcomes: The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Write in a variety of technical modes.
2.     Criticize and evaluate his/her own work.
3.     Use non-fiction text as supporting evidence.
4.     Proofread and edit his/her own work and that of others.
5.     Contribute to group discussions.
6.     Recognize and correctly use standard American English beginning with the basic parts of speech.
7.     Use the composing process to generate writing assignments.
8.     Know the parts of a sentence and be able to vary their work through sentence combining
       technique


Careers Related to Content:
Education, Law, Journalism, Communications, Writing, Publications, Editing, Advertising, Human
Relations, International Relations, Business, Marketing and Technical Writing
                                             ENGLISH


SPEECH: - Semester Course
Course #: 1003


Credit: 1
Required: Grades 9 - 12
Prerequisite: None


Course Description:

Students will refine speaking and listening skills. Students will plan, research, outline, and deliver
speeches. They will learn to be prepared for situations both informal and formal occasions.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:

Students must be able to read, listen, and express themselves by speaking, writing, and using visual aids.
Tolerance for various points of view and opinions is necessary.

Specific Outcomes: -The Student Will Be Expected To:

1.     Prepare for and handle with confidence various communication in public speaking.
2.     Present and support an idea using a variety of evidence.
3.     Analyze communication critically.
4.     Interpret verbal and nonverbal messages.
5.     Appreciate individual and cultural differences.

Careers Related to Content:

Education, Law, Journalism, Communications, Writing, Publications, Editing, Advertising, Human
Relations, International Relations, Business, Marketing and Technical Writing.
                                            ENGLISH


ADVANCED SPEECH: SPEAKING FOR PUBLIC PERFORMANCE: - Semester Course
Course #: 1013


Credit: 1
Elective: Grades 10 -12
Prerequisite: Speech


Course Description:

This course will improve existing speech and performance skills and develop new skills. Students will
study voice techniques and acting skills. Areas of exploration include parliamentary procedure, group
discussion, and debate, as well as radio and TV news. The class will also cover the individual areas of
public address, storytelling, acting, prose, poetry, and literary program; and the large group areas of
readers‘ theatre, one-act play, choral reading, and ensemble acting. The courses is both individualized
to challenge students and generalized to facilitate group interaction.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:

Students must have successfully passed Speech. They should also have personal confidence in public
speaking, group discussion, oral interpretation, and acting.

Specific Outcomes: The Student Will Be Expected To:

1.     Understand the importance of parliamentary procedure in a democratic society.
2.     Recognize various methods of group discussion along with methods of group decision making.
3.     Know and practice the techniques of preparing and presenting a formal debate.
4.     Prepare and present both manuscript and extemporaneous speeches.
5.     Demonstrate an understanding and appreciation of literature through interpretation.
6.     Practice simple acting techniques.
7.     Convey ideas dramatically through voice and body.
8.     Work together in small and large group activities.

Careers Related to Content:

Education, Law, Journalism, Communications, Writing, Publications, Editing, Advertising, Human
Relations, International Relations, Business, Marketing, Technical Writing, and professional theatre.
                                            ENGLISH


INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE: - Semester Course
Course #: 1111


Credit:        1
Elective:      Grades 10 – 12


Course Description:

Theatre class encourages participation and involvement in drama. Students are introduced to theatre
history as well as theatre production. Academic work and practical experiences prepare the students to
appreciate theatre as a means of both self expression and recreation.


Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:

Students will be expected to participate in classroom activities and to work cooperatively. They should
be able to express themselves in both actual performance and imaginative thinking. Students must be
able to understand and to analyze historical theatre. Students must also be able to be creative in
directing, blocking, and designing the many components of production (set design, costume renderings,
make-ups sketches, etc.).


Specific Outcomes – The Student Will Be Expected To:

   1.       Know basic tenets, trends, and influences of historical theatre.
   2.       Use and understand theatre vocabulary.
   3.       Develop skills necessary for play analysis.
   4.       Identify major themes and conflicts in reading and studying a play.
   5.       Design sets, costumes, make-up, and publicity.
   6.       Work together in small and large group activities.
   7.       Increase his/her awareness of theatre.


Careers Related to Content:

Education, Communications, Writing, Publications, Editing, Advertising, Human Relations,
International Relations, Marketing, Cosmetology, Mortuary Sciences, Graphic Arts, Theatre
Management, Theatre and Technical Writing.
                                             ENGLISH

JOURNALISM: COMPOSITION FOR MEDIA PRODUCTION: Semester Course
Course #: 1903


Credit: 1
Elective: 10 - 12
Prerequisite: None


Course Description:

The writing-based course will focus on composing, drafting and revising various media. The initial
focus will be on journalistic style of writing: news reporting, feature stories, sports articles & editorials
along with advertising. Newspaper design is studied to create a newspaper layout and finished project.
Other focus will include script writing for radio, TV, & movie production. Imovie scripts will be
written, and films will be created. Finally, web design will focus on newsletter writing with production
of a web-based newsletter.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:

Students need to be able to communicate through writing and computer technology. They must be
aware of the various kind of media available and be interested in its production.

Specific Outcomes: The Student Will Be Expected To:

1.     Understand the mass media and its role in today's society.
2.     Recognize the psychology of advertising.
3.     Prepare and present a radio, TV, film, and play production.
4.     Understand the various component of radio, TV, and film.
5.     Demonstrate computer literacy.

Careers Related to Content:

Education, Law, Journalism, Communications, Writing, Publications, Editing, International Relations,
Business, Marketing and Technical Writing.
                                           FINE ARTS


INTRODUCTION TO ART: - Semester Course
Course #: 1103


Credit: 1
Elective: Grades 9 – 12
Prerequisite: None


Course Description:
This course can best be described as an exploration into the world of visual arts. Students will create
several different projects in a variety of mediums. This is a studio based course, so the main focus will
be on the ―hands-on‖ creation of your works of art. Students will also create weekly sketches as they
learn about famous artists in history and the Elements and Principles of Design.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students should be self-motivated, courteous and willing to create work to the best of their abilities.
They should be willing to generate, elaborate and refine ideas for art work. There is an emphasis placed
on the drawing from observation of three-dimensional objects.

Specific Outcomes – The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Identify and implement the elements and principles of design.
2.     Become familiar with basic history and appreciation of art.
3.     Demonstrate skill in six different media (combination of 2-D and 3-Dimensional).

Careers Related to Content:
Advertising, Animation, Archaeology, Architect, Architectural Historian, Art Historian, Art Restoration,
Book Binding, Cartoonist, Ceramics, Costume Designer, Editorial Cartoonist, Education, Fabric
Designer, Fashion Designer, Framer, Free Lance Artist, Graphic Design, Historic Preservation,
Book/Magazine/Medical Illustration, Industrial Design, Interior Design, Jeweler, Landscape Architect,
Lighting Design, Magazine/Newspaper Layout, Museum Curator, Museum Director, Makeup Artist,
Package Design, Product Design, Painter, Paper Maker, Print Maker, Sculptor, Set Design, Sign Painter,
Special Effects, Weaver, Woodworker.
                                          FINE ARTS


2-D DESIGN –DRAWING/PAINTING/PRINTMAKING: - Semester Course
Course #: 1123


Credit: 1
Elective: Grades 9 – 12
Prerequisite: Intro Art


Course Description:
This course is designed to focus on Two-Dimensional art. Students will create several different projects
in a variety of mediums including OIL/ACRYLIC on STRECHED CANVAS, CHARCOAL,
MONOPRINTING, WATERCOLOR and PASTEL. This is a studio based course, so the main focus
will be on the ―hands-on‖ creation of your works of art. Students will also create weekly sketches as
they learn about famous 2-D artists in history. You will use the Elements and Principles of Design for
problem solving skills that you encounter.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students should be self-motivated, courteous, and willing to create work to the best of their abilities.
They should be willing to generate, elaborate, and refine ideas for art work. There is an emphasis placed
on the design and creation of two-dimensional art.

Specific Outcomes – The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Identify and implement the elements and principles of design.
2.     Become familiar with basic history and appreciation of three-dimensional artists.
3.     Demonstrate skill in five different two-dimensional media.

Careers Related to Content:
Advertising, Animation, Archaeology, Architect, Architectural Historian, Art Historian, Art Restoration,
Book Binding, Cartoonist, Ceramics, Costume Designer, Editorial Cartoonist, Education, Fabric
Designer, Fashion Designer, Framer, Free Lance Artist, Graphic Design, Historic Preservation,
Book/Magazine/Medical Illustration, Industrial Design, Interior Design, Jeweler, Landscape Architect,
Lighting Design, Magazine/Newspaper Layout, Museum Curator, Museum Director, Makeup Artist,
Package Design, Product Design, Painter, Paper Maker, Print Maker, Sculptor, Set Design, Sign Painter,
Special Effects, Weaver, Woodworker.
                                          FINE ARTS


3-D DESIGN –SCULPTURE & POTTERY: - Semester Course
Course #: 1133


Credit: 1
Elective: Grades 9 – 12
Prerequisite: Intro Art


Course Description:
This course is designed to focus on Three-Dimensional art. Students will create several different
projects in a variety of mediums which may include CLAY PORTRAIT, PLASTER CARVING,
METAL CASTING, WHEEL THROWN POTTERY, and more. This is a studio based course, so the
main focus will be on the ―hands-on‖ creation of your works of art. Students will also create weekly
sketches as they learn about famous 3-D artists in history. You will use the Elements and Principles of
Design for solving problems that you encounter.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students should be self-motivated, courteous, and willing to create work to the best of their abilities.
They should be willing to generate, elaborate, and refine ideas for art work. There is an emphasis placed
on the design and creation of three-dimensional art.

Specific Outcomes – The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Identify and implement the elements and principles of design.
2.     Become familiar with basic history and appreciation of three-dimensional artists.
3.     Demonstrate skill in five different three-dimensional media.

Careers Related to Content:
Advertising, Animation, Archaeology, Architect, Architectural Historian, Art Historian, Art Restoration,
Book Binding, Cartoonist, Ceramics, Costume Designer, Editorial Cartoonist, Education, Fabric
Designer, Fashion Designer, Framer, Free Lance Artist, Graphic Design, Historic Preservation,
Book/Magazine/Medical Illustration, Industrial Design, Interior Design, Jeweler, Landscape Architect,
Lighting Design, Magazine/Newspaper Layout, Museum Curator, Museum Director, Makeup Artist,
Package Design, Product Design, Painter, Paper Maker, Print Maker, Sculptor, Set Design, Sign Painter,
Special Effects, Weaver, Woodworker.
                                             FINE ARTS

ADVANCED ART: - Semester Course
Course #: 1113


Credit: 1
Elective: Grades 9 - 12                *Course may be repeated

Prerequisite:          Intro Art       and       2-D Design or 3-D Design


Course Description:
This course is designed as an in-depth, independent study in Art. Students are given the opportunity to
focus on a specific medium or content area OR experiment with a new one. This course also allows
students to build up a portfolio of work for future schooling and job placement. ADVANCED ART
MAY BE REPEATED MULITIPLE TIMES, giving students the opportunity to continue to build on
established skills and/or create new ones.

