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					AMERICAN JEWISH
  WORLD SERVICE   ANNUAL REPOR T 20 03-20 04
A M E R IC A N J E W I S H W OR L D S E R V IC E I S A N IN DE P E N DE N T


NOT- FOR- P R OF I T OR G A NI Z AT ION FO U N DE D IN 19 85 TO


H E LP A LL E V I AT E P O V E R T Y, H U NGE R A N D DI S E A S E A MONG


THE PEOPLE OF THE WORLD REGARDLE S S OF RACE,


R E L I G I O N O R N AT I O N A L I T Y. I T B R E AT H E S L I F E I N TO


J U D A I S M ’ S IM P E R AT I V E TO P U R S U E J U S T IC E A N D H E LP S


A M E R IC A N J E W S A C T U P ON A DE E PLY F E LT OBLIG AT ION


TO IM P R O V E T H E C H A N C E S FO R S U R V I VA L , E C O N O MI C


IN DE P E N DE NC E A N D H U M A N DIGNI T Y FOR A LL P E OPL E .
                TA B L E O F
               CONTENTS

L E T T E R F R OM A J W S P R E S IDE N T A N D BO A R D C H A IR    3


A J W S A R O U N D T H E GLOBE                                       4


IN T E R N AT ION A L P R O GR A M S                                  6


S E R V IC E                                                         18


E D U C AT ION , O U T R E A C H , C OM M U NIC AT ION S             24


GR A N T LI S T                                                      26


F IN A NC I A L S                                                    42


D ONOR LI S T                                                        44


BO A R D A N D S TA F F LI S T                                       52
“In the hands of a woman, money is spent better and goes further, leading to the
       IN AN URBAN SETTLEMENT IN SOUTH AFRICA, a young mother sits in an HIV
       treatment preparedness seminar. She and her son have recently started antiretroviral ther-
       apy and are looking forward to longer and healthier lives. In India, a family celebrates their
       son’s first day of school after being freed from slave labor. In Uganda, an AJWS volunteer
       provides healthcare for an entire village. A refugee family on the Thai-Burma border com-
       pletes a life skills training course and will soon be moving from a camp to a permanent
       settlement. Meanwhile, in Honduras, groups from across Central and South America meet
       to share information and best practices on improving trade and sustainable agriculture
       throughout the region.

       Over the past year, we at AJWS have been lucky enough to witness the growing grassroots
       movement in developing countries that, with your support, is the greatest force for fos-
       tering peace and justice in a tumultuous world. But we were also witness to the effects of
       horrendous and tragic events: terrorism, ethnic cleansing, new and ongoing wars, and an
       increase in global inequities between the developed and the developing world.

       AJWS, in partnership with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, was the first
       organization in the American Jewish community to respond to the violent campaigns
       against the people of Sudan. While raising money for emergencies is nothing new for
       AJWS, linking emergency relief with direct advocacy, especially through our Web site, is
       a new step for us.

       Your support enables AJWS to make a difference in the world, through our grant making
       to more than 190 grassroots groups in over 40 countries, through the expansion of our
       international service programs that last year sent 365 volunteers – one for every day of the
       year – to the developing world, and through our outreach, education and advocacy efforts
       in the United States.

       Like you, we take the concept of tzedek (justice) seriously, as we strive to act on the most
       fundamental principles of Judaism in a world that each day presents us with new and
       increasingly serious problems.The examples from our work at the top of this page are not
       simply stories: these are real people, in real places, and they give us hope that our efforts,
       and your support, really do make change happen.

       Thank you for your ongoing commitment.




       Ruth Messinger, President                  Marty Friedman, Chair



development not only of the family unit, but society as a whole.” –Nelson Mandela

                                                                                                        AJWS   2-3
AJWS AROUND
  THE GLOBE
  AFRICA PROJECTS:                       AMERICAS                               ASIA PROJECTS:
  Algeria              1                 PROJECTS:                              Afghanistan          4
  Eritrea              1                 Argentina            1                 Cambodia             6
  Ethiopia             5                 Brazil               4                 Gaza                 2
  The Gambia           1                 Columbia             2                 Iran                 2
  Ghana                2                 Dominican Republic   6                 Iraq                 1
  Kenya                5                 El Salvador          3                 India                15
  Liberia              3                 Guatemala            2                 Turkey               2
  Malawi               1                 Haiti                8                 Thailand             7
  Namibia              1                 Honduras             9                 Vietnam              2
  Nigeria              3                 Mexico               3
  Rwanda               1                 Nicaragua            4                 ASIA VOLUNTEERS:
  Senegal              3                 Peru                 5                 Cambodia         4 JVC
  Sierra Leone         1                 Venezuela            1                 India            23 D
  South Africa         12                                                                        16 JVC
  Sudan                2                 AMERICAS                               Thailand         2 JVC
  Uganda               12                VOLUNTEERS:
  Zambia               7                 Belize               2 JVC             RUSSIA AND UKRAINE
  Zimbabwe             4                 El Salvador          57 D              PROJECTS:
  Africa-wide          3                                      2 JVC             Russia           10
                                         Guatemala            2 JVC             Ukraine          29
  AFRICA VOLUNTEERS:                     Honduras             62 AB
  The Gambia        1 JVC                                     15 IJCC           RUSSIA AND UKRAINE
  Ghana             15 IJCC              Mexico               106 AB            VOLUNTEERS:
                    5 JVC                Nicaragua            15 AB             Russia           2 JVC
  Kenya             2 JVC                                     10 D              Ukraine          30 IJCC
  Rwanda            1 JVC                                     1 JVC                              3 JVC
  Rwanda & Tanzania 2 JVC                Venezuela            2 JVC
  Uganda            9 JVC                                                       WORLDWIDE PROJECTS:
  Senegal           1 JVC                                                       Worldwide      1
  South Africa      5 JVC


  SERVICE KEY:
  AB = Alternative Break; D = Delegation Programs; IJCC = International Jewish College Corps; JVC = Jewish Volunteer Corps




                   AFRICA Projects = 68                           ✦       AMERICAS Projects = 48                             ✦
                                                                                 RUSSIA




                                                                              UKRAINE


                                                                    TURKEY
                                                                       GAZA          IRAN
                                                    ALGERIA                   IRAQ          AFGHANISTAN
          BELIZE     HAITI
 MEXICO               DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
          HONDURAS
  GUATEMALA                                                          SUDAN                                THAILAND
                 NICARAGUA            SENEGAL                                                                          VIETNAM
   EL SALVADOR
                                     THE GAMBIA SIERRA LEONE                   ERITREA
                           VENEZUELA
                                           LIBERIA                              ETHIOPIA                             CAMBODIA
                                                   GHANA
        COLOMBIA                                          NIGERIA                                INDIA
                                                                        TANZANIA
                                                                         KENYA
                                                                  UGANDA
                                                               RWANDA
                                                                      MALAWI

              PERU                   BRAZIL
                                                              ZAMBIA

                                                                    ZIMBABWE
                                                        NAMIBIA


                                                                  SOUTH AFRICA
                                ARGENTINA




ASIA Projects = 41               ✦       RUSSIA & UKRAINE Projects = 39

                                                                                                                                 AJWS   4-5
   INTERN ATION AL
       PROGRAMS
        OVERVIE W


              O U R A P P R O A C H TO D E V E LO P M E N T R E A L LY P R O D U C E S

              RE S ULTS... AJWS supports more than 190 different grassroots organ-

              izations in over 40 countries around the world. Through our grant

              making and technical assistance, and our partners’ innovative approaches,

              we are seeing real improvements in the communities in which we work.



              The grassroots groups that we support are making a difference because

              they link sustainable development with active engagement for full

              human rights. As our partners have shown us, when individuals under-

              stand that they have rights and are able to articulate them, they can then

              begin to make them real.




AJWS programs support: Agriculture        ✦   Civil Society    ✦   Economic Development    ✦
        The groups that we work with are empowering women and nurturing civil society
        by creating self-sustaining projects that expand agricultural production, educational
        and economic opportunities, and healthcare.


        In the Americas many of the projects we support focus on community mobilization for
        rural economic development through training in organic agricultural techniques and busi-
        ness development, and on improving healthcare with sustainable community solutions.


        In Asia our work emphasizes empowering women through education, human rights
        training and skills-building, ending the trafficking of women and children, promot-
        ing children’s rights, and ending child labor.


        In Africa we work with partners who address gender disparities, post-conflict recovery,
        food security and economic development, and the impact of HIV/AIDS on people
        from all walks of life throughout the continent.


        Our partners are pioneers in the grassroots movement, advocating at the local,
        national and international levels to create economic, social, political and cultural
        change. They are building networks to learn from each others’ experiences, share
        information and develop best practices. The founders, leaders, and members of
        these projects are strengthening their communities, democratizing and reconstruct-
        ing their societies, and fighting for the protection of future generations.


        AJWS’ grant making guidelines now allow us to support organizations for periods
        of longer than three years. This change came about as a result of our project part-
        ners, who continue to teach us that lasting change can only happen over time. The
        following section highlights some of our long-standing project partners and their
        incredible achievements.




Education ✦ Emergency Relief & Reconstruction ✦ Health ✦ Women’s Empowerment

                                                                                              I N T E R N AT I O N A L P R O G R A M S   6-7
      S WAAZ




F R O M H I V /A I D S P R E V E N T I O N TO W O M E N ’ S E M P O W E R -

M E N T A N D HOP E . . . Society for Women and AIDS in Africa, Zambia

(SWAAZ), is one of 59 community-based HIV/AIDS projects that

AJWS supports in over 20 countries. SWAAZ, the Zambian chapter of

a network of African women’s organizations, was founded in 1989 to

enable women shouldering the burdens of HIV/AIDS to respond to the

multi-faceted crises created by the epidemic.




 ✦   In developing countries only seven to eight percent of people
       In the face of drought, famine, serious oppression of women and a rising number of                   SWAAZ kinder-
                                                                                                            gartener in AIDS
       AIDS orphans and vulnerable children, SWAAZ’s philosophy is that it is not enough                    education skit

       to simply offer training and consciousness-raising.


       Operating in all nine provinces of Zambia, SWAAZ has 64 chapters that offer effec-
       tive economic empowerment opportunities. It helps former prostitutes leave the
       world of commercial sex through training, counseling and education. It sets up cen-
       ters for AIDS orphans and vulnerable children, providing them with food, counseling
       and love. SWAAZ also buys land and creates agricultural cooperatives near rural town-
       ships to start income generation programs for people where unemployment rates are
       eighty percent and who cannot afford school fees or two meals a day. SWAAZ’s
       approach has developed to build the capacity of women to address the effects of
       HIV/AIDS and to enable communities to create conditions for hope.


       We started by identifying the challenges that put women and children at risk for
       HIV/AIDS before the international community even recognized that women were at risk.
       We have moved over the last 15 years to see that empowering women and their inde-
       pendence is the most critical thing in order to stop the epidemic and save our country.
       –Member of SWAAZ, Lusaka




living with HIV/AIDS are receiving treatment for the disease                               ✦



                                                                                               I N T E R N AT I O N A L P R O G R A M S   8-9
               AIL




F R O M E D U C AT I O N A N D H E A LT H C A R E TO IN D E P E N D E N T

GR A N T M A K ING. . . AJWS has provided ongoing support to the

Afghan Institute of Learning (AIL) since 1999. In an effort to promote

the full participation of women and girls in Afghan society, our

resources have consistently targeted rural areas where women are most

marginalized. As AIL continues to grow and develop, AJWS support has

adapted, too, bolstering AIL’s successes and addressing the emerging

needs that AIL identifies as priorities.




                   ✦   By the age of 18, on average, girls have received
                                                        AJWS support for AIL initially                     Young Afghan
                                                                                                           women in school
                                                        focused on girls’ education pro-
                                                        grams; its expertise in this area
                                                        came from its initiation of commu-
                                                        nity-based schools in refugee camps
                                                        in Pakistan, and underground home
                                                        schools in Afghanistan during the
                                                        reign of the Taliban. In 2001, AJWS’
                                                        work with AIL expanded to
                                                        women’s centers throughout the
                                                        country, providing critical resources
                                                        not only for education, but also for
                                                        healthcare services, reproductive
                                                        health education and skill-building
                                                        for women and girls.


      Most recently, our support for AIL has focused on a pioneering re-granting program
      in the field of education. AJWS support allows AIL to provide staff training, techni-
      cal support, funding and supervision to burgeoning community groups throughout
      Afghanistan. AJWS support for this program is essential for AIL to increase its
      impact, and to ensure that a new generation of community groups and women
      activists are prepared to respond to Afghanistan’s extreme economic and political
      instability, and huge social problems.


      It is an obvious truth that in the last two decades of war, Afghanistan sustained a great
      deal of damage… our country’s education system was shattered, but with the assistance
      and cooperation of AIL, this center has been able to expand its activities and work more
      effectively. We are all obliged to AIL. –Student beneficiary of AIL’s re-granting program




4.4 fewer years of education than boys                     ✦



                                                                                          I N T E R N AT I O N A L P R O G R A M S   10-11
EL COMITÉ




 FROM      P O S T- D I S A S T E R   RECOVERY      TO    S U S TA I N A B L E

 A GR IC U LT U R E A N D C I V IL S O C IE T Y. . . In response to Hurricane

 Mitch in 1999, AJWS began supporting the indigenous Garífuna com-

 munities of Honduras through Comité de Emergencia Garífuna de

 Honduras (El Comité). Mitch destroyed the Honduran Caribbean coast

 and took with it the land and livelihoods of the marginalized Garífuna

 population.Through its activities over the past five years, El Comité has

 enabled communities to rebuild as they work to advance the develop-

 ment and self-sufficiency of the Garífuna people.




