Catering Memorandum of Understanding

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					Memorandum of Understanding




College of Technology at Delhi

           and the
State University of New York




        December 2000
                                                           CONTENTS


Market Niche/Distinctiveness .................................................................................................. 1


Projected Institutional Position and Benchmarks of Success .............................................. 1
 1.0     Enrollment/Admission Selectivity................................................................................ 2
 1.1     Enrollment growth........................................................................................................... 2
 1.2     Student mix ...................................................................................................................... 3
 1.3     Recruitment...................................................................................................................... 3
 1.4     Level on selectivity matrix ............................................................................................... 4
 1.5     Comparisons with selected benchmark institutions ........................................................ 6

2.0      Student Outcomes.......................................................................................................... 7
 2.1     Student life....................................................................................................................... 7
 2.2     Retention/graduation rates.............................................................................................. 7
 2.3     Student/alumni satisfaction ............................................................................................. 9
 2.4     Post-graduate success ................................................................................................... 10
 2.5     Employer satisfaction .................................................................................................... 10
 2.6     Assessment planning...................................................................................................... 10

3.0      Faculty Development and Scholarship ...................................................................... 11
 3.1     Faculty recruitment ....................................................................................................... 11
 3.2     Faculty review, promotion, and tenure ......................................................................... 11
 3.3     Quality and quantity of scholarship .............................................................................. 11

4.0      Intercampus Collaboration ........................................................................................ 12
 4.1     Joint academic programs .............................................................................................. 12
 4.2     Articulation.................................................................................................................... 12
5.0     Academic Program Directions ................................................................................... 12
 5.1    Undergraduate .............................................................................................................. 12
 5.1.1 General Education........................................................................................................ 14
 5.2    Responsiveness to local/regional/state needs................................................................ 15

6.0     Infrastructure and Technology .................................................................................. 15
 6.1    Facilities........................................................................................................................ 15
 6.2    Academic technology..................................................................................................... 16
                               Market Niche/Distinctiveness
                              Campus role within SUNY System

Delhi College, a member of the University Colleges of Technology (UCT) offers specialized
and technical programs—credit and non-credit—emphasizing applied, experiential learning.
Students engage in a variety of hands-on projects such as designing and building on and off-
campus facilities, catering banquets, providing animal and human health care, and
maintaining turf and grounds at the campus golf course. Delhi’s over forty academic degrees
range from one-year certificates in Electrical Construction and Maintenance to associate
programs in Nursing and Veterinary Science Technology to baccalaureate programs in
Hospitality Management and Golf Course Management. The Hospitality program was the
College’s first baccalaureate degree granting program; the two-year Hospitality program was
one of the first such programs in the state. The program offers three concentrations in travel
and tourism, hotel management, and restaurant management.

The five University Colleges of Technology are linked through a consortium agreement that
provides for cooperative planning and delivery of academic programs and services. This
creative partnership allows students at any one of the five campuses to participate in courses
originating from another campus using distance learning technology. This strategy allows
UCT students to benefit from a wider array of courses and the expert teaching available at
each of the campuses.

Founded in 1913 as a residential college, Delhi is committed to providing programs and
services designed to enhance the intellectual, personal and cultural development of students.
Five on-campus residence halls are an integral part of that experience. Approximately 65
percent of the student body live on campus.


               Projected Institutional Position and Benchmarks of Success

Technology-based programs, and the institutions that focus on them, are, of necessity, in a
constant state of change. The rapid pace of innovation and its diffusion within the economy
and society mean that colleges of technology must continually reinvent themselves in order to
stay relevant. For Delhi, this means refocusing its academic mission on baccalaureate
programs, while maintaining strong one and two-year programs.

Over the next ten years, Delhi College seeks to become the top technology-based institution
of higher education in the Catskills. As part of the UCT, Delhi will offer a broad array of
baccalaureate programs that have, at their core, a solid base of science and mathematics.
Graduates will receive hands-on educational training in programs such as information
technology, veterinary science technology, and technology management.

Delhi will expand its unique Hospitality program to offer a fourth concentration in the
culinary arts in fall 2001. A fifth concentration in resort/casino management is still in the
planning stage. The College is working with Mohawk Valley Community College to develop



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Memorandum of Understanding                                                College of Technology at Delhi


a regional agreement with MVCC and other near-by colleges to deliver third and fourth year
courses for the Hospitality baccalaureate program. In addition, Delhi is working with both
public and for-profit companies, here and abroad, to establish internship experiences for
Hospitality students.

The Hospitality model is one that Delhi College intends to duplicate with Golf Course
Management, which officially started in fall 2000. Delhi is unique among colleges in that it
has an 18-hole golf course to support the BBA in Golf Course Management.