Areas of study may include: Painting - oil, acrylic, watercolor, air brush. Dry colored media - chalk and
oil pastels, ink, charcoal. Printmaking - linoleum block, wood cut. Sculpture -clay, wood, plaster, metal,
Commercial art. Computer art - graphics, illustration, animation, Architecture. Pottery - hand built and
wheel thrown. and MORE. A weekly homework assignment of out-of-class sketches is designed to
improve the student's observation skills or to prepare ideas for upcoming projects.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must be self-motivated, responsible and hard working. They should be willing to generate,
elaborate and refine ideas for art work. Students, with the guidance of the instructor, will be responsible
for the direction (theme/content) of their projects.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Identify and implement the elements and principles of design.
2.     Research the history and techniques of art media.
3.     Demonstrate skill in the various two or three-dimensional media of their choice.
4.     To build up a portfolio of work for future schooling and/or job placement.

Careers Related to Content:
See careers listed in Introduction to Art.
                        FINE ARTS and CAREER/TECH DEPT
MULTIMEDIA –- Semester Course
FHS DEPARTMENTS: FINE ARTS & CAREER/TECH
Course #: 0333

Credit: 1
Elective for 10 - 12th graders
PREREQUISITE: Intro to Art class is STRONGLY SUGGESTED.
                     Basic Word Processing and Computer Skills

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Multimedia is the use of various tools such as digital cameras, digital video cameras, scanners, laser printers, laptops or desktops,
and a variety of software to create mini-movies, TV announcements, Web page projects, and Digital Photos. This cross
curriculum application course will integrate Computer Technology, Art (Photography, Graphic Design),
Business/Advertising, Information Media as well as English skills. This course will be taught with Diane Goudy of the
Business Department and David Kraemer of the Art Department as the primary instructors. This course offers creative
projects, photoshoot opportunities, and complete coverage of the basics of PhotoShop 4.0, which includes: working with layers,
making selections, adjusting color techniques, using pint tools, working with filters and transforming type.

Computers and the web have seen an explosion in the amount and quality of digital, audio, and video forms of communication.
The web is a form of media comparable to television, radio, and newsprint. Communication on the web can be seen on a
personal level, as well as in a multitude of careers. Understanding how to design a web site and/or a multimedia project is a skill
that can help a student‘s employability. Communicating in a digital format utilizes skills in graphic design, photography, audio
production, video production, website construction, and multimedia authoring for the Internet, CD ROM, and DVD
application. In addition, the 21st Century Skills of teamwork and communication skills can be taught in this ideal task-and
process-oriented course.

 Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students should have basic computer software skills; have a desire to independently explore various forms of media in an
experimental environment; the ability to listen attentively and follow both written and oral directions and follow established
procedures; be self-motivated, courteous; be able to generate, elaborate and refine ideas, and have a desire to take quality digital
photographs in a variety of photoshoots and varied final products.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
     1. Use various types of equipment, including: Digital cameras, digital video cameras, scanners, laser printers, laptop or
          desktop computers, etc.
     2. Appropriate use of the features of a variety of software, primarily including: Adobe PhotoShop Elements 4.0, Word,
          Publisher, Power Point and the Internet
     3. Complete the cycle of idea generation, creation, modification, constructive suggestions, peer mentoring, trial-and-or
           experimentation and perseverance can be expected and strengthened with evaluation and follow-up
     3. Explore the use of electronic media in the production of two-dimensional art work., and use traditional drawing media
          as needed to combine with electronic techniques, and demonstrate expertise in the production of digital and computer
          generated images.
     4. Apply knowledge of the elements and principles of design to electronic media—especially digital photography.
     5. Draw nine-zone grids and apply the understanding to enhance their photos.
     6. Design simple web pages in the form of a student portfolio to showcase their best artistic work, including a slide show
          of best photos Evaluate various web sites for information and eye-pleasing characteristics, as well as ease of
          navigation.
     7. Examine multimedia-related careers and the necessary education.
     8. Research famous photographers and their photographs and understand their backgrounds and influences on their work
          and examine the history of photographic processes.

Careers Related to Content:
Photographer, Digital Photographer, Graphic Design, Logo Creater, Book/Magazine/Medical Illustration, Industrial Design,
Interior Design, Package Design, Product Design, Special Effects, Webmaster, Web Designer, Video Editor, Video Producer
Advertising, Animation, Architect, Art Historian, Cartoonist, Costume Designer, Educator, Fabric Designer, Fashion Designer,
and Free-Lance Artist.
                                          FINE ARTS

FRESHMAN CHORUS: - Full Year Course
Course #: 1151 – 1152


Credit: 1 per year
Elective: Grade 9 (Begins Second Quarter)
Prerequisite: None


Course Description:
Performance and introduction to choral styles and techniques. The class meets every other day, with
three to four required performances during the year. Class work includes developing vocal and reading
skills, as well as an understanding of choral music. Information is recorded on written work sheets, and
memory of music is required. These scores, as well as singing and written quarter and semester exams,
compile the grade, which is figured on percentages. Enrollment in this course provides the opportunity
to audition for ensemble.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
The student should be able to read, and have an interest in music. This introductory level class assumes
no prior musical knowledge beyond General Music. The student should have the social skills necessary
to work well with and interact in a large group situation.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Model good singing posture.
2.     Describe and demonstrate proper breathing while singing.
3.     Sing with an open, relaxed tone quality.
4.     Demonstrate good basic vowel sounds and use of consonants.
5.     Demonstrate an effective personal warm up.
6.     Match pitch and sing a non-melodic part with 85% accuracy.
7.     Demonstrate performance concepts of phrasing, style, balance, and blend.
8.     Demonstrate an understanding of basic theory concepts.

Careers Related to Content:
Vocal Performance in Professional Ensembles, Paid Soloists, Recitals, or in Music Theater, Directorial-
Choir Conductor, Music Composers/Arrangers for Educational, Commercial, or Movie Productions,
College, Public School, or Private Teaching, Recording Industry, Television Music Production,
Accompanying.
                                            FINE ARTS

CONCERT CHOIR: - Full Year
Course #: 1161 – 1162


Credit: 1 per year
Elective: Grades 10 - 12
Prerequisite: None


Course Description:
Performance and study of choral music in styles ranging from Classical to Pop. The class meets every
other day, with four to six required performances during the year. Class work includes improving
reading and singing skills, as well as understanding of and enjoyment of the various styles. These
activities are graded through both written and oral work, and grades are figured on a percentage basis.
Enrollment in this course provides the opportunity to audition for ensembles and solos. A 10-15 minute
individual or group lesson is required weekly of all students

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
The student should be able to read, and have an interest in vocal performance. They must have the
social skills necessary to work well with and interact in a large group situation, as well as the maturity to
handle independent assignments. The ability to sing in tune will provide a greater measure of success.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Demonstrate correct singing posture.
2.     Demonstrate proper breath management.
3.     Generate a pleasing vocal tone.
4.     Sing with proper diction in English and selected foreign texts.
5.     Demonstrate a healthy use and knowledge of care of the voice.
6.     Demonstrate good intonation and expressive phrasing, as well as the ability to sing
       in a variety of vocal styles.
7.     Demonstrate an understanding of basic theory concepts.
8.     Demonstrate choral skills such as ability to achieve balance, blend.

Careers Related to Content:
Vocal Performance in Professional Ensembles, Paid Soloists, Recitals, or in Music Theater, Directorial-
Choir Conductor, Music Composers/Arrangers for Educational, Commercial, or Movie Productions,
College, Public School or Private Teaching, Recording Industry, Television Music Production,
Accompanying.
                                          FINE ARTS

SELECT CHOIR: - Full Year Course
Course #: 1171 – 1172


Credit:       1 per year
Elective:     Grades 11 – 12 (10 when not already filled from 11-12)
Prerequisite: By Audition Only

Course Description:
Performance and study of choral music in primarily classical styles. The class meets every other day
with six to eight required performances during the year. Emphasis is on refining vocal and musical
performance, as a member of a choir, ensemble and as a soloist. Grades are based on reading and
singing skills as well as understanding of the various musical styles, and are assessed through both
written and oral work. Enrollment in this course provides the opportunity to audition for ensembles and
solos. A 10-15 minute individual or group lesson is required weekly of all students.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
The student should be able to read music and have an interest in serious study of vocal/choral skills.
They must have the social skills necessary to work well with and interact in both large and small group
situations, as well as the maturity to handle independent assignments. They should be able to sing in
tune and reproduce music accurately.

Specific Outcomes – The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Demonstrate correct singing posture.
2.     Demonstrate proper breath management.
3.     Generate a maturing vocal tone.
4.     Sing with proper diction in English, Latin, and Italian.
5.     Demonstrate a healthy use and knowledge of care of the voice.
6.     Demonstrate good intonation and expressive phrasing, as well as the ability to sing in a
       variety of vocal tyles.
7.     Demonstrate an understanding of music theory concepts.
8.     Demonstrate choral skills such as ability to achieve balance and blend.

Careers Related to Content:
Vocal Performance in Professional Ensembles, Paid Soloists, Recitals, or in Music Theater, Directorial-
Choir Conductor, Music Composers/Arrangers for Educational, Commercial, or Movie Productions,
College, Public School or Private Teaching, Recording Industry, Television Music Production,
Accompanying.
                                                  FINE ARTS
9TH GRADE BAND: - Full Year Course
Course #: 1131 - 1132

Credit: 1 per year
Elective: Grade 9
Prerequisite: Middle School Band or Director Approval
Course Description:
Performance and study of music in the areas of marching band and concert band literature. Musical elements will be studied
with emphasis on technical performing proficiency. Marching and field show elements will be primarily performed and
studied during the first quarter of the school year. Concert literature and stage performance will be studied in the second,
third, and fourth quarter.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Know names and fingerings (positions) of notes in normal playing range of instrument. Know concept of counting rhythms
and use of time signatures. Know how to use key signatures and accidentals.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.       Demonstrate correct breathing skills.
2.       Demonstrate correct concept of tone.
3.       Play with an appropriate concept or intonation.
4.       Read and perform standard band literature.
5.       Demonstrate appropriate performance concepts of rhythm, phrasing, and articulation.

Careers Related to Content:
Major Symphony Orchestras; Military Bands; Music Composers/Arranger for educational, commercial, or movie
productions; College Teaching; Public School Teaching; Private Instructor; Recording Industry; Television Music
Production; Private Performance, Bands, Groups.


BAND 10 - 12: - Full Year Course
Course #: 1141 - 1142

Credit: 1
Elective: Grades 10 - 12
Prerequisite: 9th Grade Band or Director's Approval

Course Description:
Performance and study of music in the areas of marching band and concert band literature. Musical elements will be studied
with emphasis on technical performing proficiency. Marching and field show elements will be primarily performed and
studied during the first quarter of the school year. Concert literature and stage performance will be studied in the second,
third, and fourth quarter.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Know names and fingerings (positions) of notes in normal playing range of instrument. Know concept of counting rhythms
and use of time signatures. Know how to use key signatures and accidentals.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.       Demonstrate correct breathing skills.
2.       Demonstrate correct concept of tone.
3.       Play with an appropriate concept of intonation.
4.       Read and perform standard band literature.
5.       Demonstrate appropriate performance concepts of rhythm, phrasing, and articulation.