     ✦   3.5 million Hondurans rely on farming for food and income:
      El Comité promotes sustainable economic growth through fishing and agricultural                     Garífuna women
                                                                                                          cutting yucca
      initiatives. Its tool “bank” is used for agricultural projects in 14 communities and its
      farmers’ market now sells plantains and yucca, signaling the success of its agricul-
      tural activities. In addition, the community is continually diversifying its crops and
      participating in regular sustainable agriculture workshops.


      El Comité and the Garífuna communities also link human rights promotion and civil
      society building with their sustainable agriculture work.This is a vital tool in organ-
      izing the capacity of people to create a just and humane society, and to protect
      Garífuna land, rights and cultural heritage. As their experience shows, human rights
      education and advocacy is crucial to defend and develop the land and lives of indige-
      nous peoples, not only in Honduras, but around the world.


      We had a march about the attempt
      by congress to change the constitu-
      tion to sell off Garífuna lands. I
      went to strengthen the effort, to
      enable us to help one another.When
      they launched teargas at us, I
      thought we were going to die. But I
      knew I needed to be there, because we
      were fighting for our land, our past
      and our future.
      –El Comité participant and activist




over sixty percent of them don’t have enough to eat                           ✦



                                                                                          I N T E R N AT I O N A L P R O G R A M S   12-13
      EMERGENCY
      RELIEF AND
  RECONSTRUCTION




                  A J W S P R O V IDE S E M E R GE NC Y R E LIE F in response to wars, civil

                  conflicts, earthquakes, hurricanes and floods. When humanitarian

                  crises, natural disasters and complex emergencies occur around the

                  world, we provide a vehicle for the Jewish community’s actions, ensur-

                  ing that ninety-five percent of emergency funds raised goes directly to

                  providing humanitarian aid for the people who need it most.




AJWS emergency relief and reconstruction 2003/04: Algeria ✦ Argentina ✦ Colombia ✦
         Over the past year we responded to ten global emergencies, including flooding in                   Refugee camp,
                                                                                                            Darfur, Sudan
         the Dominican Republic and Haiti, and the devastating earthquake in Bam, Iran.
         Most recently we have placed great emphasis on the crisis in Darfur, Sudan, focus-
         ing our efforts on rehabilitating water sources and providing basic healthcare and
         other humanitarian services.


         Our approach to emergency relief also commits us to reconstruction and to better
         prepare communities for future crises after the acute phase of the emergency is
         over. We partner with local civil society groups – many of which are mobilized by
         community women – working with them in rebuilding and renewal efforts.


         Remember the stranger, for you were once strangers in the land of Egypt. –Exodus: 23:9




Dominican Republic ✦ Eritrea ✦ Haiti ✦ India ✦ Iran ✦ Iraq ✦ Liberia ✦ Sudan ✦ Turkey

                                                                                           I N T E R N AT I O N A L P R O G R A M S   14-15
                    JCDF
          THE JE WISH COMMUNIT Y DE VELOPMENT F UND IN RUS SIA

          AND UKRAINE (JCDF) supports grassroots Jewish renewal and human

          rights programs in the former Soviet Union (FSU). Here, where Jews

          have now been free to practice openly for over a decade, supporting

          Jewish renewal while promoting civil society is essential for the future.



          JCDF’s work is driven by the ideals of democracy and respect for

          diverse approaches to Judaism. Like the rest of AJWS’ project partners,

          our Russian and Ukrainian grantees are succeeding in vastly improving

          the lives of the people they work with. And, with the passage of time,

          their capacities have developed to meet the growing and changing needs

          of their communities.




JCDF programs support: Spiritual and Cultural Jewish Community Revival ✦
                                                                                                            Young Jewish
                                                                                                            builders of the
                                                                                                            Nikolaev Jewish
                                                                                                            Community Center




       F R OM LO C A L J E W I S H R E N E WA L TO C O U N T R Y W IDE A N D
       IN T E R N AT ION A L R E C O GNI T ION
       Since JCDF began supporting the Nikolaev Jewish Cultural Community in Ukraine
       in 1999, the organization – which was founded to revitalize Jewish religion and
       Jewish cultural life in a city of over half a million people – has developed at a tremen-
       dous pace. From its humble beginnings, it now runs a family summer camp for 200
       families, a large Sunday school, a Holocaust museum, a choral ensemble and an
       Internet outreach project.This year, the Nikolaev community completed work on a
       Jewish community center, the first of its kind in the FSU to be built almost exclu-
       sively with local money and community labor.


       Today, with JCDF support, the Nikolaev Jewish Cultural Community is a major
       Jewish institution in the city, engaging the local Jewish population and channeling
       the community’s energy into exciting projects that extend well beyond city limits.


       As to how our participants’ use of the Internet connects with increased involvement in
       Jewish life: we make sure that they also study Hebrew, Jewish history and tradition. We
       do not expect them all to go to synagogue,but we want them all to know something about
       what it means to be a Jew. – Instructor, Internet outreach project




Education ✦ Human Rights ✦ Information Technologies and Publications

                                                                                           I N T E R N AT I O N A L P R O G R A M S   16-17
                    SERVICE
                  A JW S’ SER VICE PROGRAMS have continued to grow exponentially

                  over the past year. To some extent, the figures speak for themselves: our

                  International Jewish College Corps (IJCC) brought 30 college stu-

                  dents and recent college graduates to Ghana, Honduras and Ukraine;

                  183 college students spent time living and working in Nicaragua,

                  Honduras and Mexico on Alternative Break, in partnership with

                  Hillel:The Foundation for Jewish Campus Life; 90 people from across the

                  United States traveled to El Salvador, Nicaragua and India with our

                  delegation programs, and 62 skilled volunteers, including doctors,

                  teachers and social workers, went to 18 countries to provide non-govern-

                  mental and community-based organizations with technical training and

                  support through our Jewish Volunteer Corps (JVC).




AJWS volunteers: build schools ✦ teach people how to read ✦ lay water pipes ✦ paint
       Yet the numbers only skim the surface of what AJWS’ service programs achieve.
       Our service programs radically transform countless lives each year.The lives of our
       volunteers are changed forever, as are those of the people with whom they live,
       learn and work in the developing world.


       Our approach to service enables volunteers to respond as Jews to the global chal-
       lenges of the 21st century. It enables Jews to tackle globalization, HIV/AIDS and
       natural disasters through a uniquely Jewish and humanitarian lens. Our approach
       roots sustainable international development in Jewish sources and traditions, and
       enables Jews to act as global change-agents, creating healing and goodwill among
       diverse communities throughout the world. AJWS views service as an end in itself,
       and as a means to contributing to the creation of something even greater: peace, jus-
       tice and positive change in a world that belongs to all of us.




                                                                                               Alternative Break
                                                                                               volunteer and
                                                                                               children, Honduras




murals ✦ provide oral health care ✦ educate about HIV/AIDS and STDs ✦ develop

                                                                                                      SERVICE   18-19
    Hinda Schnurman    J E W I S H V OL U N T E E R C OR P S ( J V C )
    at RIDE in India
                       Hinda and Peter Schnurman of Seattle, Washington, have volunteered with AJWS’
                       JVC three times over the past two years. AJWS project partners EarthRights
                       International in Thailand, the Rural Institute for Development Education (RIDE) in
                       India, and Reach Out in Uganda have all benefited from Hinda’s expertise in health
                       care management and Peter’s years as a community organizer. Recently returned
                       from Uganda, they are already planning a fourth placement through AJWS’ JVC.
                       Why? In Peter’s own words:


                       We’re acting on our belief that Judaism is best expressed by helping to make the world a
                       better place for all people, both for today and for the future.




Web sites ✦ renovate cemeteries ✦ dig ditches ✦ train midwives ✦ prevent glaucoma...
       R A BBINIC A L S T U DE N T S ’ DE L E G AT ION
       In January 2004, 25 students from five rabbinical schools came together for AJWS’
       first annual rabbinical students’ delegation. They spent 10 days working and learn-
       ing alongside members of La Coordinadora in El Salvador.


       I will look back on this trip as a transformative experience: one that not only renews my
       faith in the impact our Jewish community can have on the world, but which proves that
       Jews from every denominational background can join together for a common purpose.
       –Rabbinical Students’ Delegation participant


                                                                                                   Rabbinical
                                                                                                   students doing
                                                                                                   text study in
                                                                                                   El Salvador




AJWS service groups 2003/04: UCLA Hillel ✦ Jewish Youth Philanthropy Institute ✦

                                                                                                          SERVICE   20-21
  above:             A LT E R N AT I V E BR E A K ( A B )
  IJCC Ghana 2003
  in discussion of   I really never connected Judaism with social action before volunteering with Alternative
  local problems
                     Break. Now I see it as a Jewish duty that I hope to continue to weave within my life.
                     –AB participant
  opposite page:
  Jewish woman
  watches as IJCC
  2003 work in a     IN T E R N AT ION A L J E W I S H C OLL E GE C OR P S ( I J C C )
  cemetery,
  Kharkov, Ukraine   I participated in IJCC because I wanted to help others and make a positive difference in
                     the world. However, I have learned that it is not as simple as I thought and in some ways
                     I feel that I gained more than I gave.Working in the cemetery in Kharkov made me
                     rethink what it means to help; it doesn’t always have to be a direct action like building
                     a water system in Honduras.
                     –IJCC participant




Vanderbilt Hillel ✦ Camp Tawonga Delegation ✦ Columbia/Barnard Hillel ✦ Na’aseh
Young Adult Delegation ✦ Yale University Hillel ✦ University of Pennsylvania Hillel...
        OUTREACH
       EDUC ATION
  COMMUNIC ATIONS




                  O U R O U T R E A C H E F FOR T S continued to grow over the past year.

                  With offices in Chicago and the Bay Area, a Washington D.C. based pol-

                  icy associate, and a national alumni coordinator, we hosted more infor-

                  mational events and parlor meetings, and spoke at more congregations

                  than ever before.We also held events in Columbus, Denver, Phoenix and

                  Boston that helped to expand our reach. Our quarterly congregational

                  bulletin now reaches a wider audience than at any time in the past, and

                  has resulted in increased awareness and support for our work.




“The highest form of tzedakah is to strengthen the hand of the poor by extending a
        The past year has seen many of AJWS’ long-term education projects come to
        fruition. We completed our Bar/Bat Mitzvah project, “More Than a Drop in the
        Box,” which will soon be used in Hebrew schools and synagogues around the coun-
        try.The goal of the project is to engage youth in philanthropy and advocacy through
        learning about global justice. During the spring of 2004, we taught an adult educa-
        tion course at the Skirball Center for Adult Jewish Learning in New York, and we
        will be teaching it again next year with the assistance of one of the alumni from
        AJWS’ first annual Rabbinical Students’ Delegation to El Salvador.


        Over the past year, AJWS made media outreach a priority in order to maximize vis-
        ibility of our work and raise awareness about important international humanitarian
        issues. In addition to Jewish and secular newspapers, radio, television and Internet
        media covering events, volunteers, project partners, feature stories and emergency
        relief, a donation from an anonymous donor has allowed AJWS to sponsor National
        Public Radio for the second year in a row. Part of this donation was designated to
        increase NPR’s news coverage from Africa, a continent with extraordinary needs.


        In May 2004 AJWS celebrated the launch of our redesigned Web site. Our new Web
        site not only provides secure on-line giving but also provides the opportunity for
        visitors to our site to “take action” through our on-line action center. Our Web site
        provides a wealth of resources for friends of AJWS, who are now able to learn in
        detail about the projects we support in Africa, the Americas, Asia, Russia and
        Ukraine, and about upcoming service opportunities.


        The achievements of our outreach, education and communications departments
        once again emphasize that as people become aware of our mission, many become
        passionate supporters of AJWS, enabling us to increase the impact of our work in
        the developing world.




loan, joining in partnership, or helping the poor to find employment...” - Maimonides

                                                                             O U T R E A C H , E D U C AT I O N , C O M M U N I C AT I O N   24-25
   GRANTS
A G R I C U LT U R E
A F R IC A \ K E N YA | K ILILI S E LF H E LP P R O J E C T ( K S H P ) To enable women trainers in
biointensive farming methods to conduct workshops for 150 farmers and to integrate
HIV/AIDS/STD awareness into all workshops.

A F R IC A \ K E N YA | WA H A N D A W OM E N DE V E LOP M E N T GR O U P ( W W D G ) To improve food
sufficiency and food security in the Kamuma community by expanding cooperative dairy and agri-
cultural activities among widows, orphans and poor families.

A F R IC A \ S E N E G A L | A S S O C I AT ION S É N É G A L A I S E DE R E C H E R C H E S D ’ É T U DE E T
D ’ A P P U I A U D É V E LOP P E M E N T ( A S R E A D ) To extend a women’s farming and tree planting ini-
tiative to a fourth village; to provide literacy training; to provide agricultural training through radio
broadcasts.