The mission of Delhi, along with that of the other four UCTs, is being extended to provide a
pragmatic blend of one-year certificate programs, two-year associate programs, and
baccalaureate programs in technology and technology-related areas. Students will be located
either on one of the five UCT campuses, at multiple off-campus sites, or connected via
distance learning or internet-based media. Students will be offered a unique educational
“ladder” that allows them to enter at the certificate, associate or baccalaureate level. Some
will receive initial degrees in focused disciplines and then decide to broaden their educational
experience. Others will enter baccalaureate paths directly. Key benchmarks of success for
Delhi will be the degree to which the College develops a niche in hands-on application of
technology, and the degree to which the five UCT colleges are able to offer program options
collectively that exceed their ability to do so individually.


1.0     Enrollment/Admission Selectivity

1.1     Enrollment growth

Delhi is projecting its entering student enrollment to increase in each of the next five years, as
demonstrated by the chart below. This, coupled with better retention, should help the College
realize its overall enrollment goals.

Projections Regarding Size of Enrollment
                        Fall 1999    Fall 2000   Fall 2001   Fall 2002   Fall 2003   Fall 2004   Fall 2005
                         (actual)   (approved)   (planned)   (planned)   (planned)   (planned)   (planned)
 Full-time first-time         847         865         884          890        895         904         967
 Full-time transfer           131         150         165          169        174         176         190
 FT cont/returning            866         860         885          894        903         912         935
  Total full-time           1,844        1,875       1,934       1,953       1,972       1,992       2,092
  Total part-time             224         224         285          305        305         305         305
 Total Headcount            2,068        2,099       2,219       2,258       2,277       2,297       2,397
 Total AAFTE                1,817        1,896       1,932       1,956       1,974       1,993       2,088

Note: enrollment goals may be affected by external factors such as changing economic
conditions, tuition increases, and fiscal constraints. Official enrollment targets that are
the basis for the University’s budget model are set annually through dialogue between
campuses and System Administration, and may differ somewhat from the above.




                                                      2
Memorandum of Understanding                                            College of Technology at Delhi


1.2       Student mix

Changes in Delhi’s student profile are already occurring. While its students predominately
come from downstate New York, Delhi has a growing number of international and out-of-
state students. There will likely be more transfer students as baccalaureate degrees are
developed (see §1.1). The number of minority students at Delhi continues to increase, since
Delhi is a reasonable distance from New York City and the metropolitan area. In 1985,
Delhi’s minority enrollment was 5.7%; in 1998, it was 22%.

The number of part-time students increased significantly in fall 1999 (from 153 in fall 1998 to
224 in fall 1999), due to outreach work with high schools and non-traditional students. It is
not anticipated, however, that the total number of part-time students will continue to increase
as dramatically over the next few years.

Finally, Delhi College also has the potential to reach more non-traditional students as distance
learning networks are utilized and its Weekend College, which began with a Nursing program
in spring 1998, expands.

      •   Assuming the timely development of additional four-year programs, Delhi expects to
          have over 300 baccalaureate students (14% of the total headcount) by fall 2004.

      •   Delhi will strive to maintain or increase the diversity of its student body as it increases
          enrollment.

1.3       Recruitment

The College has added staff and resources in recent years in order to improve the efficiency
and effectiveness of its enrollment management and institutional advancement activities.
Delhi also contracted for qualitative and quantitative research on recruitment by Stamats
Communications, as well as geodemographic profiling of potential students and markets by
Carnegie Consulting. The results of these initiatives now guide all recruitment and marketing
programs and the development of associated publications.

Besides its traditional downstate New York market, Delhi is focusing its recruitment efforts in
Western New England, Northern New Jersey and Northeastern Pennsylvania.

The College has four major recruitment goals for the next three years:

      •   to substantially increase the student yield from high school visits and college nights

      •   to significantly increase the number of out-of-state students (90 in fall 1999)

      •   to increase applications by 3% increase per year for the next five years

      •   to increase the student yield rate by 3% in each of the next five years



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Memorandum of Understanding                                         College of Technology at Delhi


The College will also analyze its scholarship program to determine if funds are currently
being used most effectively in student recruitment. In preparation for this effort, a new
scholarship data base has been developed that will allow enrollment counselors to match
prospects with restricted scholarship dollars earlier in the recruitment process.

1.4      Level on selectivity matrix

Delhi College has already begun to move to a higher level of selectivity. In 1998-99, the
College began requiring a high school average of at least 70 and successful completion of at
least Regents’ Math Course 1 for admission. In 1999-2000, Delhi also began requiring
Regents English for admission. As further Regents’ mandates take effect, the campus will
raise its bar to meet those standards a year in advance. Delhi’s growing emphasis on
selectivity has led, thus far, to a 50% increase in denials.