Careers Related to Content:
Major Symphony Orchestras; Military Bands; Music Composers/Arrangers for educational, commercial, or movie
productions; College Teaching; Public School Teaching; Private Instructor; Recording Industry; Television Music
Production, Private Performance, Bands, Groups.
                                           MATHEMATICS
PRE-ALGEBRA:            Full Year Course
Course #: 2011 – 2012

Credit: 2
Elective: Grades 9 – 10                   Prerequisite:      None
Course Description:
Pre-Algebra is for students who are not quite ready for Algebra 1. Topics covered are similar to Algebra 1, but at
a less complicated level.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
8th grade math skills, basic use of calculator and order of operations.

Specific Outcomes – The Student Will Be Expected To:
The student will be able to work with and understand: variables, equation solving, positive and negative numbers,
formulas, polynomials, factoring, graphs, fractions in algebra, decimals and percents in algebra, squares and
square roots, and quadratic equations.
Careers Related to Content:
Construction, Computer Software, Accounting, Education, and Business.

ALGEBRA 1: - Full Year Course
Course #: 2031 – 2032

Credit: 2
Elective: Grades 9 – 12                   Prerequisite:      None

Course Description:
This course in Algebra uses variables to represent numbers which makes it easier to study number patterns and
solve problems. The logical thinking and problem-solving skills gained are important in everyday life as well as
in most careers.
Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must be competent in basic math skills: addition, subtraction, multiplication and division of whole
numbers, fractions, and decimals.
Specific Outcomes – The Student Will Be Expected To:
 1.     Understand language of Algebra.
 2.     Appreciate the need for precision of language.
 3.     Recognize how and where Algebra is used in everyday living.
 4.     Classify real numbers.
 5.     Solve linear equations.
 6.     Graph relations and functions.
 7.     Analyze liner equations.
 8.     Solve linear inequalities
 9.     Solve systems of linear equations and inequalities.
10.     Classify and perform operations on polynomials.
11.     Factor polynomials.
12.     Solve quadratic equations.
13.     Solve right triangles.
14.     Simplify radical expressions.
Careers Related to Content:
Business, Education, Medicine, Engineering, etc.
                                     MATHEMATICS


GEOMETRY: - Full Year Course
Course #: 2041 – 2042


Credit: 2
Elective: Grades 9 - 12
Prerequisite: Algebra 1
             (9th grades entering geometry must have fulfilled the 8th grade Algebra 1 contract to
             be able to take this course in 9th grade. That is, they must earned a B in 2nd
             semester algebra 1 in 8th grade.)


Course Description:
Geometry is the study of deductive and inductive reasoning utilizing points, lines, and planes. The
logical thinking and problem-solving skills gathered are important in everyday life as well as in most
careers.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must be able to use algebraic skills in transforming and solving equations. They should be able
to use and simplify all real numbers involved in mathematical operations.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
 1.    Use geometric tools.
 2.    Understand the language of Geometry.
 3.    Understand and complete two-column proof.
 4.    Understand elementary laws of logic.
 5.    Discover and apply the angle relationships between parallel and perpendicular lines.
 6.    Solve right triangles.
 7.    Classify polygons.
 8.    Solve problems using relationships between angles and line segments involved with circles.
 9.    Use perimeter, circumference, and area formulas for polygons and circles.
10.    Compute surface area and volume of familiar solids.

Careers Related to Content:
Education, Drafting, Architecture, Engineering, Construction, Graphic Design, Geology, Computer
Software Design, Cartography,
Accounting
                                     MATHEMATICS


ALGEBRA 2: - Full Year Course
Course #: 2061 – 2062


Credit: 2
Elective: Grades 10 - 12
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra 1 and Geometry


Course Description:
Algebra 2 is a continuation of Algebra 1 and is needed by college-bound students. It is the study of the
real number system and provides applications that connect the content to common situations. Students
also experience different problem-solving techniques and refine problem solving skills.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students should understand the use of variables, operations with signed numbers, order of operations,
solving equations in one variable, using exponents to simplify expressions, factoring, solving verbal
problems and evaluating arithmetic and algebraic expressions. Students must have a scientific
calculator. Graphing calculators are optional, but strongly encouraged for those intending on taking Pre-
Calculus after this course. Students should also be able to do ‗mental arithmetic‘.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
 1.    Solve and graph linear equations and inequalities.
 2.    Solve systems of equations and inequalities in two or three variables.
 3.    Perform operations with matrices.
 4.    Perform operations with complex and irrational numbers and polynomials.
 5.    Solve quadratic equations using a variety of methods, and graph them.
 6.    Distinguish between conic sections and graph them.
 7.    Find factors, zeros, and graphs of polynomials.
 8.    Simplify rational expressions and solve rational equations.
 9.    Solve problems using trigonometry.
10.    Solve problems using geometric and arithmetic sequences and series.
11.    Use statistics and probability to compare, count and classify data.
12.    Perform operations with exponential and logarithmic functions.


Careers Related to Content:
Science, Engineering, Business, Computer Science, Education, Medicine, Computer Graphics,
Accounting, Actuarial Science
                                             MATHEMATICS
PRE-CALCULUS: - Full Year Course                                        Credit: 2
Course #: 2071 – 2072
Elective: Grades 11 - 12                                       Prerequisite:   Successful completion of Algebra 2

Course Description:
Pre-Calculus is a course in which emphasis is placed on trigonometry, advanced algebra, analytic geometry, functions and
combinations of these topics. In Pre-Calculus, the student will spend time studying functions, theory of equations, nature of
graphs, trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities and equations, graphs and inverses of the trigonometric functions,
application of trigonometry, exponential and logarithmic functions, matrices, vectors, polar coordinates, complex numbers,
conics.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must be able to solve equations, solve linear equations, solve systems of equations, solve quadratic equations, graph
functions, understand conic sections, work with exponents and exponential functions, write equations, find asymptotes,
evaluate and solve trigonometric functions.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
Answer questions regarding linear relations and functions, matrices and determinants, theory of equations, nature of graphs,
trigonometric equation and graphs and applications, complex numbers, conics, polar coordinates, sequences & series,
probability & statistics. Scientific calculators are essential, and graphing calculators are strongly recommended.

Careers Related to Content:
Education, Accounting, Engineering, Architecture, Medicine, Technology, Computer, Marketing, Actuary Science.


AP CALCULUS: - Full Year Course                                         Credit: 2
Course #: 2081 – 2082
Elective: Grade 12                                             Prerequisite:   Successful completion of Pre-Calculus

Course Description:
Calculus is the study of: algebraic, trigonometric, and logarithmic functions; the introduction to and development of limits
and their properties; the derivatives of algebraic, trigonometric, and logarithmic functions and the applications to maximum
and minimum values of the functions; the introduction to and development of the basic integration formulas and rules for the
algebraic, trigonometric, and logarithmic functions. Students will be encouraged to take the Advanced Placement Calculus
Exam.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must be skilled in algebraic and trigonometric manipulations and techniques.
Scientific calculators are essential, and graphing calculators are strongly recommended.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:

1.       When studying the algebraic, trigonometric, and logarithmic functions:
         a.        Sketch their graphs.
         b.        Find the limit or limit at infinity of the functions.
         c.        Determine if they are continuous and differentiable on an interval.
         d.        Develop the derivative formulas and determine derivatives of the functions.
         e.        Find the integrations of the functions.
2.       Find average, instantaneous, and related rates of change, and apply these to liner motion problems
3.       Apply the concept of derivatives to find critical values, maximum and minimum of functions, and business and
         inflection points and concavity.
4.       Find the area of a plane region.
5.       Apply the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.
6.       Be able to show representations graphically, numerically, symbolically, and verbally.
7.       Find volumes of solids.
8.       Apply the concept of integrals to areas, volumes, and linear motion.

Careers Related to Content:
Education, Mathematics, Engineering, Science, Business, Medicine and Actuary Science.
                                      MATHEMATICS

PRACTICAL MATH I: - Semester Course
PRACTICAL MATH II: - Semester Course
Course #: 2021 - 2022


Credit: 1 per course
Elective: Grades 10 - 12
Prerequisite: 1 year of math and instructor consent


Course Description:
These courses are designed to allow students to explore how math is used in every day living. Instructor
consent is needed to take this course.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Basic understanding of the fundamental operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division
of whole numbers, fractions and decimals.

Specific Outcomes – The Student Will Be Expected to:
   1 Use measurement and estimation
   2. Use graphs, charts, and tables dealing with data
   3. Use ratios and proportions
   4. Fill out applications and write resumes
   5. Keep money records
   6. Calculate payroll
   7. Gain a basic understanding of taxes and insurance
   8. Gain an understanding of simple probability and odds
   9. Gain an understanding of how to solve equations
   10. Gain calculator skills

Careers Related to Content:
Bookkeeping, Salesperson, other business related careers
                                      MATHEMATICS

Topics in Math I - Semester Course
Topics in Math II - Semester Course
Course #: 2051 - 2052


Credit: 1 per course
Elective : Grades 11-12
Prerequisite: 2 years of math and instructor consent


Course Description:
These courses offer a unique approach for the exploration of topics that are not usually covered in other
math courses. The topics are relevant and engaging and include 21st Century math skills. Topics
covered include: patterns, data analysis, statistics, algebra, geometry, evolution of mathematics, and
numbers/operations.

Skills Needed To Be Successful in the Class:
Students need to be able to use a scientific calculator and be competent in reading and basic math skills.
Students must be able to work alone and in groups.


Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
       1) Apply basic math skills to real world applications
       2) Create and interpret graphs
       3) Look for patterns
       4) Communicate mathematically in verbal and written form
       5) Understand units of measurement
       6) Understand and use mathematical terminology
       7) Use the Internet to research mathematical topics
       8) Work independently and in a group


Careers Related to Content:
Since all careers involve some aspect of mathematics, these courses will be applicable to all careers.
                                     MATHEMATICS

STATISTICS: - One Semester Course
Course #: 2063


Credit: 1
Elective: Grades 11 – 12
Prerequisite: Algebra 2 ( may take concurrently)


Course Description:
This course is intended to be only an introduction to statistics. Vocabulary to be learned includes not
only mean, median, and mode, but also normal distribution, stem and leaf, prediction equations,
probability, binomial expansion, box and whisker plots, variance, and standard deviation. The hand
calculator will be an extremely useful tool in the statistics classroom; as well, the computer is an
important component of the contemporary statistics laboratory.

Skills Needed to be Successful in the Class:
Students must be skilled in algebra manipulation, fractions, and percent. They should be familiar with
the basic operations of the ―scientific calculator‖ or the ―graphing calculator.‖ The students should
understand the basics of probability such as counting of permutations and combinations.

Specific Outcomes – The Student will be expected to:
Read data in different forms as text, numbers, and graphs and develop these descriptions from one set to
the next. Use expected values to predict eventual outcomes from ―textbook data‖ and local practical
data from the community. Learn to enhance statistic skills with the use of calculators and computers.

