Apa Template 6Th Edition by xnf15081

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									HSAD602: Pearson
 Library Instruction
      Lucy Holman
    Langsdale Library
      410-837-4333
   lholman@ubalt.edu

                        1
                Outline
1.   Course website and resources
2.   Searching
3.   Periodical comparison
4.   Citation
5.   Plagiarism


                                    2
           Getting Started
• Course website:
http://langsdale.ubalt.edu/howto/course_
websites/fa09/hsad602_pearson.htm
• Get barcode:
https://langsdale.ubalt.edu/info_services/
lib_reg_form.cfm
                                         3
           2. Searching
• Identify keywords and related terms –
  topic concepts, population, relationship,
 etc




                                          4
3. Periodical Comparison
Not all journals are created equal



  Comparison chart
  Exercise


                                     5
             4. Citation
• All academic work uses the ideas of
  others…
• “If I have seen further it is by standing on
  the shoulders of giants.”
       Issac Newton, Oxford Dictionary of
         Quotations



                                                 6
          Citation

Give Credit where Credit is Due




                                  7
             Why Cite?
• Supports your argument
• Shows knowledge of research in field
• Honest/ethical/legal – avoid violations
  of academic integrity
• Helps reader find your sources



                                        8
           Why Cite? (cont.)
Consequences of Academic Dishonesty at UB
  (Plagiarism, cheating, etc.)
• Non-credit for Work (likely failing class)
• Disciplinary Probation (cannot represent UB)
• Disciplinary Suspension (at least 1 semester)
• Disciplinary Dismissal (reapply after 1 year)
• Disciplinary Expulsion (permanent dismissal)

Source: UB Student Handbook
Why Worry About Format?

       Let’s Play
   Spot the Author!




                          10
• “From Slip to Chip” in “Harvard Magazine”
  November/December 1990. Pages 52-57.
  Edward Tenner.
• PC WEEK, volume 16, Issue 5. page. 3. Dodge,
  John. 1999. “When Listening to Customers is the
  Wrong Thing to Do.”
• Special Section 361 (8246) 3. Drucker, Peter.
  The Economist. The Next Society. 2001




                                                  11
• Nieuwenhuysen, P. (2000). Information literacy
  courses for university students. Campus-Wide
  Information Systems 7 (5): 167-173.
• Fishman, D.L. (1998). Managing the virtual
  reference desk. Medical Reference Services
  Quarterly 17 (1): 1-10.
• Kuhlthau, C.C. (1993). Principle of uncertainty for
  information seeking. Journal of Documentation 49
  (4): 339-355.


           Activity from:
           Paon, M. (2004). Citation Scramble. Retrieved September 2, 2009, from
           Dalhousie University Libraries at:
           http://infolit.library.dal.ca/staff/activities/Citation_Scramble.htm 12
           Citation Style
APA style
• Publication Manual of the American
  Psychological Association (5th or 6th
  ed.)
• Chapter 4 (Reference List)



                                          13
           Citation Style
2 parts to APA style
• Parenthetical notation in-text
• Reference List at end




                                   14
            Pt. 1: In-text
Your paper:
Recent studies indicate “that students are
 often unclear as to what constitutes
 plagiarism and correct forms of
 paraphrasing” (Roig, 1997, p. 113).




                                             15
            Pt. 1: In-text
Your paper (alternate version):
A 1997 study by Roig indicated “that
  students are often unclear as to what
  constitutes plagiarism and correct forms
  of paraphrasing” (p. 113).




                                             16
     Pt 2: Reference List
After the paper:
Roig, M. (1997). Can undergraduate students
  determine whether text has been
  plagiarized? Psychological Record 47(1),
  113-122.




                                              17
         Citation Information
Get all the info you need to properly cite the source
• Author(s)/Editor(s)
• Article/Chapter Title
• Journal Information (title, volume, issue, pages,
  database name)
• Book Information (title, edition, publisher &
  location)
• Publication date
• Document Object Identifier (DOI), Web address
  (URL) and date accessed
    Citation Style: Journals
 Author     Date            Article Title

 Roig, M. (1997). Can undergraduate students
  determine whether text has been plagiarized?
   Psychological Record 47(1), 113-122.