Delhi College is currently classified as “selective” (group 4). Its goal is to continue to provide
access to students in most certificate and associate degree programs, especially for students
from the community. Since 95% of all of its non-traditional adult students are from the region,
and Delhi fulfills the community college need for its surrounding counties, these students will
continue to be admitted as they have before. If non-traditional adult students do not meet the
standards for their program of choice, they will be given an opportunity to refine their skills in
the General Studies Program.

Another goal is to move to “very selective” (group 3) for the baccalaureate programs. The
new admissions requirements for the BBA in Hospitality and Golf Course Management, and
the BT in Information Technology are presented below.

      1. For the BBA in Hospitality Management:

         High school students must have:
         - an average of 80 or higher
         - one year of Biology
         - Mathematics II

         Students transferring from Delhi or other institutions must have a 2.25 cumulative
         average.

      2. For the BBA in Golf Course Management:

         High school students must have:
         - an average of 80 or higher
         - 3 units of English
         - 3 units of Social Science
         - 2 units of Mathematics (Course I and II)
         - 2 units of Science (Biology is required)
         - Use 950 SAT or 19 ACT as an indicator (not required)
         - On campus interview strongly recommended



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Memorandum of Understanding                                         College of Technology at Delhi



       As A Transfer Student:
       - A 2.3 cumulative grade point average required
       - Transfer only C level course work or better
       - Previous study in golf course management is not required for transfer students

       Freshman applicants who do not meet the minimum entrance requirements for the
       BBA degree will be offered admission into the appropriate AAS degree programs of
       Golf Course Operations, Business, or Hotel & Resort Management (according to
       concentration interest). It is understood that these students meet the minimum
       entrance requirements for the appropriate AAS program.

   3. For the BT in Information Technology:

       High school students must have:
           High School GPA                   ACT Results                  SAT Results

            86 and above *                      N/A                          N/A
                                  AND




                                                               OR
               81 – 85 *                           16                         750

               77 – 80 *                           20                         860



       As a transfer student:
             College GPA                    ACT Results                   SAT Results

            3.0 and above *                    N/A                           N/A
                                 AND




                                                              OR




              2.5 – 2.9 *                       16                            750

              2.0 – 2.4 *                       20                            860



The admission requirements for the above baccalaureate programs, as well as for others to be
added, will be slowly raised to ensure they are classified as "very selective." Toward this end,
for all baccalaureate programs, by 2005 Delhi will:

   •   Require SAT or ACT scores

   •   Raise the minimum high school average for regular admits to 80

   •   Increase the number of units required for admission in mathematics and science

   •   Recommend on-campus interviews

   •   Develop program-specific requirements for admission


                                               5
Memorandum of Understanding                                                             College of Technology at Delhi



The projected percent distribution of first-time, full-time admitted students by selectivity
group through 2002 is as follows:

                                                   Selectivity         Fall       Fall      Fall      Fall
                                                       Group           1999       2000      2001      2002
                                                                     (actual)  (planned) (planned) (planned)
           Regular Admits who have an SAT               Total             100%       100%      100%      100%
           Score and a High School Average         In Group 1             1.8%       2.3%      2.5%       2.8%
                                                   In Group 2             3.7%      10.0%     10.2%     10.8%
                                                   In Group 3            18.3%      24.3%     25.2%     25.7%
                                                   In Group 4            45.0%      38.6%     38.4%     38.1%
                                                   In Group 5            31.2%      24.9%     23.7%     22.6%

                   Special Admits (EOP or Other Risk) as a
                                                                        12.6%           10.2%           10.4%       10.5%
                     Percent of Total First-Time Full-Time



1.5     Comparisons with selected benchmark institutions

The five UCTs share a unique history within the University and are more alike than any other
institutions in SUNY. As such, they collectively provide their own benchmarks of success.
As predominately two-year agricultural and technical colleges, several peer institutions exist
in other states. For example, North Dakota State College of Science is an open door,
comprehensive two-year college offering career and transfer curricula in applied science,
technologies, health, business and liberal arts.

As Delhi develops more four-year technology programs, broad-based institutions for technical
education in other states will serve as aspirational peers. These include Fairmont State
College, Pennsylvania College of Technology and the Oregon Institute of Technology.