A F R IC A \ S O U T H A F R IC A | IK A M VA L A B A N T U To help with training and acquisition of seeds
and gardening equipment for food gardens for vulnerable families.

A F R IC A \ U G A N D A | DE V E LOP M E N T FO U N D AT ION FOR R U R A L A R E A S ( DE FOR A ) To
expand a food security project in two sub-counties and empower women by increasing awareness of
human rights, women’s rights and HIV/AIDS.

A M E R IC A S \ E L S A LVA D OR | A S O C I A C I Ó N M A NGL E ( A M ) To strengthen the institutional
capacity of Asociación Mangle in administration, marketing and production.

A M E R IC A S \ E L S A LVA D OR | A S O C I A C I Ó N M A NGL E ( A M ) To provide financial resources to
cooperatives for production-oriented, diversified agricultural activities.

A M E R IC A S \ H A I T I | S E M E NC E FO U N D AT ION ( S E E D ) To provide technical assistance, tools
and supplies to key cooperatives in the northeast of Haiti to recommence agricultural production.

AMERIC A S\HAITI | WORLD NEIGHBOR S -HAITI (WNH) To support and strengthen
peasant organizations to sustain autonomous development and to meet the basic needs of families and
communities.

A M E R IC A S \ HON D U R A S | E L C OMI T É DE E M E R G É NC I A G A R Í F U N A DE HON D U R A S
( E L C OMI T É ) To continue providing technical training and inputs for sustainable agriculture proj-
ects; to strengthen Garífuna agriculture, nutrition, income and culture.
A M E R IC A S \ M E X IC O | E L HOM BR E S OBR E L A T IE R R A ( H S T ) To improve the social sta-
tus, income and nutrition of 100 Mayan women and their families through the restoration of their
backyard farms with tools, seeds and training in sustainable farming techniques.

A M E R I C A S \ N I C A R A G U A | F U N D A C I Ó N D E N I S E R N E S TO G O N Z Á L E Z L Ó P E Z
( F DE GL ) To support 116 families in the villages of Yucul and El Horno, Matagalpa who are transi-
tioning from unemployed coffee workers into productive farmers.


ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
A F R IC A | A F R IC A N W OM E N ’ S DE V E LOP M E N T F U N D ( AW DF ) To support women’s
groups throughout Africa that work for women’s rights and the improvement of women’s health and
economic conditions.

A F R IC A \ E T HIOP I A | H U N DE E OR OMO GR A S S R O OT S DE V E LOP M E N T INI T I AT I V E To
establish a women’s cereal bank association to enhance women’s bargaining power in grain market-
ing; to provide women’s rights training; to create forums for women to articulate their concerns.

A F R IC A \ E T HIOP I A | S IK E W OM E N DE V E LOP M E N T A S S O C I AT ION ( S W D A ) To inte-
grate community education about women’s rights with water system development and economic
support activities for low-income women.

A F R IC A \ NIGE R I A | W OM E N IN DE V E LOP M E N T A N D E N V IR ON M E N T ( W OR L D W IDE
N E T W OR K : NIGE R I A ) To establish two “Youth-Friendly Centers” in Enugu state that offer inten-
sive six-week training courses to out-of-school youth on HIV/AIDS prevention, adolescent sexuali-
ty, reproductive health, counseling and communication skills.

A F R IC A \ S IE R R A L E ON E | W OR L D R E H A BILI TAT ION F U N D ( W R F ) To provide psy-
chosocial and socioeconomic rehabilitation and reintegration skills to women and their families
affected by the war in Sierra Leone.

A F R IC A \ U G A N D A | N AT ION A L A S S O C I AT ION OF W OM E N ’ S OR G A NI Z AT ION S OF
U G A N D A ( N AW O U ) To support and expand NAWOU’s socioeconomic empowerment of women
at the grassroots level by offering loans to women, providing business management skills and moni-
toring loan recipients.

A F R IC A \ Z IM B A B W E | IN S T I T U T E OF C U LT U R A L A F FA IR S Z IM B A B W E ( IC A ) To pre-
vent the spread and minimize the impact of HIV/AIDS among affected children and families in the
Mufakose community.

A M E R IC A S \ BR A Z IL | R E DE A R T E MI X A PLIC A D A ( R A M A ) To organize the neighborhood
of Beira Rio, Rio de Janeiro, to protect and repair its natural environment and generate income
through recycling and education projects led by unemployed women and youth.

A M E R IC A S \ H A I T I | FON K O Z E To support Fonkoze’s micro credit commercial bank; to provide
leadership training, literacy and business skills to the clients of over 200 village banks.

A M E R IC A S \ HON D U R A S | MO S Q U I T I A PAW I S A S A P I S K A ( MOPAW I ) To strengthen the
management and operating abilities of community banks; to strengthen the institutional capacity of
MOPAWI to provide them with support.

AMERIC A S\ME X ICO | C APACITACION, A SE SORIA , MEDIO AMBIENTE Y DEFENS A DEL
DERECHO A L A S ALUD A .C. (C AMADDS) To support the community credit system through
growth of a credit fund, increased management capacity and the construction of a regional field office.


                                                                                                               GRANTS   26-27
AMERIC A S\PERU | MINGA PERU To expand Minga Peru’s rural training center; to buy a build-
ing to house their activities in Iquitos; to support fundraising and provide insurance for staff.

A S I A \ C A M B O D I A | A N G K O R PA R T I C I PATO R Y D E V E LO P M E N T O R G A N I Z AT I O N
( A P D O ) To provide women with access to income generation opportunities; to build the capacity
of the village bank structure with a view to local ownership.

A S I A \ IN DI A | DE E PA K C H A R I TA BL E T R U S T ( D C T ) To strengthen the capacity of poor
rural women in self-help groups to manage micro finance programs; to address rights and health
issues that affect women in the region.

A S I A \ IN DI A | S WAYA M S HIK S H A N P R AY O G ( S S P ) To empower women’s savings and cred-
it groups formed after the January 2002 earthquake to participate in village development planning;
to promote girls’ education, legal rights, and access to water.

A S I A \ T H A IL A N D | PAT TA N A R A K FO U N D AT ION To provide vocational training and livelihood
opportunities to non-Thai and landless youth in five communities on the Thai-Burmese border to
promote local community development and reduce poverty and migration to urban areas.

A SIA\VIE TN AM | VIE T N AM PLUS To increase the health, resources and income of the Tanh Linh
communities through agricultural extension work, health education and micro finance programs.

MIDDL E E A S T \ G A Z A | A M E R IC A N N E A R E A S T R E F U GE E A ID ( A N E R A ) To hire a lend-
ing operations manager to oversee and manage the loan portfolio of the Gaza Women’s Loan Fund
and implement a group guarantee program.


EDUCATION
A F R I C A \ E T H I O P I A | R I F T VA L L E Y C H I L D R E N A N D W O M E N D E V E L O P M E N T
A S S O C I AT ION ( R C W D A ) To expand the work of RCWDA by adding an informal basic education
component for children in Adamitulu Jido Kombolcha District.

A F R IC A \ GH A N A | C A M PA IGN FOR F E M A L E E D U C AT ION IN T E R N AT ION A L ( C A M F E D )
To support the ongoing education of 300 elementary school girls from poor families in the Gushegu
district of northern Ghana.

A F R IC A \ S E N E G A L | TO S TA N To provide general support for the construction of a training cen-
ter and the expansion of community-based programs.

A F R IC A \ S E N E G A L | TO S TA N To identify and support “Communities that Protect Human
Dignity” as they continue activities that promote human rights in the Thiès region.

A F R IC A \ S O U T H A F R IC A | DIK E T S O E S E NG DIP U O C OM M U NI T Y DE V E LOP M E N T
T R U S T ( DE DI ) To fund family support workers who strengthen communities through early child-
hood development programs and small business and income generation programs.

A F R IC A \ U G A N D A | R A I S ING V OIC E S To collaborate and strategize with more than 100 com-
munity volunteers, counselors and local government leaders to raise awareness and take action to
prevent domestic violence in Kawempe Division.

AFRIC A\UGANDA | WAT WERO RIGHTS FOC US INITIATI VE To undertake life-skills and
human rights training with a focus on gender sensitivity, alcoholism and HIV/AIDS prevention among
the population of “night commuters,” who sleep in safe houses to avoid night attacks from rebels.
A F R IC A \ U G A N D A | W OM E N ’ S C OM MI S S ION FOR R E F U GE E W OM E N A N D C HIL DR E N
To support a partnership between AJWS and the Women’s Commission that provides youth-led
organizations in northern Uganda with a combination of advocacy training and direct grants for orga-
nizational development.

AFRIC A\Z AMBIA | LUAPUL A FOUNDATION To support the education of 100 secondary school
orphans through grade twelve with school fees, uniforms and school supplies and HIV/AIDS education.

A F R IC A \ Z IM B A B W E | GIR L C HIL D N E T W OR K ( GC N ) To raise awareness about children’s
rights in violence-affected communities; to provide training for girls in exercising their rights; to pro-
vide education and income generation opportunities for girls.

AMERIC A S\BRAZIL | GRUP O PRIMAVERA To support the “Initiation into the Working World”
program that provides girls with skills, vocational training and community service opportunities.

A M E R IC A S \ C OLOM BI A | A M E R IC A N F R IE N D S S E R V IC E C OM MI T T E E ( A F S C ) To sup-
port Comité Andino de Servicios to empower women leaders and their communities in areas of
severe conflict in Putumayo; to defend and promote human rights and address basic food, income
and personal security challenges.

A M E R IC A S \ E L S A LVA D OR | HIL D A R OT H S C HIL D FO U N D AT ION ( H R F ) To support a
home-schooling program designed to empower parents as the primary educators of their children
and to foster parental involvement in school and community life.

A M E R IC A S \ G U AT E M A L A | R IGH T S A C T ION ( R A ) To support a community education pro-
gram, through a combination of training, technical assistance, mutual learning and re-granting.

A M E R IC A S \ H A I T I | FON K O Z E To support the implementation of a sexual and reproductive
health module into Fonkoze’s literacy program for micro credit borrowers.

A M E R IC A S \ H A I T I | L A M BI F U N D OF H A I T I To organize two “Women, Organizing and the
Environment” training conferences that teach leadership skills, community organizing and the basics
of environmental protection, with a focus on solar energy.

A M E R IC A S \ HON D U R A S | C ON S E J O C Í V IC O DE OR G A NI Z A C ION E S P OP U L A R E S E
IN D Í GE N A S DE HON D U R A S ( C OP IN H ) To train a group of 70 indigenous Lenca community
leaders to educate their communities in gender equity, indigenous rights and culture and the envi-
ronment; to foster greater communal activism to further democratization and human rights.

A M E R IC A S \ HON D U R A S | P R O Y E C TO A L DE A GLOB A L ( PA G ) To support the operation of
four paralegal offices and a mobile office to allow PAG’s Deborah project to broaden its reach in the
communities it serves.

AMERIC A S\HONDURA S | RED DE COMER CIALIZ ACIÓN COMUNITARIA ALTERN ATI VA
(COMAL) To build the capacity of COMAL’s board of directors and its peasant member organizations.

A M E R IC A S \ NIC A R A G U A | A S O C I A C I Ó N DE M U J E R E S C ON S U E LO B U I T R A GO ( A M U -
C OB U ) To support and train a network of youth to serve as community leaders and peer educators
through ongoing workshops, reflection groups and bi-annual parent and youth gatherings.

A M E R IC A S \ NIC A R A G U A | R E D DE M U J E R E S DE C ON DE G A PA R A L A FOR M A C I Ó N Y
DE S A R R OLLO IN T E GR A L To support the training of rural women leaders to strengthen com-
munity awareness on domestic violence and gender.



                                                                                                                 GRANTS   28-29
AMERIC A S\PERU | A S OCIACIÓN CI VIL PRO NIÑO INTIM0 (ACPNI) To support ACPNI’s
“Schools for Sports and Life” that use sports to engage youth in a comprehensive education and
human development program.

A M E R IC A S \ P E R U | MING A P E R U To support a group of experienced women promoters to
train a network of community members to create income generation projects and educate about
women’s health and empowerment.

A S I A \ A F GH A NI S TA N | A F GH A N IN S T I T U T E OF L E A R NING ( A IL ) To support the expan-
sion of AIL’s work with women and children in the Herat region, focusing on literacy and skills train-
ing, teacher training and human rights education.

A S I A \ A F GH A NI S TA N | A F GH A N IN S T I T U T E OF L E A R NING ( A IL ) To support AIL’s
regranting pilot program that provides training, ongoing technical assistance and seed grants to com-
munity-based Afghan educational organizations.

A SIA\AFGHANISTAN | AFGHAN WOMEN’S RESOURCE CENTER (AWRC) To provide a year
of literacy, health and life-skills training to 100 women and girls in Khwaja Khel village, Parwan province.

A S I A \ C A M BODI A | B A N T E AY S R E I To increase community awareness about violence against
women through training volunteers and the broadcast of an education-entertainment radio drama
and talk show about violence.

A SIA\C AMBODIA | C AMBODIAN MINE ACTION CENTRE (CMAC) To develop the capacity
of Cambodian communities to work with other mine campaigns and victim assistance programs.

