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Worksite Wellness Program Presentation

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Worksite Wellness Program Presentation Powered By Docstoc
					               Worksite
www!           Wellness
                Works!
 Northern Human Resources
               Association
          Rachel Gilbertson
         UMD Health Coach
www!objectives
Participants will be able to:
   Understand the economic costs of unhealthy
    lifestyle behaviors

   Describe how worksite health promotion impacts
    employee health and well being

   List elements of a Comprehensive Worksite Health
    Promotion Program

   Brainstorm worksite wellness promotions for their
    company
www!why?
   The economic impact of overweight and obesity includes direct and indirect
    costs.

   Direct costs include:
     medical costs classified as preventive
     diagnostic and treatment
   Indirect costs include
     morbidity and mortality costs such as loss productivity,
     absenteeism
     premature death


   Research shows that as health risks increase, costs increase, as health
    risks decrease, costs decrease. By helping employees work toward a
    low-risk status, employers can make a substantial difference in the
    organization's long term physical and financial health.
www!obesity
  We have never had an epidemic like this that
    we have been able to track so thoroughly
                   and see.

   The prevalence of obesity has more than
     doubled among adults and has tripled
     among children and adolescents from
     1980 to 2004. Currently, two-thirds of
   adults and nearly one in three children are
             overweight or obese.

       The Surgeon General’s Vision for a Healthy and Fit Nation . January 28, 2010
          Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults
                         BRFSS, 1985 for 5’ 4” person)
              (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight




No Data     <10%   10%–14%
          Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults
                     BRFSS, 1986
                   (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)




No Data     <10%      10%–14%
          Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults
                     BRFSS, 1987
               (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)




No Data     <10%   10%–14%
          Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults
                     BRFSS, 1988
                   (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)




No Data     <10%      10%–14%
          Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults
                     BRFSS, 1989
                   (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)




No Data     <10%      10%–14%
          Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults
                     BRFSS, 1990
                   (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)




No Data     <10%      10%–14%
          Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults
                     BRFSS, 1991
                   (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)




No Data     <10%      10%–14%    15%–19%
          Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults
                     BRFSS, 1992
                   (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)




No Data     <10%      10%–14%    15%–19%
          Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults
                     BRFSS, 1993
                   (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)




No Data     <10%      10%–14%    15%–19%
          Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults
                     BRFSS, 1994
                   (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)




No Data     <10%      10%–14%    15%–19%
          Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults
                     BRFSS, 1995
                   (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)




No Data     <10%      10%–14%    15%–19%
          Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults
                     BRFSS, 1996
                   (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)




No Data     <10%      10%–14%    15%–19%
          Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults
                     BRFSS, 1997
                  (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)




No Data    <10%      10%–14%    15%–19%    ≥20%
          Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults
                     BRFSS, 1998
                  (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)




No Data    <10%      10%–14%    15%–19%    ≥20%
          Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults
                     BRFSS, 1999
                  (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)




No Data    <10%      10%–14%    15%–19%    ≥20%
          Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults
                     BRFSS, 2000
                  (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)




No Data    <10%      10%–14%    15%–19%    ≥20%
          Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults
                     BRFSS, 2001
                  (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)




No Data    <10%      10%–14%    15%–19%    20%–24%   ≥25%
          Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults
                              BRFSS, 2002
                 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)




No Data   <10%      10%–14%    15%–19%    20%–24%   ≥25%
          Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults
                     BRFSS, 2003
                  (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)




No Data    <10%      10%–14%    15%–19%    20%–24%   ≥25%
          Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults
                     BRFSS, 2004
                  (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)




No Data    <10%      10%–14%    15%–19%    20%–24%   ≥25%
      Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults
                 BRFSS, 2005
                 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)




No Data   <10%      10%–14%    15%–19%    20%–24%   25%–29%    ≥30%
      Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults
                 BRFSS, 2006
                 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)




No Data   <10%      10%–14%    15%–19%    20%–24%   25%–29%    ≥30%
      Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults
                 BRFSS, 2007
                 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)




No Data   <10%      10%–14%    15%–19%    20%–24%   25%–29%    ≥30%
      Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults
                 BRFSS, 2008
                 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)




