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									Phytosanitary Certification
     How to Obtain a
Phytosanitary Certificate for
   Your Export Product
 Mike Allen, NCDA&CS Export Certification
                Specialist
  Export Certification: General Overview
Agricultural and Forest products from North
Carolina may carry plant pests that foreign
countries and other States do not want
introduced into their own boundaries.
• Entryrequirements for these products may vary
greatly from country to country, and from state to
state.
• A given country or state may have very rigid
requirements for a particular plant or plant product,
but be less concerned about another.
  Export Certification: General Overview

As a service, NCDA&CS Plant Protection
Specialists provide phytosanitary certificates to
exporters to document that the plant pest
requirements have been met. These certificates
may be one of four types, with the primary certificate
being the USDA PPQ Form 577:
  •PPQ Form 577, Federal Phytosanitary Certificate
  •PPQ Form 578, Federal Export Certificate, Processed
  Plant Products
  •PPQ Form 579, Federal Phytosanitary Certificate for
  Reexport
  •NCDA&CS State Phytosanitary Certificate
   Export Certification: General Overview
Cost of Federal Certificates:
•Shipments valued at less than $1250; the certificate fee is
$42.
•Shipments valued at more than $1250; the certificate fee is
$77.
Note: After October 1, 2010 the fees will increase:


•Shipments valued at less than $1250; the certificate fee will
be $60.

•Shipments valued at more than $1250; the certificate fee will
be $104 .
     Purpose of Federal
   Phytosanitary Certificates
The purpose of a federal
phytosanitary certificate (FPC) is to
expedite the entry of domestic plants
or unprocessed or unmanufactured
plant or forest products into a foreign
country.
A Federal Phytosanitary Certificate (FPC) Helps
Serve Its Purpose by stating and certifying the
following:
• The Country of Origin for the product as the United States. In
certain instances, the State and County are also stated.
• The plant or plant product meets the importing country’s entry
requirements.
• The plant or plant product has been inspected and is considered
free from quarantine significant pests listed in the country’s
requirements; according to current inspection standards.
• The plant or plant product has been inspected and is practically
free from injurious pests (pests of non quarantine significance).
• If necessary, the plant or plant product has been tested and/or
treated according to official procedures.
 Enabling Legislation: The Plant Protection Act
Foreign countries have established plant quarantine
regulations that exporters of U.S. agricultural products are
required to meet.
To enable USDA-APHIS-PPQ* and their cooperators to help
exporters meet the plant quarantine import requirements of
foreign countries, Section 418, CERTIFICATION FOR
EXPORTS, of the Plant Protection Act provides the authority
for issuing export certificates for the export of commodities.
The regulation for enforcing the Plant Protection Act is 7CFR
Part 353 – Export Certification.
*U.S. Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health
Inspection Service, Plant Protection and Quarantine
   Phytosanitary Certification is Based on
          International Standards
The U.S. export program is based on standards established
by the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC) and
the North American Plant Protection Organization (NAPPO).
 The U.S. export program has an obligation and responsibility
to meet the standards developed by the IPPC and NAPPO.
The primary standards on which the U.S. export program is
based are the following:
• The IPPC Standards consist of International Standards for
Phytosanitary Measures (ISPM).
• The NAPPO Standards consist of Regional Standards for
Phytosanitary Measures (RSPM).
   USDA-APHIS-PPQ Represents the U.S. in
                NAPPO
PPQ is delegated as the National Plant Protection Organization (NPPO) and
assumes the responsibilities for ensuring the U.S. export program meets
international standards.
Phytosanitary Issues Management (PIM), Export Services (ES) is the
headquarters unit within USDA-APHIS-PPQ that maintains the export
program for U.S. exporters of U.S. and foreign-origin agricultural
commodities.
Although foreign countries have established plant quarantine regulations that
U.S. exporters are required to meet, the U.S. does not require export
certification of commodities.
(USDA–APHIS–PPQ) does not regulate the exportation of commodities.
PPQ and their cooperators assist U.S. exporters with commodities that are
eligible for certification; to meet the plant quarantine import requirements of
foreign countries.
  Phytosanitary Issues Management (PIM),
         Export Services (ES) Unit
Export Services (ES)
• Conducts Bi-lateral Negotiations
• Manages the Export Certification Program
• Provides phytosanitary certificates to exporters when
required by a foreign country
• Maintains EXCERPT data base to track and detail
the phytosanitary requirements for each country
• Manages the Phytosanitary Certificate Issuance and
Tracking System (PCIT)
     Federal-State Cooperative Program
The Federal and State Departments of Agriculture
participate in cooperative agreements to more effectively
perform export certification. The PPQ export program is
expanded to enable designated State cooperators to
issue export certificates at interior points of origin in the
U.S.
To obtain authority to issue export certificates, a State
plant regulatory agency must agree to sign a
Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with PPQ. The
MOU is a formal document that specifies the
responsibilities and areas of cooperation mutually
understood and agreed to by the Federal and State
Departments of Agriculture.
    Federal-State Cooperative Program

•In North Carolina, The N.C. Department of
Agriculture & Consumer Services (NCDA&CS),
Plant Industry Division, Plant Protection Section
is the designated cooperator and issues Federal
and State Phytosanitary Certificates (FPC’s).