ASIA\CAMBODIA | CAMBODIAN VOLUNTEERS FOR COMMUNIT Y DE VELOPMENT (CVCD)
To teach women sewing skills, hygiene and HIV/AIDS prevention in a squatter district of Phnom Penh;
to provide support to a children’s literacy project for families forcibly relocated by the government.

A S I A \ C A M BODI A | NGO C O A LI T ION TO A DDR E S S S E X U A L E X PLOI TAT ION OF
C HIL DR E N IN C A M BODI A ( C O S E C A M ) To support the work of Cambodian NGOs dealing
with the trafficking and sexual exploitation of children through capacity-building and exchange
workshops on standards for services in child care centers.

A S I A \ IN DI A | A LT E R N AT I V E FOR R U R A L MO V E M E N T ( A R M ) To undertake a compre-
hensive girls’ education program, providing scholarships to cover school fees and supplies, a mobile
library, women’s rights training and teacher training for all participating schools.

A S I A \ IN DI A | C OM MI T T E E FOR L E G A L A ID TO P O OR ( C L A P ) To educate marginalized
communities about children’s rights based on the U.N. Convention on the Rights of the Child; to
mobilize community leaders and families through street theater; to enable them to access govern-
ment services.

A S I A \ IN DI A | J E E VA J Y OT HI To promote the rights of impoverished children and their fami-
lies through school improvements; women’s self-help groups; emergency preparedness planning and
relief and advocacy .

A S I A \ IN DI A | M A GIC B U S To support the Magic Bus “Explorer” curriculum and activities for
120 children.

A S I A \ IN DI A | N AVA J E E VA N T R U S T To implement social, economic and empowerment pro-
grams for women and their families working in the beedi rolling trade in 50 villages in Tirunelveli
District,Tamil Nadu.
A S I A \ IN DI A | P R E R A N A To protect at-risk children from commercial sexual exploitation and
trafficking; to advocate for more effective policies and programs for these children.

A S I A \ IN DI A | R U C HIK A S O C I A L S E R V IC E OR G A NI S AT ION ( R S S O ) To address the edu-
cational and health needs of slum children and their families through informal education, nutrition,
vocational training and health services.

A S I A \ IN DI A | R U R A L IN S T I T U T E FOR DE V E LOP M E N T E D U C AT ION ( R IDE ) To inte-
grate anti-child labor activities with RIDE’s network of women’s self-help groups, increasing com-
munity resistance to child labor in Kanchipuram’s silk weaving industry.

A S I A \ IN DI A | R U R A L R E H A BILI TAT ION C E N T E R ( R R C ) To provide women’s self-help
groups with human rights, literacy training and access to a revolving loan fund.

A S I A \ IN DI A | S E T-W IN S O C IE T Y To strengthen Set-Win’s network of self-help groups to form
a federation to advocate for women’s issues and create a community movement to fight for Dalit (low
caste) and women’s rights in Tamil Nadu.

A S I A \ T H A IL A N D | B U R M A I S S U E S To provide literature in the Karen and Burmese languages,
developing children’s critical thinking skills to become leaders for the next generation.

A S I A \ T H A IL A N D | E A R T H R IGH T S IN T E R N AT ION A L ( E R I ) To build the capacity of a
growing group of ethnic Burmese activists who graduated from the EarthRights School and have
begun their own community work on human rights, health, gender equality, education and sustain-
able development.

A S I A \ T H A IL A N D | N AT ION A L H E A LT H A N D E D U C AT ION C OM MI T T E E ( N H E C ) To pro-
mote education for groups within Burma and to advance the quality of teaching of newly qualified
and existing teachers.

A S I A \ V IE T N A M | F R IE N D S FOR S T R E E T C HIL DR E N ( F F S C ) To support FFSC to oper-
ate the “Binh Hung Development Center” to provide education, health care, vocational training and
micro finance activities to disadvantaged children and their families.

W OR L D W IDE | GLOB A L F U N D FOR W OM E N ( GF W ) To advance women’s human rights
around the world by making grants to women’s groups that work to achieve freedom from poverty,
violence and discrimination


EMERGENCY RELIEF AND RECONSTRUCTION
A F R IC A \ A LGE R I A | A S S O C I AT ION C U LT U R E LL E M ’ B A R E K A I T- M E NG U E LL E T To sup-
port a summer camp for children affected by the earthquake of 2003.

A F R IC A \ E R I T R E A | GR A S S R O OT S IN T E R N AT ION A L To ship medical supplies to Eritrea to
provide free treatment for drought victims in Asmara, Barentu and Mendelera.

A F R IC A \ LIBE R I A | C O M MI T T E E FO R P E A C E A N D D E V E LO P M E N T A D V O C A C Y
( C OP D A ) To support reconstruction and relief activities in Nimba County and Monrovia, including
providing emergency food supplies to youth and other vulnerable groups.

A F R IC A \ LIBE R I A | IM A NI HO U S E , INC . To support the reopening of Imani House’s mater-
nal and child health clinic and its programs in health education, adult education and agricultural
training in Monrovia and Jahtondo Town.



                                                                                                                 GRANTS   30-31
A F R IC A \ LIBE R I A | W E S T A F R I C A N E T W O R K F O R P E A C E B U I L D I N G L I B E R I A
( WA N E P ) To provide institutional support for the “Peace, Yes! War - Never Again” campaign of
Liberia Women Mass Action for Peace; to provide vocational skills to women.

AFRIC A\S UDAN | INTERN ATION AL RE S C UE COMMIT TEE (IR C) To support community-
based interventions to assist displaced people in northern Darfur and refugees in Chad.

A F R IC A \ S U D A N | M É DE C IN S S A N S F R ON T I È R E S - D O C TOR S W I T HO U T BOR DE R S
To provide emergency relief in the Darfur region and to refugees in Chad for those impacted by the
ethnic cleansing in Sudan.

A M E R IC A S \ A R GE N T IN A | A M E R IC A N J E W I S H J OIN T DI S T R IB U T ION C OM MI T T E E
( J D C ) To support the “Meitiv School Lunch Program” for the entire school year, providing daily hot
meals to impoverished Jewish day school students.

A M E R IC A S \ C OLOM BI A | A M E R IC A N F R IE N D S S E R V IC E C OM MI T T E E ( A F S C ) To sup-
port Comité Andino de Servicios to provide emergency relief and food assistance to families in the
Putumayo region who have lost food crops and resources due to intensive fumigation.

A M E R IC A S \ D OMINIC A N R E P U BLIC | DIR E C T R E LIE F IN T E R N AT ION A L ( DR I ) To pro-
vide medical and personal hygiene supplies to equip a mobile clinic serving victims of flooding in
Haiti and the Dominican Republic in May 2004.

A M E R I C A S \ D O M I N I C A N R E P U B L I C | M O V I M I E N TO D E M U J E R E S D O M I N I C O
H A I T I A N A ( M U DH A ) To provide health services and psychosocial counseling; to strengthen
access to large scale international emergency relief and post-disaster development support.

A M E R IC A S \ D OMINIC A N R E P U BLIC | MO V IMIE N TO S O C I A L - C U LT U R A L DE LO S
T R A B A J A D OR E S H A I T I A NO S ( MO S C T H A ) To provide community health workshops to com-
plement the services provided by Mosctha’s mobile clinic.

A M E R IC A S \ D OMINIC A N R E P U BLIC | S A N DIE GO W OR L D R E S P ON S E To support emer-
gency response activities following flooding in Haiti and the Dominican Republic.

A M E R IC A S \ H A I T I | FON K O Z E To provide emergency support for continued literacy and health
education training to Fonkoze village bank clients.

A M E R IC A S \ H A I T I | L A M BI F U N D OF H A I T I To provide emergency support to Lambi proj-
ects that suffered losses during the 2004 uprising in Haiti and to fund unanticipated expenses such as
huge increases in the cost of gasoline and transportation.

AMERIC A S\HAITI | SEMENCE FOUNDATION (SEED) To support SEED’s emergency aid
plan for agricultural inputs and support for peasant families who are desperate for immediate supplies.

A S I A \ IN DI A | S A NGH A MI T R A S E R V IC E S O C IE T Y To provide emergency food support for
victims of the December 2003 cyclones in Andhra Pradesh; to provide disaster preparedness training
for the future.

MIDDL E E A S T \ IR A N | DIR E C T R E LIE F IN T E R N AT ION A L ( DR I ) To provide pharmaceu-
ticals, medical supplies and equipment to victims of the December 2003 earthquake in Bam.

MIDDL E E A S T \ IR A N | M E R C Y C OR P S To stabilize and strengthen local NGOs and other
service providers to better address the psychosocial needs of community members.
MIDDL E E A S T \ IR A Q | IN T E R N AT ION A L R E S C U E C OM MI T T E E ( IR C ) To save lives,
reduce suffering and increase the coping capacity of vulnerable populations by supporting the
restoration of local health services and addressing child trauma.

MIDDL E E A S T \ T U R K E Y | AV C IL A R HOM E- B A S E D W OR K E R S C O OP E R AT I V E To help
families overcome the long-term effects of the 1999 earthquake and the 2001-2002 economic crisis,
and to better prepare them to mitigate the effects of future crises.

MIDDL E E A S T \ T U R K E Y | IN T E R N AT ION A L BL U E C R E S C E N T ( IBC ) To support the fam-
ilies of those who have been devastated by terror in Istanbul with food packages, winter clothing and
educational materials.


H E A LT H
A F R IC A | A F R IC A N W OM E N ’ S DE V E LOP M E N T F U N D ( AW DF ) To implement the March
2004 Pfizer International HIV/AIDS Health Literacy Exchange in Zimbabwe.

A F R IC A | H E S P E R I A N FO U N D AT ION To revise, update and distribute “HIV, Health and Your
Community: A Guide For Action,” an HIV/AIDS education, prevention and care manual that pro-
vides community health workers with accurate information on HIV/AIDS.

A F R IC A \ E T HIOP I A | A F R IC A N S E R V IC E S C OM MI T T E E ( A S C ) To continue developing an
HIV/AIDS outreach program and voluntary counseling/testing center in Shola market; to replicate
this model in Addis Ababa and northern Ethiopia.

A F R I C A \ E T HI O P I A | M E K D I M HI V P O S I T I V E P E R S O N S A N D A I D S O R P H A N S
N AT ION A L A S S O C I AT ION To conduct income generation activities for people living with HIV
and AIDS orphans; to provide training for home-based care providers.

A F R IC A \ T H E G A M BI A | FO U N D AT ION FOR R E S E A R C H ON W OM E N ’ S H E A LT H ,
P R OD U C T I V I T Y A N D T H E E N V IR ON M E N T ( B A F R O W ) To provide four new literacy classes;
to develop reading materials; to establish two libraries; to continue the development of a newsletter;
to strengthen the activities of well women clinics and youth activities.

A F R IC A \ GH A N A | P R O - LIN K IN T E GR AT E D DE V E LOP M E N T P R O GR A M To promote
adolescent reproductive health and HIV/AIDS prevention with an emphasis on behavior change in
the communities.

A F R I C A \ K E N YA | G R A S S R O OT S O R G A N I Z AT I O N S O P E R AT I N G TO G E T H E R I N
S I S T E R HO OD K E N YA ( GR O OT S K E N YA ) To increase GROOTS Kenya’s home-based care pro-
gram through training about antiretrovirals and prevention of mother-to-child transmission, peer
learning and exchanges for home-based care givers, and through monitoring and evaluation of the
program’s impact.

A F R IC A \ K E N YA | K I S U M U M E DIC A L E D U C AT ION T R U S T ( K M E T ) To implement nutri-
tion as a component of a home-based care program for people living with HIV/AIDS.

AFRIC A\KENYA | MWANA MWENDE CHILD DE VELOPMENT CENTRE (MMCDC) To
improve the well-being of orphans and other vulnerable children in Mumbuni and Mavoko by providing
training and material, medical and psychosocial support to children and families affected by HIV/AIDS.

AFRIC A\MAL AWI | MAL AWI NE T WORK OF AIDS SERVICE ORGANIS ATIONS (MAN A SO)
To support MANASO’s mini-grant program with funding for an additional five organizations; to pro-
vide ongoing support to successful grantees; to institue a peer exchange program for grantees to
learn about each other’s work.
                                                                                                               GRANTS   32-33
A F R IC A \ N A MIBI A | C AT HOLIC A ID S A C T ION ( C A A ) To act as the U.S.based 501(c)(3) for
CAA for small donations from individuals and organizations that fund emergency support of orphans
and vulnerable children.

A F R IC A \ NIGE R I A | IN T E R N AT ION A L W OM E N C OM M U NIC AT ION C E N T R E ( I W C C ) To
support an ongoing prevention and anti-stigma initiative in three zones of Kwara State; to build the
operating capacity of a home-based care program operating in 12 districts.

A F R IC A \ NIGE R I A | S A G A M U C OM M U NI T Y C E N T R E ( S C C ) To support outreach and edu-
cation work among youth and commercial sex workers; to strengthen advocacy activities through
strategies that include training peer educators and empowering people living with HIV/AIDS.

AFRIC A\R WANDA | R WANDAN WOMEN COMMUNIT Y DE VELOPMENT NE T WORK
(RWN) To gather 20 women’s grassroots initiatives from four different provinces to form a network for
addressing HIV/AIDS related issues and to create stronger regional, national and international alliances.