Careers Related to Content:
Accounting, Actuary Science, Quality Control Processing, Marketing, Research, Business Analysis,
Education, Psychology and Social Science.
                                     WORLD LANGUAGE
*Note: It is Beneficial for students to take World Languages consecutively without a break in sequence.
Also, findings show that those students receiving less than a C average in any specific level will be highly
challenged in each consecutive level. It is suggested that those receiving less than a C average consider re-
enrolling in the level of non-proficiency.

FRENCH 1: - Full Year Course
Course #: 1201 – 1202
Credit: 2
Elective: Grades 9 - 12                  Prerequisite:    None
Course Description:
French 1 is a year-long intensive course introducing students to the basics of speaking, reading, writing and
understanding French. Cultural aspects in everyday living, schools, holidays, Belgium and Switzerland are
explored. Cultural awareness and language exposure are presented through various technology, holiday
celebration, and music. French 1 is open to freshmen, sophomores, juniors and seniors. Memorization of
vocabulary and verb tenses is essential.
Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must be willing to make the effort in speaking, reading, writing, and listening activities. Class
participation is necessary.
Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.      Be willing to speak French.
2.      Speak, read, write and understand French within the limits of French 1 vocabulary and grammar.
3.      Acquire an awareness of French speaking European countries, their culture, lifestyles and geography.
Careers Related to Content:
Business, Law, Social Work, Politics, Education, International Affairs, Tourism, Journalism, and Advertising.

FRENCH 2: - Full Year Course
Course #: 1211 – 1212
Credit: 2
Elective: Grades 10 - 12                 Prerequisite: Successful Completion of French 1
Course Description:
French 2 is a year-long course which first reviews French 1 material then builds on these skills. Expanded
vocabulary and grammar concepts allow students to build communication skills and develop greater cultural
awareness.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must make the effort to express and understand ideas in French. Participation is necessary in speaking,
listening, reading and writing activities.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.      Be willing to speak French.
2.      Understand, read, write and speak French within the limits of French 2 vocabulary and grammar.
3.      Acquire new vocabulary and grammar concepts.
4.      Master new vocabulary and grammar to build communication skills.
5.      Show and acquire greater awareness of culture and lifestyles of French speaking people.

Careers Related to Content:
Business, Law, Social Work, Politics, Education, International Affairs, Tourism, Journalism, Advertising.
                                     WORLD LANGUAGE

FRENCH 3: - Full Year Course
Course #: 1221 – 1222
Credit: 2
Elective:       Grades 11 - 12           Prerequisite:    Successful completion of French 2
Course Description:
French 3 is a year-long course designed to develop greater fluency and knowledge in French lifestyles, culture,
literature, and cuisine. The course includes technology, house plans, research, short stories, studies of Canada and
French-speaking Africa.
Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must make the effort to express and understand ideas in French. Participation is required in speaking,
reading, writing and listening activities.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.      Be willing to speak French.
2.      Understand, read, write and speak French within the limits of French 3 vocabulary and grammar.
3.      Continue to acquire new vocabulary and grammar concepts.
4.      Master new vocabulary and grammar concepts to improve communication skills.
5.      Show an awareness of culture, literature, geography and differences in lifestyles of the French-speaking
        peoples.

Careers Related to Content:
Business, Law, Social Work, Politics, Education, International Affairs, Tourism, Journalism, Advertising.




FRENCH 4: - Full Year Course
Course #: 1231 – 1232
Credit: 2
Elective: Grade 12                       Prerequisite:    Successful completion of French 3
Course Description:
French 4 is a year-long course which includes technology, literature, geography, history, civilization and lifestyles
of French-speaking people. There will be many opportunities to enhance the students enjoyment of and ability to
use French.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must be willing to expand and improve their communication skills through reading, writing, speaking
and listening. Participation and effort are required.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.      Be willing to speak French.
2.      Understand, read, write and speak French within the limits of French 4 vocabulary and grammar.
3.      Show an awareness of the geography, culture, history and literature of French-speaking countries.
4.      Continue to build skills to allow greater understanding and expression.

Careers Related to Content:
Business, Law, Social Work, Education, International Affairs, Tourism, Journalism, Advertising.
                                  WORLD LANGUAGE
SPANISH 1: - Full Year Course
Course #: 1241 – 1242

Credit: 2
Elective: Grades 9 - 12
Prerequisite: None
Course Description:
Spanish 1 is a year-long intensive study of a new language. It introduces experiences in speaking,
reading, writing and understanding Spanish. Cultural experiences are included with the use of guest
speakers, various technologies, music, role-playing and show-and-tell. The class is available to
freshmen, sophomores, juniors and seniors.
Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must be willing to participate in all activities in the Spanish classroom, which include speaking,
reading, writing and listening.
Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Speak Spanish.
2.     Learn introductory Spanish vocabulary and grammer.
3.     Have an open mind to cultural differences and ways of life of Spanish-speaking countries.
Careers Related to Content:
Spanish is important in all types of occupations in the U.S. today: Education, Communications,
Journalism, Law Enforcement, Social Work, International Business and Politics, and Travel.



SPANISH 2: - Full Year Course
Course #: 1251 – 1252

Credit: 2
Elective: Grades 10 - 12
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish 1
Course Description:
Spanish 2 is a year-long course which continues to build communication skills. Writing, comprehension
and reading skills become more developed. Cultural awareness is emphasized with the use of music,
show-and-tell, technology and Spanish holiday celebration.
Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must be willing to participate in all activities in the Spanish classroom, which include speaking,
reading, writing and listening within the limits of Spanish 2 vocabulary.
Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Speak, understand, read and write the vocabulary consistent at the Spanish 2 level.
2.     Expand their cultural understanding of the Spanish-speaking people.
Careers Related to Content:
By the end of second year, students are able, knowledgeable and skillful enough to see how they may
wish to use their language knowledge in a related career such as Education, Communications,
Journalism, Law Enforcement, Social Work, International Business and Politics, and Travel.
                                     WORLD LANGUAGE

SPANISH 3: - Full Year Course
Course #: 1261 – 1262
Credit: 2
Elective: Grades 11 - 12                 Prerequisite:      Successful completion of Spanish 2
Course Description:
Spanish 3 is a year-long course which continues to improve fluency of the Spanish language and increases one's
knowledge of the life in Spanish-speaking countries.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students need to be willing to converse and participate in classroom activities in order to use the Spanish
language and understand the cultural differences of the U.S. and Spanish-speaking countries.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.      Improve communication skills by speaking in the classroom.
2.      Improve all language skills.
3.      Increase vocabulary and common expression learning for use in reading, writing and speaking Spanish.
4.      Understand to a greater degree how life is in Spanish speaking countries. Through different classroom
        experiences which includes singing, dancing, foods, technology, speakers and various listening activities.
5.      Understand the differences of the American and Spanish way of life through special holiday celebration.
Careers Related to Content:
Students are able to understand in a much broader sense the different directions one may go in order to pursue a
career with the Spanish language enhancing one's job opportunities. Careers included are: Education,
Communication, Journalism, Law Enforcement, Social Work, International Business, Politics and Travel.

SPANISH 4: - Full Year Course
Course #: 1271 – 1272
Credit: 2
Elective: Grade 12               Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish 3
Course Description:
Spanish 4 is a year-long course that pieces together all previous years of language learning. At this level one
proceeds with an in-depth study of Spanish while participating in classroom activities that explores all cultural
aspects of the Spanish speaking countries.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students should be willing to participate in all classroom activities in order to improve all skills with emphasis on
communication and to expand their knowledge about Spanish-speaking countries.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.      Speak Spanish at a more sophisticated level.
2.      Understand, read and write Spanish.
3.      Continue to increase their knowledge of vocabulary and expressions appropriate to this level of Spanish.
4.      Show an awareness of cultural differences of U.S. and Spanish-speaking countries as a result of
        classroom experiences such as native speakers, technology, special holiday celebration, foods, songs and
        dances.
Careers Related to Content:
The use of Spanish in all types of occupations in the U.S. prevails today. Education, Communication, Journalism,
Law Enforcement, Social Work, International Business, Politics and Travel.
                      PHYSICAL EDUCATION/HEALTH


HEALTH: - Semester Course
Course #: 2302

Credit: 1
Elective: Grades 9
Prerequisite: None


Course Description:
Health class is designed to help students examine their lifestyles, select goals, and make plans to achieve
and maintain optimum health. Various aspects of healthful living are taught by providing students with
information and life management skills that promote responsible decision making needed to begin the
lifelong process of choosing and enjoying a healthy lifestyle. Content areas covered in class are
mental/emotional heath, family/social health, growth and development, nutrition, personal health and
physical activity, alcohol, tobacco and other drugs, communicable and chronic diseases, consumer and
community health, environmental health, injury prevention and personal safety.


Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must be able to express knowledge, thoughts, opinions and ideas verbally and in writing.
Students need to be able to work cooperatively in small and large groups. Tests, assignments need to be
satisfactorily completed.


Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Demonstrate knowledge of factors affecting personal health, e.g., weight control, dietary and
       nutritional habits, substance abuse (alcohol, tobacco, drugs), fitness and exercise.
2.     Demonstrate a knowledge of individual self-awareness including understanding, accepting and
       asserting self; developing a positive self-image and setting personal goals.
3.     Demonstrate knowledge of problem-solving processes, decision-making skills, conflict
       management techniques and coping skills in life situations.
4.     Demonstrate a knowledge of family planning and parenthood and acceptance of responsibility
       for and consequences of sexual activity.
5.     Demonstrate a knowledge of the basic skills necessary to maintain/mental emotional, physical
       and family/social health.

Careers Related to Content:
Health care professionals/providers such as physicians, nurses, physical therapists, dietitians,
pharmacists, psychologists, dentists, dental hygienists, EMT, respiratory therapists, medical assistants,
surgical technologists, etc.
                       PHYSICAL EDUCATION/HEALTH


Community Health: – Semester Course
Course #: 1403


Credit: 1
Elective: Grades 10 -12
Prerequisite: None


Course description:
This course will examine critical life issues facing teenagers in today‘s society. This project-based
offering will look at a variety of different topics and how they relate to living a healthy lifestyle in your
community. Topics include self awareness, self esteem, family living, addiction, healthy and unhealthy
relationships, teenage pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, emotional and social health, death and
dying, and other critical life issues. Additional topics available are community resources, contemporary
world health issues and career options within the health field.

Skills Needed to Be Successful in the Class:
Students must be able to express their thoughts, knowledge, opinions and ideas verbally and in writing.
Students need to be able to work cooperatively in small and large groups. Tests, assignments and class
projects need to be satisfactorily completed.

Specific Outcomes—The Student Will Be Expected To:
Demonstrate a better understanding of individual self-awareness, including understanding, accepting and
asserting self; developing a positive self-image and setting personal goals.
Demonstrate better understanding of factors affecting personal health, e.g. dietary and nutritional habits,
addiction, weight control.
Demonstrate a better understanding of family planning and parenthood and acceptance of responsibility
for consequence of sexual activity.
Demonstrate a better understanding of the skills necessary to maintain personal, physical and mental
health.
Demonstrate a better understanding of decision making and coping skills in life situations.