                              SUNY           UCT        North Dakota         Oregon         Pennsylvania        Fairmont
                              Delhi                     State College      Institute of      College of           State
                                                         of Science        Technology       Technology          College
 Full-time Undergraduate
                              1,844         10,910            2,322             1,625            4,190           4,522
 Enrollment
 Acceptance Rate               88%           93%              93%                n/a              93%            100%
 SAT (25/75
                             780-990       760-1020            n/a          940-1200            780-1000          n/a
 Percentile)
 High School GPA % >
                               10%           12%               n/a               n/a              n/a            15%
 3.0
 % Full-time faculty           75%           77%              92%               81%               62%            46%

 Freshman Retention            56%           58%               n/a               n/a              62%            71%
 Graduation Rate
 (6-year)                      36%         36%           n/a               n/a              50%                   n/a
   Sources: 1999 College Board survey; SUNY System Administration, Office of Institutional Research




                                                          6
Memorandum of Understanding                                                College of Technology at Delhi


2.0       Student Outcomes

2.1       Student life

As a small college in a rural area, Delhi must strive to engage its students socially. The key
for student satisfaction is involvement in the life of the campus. Such involvement and student
leadership development occurs through: clubs, student government, campus events, peer
education, community service, Greek Life, intercollegiate and intramural athletics, and
student employment. Efforts to increase student participation in these areas will continue as
the campus responds to its associate and baccalaureate students’ demands for a more
stimulating and exciting college environment. Initiatives have included the establishment of
new academically linked clubs, new leadership training programs and the establishment of the
O’Connor Center for Community Service.

The College currently assesses the percentage of students involved in campus life and student
satisfaction through the Student Opinion Survey (SOS) and other qualitative and quantitative
measures (see §2.3).

      •   Delhi will increase student participation in campus activities by 10% over the next
          three years. The College will also increase student satisfaction with student life
          according to the SOS.

      •   The Co-Curricular Transcript Pilot Project, to formalize the importance of students’
          out-of-classroom experiences, will be implemented in 2000-01 with full participation
          planned for 2001-02.

2.2       Retention/graduation rates

A major goal for Delhi is to raise retention rates. At present, Delhi’s retention rates are
slightly below the average for all SUNY two-year programs (see table).

                                         Associate Program Semester of Enrollment
                       First            Second                    Third                      Fourth
  Initial Term        Delhi       Delhi        SUNY         Delhi        SUNY        Delhi            SUNY
  Fall 1993           100%       79.17%       80.83%       56.66%        61.14%     52.22%            54.52%
                     (N=653)      (517)                     (370)                    (341)
  Fall 1994           100%       80.97%       80.42%       58.11%        60.06%     50.29%            53.77%
                     (N=678)      (549)                     (394)                    (341)
  Fall 1995           100%       77.88%       81.49%       57.35%        61.71%     51.50%            55.33%
                     (N=565)      (440)                     (324)                    (291)
  Fall 1996           100%       79.33%       80.89%       60.25%        61.92%     52.83%            54.90%
                     (N=566)      (449)                     (341)                    (299)
  Fall 1997           100%       70.93%       80.12%       55.43%        61.41%
                                                                                     N/A               N/A
                     (N=626)      (444)                     (347)


Early intervention initiatives begin prior to student enrollment, at Delhi’s Advantage Days,
where students are tested and placed into courses as early as six months before the start of
classes. Delhi then offers self-study workbooks to first-time students who test into
developmental courses. Once enrolled, Delhi helps retain students through a number of


                                                    7
Memorandum of Understanding                                            College of Technology at Delhi


activities, including peer and professional tutoring, freshman seminars, and—starting in 1999-
2000—the introduction of the Veterinary Science Technology First-Year Experience Program
(V-STEP). The V-STEP program, a collaborative living/learning residential initiative of the
Veterinary Science Technology Department and the campus Offices of Residence Life and
Counseling Services, met with solid success its first semester. V-STEP utilizes peer
mentoring and tutoring, faculty office hours and academic programming, a freshman seminar
course, counseling support, and specialized living space in the residence hall. Peer Mentors
and the Resident Assistant also sponsor social and educational programs for the floor.

These efforts have led to a noticeable jump in retention in fall 1999 (866 students compared to
811 in fall 1998). Delhi College is looking for continued improvement in its retention rates,
through enhancement of existing programs and development of new initiatives, including:

    •   Offering two new Living and Learning options in the 2000-01 academic year and
        beyond. The first, called Visions, will be a specially designed environment for first
        year Educational Opportunity Program students, supported by an Office of Special
        Programs grant. The second program will be a Living/Learning environment in
        conjunction with the Golf, Plant Sciences, and Recreation Department.

    •   Implementing recommendations from a Food Service Task Force completed in
        January 1999. In fall 1999, the Midnight Café, managed and staffed by students, was
        established to provide a late night food venue for students.