A F R IC A \ S O U T H A F R IC A | A NGE L M U LT IP U R P O S E HI V /A ID S C E N T R E To provide sup-
port and training for home-based care workers in Walmer Township; to develop a home-based care
manual in Xhosa.

A F R IC A \ S O U T H A F R IC A | HI V S A To support the salary of a social worker who provides care
and support for the growing number of clients using antiretroviral treatment.

A F R IC A \ S O U T H A F R IC A | IK A M VA L A B A N T U To continue upgrading 50 preschools into
“Child and Family Centres” that focus on medicine and health and skill-training for home-based care-
givers and preschool managers.

A F R IC A \ S O U T H A F R IC A | ILI T H A L A B A N T U To combat the incidence of violence against
women and children in South African communities by providing psychosocial, educational and legal
support programs for survivors.

A F R IC A \ S O U T H A F R IC A | N TATA I S E T R U S T To provide intensive education and training in
HIV/AIDS care and support for a network of pre-school teachers, parents and caregivers in the
Northern Free State.

A F R IC A \ S O U T H A F R IC A | P O S I T I V E W OM E N ’ S N E T W OR K ( P W N ) To strengthen links
between support groups and district hospitals and clinics; to establish two new support groups in the
Mpumalanga and the Northwest Province; to advocate on issues related to women’s rights and access
to antiretroviral treatment.

A F R IC A \ S O U T H A F R IC A | S O C IE T Y FOR W OM E N A G A IN S T A ID S IN S O U T H A F R IC A
( S WA A ) To support grassroots organizations that implement innovative local interventions for
orphans and vulnerable children.

A F R IC A \ S O U T H A F R IC A | TA P OLO GO HI V /A ID S P R O GR A M M E To establish caring, non-
institutional foster homes that provide support to AIDS orphans and children with HIV by identify-
ing suitable foster parents from within the community.

A F R IC A \ S O U T H A F R IC A | T IDE S FO U N D AT ION To provide capacity building support for
Pan-African Treatment Access Movement to support its community-based advocacy efforts to broad-
en access and disseminate information about HIV treatment among people living with and at risk for
HIV/AIDS.
A F R IC A \ S O U T H A F R IC A | T R E AT M E N T A C T ION C A M PA IGN ( TA C ) To support the devel-
opment and broadcast of a treatment literacy radio program in Xhosa to improve community under-
standing of medical issues related to HIV/AIDS.

AFRIC A\UGANDA | FOUNDATION FOR THE DE VELOPMENT OF NEEDY COMMUNITIE S
(FDNC) To support 32 community health workers to do HIV/AIDS education, health and hygiene
among community-based organizations in Mbale district; to absorb 200 school dropouts into their
vocational training center.

AFRIC A\UGANDA | GULU YOUTH FOR ACTION (GYFA) To expand GYFA’s base of support by
providing advocacy and life-skills training to youth in the Unyama internally displaced persons’ camp.

AFRIC A\UGANDA | K AMWOK YA CHRISTIAN C ARING COMMUNIT Y (KCCC) To mitigate
the impact of HIV/AIDS in three communities through micro credit, education, material support and
medical care; to provide peer educators, child counselors and youth with communication skills training.

A F R I C A \ U G A N D A | T R A D I T I O N A L A N D M O D E R N H E A LT H P R A C T I T I O N E R S
TO GE T H E R A G A IN S T A ID S A N D OT H E R DI S E A S E S ( T H E TA ) To encourage and support
local initiatives of traditional healers who initiate support groups for people living with HIV/AIDS
and/or associations of caregivers/healers.

A F R I C A \ U G A N D A | U G A N D A C O M M U N I T Y B A S E D A S S O C I AT I O N F O R C H I L D
W E LFA R E ( U C OB A C ) To promote family and community awareness about HIV/AIDS prevention
and home-based care for those affected by HIV/AIDS; to manage the socioeconomic impact of the
pandemic by providing skills training.

A F R I C A \ U G A N D A | U G A N D A N E T W O R K O F A I D S S E R V I C E O R G A N I Z AT I O N S
( U N A S O ) To build the capacity of eight participating community-based organizations to undertake
HIV/AIDS prevention and care activities through funding, follow-up, supervision and guidance.

A F R IC A \ Z A M BI A | B WA F WA NO C OM M U NI T Y HOM E B A S E D C A R E OR G A NI Z AT ION To
provide orphans and vulnerable children in Chipata, Lusaka, with healthcare, pyschosocial support
and educational and vocational training, as well as food aid to families caring for orphans.

A F R IC A \ Z A M BI A | C H U R C H OF J E S U S C H R I S T ON E A R T H B Y HI S S P E C I A L E N V O Y
S IMON K IM B A NG U ( K IM B A NG U I S T C H U R C H ) To support youth-led HIV prevention efforts,
orphan support programs and a community primary school serving orphans and vulnerable children
in the Kimbanguist Church community.

A F R IC A \ Z A M BI A | DE V E LOP M E N T A ID F R OM P E OPL E TO P E OPL E C HIL DR E N ’ S
TO W N To strengthen local community capacity to provide orphans and vulnerable children with
acceptable and affordable levels of care by training “Community Orphan Committees.”

AFRIC A\Z AMBIA | FAMILY LIFE MOVEMENT OF Z AMBIA (FLMZ) To expand the capacity
of peer and parent/elder educators to deliver quality sexual and reproductive health and family life edu-
cation to the Choma community; to sustain the project through small scale income generation programs.

A F R IC A \ Z A M BI A | S O C IE T Y FOR W OM E N A N D A ID S IN Z A M BI A ( S WA A Z ) To support
an integrated HIV/AIDS program that provides SWAAZ members with access to sustainable farm-
ing activities that generate income for community AIDS care.

A F R IC A \ Z A M BI A | Z A M BI A C HIL DR E N E D U C AT ION FO U N D AT ION ( Z A C E F ) To
expand a project that organizes communities into locally based ZACEF committees and builds their
capacities to assess and respond to the needs of orphans and vulnerable children.


                                                                                                               GRANTS   34-35
A F R IC A \ Z IM B A B W E | IN T E R- C O U N T R Y P E OPL E S ’ A ID ( IPA ) To support integrated
HIV/AIDS coping strategy programs in three informal settlements.

AFRIC A\ZIMBABWE | SOUTHERN AFRIC A HI V/AIDS INFORMATION DIS SEMIN ATION
SERVICE (S AFAIDS) To develop a “Treatment Literacy Information Toolkit” in multiple languages
to provide people caring for or living with HIV/AIDS with information about antiretroviral treatment.

A M E R IC A S \ BR A Z IL | C R IOL A To carry out a community-based HIV/AIDS prevention and
awareness program among black women as part of a larger “Black Women’s Health” program in ten
communities in Rio de Janeiro.

A M E R IC A S \ BR A Z IL | MO V IM E N TO A R T IC U L A D O DE M U L H E R E S D A A M A Z Ô NI A
( M A M A ) To address the needs of eight member groups of the Traditional Midwives Association of
the Marechal Thaumaturgo Forest; to purchase boats to enable midwives to attend expectant moth-
ers in remote river communities.

A M E R I C A S \ D O M I N I C A N R E P U B L I C | M O V I M I E N TO D E M U J E R E S D O M I N I C O
H A I T I A N A ( M U DH A ) To support an integrated approach to HIV/AIDS prevention and positive liv-
ing in marginalized Haitian and Dominico-Haitian communities.

A M E R IC A S \ D OMINIC A N R E P U BLIC | MO V IMIE N TO S O C I A L - C U LT U R A L DE LO S
T R A B A J A D OR E S H A I T I A NO S ( MO S C T H A ) To train a network of community leaders and
young people about STD/HIV/AIDS prevention; to provide scholarships for vocational training for
youth.

A M E R IC A S \ G U AT E M A L A | A S O C I A C I Ó N DE S A L U D Y DE S A R R OLLO R X IIN T N A M E T
To strengthen preventative and curative health services in the Lake Atitlán area by providing Maya-
language reproductive health education for men.

A M E R IC A S \ HON D U R A S | A DE L A N T E FO U N D AT ION OF HON D U R A S ( A DE L A N T E ) To
partner with three local health organizations to provide 2,000 rural women micro finance clients
with family planning, reproductive health and AIDS-prevention education.

A M E R IC A S \ HON D U R A S | A LT E R N AT I VA S Y OP OR T U NID A DE S To strengthen families liv-
ing and working in markets in Tegucigalpa through a volunteer-driven, participatory program of edu-
cation and leadership-training.

A M E R IC A S \ HON D U R A S | MO V IMIE N TO DE P OBL A D OR E S U R B A NO S DE T E L A
( MOP U T E L ) To train 140 families of working children in preventative and curative healthcare; to
grow vegetables and promote anti-parasite and vitamin campaigns among children up to age 12.

A M E R I C A S \ H O N D U R A S | O R G A N I Z A C I Ó N F R AT E R N A L N E G R A H O N D U R E Ñ A
( OF R A N E H ) To stop the spread of HIV/AIDS in the Garífuna community by training traditional
healers and medical personnel in culturally appropriate prevention techniques; to advocate for bet-
ter government HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment programs.

A M E R IC A S \ M E X IC O | C E N T R O PA R A LO S A D OL E S C E N T E S DE S A N MIG U E L DE
A LL E N DE ( C A S A ) To improve maternal, infant and family health in high-risk rural populations in
central Mexico by partnering with communities and new professional midwives and their experi-
enced traditional counterparts.

A M E R IC A S \ NIC A R A G U A | P R O M U J E R NIC A R A G U A To facilitate trainings on sexual and
reproductive health, domestic violence and women’s rights; to provide women’s health services to
Pro Mujer village bank clients.
A M E R IC A S \ P E R U | S OL A S Y U NID A S ( A S U ) To support the “Empowerment of Poor Women
Living with HIV/AIDS” project that combines education and vocational training to reduce the social,
economic and psychological impact of the disease.

A M E R IC A S \ V E N E Z U E L A | T U R IMI Q U IR E FO U N D AT ION To expand reproductive health
and education programs that reach out from community clinics to the peripheral barrios of southern
Cumaná.

A S I A \ A F GH A NI S TA N | A F GH A N IN S T I T U T E OF L E A R NING ( A IL ) To continue supporting
health education and services through a health clinic in Jaghartan, Herat, and a mobile health clinic
that reaches 45 villages.

A S I A \ C A M BODI A | C H U R C H W OR L D S E R V IC E - C A M BODI A ( C W S ) To support the
implementation of integrated community development projects in health, agriculture and micro
credit by two Cambodian NGOs.

A S I A \ IN DI A | BH AV N A G A R BLO OD B A N K To provide sexual, reproductive and primary
healthcare education and treatment and economic development opportunities for women from vil-
lages surrounding the Alang Shipyard.

A S I A \ IN DI A | R U R A L OR G A NI S AT ION FOR S O C I A L E D U C AT ION ( R O S E ) To enable
landless women members of self-help groups in 15 villages to raise herbs, vegetables and fruits in
their backyards for their families’ food and health needs, and to earn income from the sale of herbal
medicines.

A S I A \ T H A IL A N D | T H A I A ID S T R E AT M E N T A C T ION GR O U P ( T TA G ) To build leadership
and treatment advocacy skills among people living with HIV/AIDS, especially among vulnerable
groups such as drug users, both in Thailand and in the Greater Mekong Sub-Region.

A S I A \ T H A IL A N D | T H A I Y O U T H A C T ION P R O GR A M S ( T YA P ) To train youth to become
leaders in the struggle against HIV/AIDS in northern Thailand.

A S I A \ T H A IL A N D | W OM E N ’ S E D U C AT ION FOR A D VA NC E M E N T A N D E M P O W E R M E N T
( W E AV E ) To produce reproductive health materials in several ethnic languages for use by refugees,
migrant workers and internally displaced people living along the Thai-Burmese border.

MIDDL E E A S T \ G A Z A | A M E R IC A N N E A R E A S T R E F U GE E A ID ( A N E R A ) To improve the
nutrition of children and support the dairy industry in the West Bank.




                                                                                                               GRANTS   36-37
JCDF GRANTS
SPECIAL GRANT
R U S S I A \ S T. P E T E R S B U R G | C R E AT I V E A S S O C I AT ION P E D A GO GIC A L C L U B To sup-
port a collaborative project to create an on-line network of classroom teachers, curriculum writers,
teacher trainers and Jewish intellectuals with a special interest in Jewish education.


JEWISH REVIVAL
R U S S I A \ S T. P E T E R S B U R G | J E W I S H C H A R I TA BL E F U N D “ E VA” To support an active
community chorus to deepen their Jewish musical culture and participate in the life of the Jewish
community.

R U S S I A \ S T. P E T E R S B U R G | J E W I S H C H A R I TA BL E F U N D “ E VA” To support the “All
Generations” dance studio for people of all ages to develop their dance skills through Jewish dance
culture.

R U S S I A \ S T. P E T E R S B U R G | K L E Z F E S T To support St. Petersburg’s seventh KlezFest which
revives the musical culture of East European Jewry.