Careers Related to Content:
Health care professional/ providers such a physicians, nurses, certified nurse‘s aide, physical therapist,
dietitians, pharmacists, psychologist, dentists, dental hygienists, EMT, respiratory therapists, medical
assistants, surgical technologists, social worker, psychiatrist, etc.
                        PHYSICAL EDUCATION/HEALTH
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Course #: Seniors/Juniors: 2311 – 2321
          Sophomores/Freshmen: 2312 – 2322

Credit:         1 per year

Required:       Grades 9 - 12 (Each Semester)
                Seniors participating in a sport may opt out of Physical Education for one semester.

Prerequisite:   None
Course Description:
Physical Education provides students with a variety of information, activities and skills that will lead to fitness,
social interaction and total wellness for a healthy lifestyle. Physical Education instruction will include physical
fitness activities that increase cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength/endurance and flexibility; sports and
games; tumbling and gymnastics; rhythms and dance; water safety; leisure and lifetime activities.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Each student should have good attendance, wear the proper uniform, participate and work to his/her ability in
class activities and cooperate with others.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will:
1.      Develop basic competence in skills, techniques, and strategies of selected physical activities.
2.      Assess personal fitness status in terms of cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength and endurance,
        flexibility and body composition.
3.      Participate cooperatively and ethically when in competitive physical activities.
4.      Actively participate in games, sports, dance, outdoor pursuits, and other physical activities which
        contribute to the attainment of personal goals and the maintenance of wellness.
5.      Feel empowered to maintain and improve physical fitness, motor skills, and knowledge about physical
        activity.
6.      Make a commitment to physical activity as an important part of one's lifestyle.
Careers Related to Content:
Teacher, Coach, Official, Recreation Director, Lifeguard, Physical Therapist, Water Safety Instructor, Fitness
Instructor, EMT, Paramedic, First Responder
                                            SCIENCE

INTEGRATED SCIENCE – Full year course
Course #: 1701-1702


Credit: 2
Required: Grade 9
Prerequisite: None


Course Description:
Integrated Science is an introductory course in physics and chemistry. The first semester is devoted to
the laws and principles of physics and their application to daily life. The affect of forces on matter and
the concept of energy are the main focus. The second semester is devoted to introductory chemistry,
followed by a short unit on climate change. Lab experiences will be incorporated when applicable.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must have a willingness to learn and complete tasks. They must have good listening skills and
be able to collaborate with classmates on activities.

Specific Outcomes – The Students Will Be Expected To:
       1.     Read, interpret and describe tables and graphs.
       2.     Consider the nature and meaning of science.
       3.     Investigate how forces affect the movement of matter.
       4.     Understand that energy has many different forms.
       5.     Investigate conservation of energy.
       6.     Identify atomic structure and how it applies to the periodic table.
       7.     Describe properties and changes of properties in matter.
       8.     Consider aspects of the atmosphere, weather, climate, and how climate is changing.

Careers Related to Content:
Teaching, Farming, Nursing, Pharmacist, Lawn and Garden Services, Scientific Research, Dentistry,
Medical Lab Technicians, Aviation, Veterinary Medicine
                                            SCIENCE
BIOLOGY 1 – Full Year Course
Course #: 1721-1722


Credit: 2
Required: Grade 10
Prerequisite: Integrated Science


Course Description:
This course is designed to introduce students to major biological concepts and themes. Throughout the
year students will investigate characteristics of life, ecology, cell structure, photosynthesis, cellular
respiration, cell division, DNA structure, protein synthesis, genetics, taxonomy, and the animal
kingdom.
There are numerous inquiry lab exercises, simulations, and dissections that accompany each unit of
study.

Skills needed to be successful in the class:
Students must be able to read, listen, and follow directions. They must have a good work ethic and they
need a willingness to complete class assignments and to study for examinations. They must be able to
abide by safety rules when working with equipment in the laboratory.

Specific Outcomes – The students will be expected to:
   1) Explain the characteristics of life.
   2) Properly use a light microscope.
   3) Outline the major steps of the scientific process.
   4) Model ecological interactions.
   5) Relate cellular structures to their functions.
   6) Highlight how energy is transferred in photosynthesis and cellular respiration.
   7) Understand how DNA structure allows it to control the activities of the cell.
   8) Explain the major phases of cell division.
   9) Predict probable outcomes of various genetic crosses.
   10) Examine how living things are classified to show presumed relationships.
   11) Provide an overview of the major groups making up the animal kingdom.
   12) Dissect a fetal pig to learn the structures and functions of the major organs and organ systems of
       mammals.

Careers related to content:
Higher Education, Health services, Agriculture, Biotechnology, Research, Animal services
                                           SCIENCE

BIOLOGY II – Full year course
Course #: 1731 – 1732


Credit: 2
Elective: Grades 11 – 12
Prerequisites: Integrated science, Biology I


Course Description:
This course is designed to expand on the topics introduced in biology I. Major topics include botany,
microbiology, and human biology. Instruction will integrate a variety of teaching techniques with an
emphasis on inquiry-based learning, technology, hands-on labs, and lab simulations.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must have a willingness to learn and complete tasks. They must be able to collaborate with
classmates on activities and use technology to enhance their learning.

Specific Outcomes – The Students Will Be Expected To:
1.     Relate basic plant structures to their functions.
2.     Compare and contrast plant structures to summarize how plants are classified and
       identified.
3.     Describe the life cycle of plants.
4.     Explore how plants respond to environmental stimuli and play a major role in
       the balance of the ecosystem.
5.     Investigate viruses, bacteria, protists, and fungi by:
               a.)     relating structures to functions.
               b.)     describing reproductive cycles.
               c.)     classifying and identifying.
               d.)     identifying ecological, medical, and economical importance.
6.     Study the structure and function of cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems
       of the human body.
   8.      Examine the expression of human genes and patterns of human inheritance.

Careers Related to Content:
Medical and Paramedical Careers, Laboratory Technicians, Bio-tech, Education, Agriculture,
Biological Research
                                                     SCIENCE
CHEMISTRY I: - Full Year Course
Course #: 1741 – 1742

Credit: 2
Elective:     Grades 11 - 12        (10 W/instructor permission)
Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent enrollment in Algebra 2,
              Previous taken Integrated science & Biology I

Course Description:
This is an introductory chemistry course that deals with the basic laws and theories of matter. Students will study atomic
theory, periodicity, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, stages of matter, organic chemistry, redox reactions, acids & bases,
and qualitative analysis. A scientific calculator is strongly recommended. (Note: It is necessary for a student to successfully
complete the first semester of chemistry before continuing on to the second semester.)

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students should be able to read and comprehend the chemistry text, solve math problems involving Algebra 1 level skills, use
higher level thinking skills, and do safe laboratory work.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.       Understand the basic principles of chemistry such as physical and chemical changes, bonding, moles, and
         periodicity.
2.       Develop skill, responsibility, and respect for safe handling of chemicals and for safety in the laboratory.
3.       Apply math skills and the S.I. system to chemical problems.
4.       Use correct word definitions, spelling, grammar, and punctuation in written reports and problem results.
5.       Develop scientific literacy through an understanding of chemicals that occur in their daily lives.

Careers Related to Content:
Any medical career including: Doctor, Nurse, Pharmacist, Veterinarian, Dentist, etc.; Engineering, Agriculture, Home
Economics, Education, Environmentalist, Science, Law


CHEMISTRY II: - Full Year Course
Course #: 1751 – 1752

Credit: 2
Elective: Grade 11 - 12
Prerequisite: "B" average or better in Chemistry 1. Students with a "C" in Chemistry 1 must get written
               permission from the teacher before being allowed to enroll in Chemistry 2.

Course Description:
Chemistry 2 provides a brief review of basic topics covered in Chemistry 1 and then goes on to a more in-depth study of
quantitative analysis, qualitative analysis, redox reactions, the chemistry of solutions, thermochemistry, chemical
equilibrium, kinetics, and organic chemistry.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students should be able to read and comprehend their chemistry text, handle complex math calculations, and do detailed and
accurate lab work.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.       Reinforce basic concepts from Chemistry 1.
2.       Develop superior lab techniques with both accuracy and precision.
3.       Apply math principles and skills to the solution of chemical problems.
4.       Understand the basics of organic chemistry.
5.       Develop confidence for future study in any scientific field.

Careers Related to Content:
Medicine, Engineering, Law, Pharmacy, Dentistry, Scientific Research, or any Highly Competitive Professional Career
                                            SCIENCE

PHYSICS: - Full Year
Course #: 1761 – 1762


Credit: 2
Elective: Grade: 12 ( Grade 11 with instructor permission)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra 2, Integrated Science & Biology I


Course Description:
Physics is the study of the interrelationship between energy and matter. This course includes units on
mechanics, states of matter, wave phenomena, light, and electricity. Labs, visual aids and
demonstrations are correlated with each unit studies. This introductory course is designed for the
college-bound student who is interested in a science that can give them an idea of the way physicists
view the world.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
The ability to read, take notes, express themselves in written and oral forms, apply new knowledge to
new situations, work with others in a lab setting and a strong work ethic and desire are all necessary to
be successful in this class.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
 1.    Gain an understanding of the nature of physics and of the fundamental laws that govern our
       universe.
2.     Gain knowledge of the basic measurements, calculations, and tools used by physicists.
3.     Be able to effectively use laboratory equipment to gather and analyze data.
4.     Develop a basic understanding of motion, forces, work, states of matter, energy, electricity, wave
       phenomena, and light properties.

Careers Related to Content:
Surveyors, Aviation, Air Traffic Control, all types of Engineers, Telecommunications, Fiber Optics,
Music Related Fields, Acoustics, Electrical and Electronic Technicians, Medicine, Education
                                            SCIENCE


HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY: - Full Year Course
Course #: 1771 – 1772


Credit: 2
Elective: Grades 11 - 12
Prerequisites: Integrated science, Biology I


Course Description:
Anatomy and Physiology is the study and function of the ten organ systems of the human organism
and their relationship to one another. Labs and visual aids are correlated with each system studied.
This course is designed for the college-bound student who is interested in a health-related career and
would prove valuable to any student who wants to know more about the structure and functioning of
their own body.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
The ability to read, take notes, express themselves in written and oral forms, apply new knowledge to
new situations, work with others in a lab setting and a strong work ethic and desire are all necessary
to be successful in this class.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Show an increased awareness and appreciation for their own body and its
       intricate organization and their responsibility for its well being.
2.     Understand the relationship of cells, tissues, organs, organ systems and complete organisms.
3.     Be able to effectively use the microscope as an investigative tool in cellular studies.
4.     Show proficiency in their dissecting skills through organ dissection and comparative small
       mammal dissection.
5.     Become skilled at using basic reference texts to supplement text reading and laboratory
       materials.