    •   Implementing recommendations from the Residence Life Strategic Plan that was
        completed in January 2000 (see §6.1)

The result of all these initiatives will be to raise the College’s retention rate.

    •   Delhi plans, at a minimum, to reach the system-wide retention average by 2005.

The College’s associate program graduation rates are significantly higher than those of SUNY
as a whole (see graduation table below). Delhi also has a much higher percentage of students
transfer to other SUNY institutions (about 27% vs. approximately 13% for all associate
programs). In total, over two-thirds of Delhi students either graduate or transfer to another
college.

                           Cumulative Percent of Initial Cohort Receiving an Associate Degree
   Initial Term                                  (Status as of Fall 1998)
   and Size (N)       Two Years or Less                Three Years                   Four Years
   of Cohort         Delhi        SUNY            Delhi          SUNY           Delhi         SUNY
   Fall 1994
                    20.94%        13.61%        33.18%        27.15%         36.43%        31.55%
   (N=678)
   Fall 1995
                    24.42%        14.27%        33.27%        28.24%          N/A           N/A
   (N=565)
   Fall 1996
                    24.38%        14.14%          N/A           N/A           N/A           N/A
   (N=566)




                                                  8
Memorandum of Understanding                                                  College of Technology at Delhi


Delhi College plans to continue to have higher graduation and transfer rates than the SUNY
System as a whole.

      •    By 2005, 70% of Delhi students will either graduate within four years or transfer to a
           SUNY or private college.

2.3        Student/alumni satisfaction

Based on results from the 1997 Student Opinion Survey and 1998 Alumni Opinion Survey,
Delhi students and alumni give the College a generally positive rating. SUNY Delhi has
ranked on a par with the other Colleges of Technology and all State-operated campuses in
terms of overall satisfaction by current students. It ranks higher than average in academic
advising (3.44 on a 5.0 scale) and availability of courses (3.28 vs. 2.91) compared to SUNY
as a whole. The Student Opinion Survey also ranks Delhi slightly above average in the key
area of preparation for career (3.63 vs. 3.57). Students ranked Delhi below average in the
physical condition of the campus (buildings, grounds and residence halls) and, in the category
"sense of belonging" (3.23 vs. SUNY-average 3.40).

The Alumni Opinion Survey1 ranked Delhi at or above the SUNY-wide category in almost
every category. In contrast to the Student Opinion Survey, alumni were very positive about
having a "sense of belonging" while at Delhi (3.76 vs. SUNY-average 3.42). Other positive
results were for student/faculty interaction, faculty respect for students, and career
preparation. The major areas where alumni ratings were not as high as the SUNY-wide
average were student body diversity and the lack of cultural programs (3.04 vs. SUNY-
average 3.34), both typical concerns at a small campus without a large population base.

      •    Delhi, in conjunction with the other UCT campuses, has hired a full-time institutional
           research person to both develop assessment parameters for productivity, efficiency,
           effectiveness and quality of outcomes as well as perform “benchmarking” functions by
           identifying and disseminating information about best practice activities on individual
           campuses.

      •    As noted in §2.2, Delhi will initiate programs to improve student satisfaction and the
           quality of student life on campus.

While comparisons are anecdotal, it appears that Delhi’s development and scholarship
programs currently lag behind those of its primary competitors. The College has recognized
the importance of this area, has reorganized to provide new leadership, and has created a new
position focussed on increasing donations of unrestricted gifts for scholarships and other
forms of direct student aid. An annual giving coordinator was hired, effective fall 2000, and
the campus development and advancement office was reorganized in academic year 2000-
2001.




1
    Administered to a 50% sample of undergraduate alumni from the classes of 1991 and 1994


                                                       9
Memorandum of Understanding                                         College of Technology at Delhi



2.4       Post-graduate success

Each year, graduating seniors are surveyed to assess their primary activity following
graduation from Delhi College. The College also surveys alumni every five years for
program reviews.

      •   Future surveys of graduating seniors will include information on non-completers, as
          well as on special population groups. Delhi College will also strive to increase the
          percentage of survey returns.

2.5       Employer satisfaction

Employers interviewing students on campus are encouraged to complete an assessment
instrument concerning their recruiting visit, students’ performance during the interviews, and
employer interest in hiring each candidate. The College also attempts to collect anecdotal
information from employers through faculty/staff inquiries, surveys, and on-site visits.

      •   Future surveys of employers interviewing students on campus will include information
          on non-completers, as well as on special population groups.