No Data   <10%      10%–14%    15%–19%    20%–24%   25%–29%    ≥30%
www!riskfactors
      Asthma
      Diabetes (Type 2)
      Hypertension
      Orthopedic Complications
      Sleep Apnea
      Coronary Heart Disease
      Stroke
      Psychosocial Effects & Stigma


   Each year, obesity contributes to an estimated 112,000
                      preventable deaths.
                  The Surgeon General’s Vision for a Healthy and Fit Nation 2010
            http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/obesityvision/obesityvision2010.pdf
www!cost
   “The health cost of obesity in the United
    States is as high as $147 billion annually,

   Overall, persons who are obese spent $1,429
    (42 percent) more for medical care in 2006
    than did normal weight people”


      Center for Disease Control and Prevention (2009, July 27).
Problem Statement
 “The surge in obesity in this country is nothing
  short of a public health crisis that is threatening
    our children, our families, and our future,”

“In fact, the health consequences are so severe
     that medical experts have warned that our
    children could be on track to live shorter
              lives than their parents. “

                    -First Lady Michelle Obama.


The Surgeon General’s Vision for a Healthy and Fit Nation . January 28, 2010
www!why???
   Portion sizes?
   Poor food choices?
   Inactivity?
   others?
PORTION DISTORTION QUIZ




  National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
        Obesity Education Initiative
              BAGEL
   20 years               Today
     ago




3-inch diameter
  140 calories        6-inch diameter
                         ??? calories
                      350 250 150
      ANSWER

      350 calories




Calorie Difference = 210
How long will you have to rake leaves
in order to burn the extra 210 calories?*




             1 hour and 30 minutes
                  50 minutes
                    2 hours
                 * Based on 130 lb person
         ANSWER

          50 minutes.




If you rake leaves for 50 minutes
 you will burn approximately 210
             calories.*
          * Based on 130 lb person
       Cheeseburger

 20 years             Today
   ago




333 calories       ??? calories
                 590 620 700
     ANSWER

      590 calories




Calorie Difference = 257
 How long will you have to lift weights
in order to burn the extra 257 calories?*




                    1 hour
               1 hour 30 minutes
                  30 minutes
                * Based on 130 lb person
          ANSWER

1 hour and 30 minutes, you will burn
     approximately 257 calories.*




            * Based on 130 lb person
       Spaghetti and Meatballs

       20 years                      Today
         ago




1 cup spaghetti with sauce
   and 3 small meatballs        ??? Calories

       500 calories          1,025    600    800
          ANSWER
          1,025 calories.
This includes 2 cups of pasta with
   sauce and 3 large meatballs.




    Calorie Difference = 525
How long you will need to houseclean
in order to burn those extra calories?*




            1 hour and 25 minutes
            2 hours and 35 minutes
                    2 hours
                * Based on 130 lb person
         Answer

2 hours and 35 minutes you will
burn approximately 525 calories.*




          * Based on 130 lb person
      FRENCH FRIES

 20 years            Today
   ago




210 Calories
2.4 ounces       ??? Calories

               610   590     650
     ANSWER

      610 calories




Calorie Difference = 400
 How long will you have to walk leisurely
in order to burn those extra 400 calories?*




                   40 minutes
                1 hour 10 minutes
                     2 hours
                  * Based on 160 lb person
             ANSWER

1 hour and 10 minutes

You will burn
approximately 400 calories*




              * Based on 160 lb person
     Turkey Sandwich

  20 years              Today
    ago




320 calories        ??? Calories

                  820     510   630
    ANSWER

      820 calories




Calorie Difference = 500
Now guess how long you will have
    to ride a bike in order to
   burn those extra calories?*




             45 minutes
        1 hour and 25 minutes
          2 hours 15 minutes
          * Based on 160 lb person
           ANSWER

1 hour and 25 minutes



You will burn
approximately
 500 calories
                * Based on 160 lb person
        Thank you for participating in the
          Portion Distortion Quiz!
For more information about Maintaining a Healthy
                     Weight
             visit www.nhlbi.nih.gov
 www!sugar
    Today, according to the USDA we drench
     ourselves in 30 or more tsp of added sugar
     every day.