Careers Related to Content:
Clinical Laboratory Services, Health Occupation Services, Physical Therapy, Nursing, Doctor, Dentist,
Laboratory Technicians, Education
                                    SOCIAL STUDIES

WORLD CULTURES: - Semester Course
Course #: 2703


Credit: 1
Elective: Grade 9 (Meets World History Requirement)
Prerequisite: None


Course Description:
World Cultures is an in-depth study of the geography, people, and insures of the non-western world.
World Cultures focuses on the regions of Africa, Middle East, South Asia, Southeast Asia, Australia and
Latin America. This course emphasizes the study of people, their traditions, customs, history, religion,
music, literature and art.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must have a desire to improve themselves and must possess a strong work ethic to be
successful in this class. Students must have an open mind to new ideas and have basic skills in using the
computer and library for research. Students are required to participate in class.

Specific Outcomes:
1.     Students will demonstrate basic geography skills and an understanding of how geography
       influences the culture of a region.
2.     Students will demonstrate an understanding of global interdependence as it occurs through the
       exchange of goods and ideas.
3.     Students will demonstrate an understanding of different elements of culture (social organization,
       customs, traditions, language, arts, literature, government and religion).
4.     Students will demonstrate a respect and appreciation for the historical and contemporary
       contributions of diverse cultural groups to society.
5.     Students will demonstrate research and writing skills as they complete projects.
6.     Students will demonstrate skills in creative and critical thinking, problem solving, and decision
       making that will enable them to meet the challenges of a changing world.
7.     Students will demonstrate an ability to use the internet for research or a means of communication
       with people around the world.
8.     Students will demonstrate an understanding of major sources of tension and conflict in the
       contemporary world efforts that have been made to address them.
9.     Students will demonstrate an understanding of long term changes and recurring patterns in world
       history.

Careers Related To Content:
Travel Agent, Tour Guide, Museum Operator, Journalism, Marketing, International Law, Ambassador,
Public Relations Manager, Historian, Genealogist, Investment Services, Archeologist, Commercial
Airline Employee, Military Service, Diplomat, CIA, International Industry and Education.
                                     SOCIAL STUDIES


WESTERN CIVILIZATION: - Semester Course
Course #: 2713


Credit: 1
Elective: Grade 9 (Class of 2011 must take one World History other than Western Civilization)
Prerequisite: None


Course Description:
This course takes a thematic approach to the development of Western Civilization from Greece and
Rome up through the present time. Various themes such as nationalism, international conflicts, the
Renaissance, Imperialism, Industrialism, and other selected themes will be included during the semester.
The course will center on making history relevant to the world as it exists today.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
 Students must be able to cooperate well with others. They must be disciplined enough to get the
assigned reading completed on time, along with the written assignment. The student must be able to
respect the opinions of others in the class.

Specific Outcomes – The Student Will Be Expected To:
 1.    Understand the concept of cause and effect on the historical process.
 2.    Identify places and persons significant in the historical development of Europe.
 3.    Describe the differences between primary and secondary sources, fact and
       opinion, inference and judgment.
 4.    Identify the current nation-states in Europe.
 5.    Relate current news reports to material presented in the course.
 6.    Make relevant oral comments on questions asked in large and small groups.
 7.    Write short responses to describe, compare and evaluate written, visual or oral presentations.
 8.    Locate, use, and interpret social studies materials.
 9.    Read and interpret maps and graphs.
10.    Develop desirable social skills which will create respect for the basic rights, feelings, and
       opinions of others.

Careers Related to Content:
Archeology, Education, Law, Linguistics, Travel Consultant, Airline Employment, Politics, Military
Service, Tour Guide.
                                     SOCIAL STUDIES

U.S. HISTORY: - Full Year Course
Course #: 2721 – 2722


Credit: 2
Required: Grade 10
Prerequisite: None


Course Description:
This class will examine and analyze the course of United States history from the 1870‘s to the present.
Special emphasis will be placed upon; immigration and industrialization, imperialism, progressivism,
World War I, the Great Depression, the New Deal, World War II, the Cold War , the Civil Rights
movement, the Vietnam War, and Watergate.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students will need to have good reading and writing skills. Students should also possess critical
thinking skills and be good listener.

Specific Outcomes- Students will be Expected To:

1.     Have a greater understanding and appreciation of recent domestic and foreign policies.
2.     Have a greater understanding as to how the United States government forms domestic and
       foreign policies.
3.     Have a better appreciation of democratic process.
4.     Clearly recall and state facts, ideas, opinions and interpretations.
5.     Understand and appreciate America‘s history as a part of an on going story.
6.     Develop the ability to read critically, to evaluate evidence, separate fact and opinion, and
       distinguish between primary and secondary account.
7.     Gain insight and interest into current political, economic, culture and social problems.

Career Related to Content:
Education, Business, Economics, Political Science, Journalism, Public Relations, and Politics.
                                      SOCIAL STUDIES

CONTEMPORARY WORLD ISSUES: - Semester Course
Course # : 2752


Credit: 1
Required: Class of 2011 must take one World History other than Western Civilization
Grades: 11 or 12     (Meets social studies elective requirements)
Prerequisite: None


Course Description:
This course will study current political, economic, and social issues facing the world without an
emphasis on the United States. Special emphasis will be placed upon; Human Rights/Genocide,
Globalization, Movement of Peoples, Global Health Issues, Environmental Issues, and World Conflicts.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students will need to have good reading, writing, and research skills, critical thinking skills and be a
good listener.

Specific Outcomes – Students will be Expected To:
   1. Students will demonstrate an understanding of major sources of tension and conflict in the
       contemporary world.
   2. Students will demonstrate skills in critical thinking and problem solving for research.
   3. Student will expand their knowledge of world issues.

Careers Related to Content:
Politics, International studies, Law, Education
                                      SOCIAL STUDIES


THEMES IN AMERICAN HISTORY: - Semester Course
Course #: 2743


Credit: 1
Elective: Grades 11 - 12       (Meets Social Studies Elective Requirement)
Prerequisite: None


Course Description:
This course will study various themes in American history. Each theme will be studied from colonial
times up to the present. Such themes might include war, music, race relations, and religion. These are
only examples and the students will also pick topics to study. Instructions will include discussion, team
competition, lectures, simulations, and independent study.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must be able to cooperate well with others. They must be disciplined enough to get the
assigned reading completed on time along with the written assignments. The student must respect the
opinions of others in the class.

Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Understand the concept of cause and effect on the historical process.
2.     Identify places and persons significant in the historical development of the United States.
3.     Describe the difference between primary and secondary sources, fact and opinion, inference
       and judgment.
4.     Interpret political cartoons.
5.     Identify the states and capitals of the United States.
6.     Relate current news reports to material presented in the course.
7.     Develop skills in locating, using, and interpreting social studies materials.
8.     Express ideas and opinions in a logical and organized manner.
9.     Responsible to ask questions on matters with which he/she disagrees.

Careers Related to Content:
Politics, military service, archeology, law, education, travel consultant.
                                         SOCIAL STUDIES
PSYCHOLOGY: - Semester Course
Course #: 2763
Credit: 1
Elective: Grades 11 – 12 (Meets Social Studies Elective Requirement)
Prerequisite: None
Course Description:
Psychology is a one semester course designed to help understand ourselves and others. Students will learn about
the nature of psychology, personality theory, development, and therapy, nature of learning, body sensations and
perception, stress and conflict, altered states of consciousness, psychological testing, and classical and operant
conditioning.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Students must be able to participate in experiments, organize time, develop vocabulary, state position both
verbally and written, and read for content and personal gain.

Specific Outcomes – The Student Will Be Expected To:
 1.     Become familiar with various functions and parts of the nervous system.
 2.     Understand the functions of motivation, emotion, and theories of needs.
 3.     Compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages of selected altered states of consciousness.
 4.     Describe the principles and techniques of classical and operant conditioning.
 5.     Understand the different theories that account for memory and forgetting, plus the different types
        of memory systems.
Careers Related to Content:
Clinical and Research Psychology, Law, Business, Sociology, Communications, Guidance and Counseling,
Education, Human Services, Personnel Administration, Most Medical Fields.

SOCIOLOGY: - Semester Course
Course #: 2753
Credit: 1
Elective: Grades 11 – 12 (Meets Social Studies Elective Requirement)
Prerequisite: None
Course Description:
Sociology is a semester course designed to give the student an understanding of human group behavior and
current social problems. Areas covered include: culture, conformity and defiance, roles and relationships, social
stratification, the family, religion, education, childhood, socialization, adolescence, adult years, discrimination,
poverty, crime, and the use of the scientific method.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Read, write, express opinions, cooperate, listens, be responsible.

Specific Outcomes – The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.      Learn information related to broad social concepts.
2.      Clearly state and write opinions and ideas.
3.      Develop understanding of human group behavior.
4.      Analyze critically and constructively themselves and society.

Careers Related to Content:
Education, Human Relations, Communications, Writing, Journalism, Therapy, Social work, Homemaking/parent,
Business, Marketing, Political Science.
                                      SOCIAL STUDIES


AMERICAN GOVERNMENT: - Semester Course
Course #: 2783


Credit: 1
Required: Grade 12             (Meets American Government Requirement)
Prerequisite: None


Course Description:
Government is a one semester course designed to introduce students to our unique form of American
government including: rights and responsibilities of citizenship, the three branches of government, and
the role of state and local government in our federal system.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Read, write, listen, express opinions, cooperate, take responsibility for assigned tasks.

Specific Outcomes – The Student Will Be Expected To:
1.     Acquire information on the workings of American government.
2.     Expand their knowledge and interest of current political issues.
3.     Comprehend and appreciate opposing political views.
4.     Attend a city council meeting or school board meeting.
5.     Write a letter to governmental official concerning current issues.
6.     Understanding rights and responsibilities of citizenship.

Careers Related to Content:
Politics, government service, Education, and law related professions
                                      SOCIAL STUDIES

AP AMERICAN GOVERNMENT: - Semester Course
Course # - 2784


Credit: 1
Elective: Grade 12            (Meets American Government Requirement)
Prerequisite: None

* College Credit Available
Course Description:
AP U.S. Government and Politics is a semester course that analyzes the different institutions, groups and
beliefs that make up the United States political system. Students will be expected to go beyond a basic
analysis of how our government operates, develop an understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of
the American political system. Students will also prepare to take the AP Government Exam. This
course is taught on a college level and requires a considerable amount of reading and preparation.
Students will be encouraged to take the Advanced Placement American Government Exam.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
Read, write, listen, express opinions, cooperate, take responsibility for assigned tasks and be able to
express ideas using the proper rules of English.

Specific Outcomes- The Student Will Be Expected To:
   1. Acquire information relating to the important facts, concepts and theories relating to United
       States government and politics.
   2. Have a greater understanding of how the political process functions and the behavior and
       consequences of it.
   3. Expand their knowledge and interest of current political issues.
   4. Comprehend and appreciate opposing political views.
   5. Attend a city council meeting or school board meeting.
   6. Write a letter to a government official concerning current issues.
   7. Understand the rights and responsibilities of citizenship.
   8. Analyze and interpret data relevant to United States government and politics.
   9. Take the AP Government Exam, a college level test.