2.6       Assessment planning

All programs are assessed annually by the President and Vice President for Academic
Programs and Services for their viability. Programs are also evaluated every five years by an
external panel of experts. The program being evaluated prepares a comprehensive self-study
report, consisting of a curriculum review, with specific objectives and outcomes stated, prior
to the external panel visit. A written evaluation report by the panel is given to the Department
Chair and the Vice President for Academic Programs and Services.

Finally, almost every program has an Advisory Council, consisting of a group of individuals,
primarily from industry and education whose backgrounds closely resemble the programs
they are asked to serve, which meets once or twice a year. The Council is responsible for
assessing program strengths and weaknesses, and suggesting new directions. In addition,
many of the programs go through periodic specialized accreditation reviews: for example,
Veterinary Science (AVMA); Nursing (NLN); and Automotive (ASE).

The College has made significant progress at developing a campus-wide assessment plan, and
has many of the requisite elements in place. The College may assess, possibly as early as fall
2000, that students are meeting the general education requirements, by using a model similar
to the one used and approved by Middle States for King’s College in Pennsylvania. During
the 1999-2000 academic year, Delhi College required each of its programs to state in writing
what a student of that program should have mastered upon graduation. The College plans to
publish these lists in its next catalog.




                                                10
Memorandum of Understanding                                        College of Technology at Delhi


However, some additional work remains. The interim report issued by the Provost’s Advisory
Task Force on the Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes may provide additional
guidance and direction in the area of academic assessment.


3.0       Faculty Development and Scholarship

3.1       Faculty recruitment

At present, 27 faculty have doctoral degrees. This number will increase in the years ahead, as
the College adds more baccalaureate degrees to its offerings. Delhi requires a doctorate or
other appropriate terminal degree for all new faculty teaching in baccalaureate programs.

3.2       Faculty review, promotion, and tenure

At present, faculty are evaluated in five broad categories outlined by the SUNY Board of
Trustees: mastery of subject matter, effectiveness of teaching, scholarly ability, effectiveness
of university service, and continuing growth. Teaching effectiveness will always remain the
number one criteria, but beyond that, faculty may choose to emphasize one or more other
categories.

All candidates for promotion must submit a dossier for review by the Promotion Committee.
The dossier must include responses to the above listed five criteria set forth by the Board of
Trustees. It also requires candidates for associate and full professor to respond to more
criteria, including proof of positive and effective leadership and documentation of continual
professional growth and development.

Delhi College has no plans to change the faculty review, promotion and tenure system with its
change of mission. The College does not currently require external-to-the-College peer review
of faculty scholarship and has, as yet, no plans to do so. Nevertheless, Delhi has indicated its
willingness to engage in a dialogue with System Administration on the issue.

3.3       Quality and quantity of scholarship

While teaching is the major focus at Delhi, there is also significant value in having faculty
engaged in intellectually vibrant applied research and the College does support some research
activities. One key source of support is the distribution of money through the SUNY
Undergraduate Research Initiative. Most faculty interested in applied research are active in
grant writing and securing funding through a network of business and industry contacts, or
educational associations.

      •   Delhi had $254,074 in sponsored program activity in 1999. By 2005, Delhi will raise
          its average yearly sponsored program dollars to $400,000 annually, an increase of
          approximately 60%.




                                                  11
Memorandum of Understanding                                       College of Technology at Delhi


4.0       Intercampus Collaboration

4.1       Joint academic programs

Delhi will continue to develop joint programs with the other UCT colleges and other
baccalaureate institutions. Delhi has enjoyed a particularly beneficial working relationship
with SUNY Oneonta and Mohawk Valley Community College, where the College is working
to offer the BBA in Hospitality Management at their Utica-Rome campus.

Within the UCT, Information Technology and Technology Management are the first UCT-
wide programs to be implemented. Others will be developed for all five colleges, and some
new degrees will involve only some of the UCT colleges.

4.2       Articulation

Because of the mission changes at Delhi, including the introduction of new baccalaureate
programs, all existing articulation agreements will be revised and several new agreements are
planned.

      •   New baccalaureate degrees have spurred articulation discussions with several
          community colleges (Sullivan, Columbia-Greene, and Schenectady), and Emerson
          College, Scotland.


5.0       Academic Program Directions

5.1       Undergraduate

Delhi intends to emphasize the development of baccalaureate programs in the future. At
present, the College offers two baccalaureate degrees: Hospitality Management and Golf
Course Management. A third four-year program, the UCT Information Technology degree,
will start fall 2001. The UCT is also planning to submit a joint baccalaureate program in
Technology Management. In the future, Delhi plans to develop a baccalaureate program built
on its successful associate program in Veterinary Science Technology.