•PPQ also issues FPC’s in North Carolina at ports
and some interior points of origin.
      How to Obtain a Federal Phytosanitary
         Certificate in North Carolina?
Your first step is to contact either your local NCDA&CS Plant
Pest Specialist or USDA-APHIS-PPQ office.
NCDA&CS Specialists and PPQ ACOs (Authorized
Certification Officer):

• Have met educational and field experience
requirements to become certified to issue FPC’s
• Have access to the EXCERPT data base of
product requirements of importing countries
• Have access to PCIT to process the application,
charge the appropriate fees, and process the
certificate
      How to Obtain a Federal Phytosanitary
         Certificate in North Carolina?
Your first step is to contact either your local NCDA&CS Plant
Pest Specialist or USDA-APHIS-PPQ office.
NCDA&CS Specialists and PPQ ACOs (Authorized
Certification Officer):
• Provide guidance and regulatory oversight for any
sampling, laboratory testing, field inspections, or
treatments necessary for certification
•Will inspect the product to be exported
• If the product passes inspection and meets the
requirements, will issue the Federal Phytosanitary
Certificate for export
        Contact Information: NCDA&CS
          Specialists and PPQ ACOs
Use this link:
http://www.ncagr.gov/plantindustry/plant/nursery/fwatxt.htm to
access contact information for Specialists. If you
are unable to reach a Specialist contact:
Mike Allen
Export Certification Specialist
NCDA&CS Plant Protection Section
Phone: 919.733.6930 ext. 230
Fax: 919.733.1041 Mike.Allen@ncgar.gov
      Contact Information: NCDA&CS
        Specialists and PPQ ACOs

PPQ ACOs can be contacted through the following
regional offices:
Susan Kostelecky, USDA-APHIS-PPQ Export
Certification Specialist, North Carolina and South
Carolina, Susan.P.Kostelecky@aphis.usda.gov
Goldsboro, NC Phone: (910) 583-0033, Fax: (910)
583-0035

Wilmington (910) 815-4667
Raleigh (919) 855-7605
Charlotte (704) 424-1014
        Plan Ahead and Make Contact
          with the Specialist or ACO
•If you contact the Specialist or ACO after the
shipment is gone, it could result in costly delays or
possible refusal of entry of the product at its
destination.
•Requirements may include field inspections,
laboratory testing, treatment requirements; or the
product may not be eligible for certification.
•Many countries require two year or two growing
cycle field inspections for ‘freedom from” statements
for certain diseases on nursery stock or high risk
plants and plant products.
       Plan Ahead and Make Contact
         with the Specialist or ACO
•Investigate what countries you may want to send
your products to well in advance to avoid delays,
rejections, or destruction of your shipment.
•Do your homework and use the Specialist or ACO
as a resource early on in your export
considerations.
•If your product is eligible for certification and the
requirements can be met, then proceed to the
next step.
  Exporter (Shipper) is Responsible for
 Applying for Inspection and Certification
            Welcome to PCIT!
 Apply for the Inspection and Certification of each
  shipment you want certified through PCIT (web
based Phytosanitary Certificate Issuance & Tracking
                     System).
For the Do-it-Yourself types, this Industry Users
Quick Reference Guide provides the steps and
directions for setting up your initial account in PCIT.
 Exporter (Shipper) is Responsible for
Applying for Inspection and Certification
           Welcome to PCIT!
If you are unable to establish your PCIT account using the
quick reference guide, then contact your Specialist or ACO
and they will help you set one up. If you are unable to
reach a Specialist contact:

Frank S. White
Plant Protection Specialist/Field Export Certification
Specialist
NCDA & CS Plant Protection Section
Phone/Fax: 252-792-5624
Cellular: 252-217-3046 Frank.S.White@ncagr.gov
    Information to be Supplied in the PCIT
                 Application
 Applicants must provide the following information in the PCIT
  application in order for a Specialist or ACO to determine if a
                   commodity may be certified:
• Commodity’s scientific (botanical) name—if the exporter only
provides a common name, the exporter should precisely
identify the commodity for the purpose of identifying specific
import requirements (e.g., wheat grain versus wheat seeds).
The scientific name is required in most cases to search
EXCERPT, and it is the exporter’s responsibility to provide the
scientific name.
• Country to which the commodity is being exported, including
port (s) of entry
   Information to be Supplied in the PCIT
                Application
• Exportation date
• Location where the commodity can be inspected
• Location where the commodity was grown (country,
State, or county)
• Supporting documents: foreign export certificate or
equivalent, import permit, State or other Federal
agency inspection certificate, laboratory test results,
etc.
• Whether the commodity is a processed product and
if so, a description of the process
  Exporter Certification Responsibilities:
               Official Documents
•When they exist, exporters should provide official
documents stating import requirements if they differ
from the receiving countries export summary in
EXCERPT.
•Official documents may be Import Permits (IP),
Special Authorizations, or recent correspondence
from the plant protection service of the foreign
country, which takes precedence over the information
in the export summary.
  Exporter Certification Responsibilities:
           Official Documents
•Exporters are responsible for providing written,
certified, accurate translations of official documents
before the Specialist or ACO can accept them.
•Letters of credit are strictly fiduciary documents.
For the purposes of Phytosanitary Certification,
letters of credit cannot be considered of official
notification of changes or exceptions to plant
quarantine regulations, which must come from the
plant protection services of foreign countries.
   Exporter Certification Responsibilities:
                Time Limits
•Exporters must be aware of the Time Limits foreign
countries impose for the period between inspection or
date of issue and shipping date.
•Specific time limits are in export summaries, and the
Specialist or ACO can furnish this information. If a
time limit is not specified, then the general time limit
between inspection or date of issue is not more than
30 days before export, unless the export summary
states it differently.
  Exporter Certification Responsibilities:
               Time Limits

•Exporters must be aware of lead time requirements.
Lead time refers to the amount of time needed to
inspect or to examine commodities before their
shipping date.
•An adequate amount of lead time must be allowed
between submitting the application in PCIT, and the
anticipated shipping date, to allow for inspection and
other certification requirements that may be
necessary (growing field/site inspections, sampling
and laboratory testing, treatments).
   Exporter Certification Responsibilities:
                     Inspection
•Exporters should make the shipment available for
inspection.
•Shipments cannot be inspected on board aircraft,
ships, or in the holds of vessels.
•Plants or plant products must be accessible to the
Specialist and ACO to verify and inspect the material
described in the application.
 Exporter Certification Responsibilities:
                Inspection
•Shipping documents or dock papers should be
marked or stamped to prevent the shipment form
being loaded before the inspection is conducted.
•The exporter is responsible for providing the labor
to open and close packages for inspection and to
provide adequate facilities to perform the
inspection.
•Such facilities include supplies, equipment and
proper lighting required for an official inspection
before certification.
   Exporter Certification Responsibilities:
                     The Product
•The exporter should provide a high quality, pest free
product.
•There is no wiggle room on the pest free part. Freedom
from regulated pests and apparent freedom (98%+) of
quality pests has to occur to meet import requirements.
•The export product represents North Carolina, the U.S.
and the producer in the world market.
•North Carolina export products face competition from
producers in other States and countries. Only the best
can survive that level of competition!
   Exporter Certification Responsibilities:
                 Treatments
•The exporter should provide for any required treatments,
reconditioning, or other actions to meet import requirements
of the foreign country.
•Export only those plants or plant products that have been
inspected and met all certification requirements.
•The exporter should insure that all products used in
treatments are labeled for use in North Carolina, and that
treatments are conducted in a safe manner that meets all
label precautions and guidelines.
•The exporter should safeguard the certified shipment from
infestation between the date the shipment was certified and
the actual shipping date. Keep it clean and pest free.
If Problems Occur With the Shipment…….
Call us if problems occur! If there are problems with
a product under a Federal Phytosanitary Certificate,
contact the issuing office immediately for
assistance.
USDA maintains ties with most importing countries
and some international area offices, and we
(NCDA&CS) maintain close ties with USDA.
USDA may be able to work with the government
officials on the shipment to get the shipment
released and moving to its destination and to help
avoid future problems.
Contact Information: NCDA&CS Specialists
Use this link:
http://www.ncagr.gov/plantindustry/plant/nursery/fwatxt.htm
to access contact information for Specialists. If you
are unable to reach a Specialist contact:


Mike Allen
Export Certification Specialist
NCDA&CS Plant Protection Section
Phone: 919.733.6930 ext. 230
Fax: 919.733.1041 Mike.Allen@ncgar.gov
 Thank You
for Exporting
North Carolina
  Products!

								
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