    In 1980 the average American consumed
     about 123 pounds of added sugar per year

    By 1999 that jumped to 158 pounds per
     person
                                                         American Dietetic Association
Diet Makeover: How to Spot Sneaky Sugars.   http://www.eatright.org/cps/rde/xchg/ada/hs.xsl/home_45
http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/29182841                        31_ENU_HTML.htm
= 31.6 (5lb)
   bags
 of Sugar!
www!inactivity

   Despite common knowledge that exercise is healthful, more than 60
    percent of American adults are not regularly active, and 25 percent of
    the adult population are not active at all.


   The World Health Organization reported that in the U.S. an investment
    of $1 in physical activity leads to $3.20 in medical costs savings.




                Physical Activity and Health A Report from the Surgeon General
                        http://www.cdc.gov/NCCDPHP/SGR/summ.htm

                       National Coalition for Promoting Physical Activity
                            http://www.ncppa.org/policy/takeaction/
Stretching in the Office ©2002 Robert A. Anderson, Jean E. Anderson & Shelter Publications, Inc.




    www!stretch
                www!
      Creating a
Comprehensive Worksite
   Health Promotion
       Program
Surgeon General’s Vision for a
Healthy and Fit Nation include

    Improving our communities
    Healthy Choices and Healthy Home
     Environments
    Creating Healthy Child Care Settings
    Creating Healthy Schools
    Creating Healthy Work Sites
    Mobilizing Medical Communities


The Surgeon General’s Vision for a Healthy and Fit Nation 2010
http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/obesityvision/obesityvision2010.pdf
Creating Healthy Work Sites
    Employers can implement wellness
    programs that promote healthy eating in
    cafeterias, encourage physical activity
    through group classes and create
    incentives for employees to participate.




          The Surgeon General’s Vision for a Healthy and Fit Nation 2010
    http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/obesityvision/obesityvision2010.pdf
www!ROI
   Obesity is linked to many co-morbid conditions
    resulting in increased health care costs. With high
    obesity rates in the United States, these health care
    costs can directly affect employer profits. It is
    estimated that employers spend $13 billion
    annually on the total cost of obesity.
   Workplace obesity prevention and control programs
    can be an effective way for employers to reduce
    obesity. They can produce a direct financial
    return on investment (ROI) by lowering health care
    costs, lowering absenteeism, and increasing
    employee productivity.
                                  LeanWorks
                   http://www.cdc.gov/leanworks/why/roi.html
Tools for Success

    Three wishes for your wellness program

1._________________________________

2._________________________________

3._________________________________


                Tools for Success
           Hennepin County Health@Work
           www.hennepin.us/health@work
    Results-oriented
    Program Benefits
   Increased productivity
   Lower health-care, insurance costs
   Decreased absenteeism
   Increased employee retention, morale
   Attract prospective employees
   More positive community image
   Fewer workers’ compensation disability claims
                                     Tools for Success
                                Hennepin County Health@Work
                                www.hennepin.us/health@work
Results-oriented
Program Benefits continued

   More motivation to practice healthy behaviors
   Employees connect, support one another
   For additional information, visit :
    http://www.welcoa.org/wwp/pdf/aa_6.1_novdec06.pdf




                           Tools for Success
                      Hennepin County Health@Work
                      www.hennepin.us/health@work
WELCOA’s “Seven C’s” of
workplace wellness
1.   Capturing Senior Level Support
2.   Creating A Cohesive Wellness Team
3.   Collecting Data To Drive A Results-Oriented
     Wellness Initiative
4.   Crafting An Annual Operating Plan
5.   Choosing Appropriate Health Promotion
     Interventions
6.   Creating A Supportive, Health-Promoting
     Environment
7.   Carefully Evaluating Outcomes
Step 1:
   Capturing Senior Level Support
Step 1:
   Capturing Senior Level Support

Gain & Sustain
management support
     Gain support of key stake holders, including CEO
     Address: “How will an employee wellness program
      help our worksite achieve its primary mission?”