Careers Related to Content:
Politics, government service, education and law related professions.
                                     SOCIAL STUDIES


ECONOMICS: - Semester Course
Course #: 2773

Credit: 1
Elective: Grade 11 – 12      (Meets Social Studies Elective Requirement)
Prerequisite: None

Course Description:
This course is designed to be practical. In addition to economic principles of meeting needs and wants,
there will be practical consideration to individual strategies of: Saving, Investment, and overall
Economic decision making. This course will also look at economics at the global level and how the
economics of the world are connected. Guest speakers, internet usage and cooperative activities will be
included.

Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
A genuine curiosity of how to make informed financial decisions is the most important characteristic to
succeeding in this class. Students should be good listeners and also be willing to actively participate in
economic decisions. Skills related to reading, writing and internet usage will all play a role in
succeeding in this class.

Specific Outcomes – The Student Will Be Expected To:
 1.     Have a greater understanding of how the free enterprise system works.
 2.     Have developed knowledge and strategies for wise planning and participation in their financial
futures.

Careers Related to Content:
Business, sales, banking, brokers, financial planners and consumerism
                        IOWA CLASSROOM NETWORK (ICN)
*Specific Requirements Needed for Enrollment, Check with the Guidance Office Prior to Requesting Courses from this Section.

  MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY
  FHS Course #: 1407                         IHCC Course #: HSC113

  College Credits:       2
  High School Credit: 1
  Elective: Grade 11 -12
  Course Description:
  Covers the basic medical language essential to health careers. Emphasis is on prefixes ands suffixes,
  definitions, pronunciations, spelling and abbreviations. Various health careers are explored.

  Specific Outcomes – The Student will Be Expected To:
  The course includes job shadowing experiences and a field trip.


  NURSING ESSENTIALS I
  FHS Course #: 1408                         IHCC Course #: PNN147

  College Credits:    3
  High School Credit: 1
  Elective: Grade 11 -12

  Course Description:
  Introduces students to the scientific knowledge, skills and communication needed to functions as an
  accountable member of the health care team. Theory, laboratory practice and clinical experience helps
  prepare students to address patient needs.

  Specific Outcomes – The Student will Be Expected To:
  The course will complete four clinical days in a long –term care setting.
  The course will prepare the students for the Sate CAN Registry exam.


  INTRO TO PRE-HOSPITAL
  FHS Course #: 1409                         IHCC Course #: EMS110

  College Credits:    2
  High School Credit: 1
  Elective: Grade 11 -12

  Course Description:
  Provides students with information necessary to deliver first on the scene emergency care at the First
  Responder level as outlined by the Iowa Department of Public Health. Patient‘s assessment skills,
  medical and trauma emergencies, and related treatment are discussed.

  Specific Outcomes – The Student will Be Expected To:
  Will be going to IHCC for 3 clinical day working with EMT‘s, First Responder, EMS students and
  doing lab work.
                                     PLACEMENT COURSES
*Specific Requirements Needed for Enrollment, Check with the Guidance Office Prior to Requesting Courses from this Section.




 Secondary Reading Strategies: Semester or Year long Course
 Course #: 01066


 Credit 1

 Elective: Grades 9-10, (11)
 Prerequisite: Data indicating need based upon ITED scores, Basic Reading Inventory and other
               pertinent data.


 Course Description:

 This course provides instruction in many strategies to improve reading comprehension and fluency for
 the demands of the secondary content area curricula. It provides extensive independent reading at
 students‘ recreational level, vocabulary development which is age appropriate and recreational reading
 levels. Comprehension instruction is lower to higher order, and encompasses literature in fiction and
 nonfiction. Fluency instruction and monitoring is utilized and writing is utilized as an aid for
 comprehension. Many strategies are utilized for reading comprehension which has direct correlation to
 content area course reading.


 Specific Outcomes: The student will be expected to:

 1. Demonstrate growth in reading comprehension.
 2. Demonstrate growth in fluency.
 3. Utilize comprehension strategies in content areas.
 4. Demonstrate growth in vocabulary knowledge.
                                     PLACEMENT COURSES
*Specific Requirements Needed for Enrollment, Check with the Guidance Office Prior to Requesting Courses from this Section.



 TAG: One Semester Course - (May Be Taken As Many Semesters As Desired)
 Course #: 2801 1st Sem (A & B days),
           2802 2nd Sem (A & B days),
           28011 1st Sem (A day),
           28021 2nd Sem (A day),
           28012 1st Sem (B day),
           28022 2nd Sem (B day)

 Credit:           Students who meet daily receive 1 credit per semester.
                   Students who choose to meet every other day receive .5 credit per semester.

 Elective:     Grades 9 – 12
 Prerequisite: Students with scores at or above the 90th percentile on the ITED or ITBS test will
               automatically qualify for the program. Students with lower scores might be
               admitted to the program by teacher referral, parent referral, or self-referral; these
               students will need to discuss admittance to the program with the teacher &
               counselor.

 Course Description:
 In TAG, students design, organize and implement their own projects. They are expected to work
 independently on topics of their own choosing. Students will also participate in whole-class activities,
 which include, but are not limited to, developing thinking skills, creativity skills, or inter/intrapersonal
 skills. Students receive a grade of pass/fail and the grade is not entered in the grade point average. This
 class can only be taken as a 7th, or 8th subject.

 Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
 Thirst for knowledge, desire to work independently, internal motivation to succeed, willingness and
 openness to new ideas and activities. Students who do not consistently work on their projects may be
 asked to drop the class.

 Specific Outcomes: -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
 1.     Design, organize and implement independent study projects.
 2.     Be open to learning more about themselves and their unique talents.
 3.     Cooperate in a group.
 4.     Work on improving higher order thinking skills.
 5.     Work on improving creativity skills.

 Careers Related to Content: Any Career.
                         PLACEMENT COURSES -- ENGLISH
*Specific Requirements Needed for Enrollment, Check with the Guidance Office Prior to Requesting Courses from this Section.

 LEVEL 1 READING: - Full Year Course
 Course #: 2811 – 2812

 Credit: 2
 Elective: Grades 9 – 12
 Course Description:
 This course is designed to increase the comprehension skills of emergent readers. Students will read a
 variety of materials including short stories, poetry, adapted novels, and nonfiction.
 Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
 Students will complete reading and writing assignments at the highest level at which they are capable.
 They will participate in class discussions and complete homework as directed.
 Specific Outcomes – The Student Will Be Expected To:
 1.     Increase sight-reading vocabulary, phonemic awareness, reading rate, accuracy and
        comprehension of written text.
 2.     Demonstrate understanding of literary elements and devices such as conflict, point of view,
        characterization, setting, foreshadowing, personification, irony and imagery.
 3.     Develop an appreciation of reading as a survival skill and a leisure activity.
 Careers Related to Content:
 Clerical, Communications, Business, Retail


 LEVEL 2 READING: - Full Year Course
 Course #: 2821 – 2822
 Credits:      2
 Elective:     Grades 9 – 12
               Skill levels necessary for successful completion of Level 1 Reading
 Course Description:
 This course is designed to continue to build reading speed, accuracy and comprehension skills of
 emergent readers. Students will read a variety of materials including short stories and adapted novels
 of a higher reading level than Level 1 Reading.
 Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
 Students will complete reading and writing assignments at the highest level at which they are capable.
 They will participate in class discussions and complete homework as directed.
 Specific Outcomes – The Student Will Be Expected To:
 1.     Increase sight-reading vocabulary, phonemic awareness, reading rate, accuracy and
        comprehension of written text.
 2.     Demonstrate understanding of literary elements and devices such as conflict, point of view,
        characterization, setting, foreshadowing, personification, irony and imagery.
 3.     Develop an appreciation of reading as a survival skill and a leisure activity.
 Careers Related to Content:
 Clerical, Communications, Business, Retail
                         PLACEMENT COURSES -- ENGLISH
*Specific Requirements Needed for Enrollment, Check with the Guidance Office Prior to Requesting Courses from this Section.

 LIFE SKILLS READING: - Semester Course
 Course #: 2808

 Credit: 1
 Elective: Grades 10 - 12

 Course Description:

 Students are encouraged to improve skills in recreational reading through both avenues of silent and oral
 reading. Comprehension of reading material is expressed both verbally and in written form.

 Skills Need To Be Successful In The Class:

 1.       Paraphrase main topic.
 2.       Differentiate between main ideas and supporting facts.
 3.       Build vocabulary and reading skills.
 4.       Read for enjoyment.

 Careers Related to Content:

 Communications, Education, Day Care, Technical Writing, Journalism and etc.



 LIFE SKILLS WRITING: - Semester Course
 Course #: 2809

 Credit: 1
 Elective: Grades 10 - 12

 Course Description:

 Students will complete functional writing assignments, utilizing correct grammar, capitalization,
 punctuation, and spelling. Improved communication will be fostered through both verbal and written
 avenues.

 Skills Needed to be Successful in Class:

 1.       A basic English skills foundation.
 2.       Motivation to improve written and oral communications.
 3.       Vocabulary building skills.

 Careers Related to Content:

 Communications, Journalism, Technical Writing, Education, Business
                         PLACEMENT COURSES -- ENGLISH
*Specific Requirements Needed for Enrollment, Check with the Guidance Office Prior to Requesting Courses from this Section.

 LITERATURE: - Semester Course
 Course #: 2827
 Credit: 1
 Required: Grades 10 – 12
 Course Description:
 This course is designed to introduce students to various novels and short stories written by a number of
 well-known authors.
 Skills Needed To Be Successful In This Class:
 Students need to be able read, write and complete assignments accurately. Participations are required.
 Specific Outcomes - - The student will be expected to:
 1.     Develop an appreciation of reading for pleasure.
 2.     Identify major themes.
 3.     Identify major characters and their roles within the text of the literature.
 4.     Improve reading skills.
 Career Related To Content:
 Education, Communication, Journalism, Writing, Human Relations



 VOCATIONAL ENGLISH: - Full Year Course
 Course #: 2843 – 2824 Have to take class to do Work Study Program
 Credit: 2
 Required: Grades 11 – 12
 Prerequisite: English 1 or 2                (NEEDED FOR WORK STUDY)
 Course Description:
 Students apply English skills already learned toward use in pursuing a career. Vocational situations
 include finding job openings, completing job applications, writing letter of application, developing a
 resume and interviewing. Other areas addressed are reasons people work, interest surveys and aptitudes.
 Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
 Students need to be able to read, write, and complete given assignments.
 Specific Outcomes – The Student Will Be Expected To:
 1.     Complete W-4, W-2 and application forms.
 2.     Compare earnings.
 3.     Learn vocabulary associated with applying and finding a job.
 4.     Evaluate personal job interests and skills.
 5.     Write a letter of application.
 6.     Complete a resume
 7.     List personal attributes.
 8.     Participate in a variety of job interviews.
 Careers Related to Content:
 Career exploration is completed throughout the course.
                         PLACEMENT COURSES -- ENGLISH
*Specific Requirements Needed for Enrollment, Check with the Guidance Office Prior to Requesting Courses from this Section.