RUS SIA \ MOSCOW | MOSCOW HILLEL Y IDDISH CENTER To support a group of young
“Yiddishists” who are using Yiddish culture and music to deepen their understanding of Jewish identity.

R U S S I A \ N E V E L | N E V E L R E GION A L M U S E U M To support the construction of a new
memorial, Golubaya Dacha (Blue Hut), at the site of a mass execution of 2,000 Jews by the Nazis.

R U S S I A \ S T. P E T E R S B U R G | S O C IE T Y FOR J U D A IC S T U DIE S : A D A IN LO To support
the Adain Lo Sunday school, four kindergartens and a youth group, which teach Jewish themes
through innovative curricula of dance, music and visual arts.

R U S S I A \ MO S C O W | T H E U NION OF J E W I S H WA R A N D DI S A BL E D V E T E R A N S To
support the seventh edition of “The Book of Memory,” a series dedicated to memorializing the par-
ticipation of Jewish soldiers of the Soviet army during World War II.

U K R A IN E \ K OR S U N | A S S O C I AT ION OF J E W I S H C OM M U NI T IE S IN S M A LL TO W N S
OF U K R A IN E To support the activities of an umbrella organization of 40 rural communities that
comprise a total of 5,000 Jews. Activities include holiday celebrations, a regional welfare association
and Sunday school, a monthly Jewish newspaper and a Jewish library.

U K R A IN E \ K OR S U N | A S S O C I AT ION OF J E W I S H C OM M U NI T IE S IN S M A LL TO W N S
OF U K R A IN E To support the operation of a regional Sunday school that draws students and their
family members from the Zvenigorodka, Boguslav, Gorodishche,Vatutino and Kanev communities.

U K R A IN E \ K OR S U N | A S S O C I AT ION OF J E W I S H C OM M U NI T IE S IN S M A LL TO W N S
OF U K R A IN E To support an integrated program of Yiddish learning called “Yiddish Lives” through
texts, music and association with other “Yiddishists” in ten member communities.

U K R A IN E \ K OR S U N | A S S O C I AT ION OF J E W I S H C OM M U NI T IE S IN S M A LL TO W N S
OF U K R A IN E To support a cycle of cultural performances in March and April 2004 to commemo-
rate the 145th anniversary of the birth of Yiddish writer Sholom Aleichem.

U K R A IN E \ C H E R K A S S Y | C H E R K A S S Y U NI T E D J E W I S H C OM M U NI T Y To support the
“Prahim” (Flowers) Kindergarten for children aged three to seven, which provides students with both
a secular and Jewish education and helps introduce parents to the Jewish community.
U K R A IN E \ C H E R K A S S Y | C H E R K A S S Y U NI T E D J E W I S H C OM M U NI T Y To support the
Jewish Sunday school that provides Jewish education to over 120 students and their parents.

U K R A IN E \ C H E R NIGO V | C H E R NIGO V J E W I S H C OM M U NI T Y To support a series of cul-
tural programs – two choirs, a dance ensemble and a theater group – which have strengthened the
community’s activities both within the city and in four nearby small towns.

U K R A IN E \ C H E R NIGO V | C H E R NIGO V J E W I S H C OM M U NI T Y To support a Jewish
Sunday school and its 60 students, teaching them Hebrew, Jewish history, tradition, music, dance, art
programs, and organizing monthly Shabbat services for the entire community.

U K R A IN E \ D ON E T S K | D ON E T S K S TAT E U NI V E R S I T Y To support a minor in “Yiddish and
the Jewish Culture of Eastern Europe.”

UKRAINE \ DNIPROPETROVS’K | DNIPROPETROVS’K REGIONAL JE WISH COMMUNIT Y
To support the Center of Aesthetic Education, an innovative program of art-centered pre-school education.

UKRAINE \ DNIPROPETROVS’K | DNIPROPETROVS’K REGIONAL JE WISH COMMUNIT Y
To support the “Society for the Deaf ” to allow the deaf and hearing-impaired to more fully participate
in the Jewish community.

U K R A IN E \ K IE V | H AT I V K VA H C ONGR E G AT ION OF P R O GR E S S I V E J U D A I S M To sup-
port two Jewish kindergarten classes that have brought over 100 new families to the community.

U K R A IN E \ K H A R K O V | K H A R K O V J E W I S H D AY S C HO OL # 170 To support the school
tzedakah club, the “Union of Hearts,” to implement a program of contact between children and the
needy and elderly.

U K R A IN E \ K H A R K O V | K H A R K O V J E W I S H S T U DE N T C U LT U R A L C E N T E R “ HILL E L”
To support one of the most active Hillel groups in the FSU to run a variety of programs, including
weekly Shabbat services and traveling Passover Sederim.

U K R A IN E \ K IE V | K L E Z F E S T U K R A IN E To support Ukraine’s fourth KlezFest which revives
the musical culture of East European Jewry.

U K R A IN E \ NIK OL A E V | NIK OL A E V J E W I S H C U LT U R A L C OM M U NI T Y To support a
summer family camp at a Black Sea resort that offers Jewish learning for the Nikolaev community.

U K R A IN E \ NIK OL A E V | NIK OL A E V J E W I S H C U LT U R A L C OM M U NI T Y To support the
first Jewish Sunday school in Nikolaev that combines Hebrew, history and tradition lessons for chil-
dren and their parents.

U K R A IN E \ NIK OL A E V | NIK OL A E V J E W I S H C U LT U R A L C OM M U NI T Y To support a
dance ensemble that brings traditional Jewish dance to 6,000 spectators each year throughout
Nikolaev and surrounding regions.

U K R A IN E \ S IM F E R OP OL | S IM F E R OP OL A S S O C I AT ION OF J E W I S H C OM M U NI T IE S
OF C R IM E A To support a Jewish youth center whose educational and social activities extend
throughout the Crimea.

U K R A IN E \ K IE V | U K R A INI A N C E N T E R FOR HOLO C A U S T S T U DIE S To support the
establishment of the only such center in Ukraine that runs a full program of teacher training semi-
nars, research and publishing.



                                                                                                               GRANTS   38-39
U K R A IN E \ U Z HGOR OD | U Z HGOR OD J E W I S H C OM M U NI T Y: “ LIHIOT Y E H U DI ” To
support the increased activities of this newly organized community of traditional (Masorti) Judaism.

U K R A IN E \ U Z HGOR OD | U Z HGOR OD J E W I S H C OM M U NI T Y “ LIHIOT Y E H U DI ” To
support the community’s Jewish day and family summer camps, providing both children and parents
with a recreational and educational experience.

U K R A IN E \ V IN NI T S A | V IN NI T S A R E GION A L J E W I S H C OM M U NI T Y To support the
Vinnitsa city Jewish kindergarten that provides basic, arts-based Jewish education to the children of
Vinnitsa and their parents.


COMMUNICATIONS
U K R A IN E \ S A R ATO V | S A R ATO V J E W I S H J O U R N A L : “ R O OT S ” To publish a journal of
Jewish interest, with a special focus on local Jewish history and the growth of Jewish identification in
the region.

U K R A IN E \ V IN NI T S A | V IN NI T S A J E W I S H C OM M U NI T Y R E GION A L C E N T E R To pub-
lish the Jewish newspaper “Shabbat” that covers Vinnitsa and the surrounding oblasts that once made
up the historic “Podolya” area of Jewish settlement.


INTERNET
R U S S I A \ S T. P E T E R S B U R G | J E W I S H C H A R I TA BL E F U N D “ E VA” To further develop a
successful program to teach computer skills to children and the elderly.

U K R A IN E \ NIK OL A E V | NIK OL A E V IN T E R N E T O U T R E A C H P R O J E C T To provide gen-
eral support to an Internet project that has brought previously uninvolved Jews to the community
and a virtual museum of the community’s war veterans and ghetto survivors:
www.jewish.mk.ua/en/


HUMAN RIGHTS
UKRAINE \ KIE V/KHARKOV                 | UKRAINIAN-AMERIC AN BURE AU FOR THE
P R OT E C T ION OF H U M A N R IGH T S To support a legal aid bureau to provide legal assistance to
people in Ukraine by combining the efforts of human rights workers, lawyers, public organizations
and the mass media.

U K R A IN E \ N E V E L | N E V E L R E GION A L M U S E U M “ C ON S T E LL AT ION OF M U S E U M S ”
To support an annual conference promoting religious and ethnic tolerance; to form an “archipelago”
of museums and institutions devoted to tolerance in northwestern Russia.

UKRAINE \ VINNITS A | VINNITS A REGIONAL CHARITABLE FUND “GORAL” To support a
program that retrains the unemployed and provides services to the elderly and people with disabilities.

R U S S I A \ V OR ON E Z H | V OR ON E Z H C E N T E R FOR H U M A N R IGH T S E D U C AT ION To
support a group of dedicated teachers in continuing to train their colleagues about human rights; to
produce high-level teaching materials on human rights within the Russian context.
              S TA T E M E N T O F
                    FINANCIAL
                      POSITION
                            DECEMBER 31,                                  2003         2002




                            ASSETS
                            Cash and Cash Equivalents                $1,717,664   $2,292,428
                            Contributions Receivable                   395,920      337,550
                            Marketable Securities                     1,782,740    1,436,860
                            Prepaid Expenses and Other                 227,219       58,786
                            Note Receivable                             75,000       75,000
                            Property and equipment, at cost, net        98,775       99,693
                            Total Assets                             $4,297,318   $4,300,317


                            LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS
                            Liabilities:
                             Accounts Payable and Accrued Expenses   $1,489,420   $1,610,882
                             Deferred Rent                              91,658       74,131
                             Security Deposits Held                     11,031       11,031
                             Loan Payable                               30,000
            The following    Charity Gift Annuity Obligation            39,384
 statement of financial     Total Liabilities                        $1,661,493   $1,696,044
position and statement
       of activities were   Commitments and Contingencies
 derived from the 2003      Net Assets:
   financial statements      Unrestricted:
    audited by our inde-
                               Undesignated                          $1,676,113   $1,786,358
 pendent accountants,
                               Board-designated                         20,061      124,984
Goldstein Golub Kessler
                                                                      1,696,174    1,911,342
       LLP. A copy of the
       audited financial     Temporarily Restricted                    930,351      683,631
  statements and Form        Permanently Restricted                       9,300        9,300
       990 for 2003 are     Total Net Assets                          2,635,825    2,604,273
available upon request.     Total Liabilities and Net Assets         $4,297,318   $4,300,317




                                  ✦    AJWS continues to receive an “A” rating from the American
                                                                                        S T AT E M E N T O F A C T I V I T I E S 2 0 0 3




                                                                                             s TOTAL PROGRAM
                                                                                               EXPENSES: 85.2%


                                                                                             s TOTAL GENERAL

         S TA T E M E N T O F                                                                  ADMINISTRATIVE: 5.7%



              ACTIVITIES                                                                     s TOTAL FUNDRAISING
                                                                                               EXPENSES: 9.1%




       YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31,                                                                   2003             2002

                                                                    TEMP.      PERM .
                                                UNRESTRICTED   RESTRICTED RESTRICTED            TOTAL            TOTAL

       PUBLIC SUPPORT AND REVENUE
        Individual                                $1,940,975   $4,095,513                 $6,036,488       $4,536,799
        Bequest                                       31,140                                   31,140
        Foundations and Corporations                 100,000     763,964                      863,964          813,205
        Special Event Revenue                        148,834                                  148,834          192,741
        Donated Materials and Services                           397,401                      397,401          143,237
        Investment Income                            353,303         306                      353,609           90,054
        Study Tours and Miscellaneous Revenue                     88,659                       88,659           75,013
        Net Assets Released from Restrictions      5,099,123 (5,099,123)
       Public Support and Revenue                  7,673,375     246,720                   7,920,095        5,851,049


       EXPENSES
       Program Services:
        International Programs and Disaster Relief 4,008,947                               4,008,947        4,167,938
        Jewish Volunteer Corps                       843,408                                  843,408          463,080
        International Jewish College Corps           404,619                                  404,619          417,276
        Development Education                      1,463,180                               1,463,180           734,771
       Total Program Services                      6,720,154                               6,720,154        5,783,065


       Supporting Services:
        General and Administrative                   452,272                                  452,272          431,737
        Fundraising                                  716,117                                  716,117          437,868
       Total Supporting Services                   1,168,389                               1,168,389           869,605
       Total Expenses                              7,888,543                               7,888,543        6,652,670

                                                                                                                              Summarized
       Change in Net Assets                        (215,168)     246,720                       31,552        (801,621)        Comparative
       Net Assets at beginning of year             1,911,342     683,631       9,300       2,604,273        3,405,894         Information
       Net Assets at end of year                  $1,696,174    $930,351      $9,300 $2,635,825            $2,604,273         for 2002.