                     Tools for Success
                Hennepin County Health@Work
                www.hennepin.us/health@work
Step 1:
Capturing Senior Level Support
 Gather data to help make your case:
    Employee absenteeism
    Injury incidence, workers’ compensation claims
    Health-care costs
    Employee interests



                    Tools for Success
               Hennepin County Health@Work
               www.hennepin.us/health@work
Step 1:
Capturing Senior Level Support

 Consider legal aspects of wellness
 programs:
    HIPAA requirements
    ADA
    State laws
    COBRA
    Taxes
    GINA
                       Tools for Success
                  Hennepin County Health@Work
                  www.hennepin.us/health@work
Step 1:
Capturing Senior Level Support
Ways to think about this information:
   Establish relationships with experts
   Look at present programming through legal
    framework
   Talk to senior management about
    worksite implications


                      Tools for Success
                 Hennepin County Health@Work
                 www.hennepin.us/health@work
Step 1:
Capturing Senior Level Support

  Sustain support by:
     Inviting leadership to wellness meetings
     Presenting to management at least yearly
     Developing visual record of program
     Integrating programming into worksite policies


                     Tools for Success
                Hennepin County Health@Work
                www.hennepin.us/health@work
Step 1: Resources

ACSM, Northland Chapter
Worksite Health Promotion Group
   Educational session planned for March 2010 on how
    to engage senior leadership
   For more information, go to
    http://www.northlandacsm.org/worksitehealthpromotion.html



                          Tools for Success
                     Hennepin County Health@Work
                     www.hennepin.us/health@work
Step 1: Resources continued

  A New Way of Thinking:
  “Examining Strategies for Gaining Leadership
  Support” by Judd Allen, PhD and David Hunnicutt, PhD
     Strategies for working with leaders from actively opposed to openly
      championing
     Sample wellness leadership survey
     Find the complete article at:
      http://www.welcoa.org/contentdelivery/pdf/new_way_thinking.pdf

  WELCOA Recommends 10 Great Resources To Learn More About
    HIPAA and GINA
  http://www.welcoa.org/freeresources/pdf/recommendshipaaandgina010.pdf


                               Tools for Success
                          Hennepin County Health@Work
                          www.hennepin.us/health@work
Step 1: Resources continued
  Let’s talk ROI
     “Top 5 Strategies to Enhance the ROI of Worksite
      Wellness Programs” by Steve Aldana
      http://www.welcoa.org/freeresources/pdf/top_5_strategies.pdf


     Free ROI calculator online
      http://www.workforce.com/section/00/article/25/28/58.html


     Costs of unhealthy behaviors
  http://www.welcoa.org/contentdelivery/pdf/unhealthy_behaviors.pdf
                         Tools for Success
                    Hennepin County Health@Work
                    www.hennepin.us/health@work
Step 1: Action

  What action item will you focus on related to
  gaining or maintaining management support after
  you leave today?
  ______________________________________
  ______________________________________
  _____________________________
  _____________________________


                  Tools for Success
             Hennepin County Health@Work
             www.hennepin.us/health@work
Step 2:

  Creating A Cohesive Wellness
              Team

                     T: Together
                     E: Everyone
                     A: Achieves
                     M: More
Step 2:
Creating A Cohesive Wellness Team

     Wellness teams provide:
      Credibility, importance
      “Group IQ,” creativity
      Public relations
      Stability
      Lighter load

                    Tools for Success
               Hennepin County Health@Work
               www.hennepin.us/health@work
Step 2:
Creating A Cohesive Wellness Team

    “Successful, results-oriented wellness programs
    almost always use a team approach. There’s just
    too much important work to be done for one
    person—and too many talents and skills in the
    organization to pass by.”
                         ~ WELCOA




                    Tools for Success
               Hennepin County Health@Work
               www.hennepin.us/health@work
Step 2:
Creating A Cohesive Wellness Team

    Possible team members include:
       Employees
       Department managers
       Representatives from variety of departments
       Others?



                       Tools for Success
                  Hennepin County Health@Work
                  www.hennepin.us/health@work
Step 2: Action

  What action item will you focus on related to
  your wellness team after you leave today?
  ______________________________________
  ______________________________________
  _____________________________
  _____________________________
  _____________________________


                  Tools for Success
             Hennepin County Health@Work
             www.hennepin.us/health@work
Step 2: Resources

 Building cohesive wellness teams
 Special online report from Welcoa includes:
    “Ten Secrets of Successful Teams” (p. 6-13)
    “Catch Fire: Great Ideas for Infusing Energy and
     Commitment in Your Teams”
    Read the free report online
     http://www.welcoa.org/freeresources/pdf/aa_6.3_feb07.pdf



                        Tools for Success
                   Hennepin County Health@Work
                   www.hennepin.us/health@work
Step 3:

   Collecting Data To Drive A
Results-Oriented Wellness Initiative
Step 3:
Collecting Data To Drive A Results-
Oriented Wellness Initiative
What to assess?
   Level of senior level support
   Existing opportunities that support a healthy
    lifestyle
   Most prevalent employee diseases, injury risks
   Health issues employees are interested in
    addressing
                   Tools for Success
              Hennepin County Health@Work
              www.hennepin.us/health@work
Step 3:
Collecting Data To Drive A Results-
Oriented Wellness Initiative


  Assessments provide key data:
     Current health-related costs
     Status of employee wellness program
     Interests of employees



                    Tools for Success
               Hennepin County Health@Work
               www.hennepin.us/health@work
Step 3:
Collecting Data To Drive A
Results-Oriented Wellness Initiative


  Three types of assessments:
     Employee interest survey
     Current worksite environment, policies
     Health risk assessments (HRAs)



                    Tools for Success
               Hennepin County Health@Work
               www.hennepin.us/health@work
Step 3:
Collecting Data To Drive A
Results-Oriented Wellness Initiative

  Uses for data:
   Program planning
   Feedback to employees
   Report to management
Step 3: Resources

    CDC checklist for HRAs
 http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpao/hwi/downloads/HRA_checklist.pdf


    Sample worksite wellness index: Designing Healthy
     Environments at Work Assessment (DHEW)
         http://www.mihealthtools.org/work/


    Sample employee interest survey
 http://www.tompkins-co.org/wellness/worksite/survey/surveyex1.html
Step 3: Action

  What action item will you focus on related to
  gathering data after you leave today?
  ______________________________________
  ______________________________________
  _____________________________
  _____________________________
  _____________________________


                  Tools for Success
             Hennepin County Health@Work
             www.hennepin.us/health@work
Step 4:

Crafting An Annual Operating Plan
Step 4:
Crafting An Annual Operating Plan


      Well-written plans spell out
      why, how, when, and by whom
      activities will be accomplished




                 Tools for Success
            Hennepin County Health@Work
            www.hennepin.us/health@work
Step 4:
Crafting An Annual Operating Plan




             Individual approach

           Organizational approach
Step 4:
Crafting An Annual Operating Plan




  Wisconsin Worksite
  Wellness Resource Kit

  http://dhs.wi.gov/health/physicalac
  tivity/Sites/Worksitekit.htm




        Tools for Success
   Hennepin County Health@Work
   www.hennepin.us/health@work
Step 4:
Crafting An Annual Operating Plan

   A plan should include:
      Mission statement
      Goals
      Measurable objectives
      Activities to meet objectives
      Budget
      Evaluation plans

                      Tools for Success
                 Hennepin County Health@Work
                 www.hennepin.us/health@work
Step 4:
Crafting An Annual Operating Plan

   Craft a mission statement:
   1. Purpose statement
     What program seeks to accomplish

   2. Business statement
     How to accomplish purpose

   3. Value statement
     Basic beliefs of your program


                    Tools for Success
               Hennepin County Health@Work
               www.hennepin.us/health@work
Step 4:
Crafting An Annual Operating Plan

UMD Wellness Program Mission Statement
 Our mission is to assist University of Minnesota Duluth in achieving its goals
  and objectives by recruiting, developing, and retaining a diverse productive
                                   workforce.
 To promote and preserve the health and well-being of UMD faculty and staff;
   and to encourage our campus community in maintaining a healthy living
                         environment and active lives.
Step 4:
Crafting An Annual Operating Plan
   Set goals
   Example:
   Fewer employees will report stress as a
   top area of concern on an employee
   assessment or survey




                     Tools for Success
                Hennepin County Health@Work
                www.hennepin.us/health@work
Step 4:
Crafting An Annual Operating Plan
  SMART objectives:
     Specific
     Measurable
     Achievable
     Realistic or relevant
     Time specific or tangible
                      Tools for Success
                 Hennepin County Health@Work
                 www.hennepin.us/health@work
Step 4:
Crafting An Annual Operating Plan

Sample objective:
   Working Well will implement four strategies by
    December 1, 2010 to help employees cope with
    stress




               Tools for Success
          Hennepin County Health@Work
          www.hennepin.us/health@work
 Step 4: Resources