Future development of baccalaureate programs at Delhi will be based either on campus
existing strengths, such as recreation and leisure, or done in conjunction with other UCT
campuses.

Possible new baccalaureate programs under review by Delhi, but not yet considered by
System Administration, include: Human Services Management (BBA, BT); Construction
(BBA); Architecture Engineering Technology (BBA); Civil Engineering Technology (BT);
Tech Management (BBA) in Applied Technology, Nursing, and Facilities Management; and
Individual Studies (BS).




                                              12
Memorandum of Understanding                                        College of Technology at Delhi


The UCT Alliance affords the five participating campuses the opportunity to develop a
restructured mission involving a changeover from predominately two-year residential
campuses to four-year degree campuses. This mission change provides a great opportunity for
the UCT and its member campuses.

The success of the movement to include significant baccalaureate degree offerings is highly
dependent on the selection, planning, prompt approval, and implementation of new academic
programs. While the enrollment necessary to support the campuses is known, the ultimate mix
of programs, especially in the out years, requires the campuses and the Provost’s office to
continue an active dialogue even after the completion of the MOUs. These discussions are
necessary to craft an appropriate program mix in the best interest of the individual campus,
the UCT Alliance, and the University System.

The programs that have been approved recently need to mature and be assessed; programs
identified in the MOUs need to be developed and submitted for review and approval; and
campuses must continue to identify new areas of interest while considering the future of
existing offerings. If this strategic change in mission is to be successful, the campuses and
System Administration must remain flexible and work cooperatively on its implementation.

The majority of work done on new associate degrees was to take existing AOS programs and
add an AAS option (e.g., AAS in Automotive Mechanics and Carpentry), or to take existing
AAS programs and add an AS or AA options (e.g., AS and AA in General Studies). The
intent was not only to add options, but also raise standards.

At the two-year level, Delhi received approval to offer programs in Physical Education
Studies and Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC).

Future certificate and associate program initiatives to be considered include:

   -   Pharmaceutical Lab Technician
   -   Water Quality Technician
   -   Turf Equipment Management / Welding Technology
   -   Woodworking
   -   Adventure Recreation
   -   Aquatic Management
   -   Sports Officiating
   -   Environmental Technology
   -   Pastry Arts
   -   Research/Food Science
   -   Facilities Management
   -   Dietetic Technician
   -   Veterinary Assistants
   -   Ecotourism
   -   Human Services Management
   -   Emergency Medical Training




                                               13
Memorandum of Understanding                                      College of Technology at Delhi


These and any other academic programs the College develops in the future will be reviewed
for consistency with mission, demonstrated market need, and evidence of academic quality.
As the College adds new programs it will continue to review existing programs for relevance
and enrollment strength. When appropriate, the College will consider program deactivation
and/or discontinuance.

Each January, the President and her Cabinet evaluate each academic program based on the
College’s comprehensive plan and SUNY enrollment information. Programs are then rated as
exemplary, strong, emerging, in jeopardy, or to be deactivated. Last year, fourteen programs
were deactivated and five programs were placed in jeopardy. Faculty and staff from programs
in jeopardy met with College administrators to develop strategies to improve their rating. If
that does not happen, these programs will also be deactivated.

Other academic priorities will be to:

   •   Develop a weekend college, summer sessions, and distance learning delivery systems
       for its unique programs

   •   Step up the College’s non-credit, revenue-generating effort by working with the UCT
       and the UCT Strategy Board

   •   Seek international markets for selected programs in credit and non-credit areas

   •   Start selected programs using alternative scheduling options, e.g. summer starts,
       accelerated degree programs, etc.

       5.1.1   General Education

One of the earliest efforts of the UCT was the development and adoption of UCT-wide Core
Competencies in mathematics, communication, science, problem solving, critical thinking,
information literacy, and individual and social responsibility. As the campuses progressed
through the development of independent General Education Plans, it was agreed that a
cooperative response was necessary. Representatives from each campus have been assigned
to a UCT General Education Team that will develop a coordinated plan following the
University review of campus plans.

Delhi has established and charged a campus-wide general education team to implement the
State University Board of Trustees’ resolution for all AA, AS and baccalaureate programs, as
well as pilot several AAS programs for fall 2000. Delhi hopes to combine the Board’s
resolution with the UCT core competencies. This unique combination will eventually be
mandated for all AAS, AA, AS and baccalaureate programs at Delhi.

Delhi College has been working with the Provost’s Advisory Council on General Education in
developing a general education program that will meet the requirements of the Board of
Trustees’ Resolution 98-241, and will have this program in place for first-time students
entering in fall 2000.