 ENGLISH 1 & 2: - Semester Courses
 Course #: 2806 - 2807


 Credit:         1 (per semester)
 Required:       Grades 9 - 12


 Course Description
 Students will read a wide range of literature in many genres to build an understanding of the varied
 dimensions of human experience. The course is designed to follow the curriculum in English 9, at a
 slower pace and with easier to understand text versions of great literature. First semester contains a unit
 in fables, legends and mythology, and a unit in short stories, suspense stories, autobiography, and
 biography. Second semester contains a unit in drama and poetry, including an introduction to
 Shakespeare, and a unit in the novel, during which several shorts novels will be read.

 Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
 Students must be able to read, write and complete assignments with accuracy. Students will need to be
 able to participate in class discussions.

 Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
 1.     Draw meaning about life from the study of literature.
 2.     Compose own student writing within an organized format.
 3.     Self-edit their own writing.
 4.     Build vocabulary and reading skills.
 5.     Demonstrate an understanding of literary elements.

 Careers Related to Content:
 Every career uses English skills in different ways.
                  PLACEMENT COURSES -- MATHEMATICS
*Specific Requirements Needed for Enrollment, Check with the Guidance Office Prior to Requesting Courses from this Section.

 FUNCTIONAL MATH: - Full Year Course
 Course #: 2831 - 2832
 Credit: 2
 Required: Grade 9 - 12
 Course Description:
 Students will learn practical math life skills needed to function at home and in the community. These
 skills will allow the student to participate in his community and manage his own time, money and
 personal property as independently as possible.
 Skills Needed to Be Successful in the Class:
 Students need to understand numerical values to 100 and use of a calculator, ruler, and other tools. Other
 skills needed will vary depending on level of mastery targeted for each student for a particular task.
 Specific Outcomes -- The Student Will Be Expected To:
 1.     Read and write at the highest possible level.
 2.     Learn functional math skills including use of calculators, money, measuring tools and clocks,
        and problem-solving strategies.

 Careers Related to Content :
 Grocery/Retail Assistant, Food Service, Assembly Work, Carpentry, Homemaking


 BASIC MATHEMATICS: - Full Year Course
 Course #: 2841 – 2842
 Credit: 2
 Required: Grades 9 - 10
 Course Description:
 Basic math is designed to help develop the math skills students need to succeed as well as to survive.
 Students will learn about adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing whole numbers. They will also
 learn about fractions, decimals, percents, different systems of measurement, and other basics of
 mathematics. This will give them a solid understanding of basic math which will help them to make
 good decisions all their lives--at school, at home, and on the job.
 Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
 Students need to know basic facts, be able to compute basic math problems, and use a calculator.
 Specific Outcomes:--The student will be expected to:
 1. Know basic facts and work basic addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division problems.
 2. Figure basic measurements.
 3. Solve basic word problems.
 4. Compute basic money problems.
 5. Recognize place value
 6. Round and estimate numbers
 7. Changing fractions (improper, proper, mixed, inverting) to equal fractions, know parts of
    fractions-ratio, graphs and vocabulary.
 8. Understanding decimals and percents
                  PLACEMENT COURSES -- MATHEMATICS
*Specific Requirements Needed for Enrollment, Check with the Guidance Office Prior to Requesting Courses from this Section.



  CONSUMER MATHEMATICS: - Full Year Course
  Course #: 2861– 2862


  Credit: 2
  Elective: Grades 11 – 12


  Course Description:
  Consumer Mathematics class reviews basic math skills as they are applied to daily living. The course
  will include working with income, banking, credit, transportation, housing, and some work with taxes,
  insurance and investments.

  Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
  Students need to be able to compute basic math functions and use a calculator.

  Specific Outcomes: -- The student will be expected to:
  1.     Know basic math facts, math calculation, using whole numbers, fractions, decimals and percent.
  2.     Compute hourly income, overtime, deductions and net pay.
  3.     Reconcile checking account and bank statement.
  4.     Calculate transportation costs.
  5.     Work with basic housing costs.
  6.     Prepare a personal budget.
                         PLACEMENT COURSES -- SCIENCE
*Specific Requirements Needed for Enrollment, Check with the Guidance Office Prior to Requesting Courses from this Section.



 EARTH SCIENCE: - Year Course

 Credit: 2
 Elective: Grades 9 – 12

 Course Description:
 Earth Science is the study of the earth and the universe. Earth Science involves units on geology, meteorology,
 oceanography and astronomy.

 Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
 Students must be able to read, write, listen and accurately complete assignments on time.
 Students are expected to take part in class discussions and class projects.

 Specific Outcomes: The student will be expected to
    1.      Know basic knowledge of each area of earth science.
    2.      Have a general knowledge of the following:
            a. Use of maps, the globe, and the positions of latitude and longitude.
            b. The orbits of the earth and the moon.
            c. The planets of the solar system.
            d. The life cycle of stars.
            e. Matter, compounds, and minerals of the earth‘s crust.
            f. Types of rocks in the earth.
            g. The atmosphere and how it affects weather, water, and erosion on earth.
                 PLACEMENT COURSES -- SOCIAL STUDIES
*Specific Requirements Needed for Enrollment, Check with the Guidance Office Prior to Requesting Courses from this Section.



 CURRENT EVENTS: - Semester Course
 Course #: 2817


 Credit: 1
 Electives: Grade 9 - 12


 Course Description:
 Current Events is a course concerned with the daily occurrences in the world around us. This course
 includes viewing channel one, a national student produced television news program, which gives up to
 date national and international news. Students read, discuss, and present current newspaper articles,
 read weekly current events magazines and use the internet to research contemporary issues. Students
 learn new vocabulary, use their reading comprehension skill to locate main ideas, find supporting details
 in their reading and learn map and graph skills.

 Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Class:
 Students must be willing to expand and improve their knowledge of the world around them through
 reading, writing, speaking, listening and use of computer.

 Specific Outcomes: -- The student will be expected to:
 1.     Learn new vocabulary as presented in newspaper and on the internet.
 2.     Read maps and learn graph skills.
 3.     Learn newspaper reading skills - dateline, who, what, when, where and how.
 4.     Make oral presentations of current events.
 5.     Become more aware of the surrounding world by answering questions over events of
        international, local, and national importance; human interest, weather, sports and etc.
                 PLACEMENT COURSES -- SOCIAL STUDIES
*Specific Requirements Needed for Enrollment, Check with the Guidance Office Prior to Requesting Courses from this Section.

 U.S. GEOGRAPHY EASTERN: 1ST Semester Course
 Course #: 2819
 Credit: 1
 Elective: Grade 9 – 12
 Course Description:
 This course is designed to teach students about the United States and its resources. The information
 taught includes ecology, state capitals, and relevant state facts, location of major cities, waterways,
 transportation and population.
 Skills Needed To Be Successful In This Class:
 Students need to be able to read, write and complete assignments accurately.
 Specific Outcomes: -- The student will be expected to:
 1.     Identify all states and their capitals.
 2.     Identify natural resources available in the United States.
 3.     Choose a state to research and present to the class.
 4.     Identify major waterways in United States.
 5.     Identify environmental concerns.
 Careers Related To Content:
 Travel consultant, education and political science.


 U.S. GEOGRAPHY WESTERN: 2nd Semester Course
 Course #: 2820
 Credit: 1
 Elective: Grade 9 – 12
 Course Description:
 This course is designed to teach students about the United States and its resources. The information
 taught includes ecology, state capitals, and relevant state facts, location of major cities, waterways,
 transportation and population.
 Skills Needed To Be Successful In This Class:
 Students need to be able to read, write and complete assignments accurately.
 Specific Outcomes: -- The student will be expected to:
 1.     Identify all states and their capitals.
 2.     Identify natural resources available in the United States.
 3.     Choose a state to research and present to the class.
 4.     Identify major waterways in United States.
 5.     Identify environmental concerns.
 Careers Related To Content:
 Travel consultant, education and political science.
                 PLACEMENT COURSES -- SOCIAL STUDIES
*Specific Requirements Needed for Enrollment, Check with the Guidance Office Prior to Requesting Courses from this Section.



  AMERICAN GOVERNMENT: - Semester Course
  Course #: 2818


  Credit: 1
  Required:        Grades 11-12


  Course Description:
  Course designed to introduce students to our unique from of American Government including: Rights
  and responsibilities of citizenship, the three branches of government, understanding the development of
  our constitution from the articles of confederation through the current amendments, and how students
  can become involved in local, state and national government.


  Skills Needed To Be Successful To The Class:
  Read the text, express ideas verbally and in writing, complete assignments on time, cooperate, take part
  in group discussions, work on group and individual projects.


  Specific Outcomes: -- The student will be expected to:
         1.     Identify three branches of government at local, state and national level.
         2.     Know how to cast a vote.
         3.     Register to vote as soon as age permits.
         4.     Write a letter to a governmental official concerning a current issue.
         5.     Be aware of current issues, campaigns, primary elections and how all of these
                things effect their lives.
                       PLACEMENT COURSES -- ELECTIVES
*Specific Requirements Needed for Enrollment, Check with the Guidance Office Prior to Requesting Courses from this Section.

  INTRO TO VOCATIONAL SKILLS: - Full Year Course
  Course #: 2893 – 2894
  Credit: 2
  Grades 9 – 12
  Course Description:
  This course covers two main areas: direct instruction of skills and classroom/school tasks. The direct instruction
  portion includes topics such as: following directions, measuring, filing, work habits, appropriate social
  communication and community skills. Classroom and school jobs available are varied and include tasks such as
  filing, shredding, custodial, stockroom and bookroom work and mailings.

  Skills Needed to be Successful in the Class:
  Goals will vary depending upon individually-defined levels of competence in the areas of independence, work
  habits, ability to meet job expectations and appropriate social and communication skills.
  Specific Outcomes:
  The student will be expected to complete oral/written work and classroom/ school tasks at the highest possible
  competence level. The student will gain a greater understanding of his own abilities and interests.
  Careers Related to Content:
  Assembly, Custodial, Clerical, Stockroom, Print Shop and Domestic Work.




  WORK STUDY PROGRAM: - Full Year Course
  Course #: 28512 – 28522
  Credit:         2 or 4
  Elective:      Grade 11 - 12
  Prerequisite: Vocational English
                 Every student requires an IEP goal setting meeting before placement. Students attendance
                 and social skills will be reviewed during the staffing.
  Course Description:
  Covers both community work experience on three to four yearly job sites as well as completion of job
  seeking/keeping activities. For two periods a day juniors work on the community job site every other day and
  seniors work on a daily basis.

  Skills Needed To Be Successful In The Program:
  Goals will vary depending upon individually – defined level of competence in the areas of independence, work
  habits, ability to meet job expectations and appropriate social skills.

  Specific Outcomes: -- The student will be expected to:
  1.      Successfully complete two or four non-paid job exploration sites throughout the school year.
  2.      Meet with the work experience coordinator on a regular basis.
  3.      Complete weekly time sheets on the community job site.
  4.      Follow job supervisor‘s work duty direction.
  5.      Students receive a quarterly work employer evaluation.
  Career Related To Content:
  Retail, business, farm – related, food preparation, day care and etc.

								
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