Healthy Workforce 2010
Strategies to incorporate Healthy People 2010 Goals at
the worksite
CDC Lean Works: Obesity Prevention
http://www.cdc.gov/LEANWorks/

CDC General Workforce Health
Promotion Toolkits
Worksite implementation ideas
www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/hwi/toolkits/other_general.htm
Step 4: Resources

 HERO Scorecard
 A best practice checklist
 http://www.the-hero.org/scorecard.htm

 Partnership for Prevention
 Variety of worksite resources
 http://www.prevent.org/content/view/141/166

 Health@Work Resource Directory
 http://www.hennepin.us/health@work
 Click on Resource Directory
Step 4: Action

  What action item will you focus on related to
  developing an operating plan after you leave
  here today?
  ______________________________________
  ______________________________________
  ____________________________



                  Tools for Success
             Hennepin County Health@Work
             www.hennepin.us/health@work
Step 5:

   Choosing Appropriate Health
      Promotion Interventions
Step 5:
Choosing Appropriate Health Promotion
Interventions

   What programs will be offered
   How intensive the intervention will be
   How often the programs will be offered
   Who they will be offered to
   What incentives will be used to increase
    participation

         Absolute Advantage: WELCOA’s 7 Benchmarks of Success
          http://www.welcoa.org/freeresources/pdf/7cs_report.pdf
Step 5:

      Potential programs that can and should
      be offered include but are not limited to:
   Physical activity                  Financial management
   Nutrition/weight                   Ergonomics
    management                         Mental
   Smoking cessation                   health/depression
   Responsible alcohol                Disease management
    use                                Work/family balance
   Stress management
   Medical self-care
          Absolute Advantage: WELCOA’s 7 Benchmarks of Success
           http://www.welcoa.org/freeresources/pdf/7cs_report.pdf
Step 5:
Choosing Appropriate Health Promotion
Interventions
Eight basic types of incentives:
1. Merchandise (e.g., T-shirts, movie passes)

2. Lottery prize drawings

3. Employee recognition

4. Well days off

5. Cash

6. Medical plan coverage enhancement

7. Health plan contributions

8. Medical spending accounts
        Absolute Advantage: WELCOA’s 7 Benchmarks of Success
         http://www.welcoa.org/freeresources/pdf/7cs_report.pdf
Wellness Program
Mission & Goals
   Mission:
       To create a culture that fosters and supports the
        health and wellness of employees and their
        dependents.
   Goals:
       Improve the health, morale and productivity of
        employees and their dependents
       Positively impact the culture and image of the
        University as a good place to work
       Contribute to the successful management of
        health-related costs
     Wellness Program History
   2004 - 2005 - Wellness Program offered three Health Action Plans,
    including one where all employees received pedometers.
   2005 - Farmers Markets started in Twin Cities & Duluth.
   2006 - New Wellness Assessment and on-line Healthy Living programs
    offered through Staywell - $65 incentive.
   2006 - Phone-based health coaching through Healthways - $65
    incentive.
   2007 - 10,000 Steps added through HealthPartners -$65.
   2008 - On-site health coaching programs offered in Twin Cities, Duluth,
    and Morris - $65. Health Screenings available in Twin Cities and
    Duluth.
   2008 - Fitness Rewards program with $20 credit for those exercising 8
    times per month available through HealthPartners and Medica.
   2008 – HealthCare Choices consumer education program - $65.
   2009 –Wellness Advocates Program, including Speakers Bureau.
   2010 – Weight Management programs through Fairview and Weight
    Watchers at Work.
Step 5: Resources
   Step By Step Incentive Campaign (WELCOA)
        http://www.welcoa.org/freeresources/index.php?category=22


   Health Improvement: A Comprehensive Guide to
    Designing, Implementing and Evaluating Worksite
    programs. Center for Prevention and Health Services
    Issue Brief.
    http://www.businessgrouphealth.org/pdfs/issuebrief_nov2004.pdf



   Check with your Health Insurance: Many have
    programs available for use
Step 5: Action
What action item will you focus on related to
choosing appropriate promotions after you
  leave here today?
______________________________________
______________________________________
____________________________
Step 6:

     Creating A Supportive,
  Health-Promoting Environment
Step 6:
Creating A Supportive,
Health-Promoting Environment
9 Steps To Creating A Supportive Environment
 1.   Increase physical activity
 2.   Reduce tobacco use
 3.   Promote better nutrition
 4.   Improve workstation ergonomics
 5.   Reduce unintended on-the-job injuries
 6.   Extinguish the use of alcohol and other drugs
 7.   Better manage and reduce job-related stress
 8.   Increase participation among all employees including shift
      workers and those located at remote sites
 9.   Maintain organizational benefits that protect and promote good
      health among all employees
             Absolute Advantage: WELCOA’s 7 Benchmarks of Success
              http://www.welcoa.org/freeresources/pdf/7cs_report.pdf
Step 6:
Creating A Supportive,
Health-Promoting Environment
          A well designed benefit package can go
      a long way toward keeping employees healthy.
   Health Insurance                    Maternal/Paternal Leave
   Disability Protection               Family Leave
   Life Insurance                      Child Care
   Sick Leave/Well Days Off            Dependent Care Flexible
   Leave of Absence                    Spending Accounts
   Compensatory Time Off               Health Promotion Program
   Vacation                            Prepayment or
   Flex Time                            Reimbursement
   Job Sharing                         Retirement/Investment Plan
   Work at                             Tuition Reimbursement
    Home/Teleconferencing               EAP
           Absolute Advantage: WELCOA’s 7 Benchmarks of Success
            http://www.welcoa.org/freeresources/pdf/7cs_report.pdf
Step 6: Resources
Worksite Wellness Resource Kit:
Sample Policies
http://dhs.wi.gov/health/physicalactivity/Sites/worksitekit.htm



Healthy Arkansas For a Better State of Health:
 Worksite Wellness Tool Kit
http://www.arkansas.gov/ha/pdf/worksite_welless.pdf
Step 6: Action
What action item will you focus on related to
creating a supportive environment after you
  leave here today?
______________________________________
______________________________________
____________________________
Step 7:

  Carefully Evaluating Outcomes
Step 7:
8 Targets To Monitor When Evaluating Outcomes
1. Participation
2. Participant Satisfaction
3. Improvements in Knowledge, Attitudes and
   Behaviors
4. Changes in Biometric Measures
5. Risk Factors
6. Physical Environment and Corporate Culture
7. Productivity
8. Return On Investment
       Absolute Advantage: WELCOA’s 7 Benchmarks of Success
        http://www.welcoa.org/freeresources/pdf/7cs_report.pdf
Wellness Program Results

Lifestyle
scores are
improving...
  Wellness Program Results
                        Risks are reducing in all areas
                        except weight, cholesterol and
                        alcohol...
                  100

                  80
                                                                                                                                                            63
Percent at Risk




                                                                                                                                                       59
                  60                                                                             53                                                              55 55
                                                                   50 50                    47             47
                                      36
                                             40   39 41                                               40
                                                                                                                 36 37
                  40                                                                                                                                                              30
                                                                                                                                                                          25

                  20                                                                   14
                        9         9                                               10                                                 9   7         8
                                                                                                                             4
                   0
                                                                    Cholesterol
                                                  Blood Pressure




                                                                                                                                                       Stress
                        Alcohol




                                                                                                                                                                 Weight
                                                                                                                  Exercise
                                                                                  Driving

                                                                                            Eating




                                                                                                                                         Smoking




                                                                                                                                                                          Well-Being
                                                                                                      Exams




                                                                                                                             Self Care
                                      Back Care




                                                                                            Current             Past
Step 7: Resources

WELCOA Article: Evaluating Your Wellness Program (pages 3-9)
  http://www.welcoa.org/freeresources/pdf/aa_v5.6_mayjune06.pdf

Evaluating Comprehensive Workplace Health Promotion
  http://www.thcu.ca/workplace/documents/EvaluationInfoPackFina
  lWeb.pdf

Top 10 Reasons Why People Don't Evaluate Their Workplace
   Wellness Programs
http://www.welcoa.org/freeresources/pdf/aa_oct07_top10.pdf
Step 7: Action
What action item will you focus on related to
  evaluating health promotion programs after
  you leave here today?
______________________________________
______________________________________
____________________________
Questions?
             Thank You!
               Rachel Gilbertson
UMD Health Coach/Health Educator
                  (218) 726-6753
            rmgilber@d.umn.edu