Institute of Philanthropy and a 4-star rating from Charity Navigator                                                 ✦



                                                                                                                         FINANCIALS        42-43
DONOR LIST                              contributions listed below are from the period 1/1/03 - 12/31/03




  $100,000 OR MORE                                    Hanna and Jeffrey Moskin Family Trust
  Richard and Rhoda Goldman Fund                      O.P. and W.E. Edwards Foundation, Inc.
  Moriah Fund Inc.                                    Pritzker Pucker Family Foundation
  The Pfizer Foundation                               Charles H. Revson Foundation
  Anonymous                                           Steven H. and Alida Brill Scheuer Foundation
                                                      Norman and Carol Traeger Foundation
  $50,000 - $100,000                                  Weithorn and Ehrman Familes Fund
  Joyanne Bloom                                       James Wolfensohn Family Foundation
  Nathan Cummings Foundation, Inc.                    Anonymous
  Rita and Harold Divine Foundation
  Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation                      $10,000 - $25,000
  Harold Grinspoon, Diane Troderman and               Carol Auerbach and Albert Berger
     the Harold Grinspoon Foundation                  BFK Foundation
  Klarman Family Foundation                           Jacob and Hilda Blaustein Foundation
  The Overbrook Foundation                            Andrea and Charles Bronfman
  Righteous Persons Foundation                           Philanthropic Foundation
  Rothman Family Foundation                           Edward T. Cone Foundation
  UJA/Federation of Jewish Philanthropies             Congregation Beth Jacob of Astoria
     of New York                                      Ruth B. Cowan
  Edna Wardlaw Charitable Trust                       Engelberg Foundation
  Anonymous                                           Carolyn Everett
                                                      Richard Frank
  $25,000 - $50,000                                   Michael and Susan Gelman
  Don Abramson and Julie King                         Sara Gottesman
  Dobkin Family Foundation                            Richard and Lois Gunther
  Dorot Foundation                                    Jewish Community Foundation of San Diego
  The Feinstein Foundation                            Peter Joseph
  Marty Friedman and Sarah Allen                      Daniel Kahn
  Walter and Elise Haas Fund                          Henry Kaminer
  International Service Agency                        Linda Heller Kamm
  Joseph Kahn                                         Aaron Katz
  Gerard and Lilo Leeds                               Key Foundation
  Polo Ralph Lauren                                   William H. Prusoff Charitable Lead Trust
  The Lodestar Foundation                             Harvey M. Krueger
Gary and Laura Heller H. Lauder              J.J. Segal Foundation
Max and Anna Levinson Foundation             Fred and Stephanie Shuman
Henry Lipschutz                              Bernard E Small
Amy Mandel and Katina Rodis Fund             Gerald I. Solomon
Marra Foundation                             Bruce Solomon and Susan H. Swartz
James Meier and Judith Edelstein             Bruce, Diane, Gerald and Steven Solomon
   Jewish Community Fund                     Philanthropic Fund
Leo Nevas                                    Lois and Arthur Stainman
Kathleen Peratis and Richard Frank           David J. Steirman and Anne Steirman
Lawrence S. Phillips                         Goldman-Sonnenfeldt Foundation
Pat and John Rosenwald                       Dr. Richard and Gail Ullman
Sister Fund                                  Claire and David Ilan Weis
Threadtex, Inc.                              Ron Zeff
Weaver Family Foundation                     Aaron Ziegelman Foundation
Lois Whitman                                 Anna and Emanuel Weinstein Foundation
Anonymous                                    Anonymous

$5,000 - $10,000                             $2,500 - $5,000
Dr. Bryce and Harriet Alpern                 Amcha for Tsedakah
Albert E Arent                               Daniel Arbess
Harold and Paula Baron                       Martin Birnbach
Gerry and Burton Belzer                      Philip Birnbaum Foundation
Mark W. Bernstein                            Simon and Kimberly J. Blattner
Harvey and Sally Weiskopf Bock               Ghislaine Boulanger and Charles Kadushin
Daniel and Esty Brodsky                      Lawrence and Ann Buttenwieser
Durst Organization                           Church of St. Michael
David Egger                                  Jonathan Cohen
Leigh Ekstein and Dana Telsy                 Combined Jewish Philanthropies of Boston
Lois and Richard England Family Foundation   Marvin S. Cowan
Bernard W. Freund                            Fabrangen Tzedakah Collective
Joseph and Anna Gartner Foundation           James Feldman
Dr. Barbara Gold                             Karen Fierst
Larry H. Goldberg and Betty Van Leuven       Cheri Fox
Ellen Harnick                                Eleanor Friedman
Ralph and Barbara Italie                     Ethan R. Garber
Mazon: A Jewish Response to Hunger           Debra Gelber
Karma Foundation                             Joe and Audrey Gerson
The Katzin Foundation                        Maggie Glezer
Dean Kehler                                  Glickenhaus Foundation
Michael and Andrea Leeds                     Lisa and Douglas Goldman Fund
Larry Levine                                 Linda Gorenstein
William and Ina Levine Foundation            Zev and Pearl Hack
LevMar Foundation, Inc.                      Milton and Miriam Handler Foundation
Alexander M. and June L. Maisin Foundation   Rabbi Lawrence and Sally Hoffman
Barbara J. Meislin/Purple Lady Fund          Jewish Community Federation of San Francisco
Janice Meister                               Harry and Jan Hack Katz
Alan W. and Naomi Miller                     Roy L. Kaufmann
Constance J Milstein                         Kenneth B. and Annie Klein
Carol Nathan                                 Lynn and Jules Kroll
Lawrence S. Phillips                         Mark Krueger
Renee H. Rapaporte                           Max and Anna Levinson Foundation
Riklis Family Foundation, Inc.               Leonard Litwin
Michele Rosen and Stanley Rosen              Lovell Family Ltd.
William Rosenfeld                            Norman and Milton Mann Family Foundation
David and Ida Rapoport Philanthropic Fund    David and Holly Mendel
M/I Homes Foundation




                                                                                            DONORS   44-45
Richard and Ronay Menschel                    Robert Christman and Judith Boies
Seymour P. Nagan                              Aaron Clark
Avron Pfeffer                                 Bernice Cohen
Leslie Fay Pomerantz                          Lawrence Cohen
Dr. David M. Posner                           Congregation B’nai Jeshurun
David and Laurel Rabin                        Congregation Rodeph Sholom
Aaron Roland and Annelise Goldberg            Kenneth and Lauri Coulter
Robert Rothberg                               Rabbi Rachel B. Cowan
Elizabeth and Gaurav Seth                     Lawrence and Susan Daniels
Frances Simon (z”l)                           Abby Disney
Alan B. Slifka Foundation, Inc.               James Edelman and Susan Stern Edelman
Linda and Arnold Spellun                      Glenn N. Eichen
Daniel Spiro                                  Mitzi and Warren Eisenberg Family Foundation
Syms Foundation                               David Elcott and Rabbi Shira Milgrom
The Rita Poretsky Foundation                  Dorothy Engelstad
Paul and Ellen Wachtel                        Catherine England
Herbert M.Weiss                               Louis Feder and Ken Feder
Natalie Wexler                                Robert Feder
Laurence and Tina Wiener                      Michael Finck
Howard and Diane Wohl                         Coleman Finkel
Estate of Marjorie Wyler                      Fox Family Foundation
Anonymous                                     Ari Fox and Pamela Mollie Fox
                                              Lynn Frank
                                              Samuel and Gigi Fried
$1,000 – $2,500                               Charles Friedman and Ety Friedman
James and Wendy Abrams                        Sy Frolichstein
Harold Alderman                               Jonathan Gans and Abigail Turin
Manfred Ambrose                               Joseph and Charlotte Gardner
Karen Ami                                     Alan I Gelman
Demetrios Argyriades                          Gervis-Lubran Fund
Aronson Foundation Inc                        Glantz Family Foundation
Robert Arnow                                  Marc J. Gollub
Dr. Karen Artzt                               William and Jean Graustein
Sam Avrett                                    Douglas Green
Bat Yam Temple of the Islands                 Carol Green
Marcia Baum                                   Leon and Doris Greenberg
Baxt Family Foundation                        Douglas and Margee Greenberg
Joan Beber                                    Eugene and Barbara Greene
William Becker                                Diane Asseo Griliches
Mark and Susan Beckerman                      Roslyn Grobman
Sarah G. Benator                              Ellen Grobman
Ellen Joy Bernstein                           I.A. and Diana Grodzins
David and Rachel Biale                        Hans and Doris Grunwald
Blandina Albright Steinman Charitable Trust   Andrew and Teresa Gunther
Irwin and Rita Blitt                          Jeffrey Gural
Elaine N. Blume                               Nadine Hack
Mark and Dara Bortman                         Pauline Hahn
Daniel Bradlow and Dr. Karen Hofman           Hazon:The New York Jewish Environmental Bike Ride
Sharon Brodsky                                Philip Citron Charitable Foundation Trust
David and Anne J. Bromer                      Hecht & Company, P.C.
Beth Browde                                   Michael J Hirschhorn and Jimena P. Martinez
Alec Cecil and Diane Zultowsky                Dr. Stephen Hoffman
David B. Chapnick                             John Hollander and Natalie Charkow
Sidney Hollander and Kay Berkson                 Richard Nathan
Sylvia Horwitz                                   Michael Nathanson
Leah Ice                                         Ruth Noble Estate
Marvin Israelow and Dorian Goldman               The Nordlinger Group
Jackson and Irene Golden 1989 Charitable Trust   Richard D. Ostrow
Scott A. Jacoby                                  Jeff and Peg Padnos
Helen and David Jaffe                            Martin Payson
Steven and Bobbie D Jellinek                     Perlman Family Foundation
Jewish Community Foundation of San Diego         Dorothy Perlow Fund
Jewish Women’s Foundation of New York            Brian and Jerilyn Perman
Joelson Foundation                               Dr. Harry T. Phillips
JRC AIDS in Africa Social Action Committee       David Pincus
Marilyn Kaggen                                   Jerry Posman
Irwin Kaplan                                     Robert H. Preiskel
Judith Kaplan                                    Rebecca Price and Jo-Ann Price
Myron M. Kaplan and Dr. Annette Hollander        Lisa Primavera
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Katelansky                   Jill Prosky and James Posner
Kenneth Klein and Harriet Bograd                 Heidi Queen, M.D.
Robert C Klutznick                               Howard A. Raik
Dr. Arthur J. Kolatch                            Paula Reisman
Kenneth K. Kolker                                The Reubens Family Foundation
Florence and Richard Koplow                      Reuben and Muriel Savin Foundation
Ruben Kraiem                                     Fred Richman
Jean Kramer                                      Paul and Sheri Robbins
Mark Krumholz                                    Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Dr. Neil R. Kudler and Rabbi Nancy Flam          Tobey Roland
Andrew Lachman and Ruth Messinger                Jonathan F.P. and Diana Rose
Gerard Lachman                                   Joseph B. Rosenblatt
Michael Lambert and Barbara M Schreiber          Rosetta W. Harris Charitable Lead Trust
John Lang                                        Dr. Joel A. Ross
Howard Langer and Barbara Jaffe                  Rabbi Jeffrey M. Roth and Rabbi Joanna Katz
Gavin Lazarow                                    Dr. Merrill R Rotter
Paul Lehman and Ronna Stamm                      Steven C Salop and Judith Gelman
Robert and Michele Lieban Levine                 Jacob Scheslinger and Louisa Rubinfein
Kay and Marc Levinson                            Stanley and Kay Schlozman
John G. Levy and Victoria Westhead               Robert and Lynne Schwartz
Frank and Barbara Lieber                         Jeffrey Schwarz
Sara and Andrew Litt                             Isaac I. Shamah
Mark G. Lowenstein                               Toby Shatkin
Richard Maisel                                   Shefa Fund
Peter M. Mancoll                                 Carrie Shepard
Brad and Shelley Marcus                          Rony and Catherine Shimony
Judith Martin                                    Drs. David and Mollie Shulan
Ilse Melamid                                     Peter Sills
Richard and Marie Mermin                         Elinor M. Siner
Daniel Meyer                                     John and Ruth Singer
Janet Green                                      Alison Sirkus
William and Diane Millen                         B. Lee Skilken and Marilyn Skillen
Steven Miller and Pamela S. Cowan                Matthew D. Slater and Faith Roessel
Lee H Miller                                     Charles Slivinski
Judy Minor                                       Daniel Snyder
Muse Imports, Inc                                Irene C. Snyder
David and Inez Myers                             Edwin S. Soforenko Foundation




