Tracie Howard Instructional Strategy Overview Sheet Name of Strategy Anticipation Guide Source Use APA

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Tracie Howard Instructional Strategy Overview Sheet Name of Strategy Anticipation Guide Source Use APA Powered By Docstoc
					                                                                     Tracie Howard

                 Instructional Strategy Overview Sheet
Name of Strategy

Anticipation Guide

Source (Use APA or MLA style)

Kozen, A., Murray, R., & Windell, I. (2006) Increasing All Students’ Chance to
Achieve: Using and Adapting Anticipation Guides With Middle School Learners.
Intervention in School and Clinic, 41 (4), 195-200.

Identify the North Carolina Curriculum Competency Goal(s) that your lesson
addresses (you can copy and paste the goals from the NCDPI Website).

 See attached sheet.

Give a thorough description of the strategy as it is described in the original source.

 An anticipation guide is a pre-reading strategy that combines literacy instruction
and content-area learning (Kozen, Murray, & Windell, 2006). This strategy
engages students in predicting and activating prior knowledge about a topic in
order to motivate them to get involved in reading the material. An anticipation
guide is made up of a set of 5 to 10 true and false teacher-generated statements
related to the content of the text. Students respond to each statement by agreeing
or disagreeing with it. Students can also discuss their choices and opinions with
the group. After students read the assigned text, they review their initial responses
on the anticipation guide. Students may decide to keep or change each response
and should be able to support their decisions based on information they read in the
text. Through discussion, the students’ attention is focused on what they have
learned and if the text has changed their prior opinions/thoughts.

Describe in detail how it will be implemented. Attach any necessary materials.

The students will come to a round table in the back of the room in small groups of
3 to 4. Students will be told that they will be listening to a book about bats during
whole group time, but first they will complete an anticipation guide predicting
what the book will tell them about bats. Each statement from the anticipation
guide will be read aloud to the small group. Each child will agree or disagree with
the statement and color in the appropriate face on the anticipation guide: agree-
smiley face or disagree- frown face. After all of the children have completed the
anticipation guides, the whole group will gather on the floor in front of the rocking
chair. I will lead a discussion based on the anticipation guide responses to
encourage students to engage in conversation about their opinions. I will read
Bats by Gail Gibbons to the students. As a whole group we will fill in a chart
version of the post anticipation guide, discussing the accuracy of each statement
and supporting it with specific details from the book. Students will then return to
the round table in small groups of 3 to 4 to complete their own post anticipation
guides. Each statement will be read aloud to the small group. As students fill in
the smiley/frown faces for each statement, I will be able to check for
understanding and retention of information. A copy of the anticipation guide is
attached.

Describe how you implemented the strategy. Did you deviate from your original
plan?

The students came to a round table in the back of the room in small groups of 5.
Students were told that they will be listening to a book about bats during whole
group time, but first they will complete an anticipation guide predicting what the
book will tell them about bats. Each statement from the anticipation guide was
read aloud to the small group. Each child agreed or disagreed with the statement
and colored in the appropriate face on the anticipation guide: agree- smiley face or
disagree- frown face. After all of the children completed the anticipation guides,
the whole group gathered on the floor in front of the rocking chair. I lead a
discussion based on the anticipation guide responses encouraging students to talk
about their opinions. I read Bats by Gail Gibbons to the students. We discussed
each statement on the anticipation guide and found the specific pages in the text
with the information about each statement. The following day we gathered on the
floor in front of the rocking chair to read the book again. As a whole group we
filled in a chart version of the post anticipation guide, discussing the accuracy of
each statement and supporting it with specific details from the book. Students
then returned to the round table in small groups of 5 to complete their own post
anticipation guides. Each statement was read aloud to the small group. As
students filled in the smiley/frown faces for each statement, I was able to check for
understanding and retention of information. When implementing my pre-reading
strategy, I found that due to the time of day and length of the book I needed to
extend the activity over the course of two days. After the initial reading of the
book I noticed that several of the students were “zoning out” and that one had
actually fallen asleep. During the class discussion it was evident that some, but
not all, of the students had retained the information about bats. At that time I
decided to stop the activity and resume it the following morning when the students
were fresh. I believe the earlier time of day, as well as the review of reading
through the material a second time, made the activity much more effective.
 Assess the effectiveness of the strategy. What would you change if you teach it
again?

 I found the anticipation guide to be a very effective pre-reading strategy. The
statements on the guide captured my students’ attention and let them know exactly
what to listen for during the reading of the story. The guide allowed me to quickly
and easily see the students’ progress. The students were actively participating in
the process. They enjoyed telling what they knew (or thought they knew) about
bats before the reading, and they seemed very proud of their new learning after the
reading. The two readings of the text, as well as the chart version of the
anticipation guide, provided valuable support to the students’ comprehension. The
preparation for the anticipation guide, although a little time consuming, was well
worth the effort and would probably become a quicker process with practice.
When using anticipation guides in the future I will add grid lines to the hand out to
help students keep the statements lined up with the correct faces. I would also
avoid engaging in the activity in the afternoon. I would not change anything about
the actual strategy.
  English Language Arts: Competency Goals 2 and 3

  Science: Competency Goal 1

Competency                   The learner will develop and apply strategies and skills to comprehend text that is read,
Goal 2                       heard, and viewed.
                             2.01 Demonstrate sense of story (e.g., beginning, middle, end, characters, details and setting).
                             2.02 Demonstrate familiarity with a variety of types of books and selections (e.g., picture
                             books, caption books, short informational texts, nursery rhymes, word plays/finger plays,
                             puppet plays, reenactments of familiar stories).
                             2.03 Use preparation strategies to activate prior knowledge and experience before and during
                             the reading of a text.
                             2.04 Formulate questions that a text might answer before beginning to read (e.g., what will
                             happen in this story, who might this be, where do you think this happens).
                             2.05 Predict possible events in texts before and during reading.
                             2.06 Understand and follow oral-graphic directions.
                             2.08 Distinguish fantasy from reality when reading text.
                             2.09 Identify the sequence of events in a story.


Competency                 The learner will make connections through the use of oral language, written language, and
Goal 3                     media and technology.
                           3.01 Connect information and events in text to experience.
                           3.02 Discuss concepts and information in a text to clarify and extend knowledge.
                           3.03 Associate target words with prior knowledge and explore an author's choice of words.
                           3.04 Use speaking and listening skills and media to connect experiences and text:

                                    listening to and re-visiting stories.
                                    discussing, illustrating, and dramatizing stories.
                                    discovering relationships.




Competency Goal 1: The learner will make observations and build an understanding of similarities and differences
in animals.
Objectives

1.01 Observe and describe the similarities and differences among animals including:

        Structure.
        Growth.
        Changes.
        Movement.

1.02 Observe how animals interact with their surroundings.

1.03 Observe the behaviors of several common animals.

1.05 Observe the similarities of humans to other animals including:

        Basic needs.
        Growth and change.
        Movement.

				
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