                                             14
Memorandum of Understanding                                        College of Technology at Delhi


5.2       Responsiveness to local/regional/state needs

Delhi College’s new Center for Continuing Education and Corporate Services continues to
develop numerous cooperative activities throughout New York State, for both credit and non-
credit.

Two recent major activities are Delhi’s involvement with an international pharmaceutical
company, Mallinckrodt Inc., and the Catskill Watershed Corporation. Both activities will
lead to training opportunities and possible one and two-year programs for pharmaceutical and
water-quality testing technicians.

Other examples of the College’s responsiveness include: training for the NYS Department of
Transportation in Basic Hydraulics at all DOT sites throughout the state; masonry and
computer training for the NYS Office of General Services; partnering with the NYS
Department of Environmental Conservation, offering expanded recertification programs for
watershed operations; and training for Kraft employees in Walton, New York, under a grant
from Empire State Development. In addition, the Accelerated College Entrance Program,
involving area high schools, continues to generate more credit course enrollments each year.


6.0       Infrastructure and Technology

6.1       Facilities

A critical issue facing the campus is that its residence halls are at maximum capacity. The
current housing stock is limited to double loaded corridors and group bathrooms. The College
has an occupancy plan for the next five years that includes releasing more students to live off
campus and working with the local community in an effort to expand off campus living
alternatives for students. Additionally, double rooms have been converted to triples and
lounges to 4 person suites.

      •   A Residence Life Strategic Plan, completed in January 2000, outlines directions for
          the next decade with regard to furniture and equipment upgrades, creation of a minor
          maintenance position, capital projects planning, technology and safety/security
          recommendations, and living/learning environments. A five-year plan for
          implementing wireless technology in the residence halls is underway.

      •   A team of student life, finance, and physical plant staff is reviewing options for the
          construction of a new residence hall, which would include suites and/or apartments, on
          state or auxiliary owned property. The College expects to have a comprehensive five-
          year plan for residence hall construction (new and renovations) in place by July 2001.

There is also a great need to expand athletic facilities and the Student Center as the campus
expands its baccalaureate degrees. Planning is underway for a new Athletic and Recreational
facility to accommodate an increase in intramural and recreational activities and
intercollegiate teams. This new facility will include a wrestling room, fitness center, weight


                                                15
Memorandum of Understanding                                      College of Technology at Delhi


room, and classroom space. It will also free up space in the existing Student Center for
commuters and returning adult students, expansion of the O’Connor Center for Community
Service, and a Multicultural Center.

6.2    Academic technology

Delhi has opened a computer technology center, rather than requiring all students to purchase
a laptop. This new facility is open 100 hours a week, seven days a week and gives students
access to computers without cost. Delhi has also started a laptop program for faculty
(including upgrading classrooms for laptop use).

Delhi College is planning to upgrade its ability to deliver its proposed academic programs
utilizing the expertise of SUNYConnect and the SUNY Learning Network, both of which
Delhi supports.

Utilizing capital and operating funds provided by the University, the UCT became actively
involved in synchronous distance learning in 1997. All five campuses are linked through
eight interactive television classrooms and five videoconference rooms across the campuses.

By the end of the 1998-99 academic year, the number of students utilizing this UCT-wide
system had grown to more than 750 students taking approximately 35 courses per semester.
As the UCT implements new joint baccalaureate programs such as those in Information
Technology and Technology Management, the synchronous distance learning system will be
used to deliver UCT-wide classes and to fulfill University General Education requirements.

The UCT has initiated an evaluation of this synchronous DL system to ensure quality and
productivity; four evaluation teams are in place in the areas of Academic Productivity,
Faculty and Teaching Support, Cost Effectiveness, and Expansion and Evolution.

The UCT colleges have also initiated asynchronous Distance Learning Classes using the
SUNY Learning Network. The UCT Telecommunication Center for Education project has
recently been designated for funding by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban
Development. This initiative will allow students to access technology-based Associate and
Baccalaureate Degree courses at times convenient to their work schedule. The federal
funding will be utilized for faculty development, course development and five portable
distance learning sites. The UCT will seek additional funding, including HUD and other
federal sources, to offer an entire technology baccalaureate degree on-line.




                                         * * * *




                                              16
Memorandum of Understanding                                     College of Technology at Delhi




This Memorandum of Understanding was developed jointly by College of Technology at
Delhi and the State University of New York System Administration to provide guidance for
planning the campus’ future and a framework for gauging the achievement of its goals.
Recognizing that individual institutions and the State University as a whole must be able to
respond to changing circumstances, both Delhi and System Administration will work together
to realize the goals and objectives articulated in this document.




                                             17

				
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