                                                                                               DONORS   46-47
Felicia Sol                                         Richard Blumenstein
William Soll                                        Faith Braff
Herbert and Elene J Solomon                         Joel Brenner
Professor Bruce Solomon and Susan H. Swartz         Stanley and Lynn Brooks
Norma and Kenneth Spungen                           Andrew S. Brown
Naomi Starr                                         Robert Brownstein
Dr. Michael Steer                                   Carol Bunevich
Nancy Schwartz Sternoff                             Bradley Burde
Paul Sytman                                         Sharon Burde
Edward Taran                                        Seymour M Burg
Michael Tarnow                                      Jeffrey Calman
Temple Emanu-El of Dallas                           Casa Leaders H.P. Inc.
Temple Shalom                                       Kathy Casey
Peter Verbeeck                                      Matthew and Debra J. Chanin
Jill Vexler, Ph.D.                                  Craig Charney
David and Fran Voremberg                            James Cohen
John and Cindy S.Wallach                            Steven Cohen and Mary Akerson
Arthur Waskow and Phyllis Berman                    Howard and Alexandra Cohen
Irving A.Wechsler                                   Dayl Cohen
Robert F.Wechsler                                   Common Cents New York
Miriam Weinstein                                    Congregation Rodfei Zedek
Roger Weisberg and Karen Freedman                   Congregation Shir Tikva
Scott and Debbie Weiss                              Errol Cook
Joel Weissman and Wendy Landman                     M.Tom Cramer and Michele Burger
Westchester Reform Temple                           Jerry Daniels
R. Alfred Wodehouse and Dr. Anne D. Ehrlich, M.D.   Morris Dantzker
Wolf, Haldensten, Adler, Freeman and Herz           Rabbi Joshua Davidson
Leonard and Ann Wolf                                E. L. Doctorow
Susanne Wolfsohn                                    Allan and Vered Shai Drazen
Anonymous                                           Thomas Eisenstadt
                                                    Arthur D. Emil
                                                    Barry and Barbara Epstein
$500 - $1,000                                       Federated Jewish Charities
Frederick Adler and Ann Collopy                     James and Ann Fingar
Iris Alex                                           Raymond Firestone
Alliance for Healing Arts & Science                 Herbert L. Fisher
Bernard Alpers                                      Marshall and Julia Fogel
Robert A. Alter and Sherry Siegel                   Robert C. Frank
Am Shalom                                           Friedman Fund
American Express Foundation                         David Friedman and Carolyn Stolper Friedman
Alan and Judith Appelbaum                           Edward and Arline Friedman
The Artzt Howard Foundation                         Irving Friedman
Aaron I. Back and Beth Sandweiss                    Marcia Friedman
Dr. Michael Barza and Dr. Judith Ellen Robinson     Michael Gabbay
Miriam and Irwin Baskind                            Abner and Rosalyn Gaines
Marc L Baum                                         Judith and Leonard Galler
Henry S Bean and Leora Barish                       Alison Geballe
Georgette Bennett                                   Ronald and Sarah Geller
Peter Bergel                                        George and Grace Gilson
Steve Berger                                        Giving is Living Fund
Anne L. Berger                                      Brenner and Elaine Glickman
Kathleen M Berger                                   Beth Golden
William L. Bernhard and Catherine Cahill            Frances E. Goldman
Peter Gollon                                          Shira Levine
Michael D. and Carol B. Green                         Jack Levy and Judith Bass
Rocky Greenberg and Susan Rose Popper                 Geoffrey and Gayle Liebmann
Mildred Guberman                                      Leslie Lomas
Bruce and Amy Gutenplan                               Malcolm Gibbs Foundation
Mark and Ruth Guyer                                   Gerald and Madeline Malovany
Matthew Haiken                                        Marla Meislin
Mark Handelsman and Elaine L. Bloom                   David Michaels and Gail Dratch
Caroline G. Harris                                    Eric and Sarah Schulmiller
Hebrew Union College Library                          Sharon Miller
William Hellman                                       Sally Minard
Gregory Herrell                                       Morton and Anita Mintz
Adam S. Hirschfelder                                  Mitchell Modell
Fred Hochberg                                         Michael and Ellen Golden Monheit
Mark Imowitz                                          Mikhail Moskov
Alan Isacson                                          Robert Munk
Alan Iser and Sharon Liebhaber                        Dr. Alfred Munzer
J. David Jacobs                                       Napa Jewish Welfare Fund
Henry and Terri Jasen                                 Murray Nathan
Jewish Community Center in Manhattan                  Kenneth M. Nechin and Annette Bicher
Jewish Theological Seminary - Va’ad Gemilut Hasadim   Jack Needleman
Kaplan Family Foundation                              Louis Newman
Alfred and Mary Kahn                                  Mark Niedergang and Marya Axner
David and Renee Kaplan                                Michael Nimkoff
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Kaplan Foundation                  Noank Elementary School
Lawrence Kaplan                                       Emily R. Novick
Leah Kaplan                                           Carl and Lucile Oestreicher Foundation, Inc.
Drs. Stephen and Rachel Kaplan                        Mary K. O’Melveny
Esther Kartiganer                                     Overseas Press Club of America
Dr.William and Judith Kates                           Janet S. Levy Pahima
Emanuel Kelmenson                                     Rabbi Aaron M. Petuchowski,Temple Sholom of
Daniel Kessler and Yael Friedman                      Chicago
Kirkland & Ellis                                      Judith Plaskow
Kittamaqundi Community                                Steve and Robin Pollens
Jonathan Klein and Amy Schottenfels                   Efrem M. Potts
Lester and Nancy Klein                                John and Lisa Pritzker
Phyllis Koch                                          Irv and Varda Rabin
Jeffrey and Sondra Komarow                            Robert Raymond
Nathan Kouhana                                        Dr. Allan B. Reiskin
Simeon M. Kriesberg and Martha Kahn                   Nelly Reyes
Joel Kuperberg and Lydia Levin                        Judith Mendelson Richman and Steven Richman
George and Mary Lou Langnas                           Nick Robertson and Eleanor Reynolds
Joyce Lapenn                                          Diane Rosen
Ann Lederer                                           Rabbis David and Jennie Rosenn
Elliot Lehman                                         Marc Rosenstein
Ken Lehman                                            George and Ingrid Rothbart
Meg Cox Leone                                         RRF Human Development Consultants, Inc.
Sidney and Helaine Lerner                             Miles and Nancy Rubin
Leventhal/Kline Management, Inc.                      Norman Sackar
Joshua Levin and Debra Fried Levin                    Rabbi Robert Saks and Loretta Vitale Saks
Blossom Willens Levin                                 Sheri Sandler
David Levin and Laura Kaufman                         Alvin and Harriet Saperstein
Herb Levine and Dr. Ellen Frankel                     Sol Schechter




                                                                                                     DONORS   48-49
Hans L. Schlesinger                               Silver Levine Charitable Trust
Scott S. Schnipper                                Mark Silverberg
Myron I. Scholnick                                Dr. Don Simkin and Ellen Singer
Risa Schulman                                     Robert and Elaine Sims
Ethan Schwartz                                    Arthur Sklaroff
Joseph A. Schwartz                                Vicky Sloat
Stephen Schwartz                                  Steven A. Smith and Darice Smith
Frank and Carolyn Schwarz                         Michael and Jeffrey Smith
Dr. Sheldon J. Segal                              Society for the Advancement of Judaism
Jason Shafrin                                     Victoria Sofro
Sarene Shanus                                     Alan and Susan Lewis D. Solomont
Matthew D. Shapiro and Dr. Susan Garetz           Alan and Page Spain
Elaine Shapiro                                    Michael and Marsha Starr
Jackie Shapiro                                    Mike and Cherrie Strauss
Douglas and Carole Sheft                          Morton Stein and Gayle Donsky
Steven Sheriff and Michele Alperin                Jeffrey M. Steinberg
Melvyn and Sheila Shochet                         Stephen and Renee Steinig
Rose L. Shure                                     Jay Steinman




                                          ✦   Less than one-half of one percent of U.S.
      Neil and Janice Stenbuck                        Sanford and June Watzman
      Dr. Daniel and Ann Stern                        Norman and Selda Weiss
      Rabbi Michael Strassfeld and Rabbi Joy Levitt   Sylvia Weiss
      Albert Stratton                                 Martin White and Ruth Donig-White
      Felix Strumwasser                               Joel David Wind
      Michael Switzenbaum and Gail Schuman            Stephen Winter
      Dr. Mark D.Tasch                                Douglas Wissoker and Alys Cohen
      Temple Beth El of Northern Westchester          Women’s Auxiliary of Congregation Emanu-El
      Temple B’nai Shalom                             Carolyn Zimmerman Charitable Trust
      Judy Tenney                                     Rebecca Friedman Zuber
      Richard and Joan Toder                          Anonymous
      Floyd and Marcia Tuler
      Tzedakah Hevrah of Congregation Beth El
      Ernest Underhill
      William Walderman
      Charles D.Wantman and Roberta Elliott
      Melvin and Sandra Warshal                       Thank you to all of our donors for
      David T.Wasserman and Susan Ginsberg            your continued support.




foreign aid goes to international development                            ✦



                                                                                                   DONORS   50-51
                                    Stanley Weithorn
                                    Laurence Wiener

                                    BO A R D OF A D V I S OR S
                                    Georgette Bennett
                                    Hyman Bookbinder
                                    Rabbi Balfour Brickner
                                    Lawrence Buttenwieser
                                    Rabbi Harvey J. Fields

A JWS BOARD                         Abe Foxman
                                    Arnold Glimcher
   A N D S TA F F                   Rabbi Irving Greenberg
                                    Richard Gunther
     Founder and First Chair        Rabbi Arthur Hertzberg
     Lawrence S. Phillips           Madeleine May Kunin
                                    Joel Lamstein
     BO A R D OF T R U S T E E S    Laura Heller Lauder
     Marty Friedman, Chair          Gerard and Lilo Leeds
     Ellen Harnick,Vice Chair       Ruth Morgenthau
     Steve Kantor,Treasurer         Cynthia Ozick
     Ruth W. Messinger, President   Michael A. Pucker
     Brent Copen, Secretary         John Ruskay
                                    Jeffrey D. Sachs Ph.D.
     Don Abramson                   Jack J. Spitzer
     Mark W. Bernstein              Albert Vorspan
     Marc Baum                      Elie Wiesel
     Jeri B. Block
     Joyanne Bloom                  B AY A R E A
     Ruth Cowan                     R E GION A L OF F IC E
     Carolyn Everett                388 Market Street, Suite 400
     Hon. Sam Gejdenson             San Francisco, CA 94111
     Peter Joseph                   Tel: 415.296.2533
     Linda Heller Kamm              Fax: 415.296.2525
     Shira Levine
     Rabbi J. Rolando Matalon       MID W E S T
     James Meier                    R E GION A L OF F IC E
     Sharon Miller                  320 W Ohio Street, Suite 650
     Leo Nevas                      Chicago, IL 60610-4116
     David Rabin                    Tel 312.440.0787
     Michael C. Rothman             Fax 312.440.1479
     Nancy Schwartz Sternoff
     Norman Traeger                 A D V O C A C Y OF F IC E
     Diane Troderman                2027 Massachusetts Ave, NW
     David Ilan Weis                Washington, DC 20036
     Herbert Weiss                  Tel 202.387.2800
A J W S S TA F F                                   Rosie de Fremery, IT Director
Ruth Messinger, President and
   Executive Director                              Belinda Plutz, Human Resources Director
 Elissa Richman, Assistant to the President
                                                   Catherine Shimony, Director of
Tommy Loeb,Vice President and                          International Programs
   Deputy Executive Director                        Julia Greenberg, Deputy Director of
                                                       International Programs
Phyllis Teicher Goldman,Vice President              Adriana Ermoli, Americas Senior
    for Development                                    Program Officer
  Sharon Feder, Deputy Director                     Elizabeth Toder, Asia Senior Program Officer
    of Development                                  David Brown, Americas Program Officer
  Stephen Goldberg, Director of Major Gifts         Anya Levy Guyer, Africa Senior Program Officer
  Ronnett Hemmings, Development Associate           Jennifer Gabrielson, Administrator and
  Emily Silverman, Development Associate               Grants Manager

Howie Katz, Director of National Outreach          Seth Appel, Director of Service Programs
 Ira Horowitz, Assistant Director of                    and Jewish Volunteer Corps
    National Outreach                                Amy Schrager, Director of Group
 Elizabeth Friedman-Branoff,                            Service Programs
    San Francisco Regional Office Director           Marla Mazer,Volunteer Coordinator JVC
 Elizabeth Versten,                                  Lani Santo,Volunteer Coordinator JVC
    Midwest Regional Office Director                 Glenn Gutterman, IJCC Coordinator
 Jacob Fain, Washington D.C. Policy Associate        Ilana Aisen, Delegations Coordinator
 Jenny Ackerman, Alumni Coordinator                  Aleza Summit, Alternative Breaks Coordinator
                                                     Andrea Coron, Service Department
Ronni Strongin, Director of Public Relations            Administrator
Susan Rosenberg, Director of
    Communications and Education                   Martin Horwitz, Director of Jewish
  Hadassah Max, Communications Associate              Community Development Fund
  Temima Fruchter, Education                        Jon Orren, Deputy Director, Jewish
    Program Assistant                                 Community Development Fund

Monica Reynolds, Director of Finance               IN - C O U N T R Y R E P R E S E N TAT I V E S
   and Administration                              Uganda: Josephine Buruchara
 Ruddy Miller, Financial                           Thailand: Supawadee Chimmanee
   Administrative Assistant                        India: Shumona Goel
 Valeta Simms, Administrative Assistant




P HOTO C R E DI T S : Cover – Elizabeth Toder; inside cover – Dr. R. Shimony; page 2 – Sacha Bodner;
page 9 – Susan Rosenberg; page 11 – Reuters/Ahmad Masood; page13 – Rabbi J. Saltzman;
page 15 – Ruth Messinger; page 22 – Sacha Bodner; page 23 – Sacha Bodner; page 41 – Ruth Messinger;
page 51 – Elizabeth Toder




                                                                                                       AJWS   52-53
                                                             A M E R I CA N
                                                             J E W I S H
                                                             W O R L D
                                                             S E RV I C E




45 WEST 36TH STREET   N E W Y O R K , N Y 10 018   8 0 0 . 8 8 9 .714 6   212 .73 6 . A J W S ( 2597 )   A JWS@A JWS.ORG   W W W. A J W S . O R G

				
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