Journal Title      Volume    Issue      Pages




                                                19
   Citation Style: Journals
Author

Roig, M. (1997). Can undergraduate students
 determine whether text has been plagiarized?
  Psychological Record 47(1), 113-122.




                                            20
   Citation Style: Journals
          Date

Roig, M. (1997). Can undergraduate students
 determine whether text has been plagiarized?
  Psychological Record 47(1), 113-122.




                                            21
   Citation Style: Journals
                      Article Title

Roig, M. (1997). Can undergraduate students
 determine whether text has been
 plagiarized? Psychological Record 47(1),
 113-122.




                                          22
    Citation Style: Journals

 Roig, M. (1997). Can undergraduate students
  determine whether text has been plagiarized?
  Psychological Record 47(1), 113-122.

Journal Title




                                             23
   Citation Style: Journals

Roig, M. (1997). Can undergraduate students
 determine whether text has been plagiarized?
  Psychological Record 47(1), 113-122.

               Volume




                                            24
   Citation Style: Journals

Roig, M. (1997). Can undergraduate students
 determine whether text has been plagiarized?
 Psychological Record 47(1), 113-122.

                        Issue




                                            25
   Citation Style: Journals

Roig, M. (1997). Can undergraduate students
 determine whether text has been plagiarized?
  Psychological Record 47(1), 113-122.

                                 Pages




                                            26
Citation Style: Journals (online)

 Roig, M. (1997). Can undergraduate students
  determine whether text has been plagiarized?
  Psychological Record 47(1), 113-
  122. Retrieved September 8, 2009 from:




                                                 27
Citation Style

     OK.
Now You Try It!




                  28
              Citation Shortcuts
• Endnote ($$)
• NoodleBib (individual citations)
  http://www.noodletools.com/noodlebib/exp
  ress.php
• Word 2007 (not good with online articles)
• Zotero (Firefox extension)
  http://www.zotero.org
  Workshops @ Langsdale
 http://langsdale.ubalt.edu/info_services/instruction/internet_class.ht
 m#Zotero

                                                                      29
    For More Information…
• Publication Manual of the American
  Psychological Association, 6th ed. at
  the Reference Desk
• Writing Consultation (Academic
  Resource Center, AC 111)
   arc@ubalt.edu (410) 837-5353

                                          30
                5. Plagiarism
• “Plagiarism includes the copying of
  the language, structure, ideas,
  and/or thoughts of another and
  representing same as one’s own
  original work.” [emphasis added]
  University of Baltimore. Student Handbook. Retrieved on Oct 13,
    2006 from http://www.ubalt.edu/template.cfm?page=283



                                                                    31
        Plagiarism includes
• Word-for-word quotation (with or without
  quotations)
• Paraphrasing




                                             32
              Plagiarism
Cite every time you borrow:
• language (quotation)
• sentence structure (paraphrase)
• ideas (paraphrase)

Good rule of thumb: If it’s not common
 knowledge, CITE!
                                    33
                   Plagiarism
• Penalties can include:
  – “F” on the assignment
  – “F” for the class
  – Suspension
  – Expulsion

  University of Baltimore. Student Handbook. Retrieved
   on July 14, 2005 from
    http://www.ubalt.edu/template.cfm?page=283

                                                         34
    Intentional Plagiarism
• Knowingly, Without Citing…
  – Quoting (using words)
  – Paraphrasing (using ideas or structure)
  – Cutting and Pasting Entire Sections
  – Buying a Paper




                                              35
  Unintentional Plagiarism
• Accidentally using an author’s words or
  ideas without citing them.




                                            36
   Unintentional Plagiarism
• Accidentally using an author’s words or
  ideas without citing them.

Causes:
  – Careless Notes
  – Incomplete/Lost Citation Information
  – Too Little Time…
  – Cultural Differences


                                            37
      UB Plagiarism Tutorial
• Required for all new UB students
  (undergraduate and graduate)
• Must be taken in the first semester
• Until completed, registration is blocked for the
  second semester
• Faculty can make it a requirement for all
  students in a course
• Enter through UB Portal (Student Page)
  https://myub.ubalt.edu/
             Discussion
• Which of the following scenarios are
  examples of plagiarism?




                                         39
  Questions???

Lucy Holman         Reference
410-837-4333        410-837-4274
lholman@ubalt.edu   langref@ubalt.edu
                    IM: ublangsdale



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